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  • Yavana (people)

    Yavana, in early Indian literature, either a Greek or another foreigner. The word appears in Achaemenian (Persian) inscriptions in the forms Yauna and Ia-ma-nu and referred to the Ionian Greeks of Asia Minor, who were conquered by the Achaemenid king Cyrus the Great in 545 bc. The word was

  • Yavanajataka (work by Sphujidhvaja)

    astrology: In India: …Yavaneshvara and versified as the Yavanajataka by Sphujidhvaja in ad 269/270. The techniques of Indian astrology are thus not surprisingly similar to those of its Hellenistic counterpart. But the techniques were transmitted without their philosophical underpinnings (for which the Indians substituted divine revelation), and the Indians modified the predictions, originally…

  • Yavapai (people)

    Yuman: the Hualapai (Walapai), Havasupai, and Yavapai. Two other groups of Yuman-speaking people, the Diegue?o and the Kamia (now known as the Tipai and Ipai), lived in what are now southern California and northern Baja California. The Kiliwa and Paipai still live in northern Baja California.

  • Yavarí, Río (river, South America)

    Javari River, river that rises on the border between Amazonas state, Brazil, and Loreto department, Peru. It flows northeast for 540 miles (870 km) to join the Amazon River near the Brazilian outpost of Benjamin Constant. The river follows a winding course through unbroken tropical rain forest in w

  • Yavatmal (India)

    Yavatmal, city, northeastern Maharashtra state, western India. It is situated in a plateau region about 15 miles (24 km) southwest of the Wardha River. Yavatmal lies on major roads to Nagpur (northeast), Mumbai (Bombay; southwest), and Hyderabad, Telangana state (south). It is the regional centre

  • Yavlinsky, Grigory A. (Soviet economist)

    Russia: The Gorbachev era: perestroika and glasnost: Gorbachev’s radical economists, headed by Grigory A. Yavlinsky, counseled him that Western-style success required a true market economy. Gorbachev, however, never succeeded in making the jump from the command economy to even a mixed economy.

  • Yavne (ancient city, Israel)

    Jabneh, (Hebrew: “God Builds”) ancient city of Palestine (now Israel) lying about 15 miles (24 km) south of Tel Aviv–Yafo and 4 miles (6 km) from the Mediterranean Sea. Settled by Philistines, Jabneh came into Jewish hands in the time of Uzziah in the 8th century bc. Judas Maccabeus (d. 161 bc)

  • Yavorov, Peyo (Bulgarian author)

    Peyo Yavorov, Bulgarian poet and dramatist, the founder of the Symbolist movement in Bulgarian poetry. Yavorov took part in the preparation of the ill-fated Macedonian uprising against Ottoman hegemony in August 1903, edited revolutionary papers, and crossed twice into Macedonia with partisan

  • Yavuz (Ottoman sultan)

    Selim I, Ottoman sultan (1512–20) who extended the empire to Syria, the Hejaz, and Egypt and raised the Ottomans to leadership of the Muslim world. Selim came to the throne in the wake of civil strife in which he, his brother, and their father, Bayezid II, had been involved. Selim eliminated all p

  • Yavuz, Hilmi (Turkish writer)

    Turkish literature: Modern Turkish literature: Hilmi Yavuz worked as a journalist in London, where he also completed a degree in philosophy, and he later taught history and philosophy in Istanbul. In his poems the aesthetics of Ottoman civilization become the object of deep, at times nostalgic, reflection within a thoroughly…

  • yaw (motion)

    ship: Ship motions in response to the sea: In maneuvering, a ship experiences yaw (rotation about a vertical axis) and sway (sideways motion). More generally, motions are possible in all six degrees of freedom, the other four being roll (rotation about a longitudinal axis), pitch (rotation about a transverse axis), heave (vertical motion), and surge (longitudinal motion superimposed…

  • Yaw, Ellen Beach (American singer)

    Ellen Beach Yaw, American operatic soprano who enjoyed critical and popular acclaim on European and American stages during the early 20th century. Yaw gave perhaps her first public concert in Brooklyn in 1888. Six years later, to raise money for European study, she made her first national tour. In

