You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Year of Jubilee (religious celebration)

    Year of Jubilee, in the Roman Catholic Church, a celebration that is observed on certain special occasions and for 1 year every 25 years, under certain conditions, when a special indulgence is granted to members of the faith by the pope and confessors are given special faculties, including the

  • Year of Living Dangerously, The (novel by Koch)

    Australian literature: Literature from 1970 to 2000: …reading of political events in The Year of Living Dangerously (1978) and Highways to a War (1995) and the shadowy otherness of Tasmania in The Doubleman (1985) and Out of Ireland (1999). Likewise, Shirley Hazzard wrote with great seriousness of purpose in her modern tragedy The Transit of Venus (1980),…

  • Year of Living Dangerously, The (film by Weir [1983])

    Peter Weir: …as directed, was the masterful The Year of Living Dangerously (1982). The drama was set in Indonesia around the time of the overthrow of President Sukarno and starred Gibson and Linda Hunt.

  • Year of Magical Thinking, The (play by Didion)

    Vanessa Redgrave: Movies from the 21st century: … and subsequently starred onstage in The Year of Magical Thinking, which was adapted from Joan Didion’s memoir of the same name, and Alfred Uhry’s Driving Miss Daisy. The two plays earned her Tony nominations in 2007 and 2011, respectively. As she entered her 70s, she appeared in the film dramas…

  • Year of Magical Thinking, The (memoir by Didion)

    Joan Didion: …death in 2003, she wrote The Year of Magical Thinking (2005), in which she recounted their marriage and mourned his loss. The memoir won a National Book Award, and Didion adapted it for the stage in 2007. She again visited tragedy and loss in Blue Nights (2011), a memoir in…

  • Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis, The (work by Saramago)

    José Saramago: …morte de Ricardo Reis (1984; The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis), juxtaposes the romantic involvements of its narrator, a poet-physician who returns to Portugal at the start of the Salazar dictatorship, with long dialogues that examine human nature as revealed in Portuguese history and culture.

  • Year of the Flood, The (novel by Atwood)

    Margaret Atwood: …tale from their perspectives in The Year of the Flood (2009). MaddAddam (2013), which continues to pluck at the biblical, eschatological, and anticorporate threads running through the previous novels, brings the satirical trilogy to a denouement. The novel The Heart Goes Last (2015), originally published as a serial e-book (2012–13),…

  • Year of the Horse (film by Jarmusch)

    Jim Jarmusch: …own take on the western; Year of the Horse (1997), a rock concert documentary of Neil Young and Crazy Horse; and Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (1999). Coffee and Cigarettes (2003) consisted of a collection of brief exchanges between various well-known actors and musicians as they smoked and…

  • Year of the Jungle: Memories from the Home Front (novel by Collins)

    Suzanne Collins: …McButton Lost Power (2005) and Year of the Jungle: Memories from the Home Front (2013).

  • Year of the Monkey (memoir by Smith)

    Patti Smith: …travels and other experiences, and Year of the Monkey (2019), which includes some of her photographs. Devotion (2017) is an installment in Yale University Press’s Why I Write series. In 2016 Smith accepted Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize for Literature on his behalf.

  • Year Zero (album by Nine Inch Nails)

    Nine Inch Nails: The concept album Year Zero (2007) was accompanied by an ambitious viral marketing campaign, and instrumental samples used in its creation were collected in Ghosts I–IV (2008). Having become dissatisfied with the traditional music-distribution model, Reznor released both Ghosts I–IV and the song-oriented The Slip (2008) as free…

  • Yearbook of Intermediate Sexual Types (journal)

    Magnus Hirschfeld: In 1899 he started the Yearbook of Intermediate Sexual Types, the first journal in the world to deal with sexual variants; it was regularly published until 1923. He also published an important study on cross-dressing, The Transvestites (1910). Hirschfeld was one of the founders of the Medical Society for Sexual…

  • Yeardley, George (colonial governor of Virginia)

