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  • Yang Shangkun (president of China)

    Yang Shangkun, Chinese revolutionary figure and politician who was a veteran of Mao Zedong’s Long March in 1934-35, in 1966 became a victim of Mao’s Cultural Revolution and was sent to prison for 12 years, and then regained power, serving as president from 1988 to 1993; in 1989, under instruction

  • Yang Shen (Chinese writer)

    China: Literature and scholarship: …scholar-official at his best, was Yang Shen. Yang won first place in the metropolitan examination of 1511, remonstrated vigorously against the caprices of the Zhengde and Jiajing emperors, and was finally beaten, imprisoned, removed from his post in the Hanlin Academy, and sent into exile as a common soldier in…

  • Yang Shui (river, Shaanxi and Hubei provinces, China)

    Han River, one of the most important tributaries of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) of China. It has a total length of about 950 miles (1,530 km). The Han River rises in the Shenqiong Mountains, part of the Micang Mountains in the extreme southwestern part of Shaanxi province. Its upper stream is

  • Yang Te-chih (Chinese military official)

    Yang Dezhi (Yang Te-chih), Chinese military official (born 1911, Zhuzhou [Chu-chou], Hunan province, China—died Oct. 25, 1994, Beijing [Peking], China), joined the communist People’s Liberation Army (PLA) at its creation and went on to serve in virtually every major Chinese military conflict for th

  • yang ts’ai (Chinese art)

    famille rose: …known to the Chinese as yangcai (“foreign colours”) because they were first introduced from Europe (about 1685). By the time of the reign of Yongzheng (1722–35) in the Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12), these shades were favoured over the translucent famille verte overglaze colours that were previously used and famille rose wares…

  • Yang Wei (Chinese gymnast)

    Beijing 2008 Olympic Games: Key Events from the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games: Two-time world champion Yang Wei of China won the men’s individual all-around gymnastics gold medal. Japanese swimmer Kitajima Kosuke won the men’s 200-metre breaststroke gold medal, his second gold of the 2008 Games and fourth overall. The Ukrainian women’s sabre team upset the top-seeded U.S. team and host…

  • Yang Xi (Chinese Daoist)

    China: Daoism: …of revelations, the first through Yang Xi, which led to the formation first of the Shangqing sect and later to the rival Lingbao sect. By the end of the period of division, Daoism had its own canons of scriptural writings, much influenced by Buddhist models but forming a quite independent…

  • Yang Xianyi (Chinese translator and intellectual)

    Yang Xianyi, Chinese translator and intellectual (born Jan. 10, 1915, Tianjin, China—died Nov. 23, 2009, Beijing, China), together with his wife, Gladys (d. 1999)—the daughter of a British missionary to China—made a number of classical and modern Chinese works available in English. He also

  • Yang Xiji (Chinese judge)

    Fu Shen: Yang Cheng (or Yang Xiji), who served the Wudi emperor (reigned 502–549 ce) as a criminal judge in Hunan province, was deeply disturbed that the ruler was destroying the normal family life of dwarfs by pressing them into service as personal servants and court entertainers.…

  • Yang Xiong (Chinese poet and philosopher)

    Yang Xiong, Chinese poet and philosopher best known for his poetry written in the form known as fu. As a quiet and studious young man, Yang Xiong came to admire and practice the fu form. When he was past age 40, he went to live in the imperial capital, Chang’an, where his reputation as a poet won

  • Yang Xiuqing (Chinese rebel leader)

    Yang Xiuqing, organizer and commander in chief of the Taiping Rebellion, the political-religious uprising that occupied most of South China between 1850 and 1864. A dealer in firewood, Yang joined the Taiping band shortly before the rebellion broke out and quickly rose to a high position. In 1851,

  • Yang Xuanzhi (Chinese author)

    Chinese literature: Prose: …two northerners deserve special mention: Yang Xuanzhi, author of Luoyang Jialanji (“Record of Buddhist Temples in Luoyang”), and Li Daoyuan, author of Shuijingzhu (“Commentary on the Water Classic”). Although both of these works seem to have been planned to serve a practical, utilitarian purpose, they are magnificent records of contemporary…