  • Yawar Fiesta (work by Arguedas)

    José María Arguedas: Yawar fiesta (1941; “Bloody Feast”; Eng. trans. Yawar fiesta) treats in detail the ritual of a primitive bullfight symbolizing the social struggle of the Indians and the whites. Arguedas’s masterpiece is the novel Los ríos profundos (1958; Deep Rivers), an autobiographical work that reiterates themes…

  • Yawar Waqaq (Inca emperor)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: The beginnings of external expansion: …of sons, one of whom, Yahuar Huacac (Yawar Waqaq), was kidnapped by a neighbouring group when he was about eight years old. The boy’s mother, Mama Mikay, was a Huayllaca (Wayllaqa) woman who had been promised to the leader of another group called the Ayarmaca (’Ayarmaka). When the promise was…

  • yawara (martial art)

    Jujitsu, form of martial art and method of fighting that makes use of few or no weapons and employs holds, throws, and paralyzing blows to subdue an opponent. It evolved among the warrior class (bushi, or samurai) in Japan from about the 17th century. Designed to complement a warrior’s

  • Yawara-chan (Japanese athlete)

    Tani Ryōko, Japanese judoka, who became the first woman to win two Olympic titles (2000 and 2004) in judo. At age eight Tani followed her elder brother to the dojo (school for martial arts) and within months was throwing larger boys in competition. She achieved her first major victory in 1988 at

  • Yawata (Japan)

    Kitakyūshū: The industrial nucleus, Yahata, specializes in iron and steel, heavy chemicals, cement, and glass. Wakamatsu produces metals, machinery, ships, and chemicals and is a major coal port for northern Kyushu. Tobata is one of the main deep-sea-fishing bases of western Japan, has a large output of cotton textiles,…

  • Yawata Iron & Steel Co., Ltd. (Japanese company)

    Nippon Steel Corporation: …by the 1970 merger of Yawata Iron & Steel Co., Ltd., and Fuji Iron & Steel Co., Ltd. It ranks among the world’s largest steel corporations. Its headquarters are in Tokyo, and it has several offices overseas.

  • Yawata Iron and Steel Works (Japanese company)

    Nippon Steel Corporation: …by the 1970 merger of Yawata Iron & Steel Co., Ltd., and Fuji Iron & Steel Co., Ltd. It ranks among the world’s largest steel corporations. Its headquarters are in Tokyo, and it has several offices overseas.

  • Yawatahama (Japan)

    Yawatahama, city, Ehime ken (prefecture), Shikoku, Japan. It lies along the Uwa Sea. A castle town and fishing port during the Tokugawa era (1603–1867), it later developed as a trade centre for silk cocoons and raw silk. The city is now an important base for deep-sea trawling and has

  • Yawkey, Thomas Austin (American businessman)

    Tom Yawkey, American professional baseball executive, sportsman, and owner of the American League Boston Red Sox (1933–76)—the last of the patriarchal owners of early baseball. Austin was taken into the home of his maternal uncle William Yawkey and received a B.S. degree (in mining engineering and

  • Yawkey, Tom (American businessman)

    Tom Yawkey, American professional baseball executive, sportsman, and owner of the American League Boston Red Sox (1933–76)—the last of the patriarchal owners of early baseball. Austin was taken into the home of his maternal uncle William Yawkey and received a B.S. degree (in mining engineering and

  • yawl (sailboat)

    Yawl, two-masted sailboat, usually rigged with one or more jibsails, a mainsail, and a mizzen. In common with the ketch, the forward (main) mast is higher than the mizzenmast, but the mizzenmast of a yawl is placed astern of the rudder post, while that of the ketch is closer amidships. Like most

  • Yawmīyāt nā?ib fī al-aryāf (novel by al-?akīm)

    Tawfīq al-?akīm: …Yawmīyāt nā?ib fī al-aryāf (1937; The Maze of Justice), is a satire on Egyptian officialdom.