    United States: Virginia: …new governor of Virginia, Sir George Yeardley, issued a call for the election of representatives to a House of Burgesses, which was to convene in Jamestown in July 1619. In its original form the House of Burgesses was little more than an agency of the governing board of the Virginia…

  • Yearling, The (film by Brown [1946])

    Clarence Brown: The 1940s and ’50s: Just as moving—and successful—was The Yearling (1946), based on Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings’s novel about a boy who raises a fawn as a pet but then has to kill the animal when it begins to eat his poverty-stricken family’s crops. Gregory Peck was cast as the sympathetic father and Jane…

  • Yearling, The (novel by Rawlings)

    The Yearling, novel by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, published in 1938 and awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1939. Set in the backwoods of northern Florida, the story concerns the relationship between 12-year-old Jody Baxter and Flag, the fawn he adopts. When the fawn cannot be stopped from eating the

  • Years of Lyndon Johnson, The (biography by Caro)

    Robert Caro: …publication, Caro began research on The Years of Lyndon Johnson: The Path to Power (1982), which he conceived of as the first in a series of books covering the former president’s life. In the process of researching the first volume, which would document Johnson’s life up until the United States…

  • Years of Pilgrimage (work by Liszt)

    Franz Liszt: Years with Marie d’Agoult: …named Années de pèlerinage (1837–54; Years of Pilgrimage), which are poetical evocations of Swiss and Italian scenes. He also wrote the first mature version of the Transcendental études (1838, 1851); these are works for solo piano based on his youthful étude en 48 exercices, but here transformed into pieces of…

  • Years with Ross, The (work by Thurber)

    James Thurber: …of his associates there in The Years with Ross (1959).

  • Years, The (book by Woolf)

    Virginia Woolf: Late work: …narrative, and renaming her book The Years. She narrated 50 years of family history through the decline of class and patriarchal systems, the rise of feminism, and the threat of another war. Desperate to finish, Woolf lightened the book with poetic echoes of gestures, objects, colours, and sounds and with…

  • Yearwood, Trisha (American singer)

    Garth Brooks: …star and frequent duet partner Trisha Yearwood. While he remained committed to his “retirement,” Brooks occasionally performed live shows—most notably at a series of nine sold-out concerts in Kansas City, Missouri, in 2007 and a five-show benefit for Los Angeles firefighters and wildfire victims in 2008. These brief engagements seemed…

  • Yeast (work by Kingsley)

    Charles Kingsley: His first novel, Yeast (printed in Fraser’s Magazine, 1848; in book form, 1851), deals with the relations of the landed gentry to the rural poor. His second, the much superior Alton Locke (1850), is the story of a tailor-poet who rebels against the ignominy of sweated labour and…

  • yeast (fungus)

    Yeast, any of about 1,500 species of single-celled fungi, most of which are in the phylum Ascomycota, only a few being Basidiomycota. Yeasts are found worldwide in soils and on plant surfaces and are especially abundant in sugary mediums such as flower nectar and fruits. There are hundreds of

  • yeast artificial chromosome (biology)

    recombinant DNA: Creating the clone: Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) are vectors based on autonomously replicating plasmids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker’s yeast). In yeast (a eukaryotic organism) a YAC behaves like a yeast chromosome and segregates properly into daughter cells. These vectors can carry the largest inserts of all and are…

  • yeast infection (pathology)

    Candidiasis, infectious disease produced by the yeastlike fungus Candida albicans and closely related species. A common inhabitant of the mouth, vagina, and intestinal tract, Candida ordinarily causes no ill effects, except among infants and in persons debilitated by illness such as diabetes. There

  • Yeats, Jack Butler (Irish painter)

    Jack Butler Yeats, most important Irish painter of the 20th century. His scenes of daily life and Celtic mythology contributed to the surge of nationalism in the Irish arts after the Irish War of Independence (1919–21). Jack Butler Yeats was the son of John Butler Yeats, a well-known portrait

  • Yeats, John Butler (Irish barrister and painter)