  • Yang Yan (Chinese minister)

    Yang Yan, minister to the Tang emperor Dezong (reigned 779–805). Yang introduced a new system of taxation into China that helped reduce the power of the aristocratic classes and eliminate their large tax-free estates. Yang abolished the various land, labour, produce, and other taxes to which the

  • Yang Yang (Chinese skater)

    Yang Yang, renowned Chinese short-track speed skater who at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah, won China’s first-ever Winter Olympic gold medals and was the first short-track speed skater from any country to win multiple gold medals at one Winter Games. Yang, born in

  • Yang Yang (A) (Chinese skater)

    Yang Yang, renowned Chinese short-track speed skater who at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah, won China’s first-ever Winter Olympic gold medals and was the first short-track speed skater from any country to win multiple gold medals at one Winter Games. Yang, born in

  • Yang Yen (Chinese minister)

    Yang Yan, minister to the Tang emperor Dezong (reigned 779–805). Yang introduced a new system of taxation into China that helped reduce the power of the aristocratic classes and eliminate their large tax-free estates. Yang abolished the various land, labour, produce, and other taxes to which the

  • Yang Ying (emperor of Sui dynasty)

    Yangdi, posthumous name (shi) of the second and penultimate emperor (604–617/618) of the Sui dynasty (581–618). Under the Yangdi emperor canals were built and great palaces erected. He acceded to the throne in 604, and it is generally agreed that he did so after assassinating his father (the Wendi

  • Yang Zengxin (Chinese official)

    Xinjiang: History: …the Chinese Revolution of 1911–12, Yang Zengxin, a Han commander of native Turkic troops, seized control of Xinjiang and later was appointed governor by the Beijing government. He maintained control until his assassination in 1928, which was followed by a series of rulers and shifting allegiances, mainly under Jin Shuren…

  • Yang Zhu (Chinese philosopher)

    Yang Zhu, Chinese philosopher traditionally associated with extreme egoism but better understood as an advocate of naturalism. He may also have been the first Chinese philospher to discuss human nature (xing; literally “natural tendencies”). When asked whether he would surrender merely one hair

  • Yang Ziyun (Chinese poet and philosopher)

    Yang Xiong, Chinese poet and philosopher best known for his poetry written in the form known as fu. As a quiet and studious young man, Yang Xiong came to admire and practice the fu form. When he was past age 40, he went to live in the imperial capital, Chang’an, where his reputation as a poet won

  • Yang, Chen Ning (American physicist)

    Chen Ning Yang, Chinese-born American theoretical physicist whose research with Tsung-Dao Lee showed that parity—the symmetry between physical phenomena occurring in right-handed and left-handed coordinate systems—is violated when certain elementary particles decay. Until this discovery it had been

  • Yang, Edward (Taiwanese film director)

    Edward Yang, (Yang Dechang), Taiwanese film director(born Sept. 24, 1947, Shanghai, China—died June 29, 2007, Beverly Hills, Calif.), was in the vanguard of the Taiwanese New Wave, a 1980s movement that brought international attention to the island state with films that probed political, economic,

  • Yang, Frank (American physicist)

    Chen Ning Yang, Chinese-born American theoretical physicist whose research with Tsung-Dao Lee showed that parity—the symmetry between physical phenomena occurring in right-handed and left-handed coordinate systems—is violated when certain elementary particles decay. Until this discovery it had been

  • Yang, Jerry (American reproductive biologist)

    Jerry Yang, (Yang Xiangzhong), Chinese-born American reproductive biologist (born July 31, 1959, Weixian, Hebei province, China—died Feb. 5, 2009, Boston, Mass.), was a pioneer in cloning research who in 1999 succeeded in producing the first cloned farm animal in the U.S.—a Holstein calf named Amy.