  • yawn (behaviour)

    speech: Intensity: …automatic reflexes of laughing and yawning illustrate the resonator action of the vocal organ. Together with a widely opened mouth, flat tongue, elevated palate, and maximally widened pharynx, the larynx assumes a lowered position with maximally elevated epiglottis. This configuration is ideal for the unimpeded radiation of the vocal cord…

  • yawning (behaviour)

    speech: Intensity: …automatic reflexes of laughing and yawning illustrate the resonator action of the vocal organ. Together with a widely opened mouth, flat tongue, elevated palate, and maximally widened pharynx, the larynx assumes a lowered position with maximally elevated epiglottis. This configuration is ideal for the unimpeded radiation of the vocal cord…

  • yaws (pathology)

    Yaws, contagious disease occurring in moist tropical regions throughout the world. It is caused by a spirochete, Treponema pertenue, that is structurally indistinguishable from T. pallidum, which causes syphilis. Some syphilologists contend that yaws is merely a tropical rural form of syphilis, but

  • yaya (Ottoman infantry)

    Ottoman Empire: Military organization: …organized as infantry were called yayas; those organized as cavalry, müsellems. Although the new force included some Turkmens who were content to accept salaries in place of booty, most of its men were Christian soldiers from the Balkans who were not required to convert to Islam as long as they…

  • Yayati (play by Karnad)

    Girish Karnad: …first play, the critically acclaimed Yayati (1961), while still at Oxford. Centred on the story of a mythological king, the play established Karnad’s use of the themes of history and mythology that would inform his work over the following decades. Karnad’s next play, Tughlaq (1964), tells the story of the…

  • Yayoi culture (Japanese history)

    Yayoi culture, (c. 300 bce–c. 250 ce), prehistoric culture of Japan, subsequent to the Jōmon culture. Named after the district in Tokyo where its artifacts were first found in 1884, the culture arose on the southern Japanese island of Kyushu and spread northeastward toward the Kantō Plain. The

  • Yayoi ware (Japanese earthenware)

    Yayoi culture: Yayoi pottery, like earlier Jōmon ware, was unglazed. Pottery of the Early Yayoi period (c. 300–100 bce) was characterized by knife-incised surface decoration. During the Middle Yayoi period (100 bce–100 ce) pottery objects with comb-mark decorations appeared. Forms of this warm russet-coloured ware included tall…

  • yazata (Zoroastrianism)

    Yazata, in Zoroastrianism, member of an order of angels created by Ahura Mazdā to help him maintain the flow of the world order and quell the forces of Ahriman and his demons. They gather the light of the Sun and pour it on the Earth. Their help is indispensable in aiding man to purify and elevate

  • Yazd (Iran)

    Yazd, city, capital of Yazd province, central Iran. The city dates from the 5th century ce and was described as the “noble city of Yazd” by Marco Polo. It stands on a mostly barren sand-ridden plain about 4,000 feet (1,200 metres) above sea level. The climate is completely desertic. A network of

  • Yazd-e Khvāst (Iran)

    Islamic arts: Early religious buildings: …?amāh in Syria and at Yazd-e Khvāst in Iran, where archaeological proof exists of the change. There are also several literary references to the fact that Christian churches, Zoroastrian fire temples, and other older abandoned sanctuaries were transformed into mosques. Altogether, however, those instances probably were not too numerous, because…

  • Yazdani (religious sect)

    Yazīdī, member of a Kurdish religious minority found primarily in northern Iraq, southeastern Turkey, northern Syria, the Caucasus region, and parts of Iran. The Yazīdī religion includes elements of ancient Iranian religions as well as elements of Judaism, Nestorian Christianity, and Islam.