    Jack Butler Yeats: …Yeats was the son of John Butler Yeats, a well-known portrait painter, and he was the brother of the poet William Butler Yeats. He was privately educated in Sligo, Ireland, and he then attended various art schools in London, including the Westminster School of Art. His early work was mainly…

  • Yeats, William Butler (Irish author and poet)

    William Butler Yeats, Irish poet, dramatist, and prose writer, one of the greatest English-language poets of the 20th century. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1923. Yeats’s father, John Butler Yeats, was a barrister who eventually became a portrait painter. His mother, formerly Susan

  • Yeats: The Man and the Masks (work by Ellmann)

    Richard Ellmann: His book Yeats: The Man and the Masks (1948; reprinted 1987) is a study of one of Yeats’s intense conflicts, the dichotomy between the self of everyday life and the self of fantasy. The book revealed Yeats as a timid and confused man behind a facade of…

  • Yecla (Spain)

    Yecla, city, Murcia provincia (province) and comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), southeastern Spain. It lies north of the city of Murcia, at the slopes of the Cerro del Castillo. The Stone Age remains of Monte Arabí are to the northwest. The city received its coat of arms from King Charles

  • Yeddo (India)

    Shillong, city, capital of Meghalaya state, northeastern India. The city is located in the east-central part of the state on the Shillong Plateau, at an elevation of 4,990 feet (1,520 metres). Shillong first became prominent in 1864, when it succeeded Cherrapunji as the district headquarters. In

  • Yedina (people)

    Lake Chad: Settlement history: The Yedina (Buduma) established themselves among the inaccessible islands and along the marshy northern shore of Lake Chad, and the Kuri did the same in inaccessible areas along the eastern margin of the lake.

  • YeEtiyop?iya

    Ethiopia, country on the Horn of Africa. The country lies completely within the tropical latitudes and is relatively compact, with similar north-south and east-west dimensions. The capital is Addis Ababa (“New Flower”), located almost at the centre of the country. Ethiopia is the largest and most

  • YeEtyop?iya

    Ethiopia, country on the Horn of Africa. The country lies completely within the tropical latitudes and is relatively compact, with similar north-south and east-west dimensions. The capital is Addis Ababa (“New Flower”), located almost at the centre of the country. Ethiopia is the largest and most

  • Yeezus (album by West)

    Kanye West: A year later, on Yeezus (2013), West continued to explore the dark corners of his psyche, at times filtering his observations through the provocative lens of racial politics, as on “New Slaves.” In contrast to the extravagance of his previous solo efforts, the album found him rapping over jagged…

  • Yefimov, Boris (Soviet cartoonist)

    Boris Yefimov, (Boris Fridland), Soviet cartoonist (born Sept. 28, 1899, Kiev, Ukraine, Russian Empire—died Oct. 1, 2008, Moscow, Russia), chronicled the history of his country—especially the Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin—through robustly drawn satiric cartoons, beginning in 1916. He began

  • Yefremov, Oleg Nikolayevich (Russian actor and director)

    Oleg Yefremov, (Oleg Nikolayevich Yefremov), Russian actor and theatre director (born Oct. 1, 1927, Moscow, U.S.S.R.—died May 24, 2000, Moscow, Russia), was one of his country’s finest and most influential directors; Yefremov championed new, young playwrights as well as offered classics by Anton

  • Yeghoyan, Atom (Canadian writer and film director)

    Atom Egoyan, Egyptian-born Canadian writer and director who was known for his nuanced character studies of people in unconventional circumstances. Egoyan was born to Armenian parents in Cairo and from age three was reared in Victoria, B.C. Although he received a B.A. (1982) in international studies

  • Yegipetskiye nochi (work by Pushkin)

    Aleksandr Pushkin: Return from exile: …the unfinished Yegipetskiye nochi (1835; Egyptian Nights).