  • Yang, Jerry (American businessman)

    Yahoo!: …was founded in 1994 by Jerry Yang and David Filo, graduate students at Stanford University in California. Yahoo! provides users with online utilities, information, and access to other Web sites.

  • yang-ch’in (musical instrument)

    Yangqin, Chinese stringed instrument of the dulcimer, or struck zither, family. The yangqin is played with bamboo beaters having rubber or leather heads. Its trapezoidal wooden body is strung with several courses (from 7 to 18 sets) of strings on four or five bridges. The sets of strings on each

  • Yang-chou (China)

    Yangzhou, city, southwest-central Jiangsu province (sheng), eastern China. It lies to the north of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) at the southern terminus of the section of the Grand Canal that joins the Huai River to the Yangtze. Pop. (2002 est.) 548,204. In the 4th and 3rd centuries bce,

  • Yang-Mills theory (physics)

    Yang-Mills theory, in physics, a generalization of Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell’s unified theory of electromagnetism, also known as Maxwell’s equations, used to describe the weak force and the strong force in subatomic particles in terms of a geometric structure, or quantum field theory.

  • Yang-ming (mountain, Taiwan)

    Taipei: The contemporary city: …nearby recreation areas is Mount Yang-ming (Yangming), which is only 6 miles (10 km) north of the central city. Both the mountain and the town of Pei-t’ou (Beituo) at its base are known for their hot springs. Pi (Bi) Lake has boating and water sports. There are ocean beaches not…

  • yang-pan-hsi (Chinese entertainment)

    Yangbanxi, (Chinese: “model drama”) form of Chinese entertainment that flourished during the Cultural Revolution (1966–76). The works combined elements of traditional Chinese dramas, particularly jingxi (Beijing opera or Peking opera), with modern Western drama to treat contemporary topics and

  • Yang-shao culture (prehistoric culture, China)

    Yangshao culture, (5000–3000 bce) prehistoric culture of China’s Huang He (Yellow River) basin, represented by several sites at which painted pottery has been uncovered. In Yangshao culture, millet was cultivated, some animals were domesticated, chipped and polished stone tools were used, silk was

  • yang-sheng (Chinese medicine and religion)

    Yangsheng, (Chinese: “nourishing life”) in Chinese medicine and religion (particularly Daoism), various self-cultivation practices aimed at personal health and longevity. A person’s life (sheng) is sustained by three “treasures,” or principles: jing (“essence”), qi (“vital breath”), and shen

  • Yang-ti (emperor of Sui dynasty)

    Yangdi, posthumous name (shi) of the second and penultimate emperor (604–617/618) of the Sui dynasty (581–618). Under the Yangdi emperor canals were built and great palaces erected. He acceded to the throne in 604, and it is generally agreed that he did so after assassinating his father (the Wendi

  • yang-tz’u (Chinese enamelwork)

    enamelwork: Painted enamels: …are termed by the Chinese yangci (“foreign porcelain”), the palette of colours used being the same as with enamelled porcelain, whose decoration under foreign influence is called yangcai (“foreign colours”). A ground of opaque enamel, generally white, is laid on the copper, and on this the colours are superimposed and…

  • Yanga (Veracruz, Mexico)

    slave rebellions: …de Los Negros (now called Yanga), the first settlement of freed African slaves in North America.

  • Yanga (African abolitionist and colonial leader)

    slave rebellions: …Spain (present-day Mexico), in 1570, Gaspar Yanga led the escape of his fellow slaves into nearby mountains. There they lived for nearly 40 years, arming and supplying themselves by means of raids on Spanish colonists. The Spanish colonial powers were aware of the community’s existence but made little progress against…

  • Yanga, Gaspar (African abolitionist and colonial leader)

    slave rebellions: …Spain (present-day Mexico), in 1570, Gaspar Yanga led the escape of his fellow slaves into nearby mountains. There they lived for nearly 40 years, arming and supplying themselves by means of raids on Spanish colonists. The Spanish colonial powers were aware of the community’s existence but made little progress against…