  • Yazdegerd I (Sāsānian king)

    Yazdegerd I , king of the Sāsānian Empire (reigned 399–420). Yazdegerd was a highly intelligent ruler who tried to emancipate himself from the dominion of the magnates and of the Magi (a priestly caste serving a number of religions); thus, his reign is viewed differently by Christian and Magian

  • Yazdegerd II (Sāsānian king)

    Yazdegerd II, king of the Sāsānian dynasty (reigned 438–457), the son and successor of Bahrām V. Although Yazdegerd was at first tolerant of the Christians, he remained a zealous Zoroastrian and later persecuted both Christians and Jews. He was engaged in a short war with Rome in 442 and also

  • Yazdegerd III (Sāsānian king)

    Yazdegerd III, the last king of the Sāsānian dynasty (reigned 632–651), the son of Shahryār and a grandson of Khosrow II. A mere child when he was placed on the throne, Yazdegerd never actually exercised power. In his first year the Arab invasion began, and in 636/637 the Battle of al-Qādisīyah on

  • Yazdegerd the Sinful (Sāsānian king)

    Yazdegerd I , king of the Sāsānian Empire (reigned 399–420). Yazdegerd was a highly intelligent ruler who tried to emancipate himself from the dominion of the magnates and of the Magi (a priestly caste serving a number of religions); thus, his reign is viewed differently by Christian and Magian

  • Yāzgulāmī language

    Iranian languages: Dialects: …related to this group is Yāzgulāmī. A period of a Yāzgulāmī-Shughnī common language (protolanguage) has been postulated by some scholars, after which it separated first into Yāzgulāmī and Common Shughnī; and then Common Shughnī gradually divided into Sarīkolī, Oroshorī-Bartangī, Roshānī-Khufī, and Bajuvī-Shughnī. Sarīkolī, the easternmost of these dialects, is spoken…

  • Yazgulem Range (mountain range, Tajikistan)

    Pamirs: Physiography: …metres]); and the Vanch and Yazgulem ranges, with Revolution (Revolyutsii) Peak (22,880 feet [6,974 metres]). The ranges are separated by deep ravines. To the east of the Yazgulem Range, in the central portion of the Pamirs, is the east-west Muzkol Range, reaching 20,449 feet (6,233 metres) in Soviet Officers Peak.…

  • Yazīd I (Umayyad caliph)

    Yazīd I, second Umayyad caliph (680–683), particularly noted for his suppression of a rebellion led by ?usayn, the son of ?Alī. The death of ?usayn at the Battle of Karbalā? (680) made him a martyr and made permanent a division in Islam between the party of ?Alī (the Shī?ites) and the majority

  • Yazīd ibn al-Muhallab (Umayyad governor)

    Yazīd ibn al-Muhallab, provincial governor in the service of several caliphs of the Umayyad dynasty. In the first years of the 8th century Yazīd became governor of Khorāsān. He soon came into conflict with the powerful governor of Iraq, al-?ajjāj, at whose instigation the caliph, al-Walīd, had

  • Yazīd ibn Mu?āwiyah ibn Abī Sufyān (Umayyad caliph)

    Yazīd I, second Umayyad caliph (680–683), particularly noted for his suppression of a rebellion led by ?usayn, the son of ?Alī. The death of ?usayn at the Battle of Karbalā? (680) made him a martyr and made permanent a division in Islam between the party of ?Alī (the Shī?ites) and the majority

  • Yazīd II (Umayyad caliph)

    al-Farazdaq: …chance to recover patronage under Yazīd II (720–724), when an insurrection occurred and he wrote poems excoriating the rebel leader.

  • Yazīdī (religious sect)

    Yazīdī, member of a Kurdish religious minority found primarily in northern Iraq, southeastern Turkey, northern Syria, the Caucasus region, and parts of Iran. The Yazīdī religion includes elements of ancient Iranian religions as well as elements of Judaism, Nestorian Christianity, and Islam.

  • Yāzijī, Nā?īf (Lebanese scholar)

    Nā?īf Yāzijī, Lebanese scholar who played a significant role in the revitalization of Arabic literary traditions. Until 1840 Yāzijī was employed in the service of Bashīr Shihāb II, the emir of Lebanon. He then moved to Beirut, where he continued his literary work. He was a Christian, and for a

  • Yaz?l?kaya (ancient monument, Turkey)

    Yaz?l?kaya, (Turkish: “Inscribed Rock”), Hittite monument about a mile northeast of Bo?azk?y; it was the site of the Hittite capital Hattusa in eastern Turkey. Two recesses in the rock, one to the northeast and the other to the east, form natural open-air galleries. In a northeastern recess is

  • yazna (Iranian religion)