  • Yegorov, Boris Borisovich (Soviet physician)

    Boris Borisovich Yegorov, Soviet physician who, with cosmonauts Vladimir M. Komarov and Konstantin P. Feoktistov, was a participant in the first multimanned spaceflight, that of Voskhod (“Sunrise”) 1, on October 12–13, 1964, and was also the first practicing physician in space. Upon graduating in

  • Yegorova, Lyubov (Russian skier)

    Lyubov Yegorova, Russian cross-country skier who was one of the two most decorated performers at the 1994 Olympic Winter Games in Lillehammer, Norway. She won three gold medals and a silver in 1994, adding to the three gold and two silver medals she collected at the 1992 Games in Albertville,

  • Yegoryevsk (Russia)

    Yegoryevsk, city, Moscow oblast (region), western Russia. It lies along the Glushitsy River southeast of the capital. The city of Yegoryevsk was formed in 1778 from the village of Vysokoye and became an important trading centre, especially for grain and cattle from Ryazan oblast. In the 19th

  • Yegros, Fulgencio (Paraguayan military officer)

    Paraguay: Struggle for independence: …captains Pedro Juan Cabellero and Fulgencio Yegros, they promptly deposed the governor and declared their independence on May 14, 1811.

  • Yeh Chien-ying (Chinese politician)

    Ye Jianying, Chinese communist military officer, administrator, and statesman who held high posts in the Chinese government during the 1970s and ’80s. Born of a middle-class family, Ye graduated from the Yunnan Military Academy in 1919 and joined Sun Yat-sen’s Nationalist movement shortly

  • Yeh Sheng-t’ao (Chinese author)

    Ye Shengtao, Chinese writer and teacher known primarily for his vernacular fiction. Ye taught at primary schools after his graduation from secondary school and in 1914 began writing short stories in classical Chinese for several periodicals. Influenced by the May Fourth Movement, he turned to

  • Yeh T’ing (Chinese military leader)

    Ye Ting, outstanding Chinese military leader. Ye is thought to have been of peasant origin, but he was educated at the Baoding Military Academy, from which he graduated in 1918. He joined the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in 1924 and was commander of a vanguard unit on the Northern Expedition in

  • Yeh-erh-ch’iang Ho (river, Asia)

    Yarkand River, a headstream of the Tarim River in the Uygur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, in extreme western China. The Yarkand, which is 600 miles (970 km) long, rises in the Karakoram Pass of the Karakoram Range in the Pakistani-administered portion of the Kashmir region. In its upper course it

  • Yeh-lü Ch’u-ts’ai (Chinese statesman)

    Yelü Chucai, Chinese statesman of Khitan extraction, adviser to Genghis Khan and his son ?g?dei. He established a formal bureaucracy and rationalized taxation system for the Mongol-controlled portions of China. By persuading ?g?dei to spare the inhabitants of northern China in order to utilize

  • Yeh-lü Ta-shih (emperor of Western Liao dynasty)

    Yelü Dashi, founder and first emperor (1124–43) of the Xi (Western) Liao dynasty (1124–1211) of Central Asia. Yelü was a member of the imperial family of the Liao dynasty (907–1125), which had been established by the Khitan (Chinese: Qidan) tribes and ruled much of Mongolia and Manchuria (now

  • Yeha (Ethiopia)

    Tigray: …of Aksum, the kingdom’s capital; Yeha, a ruined town of great antiquity; and Adwa, the site of a battle in 1896 in which the Italian invading force was defeated.

  • yeheb (plant)

    Fabales: Ecological and economic importance: … and pulpwood; Cordeauxia edulis (yeheb), an uncultivated desert shrub of North Africa that has been so extensively exploited for food (seeds) that it is in danger of extinction; Ceratonia siliqua (carob), a Mediterranean plant whose fruits are used as animal and human food and in the manufacture of industrial…

  • Yehenara (empress dowager of China)

    Cixi, consort of the Xianfeng emperor (reigned 1850–61), mother of the Tongzhi emperor (reigned 1861–75), adoptive mother of the Guangxu emperor (reigned 1875–1908), and a towering presence over the Chinese empire for almost half a century. By maintaining authority over the Manchu imperial house

  • Ye?ezqel (Hebrew prophet)