  • Yangadin Formation (geological formation, Russia)

    Silurian Period: Evaporites: …parts of the Upper Silurian Yangadin and Holuhan formations of Siberia, as well as in comparable formations in Latvia and Lithuania. Upper Silurian evaporites from the Pridoli Epoch are characteristic of three different basins in Western Australia. Minor amounts of halite and anhydrite occur in the Dirk Hartog Formation in…

  • Yangambi (Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Congo River: Climate: …Congo flows is that of Yangambi, a town situated on the river’s right bank slightly north of the Equator and a little downstream of Kisangani. Humidity is high throughout the year, and annual rainfall amounts to 67 inches (1,700 mm) and occurs fairly regularly; even in the driest month the…

  • yangban (Korean society)

    Yangban, (Korean: “two groups”), the highest social class of the Chos?n (Yi) dynasty (1392–1910) of Korea. It consisted of both munban, or civilian officials, and muban, or military officials. The term yangban originated in the Kory? dynasty (935–1392), when civil service examinations were held

  • Yangban ch?n (work by Pak Chi-W?n)

    Korean literature: Later Chos?n: 1598–1894: Pak Chi-W?n’s “Yangban ch?n” (“Tale of a Yangban”) and “H? Saeng ch?n” (“Tale of Mr. H?”), each a short narrative in Chinese with a carefully arranged structure and distinct themes, give voice to social criticism. Both take as their focus members of the yangban, the highest social…

  • yangbanxi (Chinese entertainment)

    Yangbanxi, (Chinese: “model drama”) form of Chinese entertainment that flourished during the Cultural Revolution (1966–76). The works combined elements of traditional Chinese dramas, particularly jingxi (Beijing opera or Peking opera), with modern Western drama to treat contemporary topics and

  • yangcai (Chinese art)

    famille rose: …known to the Chinese as yangcai (“foreign colours”) because they were first introduced from Europe (about 1685). By the time of the reign of Yongzheng (1722–35) in the Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12), these shades were favoured over the translucent famille verte overglaze colours that were previously used and famille rose wares…

  • Yangchuan (China)

    Yangquan, city, eastern Shanxi province (sheng), northeast-central China. It is a prefecture-level municipality (shi) located in the western portion of the Taihang Mountains at the eastern end of a route through the mountains via Niangzi Pass. Its site was of major strategic importance throughout

  • Yangdi (emperor of Sui dynasty)

    Yangdi, posthumous name (shi) of the second and penultimate emperor (604–617/618) of the Sui dynasty (581–618). Under the Yangdi emperor canals were built and great palaces erected. He acceded to the throne in 604, and it is generally agreed that he did so after assassinating his father (the Wendi

  • yangge (Chinese folk opera)

    Shaanxi: Cultural life: The yangge is a local form of musical folk dance with comic themes. Shaanxi-style Qinqiang opera is also popular, as are shadow plays using local leather puppets.

  • yanggona (beverage)

    Kava, nonalcoholic, euphoria-producing beverage made from the root of the pepper plant, principally Piper methysticum, in most of the South Pacific islands. It is yellow-green in colour and somewhat bitter, and the active ingredient is apparently alkaloidal in nature. Consumption of the beverage

  • Yanghui triangle (mathematics)

    Pascal’s triangle, in algebra, a triangular arrangement of numbers that gives the coefficients in the expansion of any binomial expression, such as (x + y)n. It is named for the 17th-century French mathematician Blaise Pascal, but it is far older. Chinese mathematician Jia Xian devised a triangular

  • Yangi Yol (Uzbekistan)

    Yangiyul, city, Uzbekistan. The city lies in the middle of the Tashkent oasis. Formerly a village on the site of the ancient settlement of Kaunchi-Tepe, it developed between World Wars I and II because of its proximity to Tashkent and its situation on the Tashkent–Samarkand railway and Great Uzbek

  • Yangiyer (Uzbekistan)

    Uzbekistan: Settlement patterns: also sited Yangiyul, Guliston, and Yangiyer in areas that produce and process cotton and fruit.