    Gahanbar: …or fravashis (guardian spirits); the Yasna, the central Zoroastrian rite, which includes the sacrifice of the sacred liquor, haoma; and the Pavi, prayers honouring God and his spirits, performed jointly by the priest and the faithful. A solemn feast then follows, in which the sacrifical offerings made in the preceding…

  • Yazoo Basin (region, Mississippi, United States)

    Mississippi: Relief and soils: …the great fertile crescent called the Delta is the old floodplain of the Yazoo and Mississippi rivers, comprising some 6,250 square miles (16,200 square km) of black alluvial soil several feet deep. Once subject to disastrous floods, the land is now protected by levee and reservoir systems.

  • Yazoo City (Mississippi, United States)

    Yazoo City, city, seat (1848) of Yazoo county, west-central Mississippi, U.S. It lies along the Yazoo River, 47 miles (76 km) northwest of Jackson. Founded as a planned community in 1826, it was later called Manchester; it was renamed for the Yazoo Indians in 1839. Its riverfront was a scene of

  • Yazoo Delta (region, Mississippi, United States)

    Mississippi: Relief and soils: …the great fertile crescent called the Delta is the old floodplain of the Yazoo and Mississippi rivers, comprising some 6,250 square miles (16,200 square km) of black alluvial soil several feet deep. Once subject to disastrous floods, the land is now protected by levee and reservoir systems.

  • Yazoo land fraud (United States history)

    Yazoo land fraud, in U.S. history, scheme by which Georgia legislators were bribed in 1795 to sell most of the land now making up the state of Mississippi (then a part of Georgia’s western claims) to four land companies for the sum of $500,000, far below its potential market value. News of the

  • Yazoo River (river, Mississippi, United States)

    Yazoo River, river formed by the confluence of the Tallahatchie and Yalobusha rivers north of Greenwood, Mississippi, U.S. It meanders about 190 miles (306 km) generally south and southwest, much of the way paralleling the Mississippi River, which it joins at Vicksburg. The Yazoo flows with only a

  • Ya?aqov (Hebrew patriarch)

    Jacob, Hebrew patriarch who was the grandson of Abraham, the son of Isaac and Rebekah, and the traditional ancestor of the people of Israel. Stories about Jacob in the Bible begin at Genesis 25:19. According to the Old Testament, Jacob was the younger twin brother of Esau, who was the ancestor of E

  • Ya?ariba dynasty (Arabian dynasty)

    history of Arabia: Omani expansion: The Ya?rubid dynasty—founded about 1624 when a member of the Ya?rub tribe was elected imam—expelled the Portuguese from Muscat and set to harrying Portuguese possessions on the Indian coast. Embarking on expansion overseas—to Mombasa in 1698, then to Pemba, Zanzibar, and Kilwa—the Omanis became the supreme…

  • Ya?fur, Banū (Arabian nobility)

    history of Arabia: Yemen: The Banū Ya?fur, lords north of Sanaa, expelled the Ziyādid governor and ruled independently from 861 to 997. Najā?id rule ended when ?Alī ibn Mahdī captured Zabīd in 1159.

  • Ya?qūb (Hebrew patriarch)

    Jacob, Hebrew patriarch who was the grandson of Abraham, the son of Isaac and Rebekah, and the traditional ancestor of the people of Israel. Stories about Jacob in the Bible begin at Genesis 25:19. According to the Old Testament, Jacob was the younger twin brother of Esau, who was the ancestor of E

  • Ya?qūb (Turkish leader)

    Shaykh ?aydar: …brought him into conflict with Ya?qūb, the Ak Koyunlu ruler who was also ?aydar’s brother-in-law, with the result that the alliance between the order and that dynasty was weakened. ?aydar was killed in battle by Ak Koyunlu troops while he was leading an expedition to Circassian territory. ?aydar’s major achievement…

  • Ya?qūb ebn Leys? a?-?affar (?affārid ruler)

    Ya?qūb ibn Layth al-?affār, founder of the ?affarid Empire, who rose from obscurity to rule much of present Iran as well as portions of Afghanistan and Pakistan; at one point he came close to capturing Baghdad, the seat of the caliph (the religious leader of all Islam). After an apprenticeship as a