    Ezekiel, prophet-priest of ancient Israel and the subject and in part the author of an Old Testament book that bears his name. Ezekiel’s early oracles (from c. 592) in Jerusalem were pronouncements of violence and destruction; his later statements addressed the hopes of the Israelites exiled in

  • Yehoram (king of Israel)

    Jehoram, one of two contemporary Old Testament kings. Jehoram, the son of Ahab and Jezebel and king (c. 849–c. 842 bc) of Israel, maintained close relations with Judah. Together with Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, Jehoram unsuccessfully attempted to subdue a revolt of Moab against Israel. As had his

  • Yehoshaphat (king of Judah)

    Jehoshaphat, king (c. 873–c. 849 bc) of Judah during the reigns in Israel of Ahab, Ahaziah, and Jehoram, with whom he maintained close political and economic alliances. Jehoshaphat aided Ahab in his unsuccessful attempt to recapture the city of Ramoth-gilead, joined Ahaziah in extending maritime t

  • Yehoshua, A. B. (Israeli author)

    Amalia Kahana-Carmon: Along with Amos Oz and A.B. Yehoshua, Kahana-Carmon became a key figure in the new wave of Israeli fiction of the 1960s. Unlike her contemporaries, however, she wrote about the inner lives of women, exploring a realm of desire and fantasy more subjective than the Zionist themes then prevalent in…

  • Yehoshua, Abraham B. (Israeli author)

    Amalia Kahana-Carmon: Along with Amos Oz and A.B. Yehoshua, Kahana-Carmon became a key figure in the new wave of Israeli fiction of the 1960s. Unlike her contemporaries, however, she wrote about the inner lives of women, exploring a realm of desire and fantasy more subjective than the Zionist themes then prevalent in…

  • Yehoshua? (Hebrew leader)

    Joshua, the leader of the Israelite tribes after the death of Moses, who conquered Canaan and distributed its lands to the 12 tribes. His story is told in the Old Testament Book of Joshua. According to the biblical book named after him, Joshua was the personally appointed successor to Moses

  • Yehu (king of Israel)

    Jehu, king (c. 842–815 bc) of Israel. He was a commander of chariots for the king of Israel, Ahab, and his son Jehoram, on Israel’s frontier facing Damascus and Assyria. Ahab, son of King Omri, was eventually killed in a war with Assyria; during Jehoram’s rule, Jehu accepted the invitation of the p

  • Yehuda ben Shemuel ha-Levi (Hebrew poet)

    Judah ha-Levi, Jewish poet and religious philosopher. His works were the culmination of the development of Hebrew poetry within the Arabic cultural sphere. Among his major works are the poems collected in Dīwān, the “Zionide” poems celebrating Zion, and the Sefer ha-Kuzari (“Book of the Khazar”),

  • Yehuda Sommo (Italian writer)

    Judah Leone ben Isaac Sommo, Italian author whose writings are a primary source of information about 16th-century theatrical production in Italy. Sommo wrote the first known Hebrew drama, Tza?ut bedi?uta de-qiddushin (1550; “An Eloquent Comedy of a Marriage”), in which characters such as the pining

  • Yehuda the ?asid (German Jewish mystic)

    Judah ben Samuel, Jewish mystic and semilegendary pietist, a founder of the fervent, ultrapious movement of German ?asidism. He was also the principal author of the ethical treatise Sefer ?asidim (published in Bologna, 1538; “Book of the Pious”), possibly the most important extant document of

  • Yehuda? (region, Middle East)

    Judaea, the southernmost of the three traditional divisions of ancient Palestine; the other two were Galilee in the north and Samaria in the centre. No clearly marked boundary divided Judaea from Samaria, but the town of Beersheba was traditionally the southernmost limit. The region presents a

  • Y?hūdhī (people)

    Jew, any person whose religion is Judaism. In the broader sense of the term, a Jew is any person belonging to the worldwide group that constitutes, through descent or conversion, a continuation of the ancient Jewish people, who were themselves descendants of the Hebrews of the Bible (Old

  • Yehudi (people)

    Jew, any person whose religion is Judaism. In the broader sense of the term, a Jew is any person belonging to the worldwide group that constitutes, through descent or conversion, a continuation of the ancient Jewish people, who were themselves descendants of the Hebrews of the Bible (Old

  • Yehudi ha-Kadosh, ha- (Polish ?asidic leader)

    Jacob Isaac ben Asher Przysucha, Jewish ?asidic leader who sought to turn Polish ?asidism away from its reliance on miracle workers. He advocated a new approach that combined study of the Torah with ardent prayer. Przysucha was the descendant of a rabbinic family. He became learned in the Torah and

  • Yehudi, ha- (Polish ?asidic leader)

    Jacob Isaac ben Asher Przysucha, Jewish ?asidic leader who sought to turn Polish ?asidism away from its reliance on miracle workers. He advocated a new approach that combined study of the Torah with ardent prayer. Przysucha was the descendant of a rabbinic family. He became learned in the Torah and

  • Yehudi, ha- (Polish ?asidic leader)

    Jacob Isaac ben Asher Przysucha, Jewish ?asidic leader who sought to turn Polish ?asidism away from its reliance on miracle workers. He advocated a new approach that combined study of the Torah with ardent prayer. Przysucha was the descendant of a rabbinic family. He became learned in the Torah and

  • Yeibichai (Navajo dance)

    Native American dance: The Southwest: …dances such as the curative yeibichai of the Navajo. Curative ceremonies, with long song cycles, are emphasized by the Navajo, along with circular social dances, recalling those of the Great Plains tribes. The Apache have developed a spectacular masked dance, called the gahan, to obtain cures but chiefly to celebrate…

  • Yekaterina Alekseyevna (empress of Russia)

    Catherine the Great, German-born empress of Russia (1762–96) who led her country into full participation in the political and cultural life of Europe, carrying on the work begun by Peter the Great. With her ministers she reorganized the administration and law of the Russian Empire and extended

  • Yekaterina Velikaya (empress of Russia)

    Catherine the Great, German-born empress of Russia (1762–96) who led her country into full participation in the political and cultural life of Europe, carrying on the work begun by Peter the Great. With her ministers she reorganized the administration and law of the Russian Empire and extended

  • Yekaterinburg (Russia)

    Yekaterinburg, city and administrative centre of Sverdlovsk oblast (region), west-central Russia. The city lies along the Iset River, which is a tributary of the Tobol River, and on the eastern slope of the Ural Mountains, slightly east of the border between Europe and Asia. Yekaterinburg is

  • Yekaterinodar (Russia)

    Krasnodar, city and administrative centre of Krasnodar kray (territory), southwestern Russia, lying along the Kuban River. Founded about 1793 as a Cossack guardpost on the Kuban frontier, it developed as a military town. In 1867, after the Caucasian wars, it became a city and centre of the fertile

  • Yeke Mongghol Ulus (Chinese history)

    Yuan dynasty, dynasty established by Mongol nomads that ruled portions and eventually all of China from the early 13th century to 1368. Mongol suzerainty eventually also stretched throughout most of Asia and eastern Europe, though the Yuan emperors were rarely able to exercise much control over

  • Yekini, Rashidi (Nigerian association football player)

    Rashidi Yekini, Nigerian association football (soccer) player (born Oct. 23, 1963, Kaduna, Nigeria—died May 4, 2012, Ibadan?, Nigeria), became a national hero in June 1994 when he scored Nigeria’s first-ever goal (against Bulgaria) in a FIFA World Cup tournament. Earlier that same year he had

  • Yekl (novel by Cahan)

    Yiddish literature: The 21st century: His Yekl (1896) uses some Yiddish words that are explained in footnotes. The novel generally translates Yiddish dialogue into standard English, but it also includes what the narrator calls “mutilated English” present in the characters’ Americanized Yiddish. Mary Antin, whose family moved from Russia to Boston…

  • Yekuana (people)

    Native American music: Aerophones: The Yekuana people of southern Venezuela play an end-blown free-reed bamboo instrument called the tekey?, which has a lamella inside the pipe. Although the player’s lips do not touch the lamella, it vibrates when he blows into the pipe. The tekey? is played in pairs; one…

  • Yekuno Amlak (Solomonid king of Ethiopia)

    Zagwe dynasty: …end of the 13th century Yekuno Amlak, a prince of the Amhara, incited so successful a rebellion in Shewa that the Zagwe king, Yitbarek, was driven out and murdered. A new Zagwe king stirred up a counterrebellion but was defeated.