  • Ya?qūb ibn Layth al-?affār (?affārid ruler)

    Ya?qūb ibn Layth al-?affār, founder of the ?affarid Empire, who rose from obscurity to rule much of present Iran as well as portions of Afghanistan and Pakistan; at one point he came close to capturing Baghdad, the seat of the caliph (the religious leader of all Islam). After an apprenticeship as a

  • Ya?qūb Khan (emir of Afghanistan)

    Afghanistan: Ya?qūb Khan (1879): The Treaty of Gandamak (Gandomak; May 26, 1879) recognized Ya?qūb Khan as emir, and he subsequently agreed to receive a permanent British embassy at Kabul. In addition, he agreed to conduct his foreign relations with other states in accordance “with the wishes…

  • Ya?qūbī, al- (Arab historian and geographer)

    Al-Ya?qūbī, Arab historian and geographer, author of a history of the world, Tā?rīkh ibn Wā?i? (“Chronicle of Ibn Wā?i?”), and a general geography, Kitāb al-buldān (“Book of the Countries”). Until 873 al-Ya?qūbī lived in Armenia and Khorāsān, under the patronage of the Iranian dynasty of the

  • Ya?rubid dynasty (Arabian dynasty)

    history of Arabia: Omani expansion: The Ya?rubid dynasty—founded about 1624 when a member of the Ya?rub tribe was elected imam—expelled the Portuguese from Muscat and set to harrying Portuguese possessions on the Indian coast. Embarking on expansion overseas—to Mombasa in 1698, then to Pemba, Zanzibar, and Kilwa—the Omanis became the supreme…

  • Yb (chemical element)

    Ytterbium (Yb), chemical element, a rare-earth metal of the lanthanide series of the periodic table. Ytterbium is the most volatile rare-earth metal. It is a soft, malleable silvery metal that will tarnish slightly when stored in air and therefore should be stored in vacuum or in an inert

  • YB-49 (aircraft)

    John Knudsen Northrop: …propellers; its jet-propelled version, the YB-49, first flew in 1947. The following year the U.S. Air Force rejected the flying wing, citing as one factor the instability caused by its lack of a vertical tail fin, but four decades later the Northrop Corporation adapted Northrop’s design to new control mechanisms…

  • YBAs (art movement)

    Tracey Emin: …one of the YBAs (Young British Artists; also known as the BritArtists) who came to prominence in the 1990s.

  • YBCO (chemical compound)

    ceramic composition and properties: Crystal structure: These cases are illustrated by yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO; chemical formula YBa2Cu3O7), shown in Figure 2D. YBCO is a superconducting ceramic; that is, it loses all resistance to electric current at extremely low temperatures. Its structure consists of three cubes, with yttrium or barium at the centre, copper at…

  • Ybl Museum (museum, Hungary)
  • Ybl, Miklós (Hungarian architect)

    Székesfehérvár: …fine and applied arts of Miklós Ybl, the great Hungarian architect, along with the work of other artists. Museums and galleries also include the King St. Stephen Museum, the Black Eagle Chemist’s Museum, the Hetedhét Toy Museum, and the Town Gallery Deák Collection.

  • Ybor City (area, Tampa, Florida, United States)

    Tampa: …by Vicente Martinez Ybor, and Ybor City, Tampa’s Latin quarter, became a centre of that industry; although some cigars are still made in Ybor City, the enclave is now mainly a tourist spot.