  • Yekutiel ben Isaac ibn Hasan (Spanish courtier)

    Ibn Gabirol: Early life and career: …scholars and the influential courtier Yekutiel ibn ?asan. Protected by this patron, whom Ibn Gabirol immortalized in poems of loving praise, the 16-year-old poet became famous for his religious hymns in masterly Hebrew. The customary language of Andalusian literature had been Arabic, and Hebrew had only recently been revived as…

  • Yela Island (island, Papua New Guinea)

    Rossel Island, volcanic island at the eastern end of the Louisiade Archipelago in Papua New Guinea, southwestern Pacific Ocean, lying 230 miles (370 km) southeast of the island of New Guinea. One of the group’s largest islands, it measures 21 miles by 10 miles (34 km by 16 km) and is fringed with

  • Yelchin, Anton (Russian-born American actor)

    Anton Yelchin, (Anton Viktorovich Yelchin), Russian-born American actor (born March 11, 1989, Leningrad, Russia, U.S.S.R. [now St. Petersburg, Russia]—died June 19, 2016, Los Angeles, Calif.), was best remembered for his portrayal of Chekov in the Star Trek franchise reboot films Star Trek (2009),

  • Yelchin, Anton Viktorovich (Russian-born American actor)

    Anton Yelchin, (Anton Viktorovich Yelchin), Russian-born American actor (born March 11, 1989, Leningrad, Russia, U.S.S.R. [now St. Petersburg, Russia]—died June 19, 2016, Los Angeles, Calif.), was best remembered for his portrayal of Chekov in the Star Trek franchise reboot films Star Trek (2009),

  • Yéle Haiti (international organization)

    Wyclef Jean: …Jean Foundation (later known as Yéle Haiti). The organization raised money and engineered programs to assist victims of poverty in Haiti. Following the Haiti earthquake of 2010, Yéle Haiti raised several million dollars for those affected. Jean announced in August of 2010 that he would run for president of Haiti,…

  • Yelec (Russia)

    Yelets, city, Lipetsk oblast (region), western Russia, on the Sosna River. First mentioned in 1146 and the seat of a minor princedom in the 13th century, Yelets long served as a southern frontier fortress. It was captured by Timur in 1395 and by the Mongols in 1414; in 1483 it passed to Moscow.

  • Yelena Glinskaya (grand princess of Moscow)

    Russia: Vasily III: …her apparent barrenness, he married Yelena Glinskaya, who bore him only two children—the deaf and mute Yury and the sickly Ivan, who was three years old at Vasily’s death in 1533.

  • Yelets (Russia)

    Yelets, city, Lipetsk oblast (region), western Russia, on the Sosna River. First mentioned in 1146 and the seat of a minor princedom in the 13th century, Yelets long served as a southern frontier fortress. It was captured by Timur in 1395 and by the Mongols in 1414; in 1483 it passed to Moscow.

  • Yelich-O’Connor, Ella Marija Lani (New Zealand singer)

    Lorde, New Zealand singer-songwriter who was known for lyrics that exhibited a mature, jaded worldview. Yelich-O’Connor was raised in the suburbs of Auckland and demonstrated a knack for public performance at an early age. At age 12 she was signed to a development contract with the Universal Music

  • Yelizaveta Petrovna (empress of Russia)

    Elizabeth, empress of Russia from 1741 to 1761 (1762, New Style). The daughter of Peter I the Great (reigned 1682–1725) and Catherine I (reigned 1725–27), Elizabeth grew up to be a beautiful, charming, intelligent, and vivacious young woman. Despite her talents and popularity, particularly among

  • Yelizavetgrad (Ukraine)