  • Ybor, Vicente Martínez (Spanish-born merchant)

    Florida: Population composition: …of revolutionary turmoil in Cuba, Vicente Martínez Ybor moved his cigar factories there from Havana. Labour troubles and a disastrous fire encouraged Ybor to move again in 1886, this time to Tampa, and again many Cubans followed the factories. A similar influx occurred in the early 1960s after the Cuban…

  • Yciar, Juan de (Spanish calligrapher)

    calligraphy: Writing manuals and copybooks (16th to 18th century): Juan de Yciar was the first in Spain to publish a copybook, the Recopilacion subtilissima (1548; “Most Delicate Compilation”). Two years later he published his Arte subtilissima (1550; “The Most Delicate Art”), in which he acknowledged his debt to the printed books of Arrighi, Tagliente,…

  • yd (measurement)

    Yard, Unit of length equal to 36 inches, or 3 feet (see foot), in the U.S. Customary System or 0.9144 metre in the International System of Units. A cloth yard, used to measure cloth, is 37 in. long; it was also the standard length for arrows. In casual speech, a yard (e.g., of concrete, gravel, or

  • Ydalir (Norse mythology)

    Ull: He resided at Ydalir (Yew Dales).

  • Yding Forest Hill (hill, Denmark)

    Denmark: Relief: …568 feet (173 metres), is Yding Forest Hill (Yding Skovh?j) in east-central Jutland.

  • Ye (China)

    Fuzhou, city and capital of Fujian sheng (province), southeastern China. It is situated in the eastern part of the province on the north bank of the estuary of Fujian’s largest river, the Min River, a short distance from its mouth on the East China Sea. The Min gives the city access to the interior

  • Ye Jianying (Chinese politician)

    Ye Jianying, Chinese communist military officer, administrator, and statesman who held high posts in the Chinese government during the 1970s and ’80s. Born of a middle-class family, Ye graduated from the Yunnan Military Academy in 1919 and joined Sun Yat-sen’s Nationalist movement shortly

  • Ye Mingchen (Chinese official)

    China: The antiforeign movement and the second Opium War (Arrow War): …Guangzhou, where the xenophobic governor-general, Ye Mingchen, was inciting the Cantonese to annihilate the British, the Arrow incident occurred in October 1856. Guangzhou police seized the Arrow, a Chinese-owned but British-registered ship flying a British flag, and charged its Chinese crew with piracy and smuggling. The British consul Harry Parkes…

  • Ye Shaojun (Chinese author)

    Ye Shengtao, Chinese writer and teacher known primarily for his vernacular fiction. Ye taught at primary schools after his graduation from secondary school and in 1914 began writing short stories in classical Chinese for several periodicals. Influenced by the May Fourth Movement, he turned to

  • Ye Shengtao (Chinese author)

    Ye Shengtao, Chinese writer and teacher known primarily for his vernacular fiction. Ye taught at primary schools after his graduation from secondary school and in 1914 began writing short stories in classical Chinese for several periodicals. Influenced by the May Fourth Movement, he turned to

  • Ye Shiwen (Chinese swimmer)

    London 2012 Olympic Games: …the London Games was 16-year-old Ye Shiwen of China, who won the women’s 200-metre individual medley (IM) and shattered the world record while winning the 400-metre IM event. The star of the gymnastics events was Gabrielle Douglas of the United States, who won the women’s individual all-around gold and was…

  • Ye Ting (Chinese military leader)

    Ye Ting, outstanding Chinese military leader. Ye is thought to have been of peasant origin, but he was educated at the Baoding Military Academy, from which he graduated in 1918. He joined the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in 1924 and was commander of a vanguard unit on the Northern Expedition in

  • Ye Weixun (Chinese military leader)

    Ye Ting, outstanding Chinese military leader. Ye is thought to have been of peasant origin, but he was educated at the Baoding Military Academy, from which he graduated in 1918. He joined the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in 1924 and was commander of a vanguard unit on the Northern Expedition in

  • Ye Xi (Chinese writer, cultural critic, and scholar)

    Hong Kong literature: Ye Xi (Liang Bingjun) was a writer, cultural critic, and scholar who contributed to the introduction of a number of modern literary conventions into Hong Kong literature in the 1970s. Other writers who came into prominence at that time and had strong local identities are…

  • Ye Yiwei (Chinese politician)

    Ye Jianying, Chinese communist military officer, administrator, and statesman who held high posts in the Chinese government during the 1970s and ’80s. Born of a middle-class family, Ye graduated from the Yunnan Military Academy in 1919 and joined Sun Yat-sen’s Nationalist movement shortly

  • Ye’erqiang He (river, Asia)

    Yarkand River, a headstream of the Tarim River in the Uygur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, in extreme western China. The Yarkand, which is 600 miles (970 km) long, rises in the Karakoram Pass of the Karakoram Range in the Pakistani-administered portion of the Kashmir region. In its upper course it

  • Ye.O. Paton Bridge (bridge, Kiev, Ukraine)

    Kyiv: City layout: …bridge and by the imposing Ye. O. Paton road bridge, which is 4,920 feet (1,500 metres) long and named for its designer.