    Kirovohrad, city, south-central Ukraine. It lies along the upper Inhul River where the latter is crossed by the Kremenchuk-Odessa railway. Founded as a fortress in 1754, it was made a city, Yelysavethrad (Russian: Yelizavetgrad, or Elizavetgrad), in 1765 and developed as the centre of a rich

  • Yelizavetpol (Azerbaijan)

    G?nc?, city, western Azerbaijan. It lies along the G?nc? River. The town was founded sometime in the 5th or 6th century, about 4 miles (6.5 km) east of the modern city. That town was destroyed by earthquake in 1139 and rebuilt on the present site. G?nc? became an important centre of trade, but in

  • Yellen, Janet (American economist)

    Janet Yellen, American economist and chair (2014–18) of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“the Fed”), the central bank of the United States. She was the first woman to hold that post. Yellen graduated summa cum laude in economics from Brown University (1967) and received a Ph.D.

  • Yellen, Janet Louise (American economist)

    Janet Yellen, American economist and chair (2014–18) of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“the Fed”), the central bank of the United States. She was the first woman to hold that post. Yellen graduated summa cum laude in economics from Brown University (1967) and received a Ph.D.

  • Yellin, Samuel (American metalworker)

    metalwork: Mid-19th century onward: , Samuel Yellin of Philadelphia, raised the standards of wrought-iron craftsmanship to its apex during the 1920s. He not only trained an atelier of craftsmen for the first time in the U.S., but by his efforts wrought iron was recognized as capable of enriching even the…

  • yellow (colour)

    Yellow, in physics, light in the wavelength range of 570–580 nanometres, which is in the middle of the visible spectrum. In art, yellow is a colour on the conventional wheel, located between orange and green and opposite violet, its complement. Yellow is a basic colour term added to languages often

  • yellow anaconda (snake)

    anaconda: The yellow, or southern, anaconda (E. notaeus) is much smaller and has pairs of overlapping spots.

  • Yellow Arrow, The (novel by Pelevin)

    Viktor Pelevin: …his novel Zhyoltaya strela (1993; The Yellow Arrow). In the novel a train that seems not to have started from any point or to be going anywhere carries passengers who continue the sometimes bizarre routines of their lives. Omon Ra (1992; published in English under the same title), was a…

  • Yellow Back Radio Broke-Down (novel by Reed)

    Ishmael Reed: …the hero of the violent Yellow Back Radio Broke-Down (1969). Mumbo Jumbo (1972) pits proponents of rationalism and militarism against believers in the magical and intuitive. The Last Days of Louisiana Red (1974) is a fantastic novel set amid the racial violence of Berkeley, California, in the 1960s. Flight to…

  • yellow badge (discriminatory instrument)

    anti-Semitism: Anti-Semitism in medieval Europe: …of 12th-century anti-Semitism, the compulsory yellow badge that identified the wearer as a Jew, was also revived by the Nazis. The practice of segregating the Jewish populations of towns and cities into ghettos dates from the Middle Ages and lasted until the 19th and early 20th centuries in much of…

  • yellow bedstraw (plant)

    bedstraw: Lady’s bedstraw, or yellow bedstraw (G. verum), is used in Europe to curdle milk and to colour cheese. The roots of several species of Galium yield a red dye, and many were used historically to stuff mattresses, hence their common name.

  • yellow bell (Chinese music)

    Chinese music: Tonal system and its theoretical rationalization: …produces a basic pitch called yellow bell (huangzhong). This concept is of special interest because it is the world’s oldest information on a tonal system concerned with very specific pitches as well as the intervals between them. The precise number of vibrations per second that created the yellow bell pitch…

  • yellow bile (ancient physiology)

    humour: …cardinal humours were blood, phlegm, choler (yellow bile), and melancholy (black bile); the variant mixtures of these humours in different persons determined their “complexions,” or “temperaments,” their physical and mental qualities, and their dispositions. The ideal person had the ideally proportioned mixture of the four; a predominance of one produced…

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
港台一级毛片免费观看