  • Yeager, Charles Elwood (American pilot)

    Chuck Yeager, American test pilot and U.S. Air Force officer who was the first man to exceed the speed of sound in flight. Yeager enlisted in the U.S. Army in September 1941, shortly after graduating from high school, and was assigned to the Army Air Corps. He was commissioned a reserve flight

  • Yeager, Chuck (American pilot)

    Chuck Yeager, American test pilot and U.S. Air Force officer who was the first man to exceed the speed of sound in flight. Yeager enlisted in the U.S. Army in September 1941, shortly after graduating from high school, and was assigned to the Army Air Corps. He was commissioned a reserve flight

  • Yeager, Jeana (American pilot)

    Voyager: Piloted by Dick Rutan and Jeana Yeager, the craft took off on December 14 from Edwards Air Force Base, 60 miles (100 km) northeast of Los Angeles, and landed at that same base 9 days later after completing a course of 25,012 miles (40,251 km) around the world. The Voyager…

  • Yeager, Peter Cleary (American sociologist)

    Marshall B. Clinard: …his collaboration with American sociologist Peter Cleary Yeager on a study that was published in two forms: Illegal Corporate Behavior (1979) and Corporate Crime (1980). In the Sutherland tradition, Clinard and Yeager examined crimes committed by the 477 largest manufacturing corporations and the 105 largest wholesale, retail, and service corporations…

  • Yeah Yeah Yeahs, the (American musical group)

    TV on the Radio: …worked with art punk group the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and they had a hand in that band’s 2009 album It’s Blitz!, which featured Adebimpe as a guest artist and Sitek as coproducer. Sitek also produced Scarlett Johansson’s Anywhere I Lay My Head (2008), which featured the actress’s interpretation of Tom…

  • year (chronology)

    Year, time required for Earth to travel once around the Sun, about 365 14 days. This fractional number makes necessary the periodic intercalation of days in any calendar that is to be kept in step with the seasons. In the Gregorian calendar a common year contains 365 days, and every fourth year

  • Year 1918 in Petrograd, The (painting by Petrov-Vodkin)

    Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin: In his celebrated painting The Year 1918 in Petrograd, also known as the Petrograd Madonna (1920), the events of the revolution are treated as bloodless and humanitarian, as if they were somehow abstract. This form of idealization was characteristic of the mature works of Petrov-Vodkin, and it is evident…

  • Year 2000 bug (computer science)

    Y2K bug, a problem in the coding of computerized systems that was projected to create havoc in computers and computer networks around the world at the beginning of the year 2000 (in metric measurements K stands for thousand). After more than a year of international alarm, feverish preparations, and

  • Year 2000 Information and Readiness Disclosure Act (United States [1998])

    Y2K bug: … in October 1998 signed the Year 2000 Information and Readiness Disclosure Act. The law was designed to encourage American companies to share Y2K data by offering them limited liability protection for sharing information about Y2K products, methods, and best practices.

  • Year 2000, Commission of the (American commission)

    futurology: …Arts and Sciences formed its Commission on the Year 2000 “to anticipate social patterns, to design new institutions, and to propose alternative programs”; the commission’s 1967 report constituted the first wide-ranging futurological study in the United States.

  • Year Books (British law records)

    common law: Inns of Court and the Year Books: …be referred to as the Year Books.

  • year list (Babylonian chronology)

    chronology: Babylonian chronology before 747 bc: …lists of these names, called year lists or date lists, constitute as reliable a source in Babylonian chronology as the eponym lists do in Assyrian chronology. One of the events which almost invariably gave a name to the following year was the accession of a new king. Hence, the first…

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