  • Yangiyul (Uzbekistan)

    Yangiyul, city, Uzbekistan. The city lies in the middle of the Tashkent oasis. Formerly a village on the site of the ancient settlement of Kaunchi-Tepe, it developed between World Wars I and II because of its proximity to Tashkent and its situation on the Tashkent–Samarkand railway and Great Uzbek

  • Yangon (Myanmar)

    Yangon, city, capital of independent Myanmar (Burma) from 1948 to 2006, when the government officially proclaimed the new city of Nay Pyi Taw (Naypyidaw) the capital of the country. Yangon is located in the southern part of the country on the east bank of the Yangon, or Hlaing, River (eastern mouth

  • Yangon River (river, Myanmar)

    Yangon River, marine estuary in southern Myanmar (Burma), formed at the city of Yangon (Rangoon) by the confluence of the Pegu and Myitmaka rivers. It empties into the Gulf of Martaban of the Andaman Sea, 25 miles (40 km) southeast. Linked west to the Irrawaddy River by the Twante Canal (first dug

  • yangqin (musical instrument)

    Yangqin, Chinese stringed instrument of the dulcimer, or struck zither, family. The yangqin is played with bamboo beaters having rubber or leather heads. Its trapezoidal wooden body is strung with several courses (from 7 to 18 sets) of strings on four or five bridges. The sets of strings on each

  • Yangqu (China)

    Taiyuan, city and capital of Shanxi sheng (province), China. One of the greatest industrial cities in China, it lies on the Fen River in the northern portion of the river’s fertile upper basin. Taiyuan commands the north-south route through Shanxi, as well as important natural lines of

  • Yangquan (China)

    Yangquan, city, eastern Shanxi province (sheng), northeast-central China. It is a prefecture-level municipality (shi) located in the western portion of the Taihang Mountains at the eastern end of a route through the mountains via Niangzi Pass. Its site was of major strategic importance throughout

  • Yangshao culture (prehistoric culture, China)

    Yangshao culture, (5000–3000 bce) prehistoric culture of China’s Huang He (Yellow River) basin, represented by several sites at which painted pottery has been uncovered. In Yangshao culture, millet was cultivated, some animals were domesticated, chipped and polished stone tools were used, silk was

  • yangsheng (Chinese medicine and religion)

    Yangsheng, (Chinese: “nourishing life”) in Chinese medicine and religion (particularly Daoism), various self-cultivation practices aimed at personal health and longevity. A person’s life (sheng) is sustained by three “treasures,” or principles: jing (“essence”), qi (“vital breath”), and shen

  • Yangtze alligator (reptile)

    alligator: The Chinese alligator (A. sinensis) is a much smaller, little-known reptile found in the Yangtze River region of China. It is similar to the larger form but attains a maximum length of about 2.1 metres (7 feet)—although usually growing to 1.5 metres—and is blackish with faint…

  • Yangtze delta (delta, China)

    Yangtze River: The Yangtze delta: The Yangtze delta, which begins beyond Zhenjiang, consists of a large number of branches, tributaries, lakes, ancient riverbeds, and marshes that are connected with the main channel. During major floods the delta area is completely submerged. Lake Tai, with an area of about…

  • Yangtze finless porpoise (mammal)

    porpoise: …however, the population of the Yangtze finless porpoise (N. asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis), a subspecies of narrow-ridged finless porpoise found only in the Yangtze River, has declined significantly since 1984. It was classified as a critically endangered species by the IUCN in 2013.

  • Yangtze Paraplatform (geological formation)

    Asia: Chronological summary: The Yangtze paraplatform is younger, the oldest identified orogenic event being 2.5 billion years old. Its final consolidation took place some 800 million years ago. The Kontum block is poorly known. It contains Precambrian metamorphic rocks with minimum ages of about 2.3 billion years, although the…

  • Yangtze Plain (plain, China)

    Yangtze Plain, series of alluvial plains of uneven width along the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) and its major tributaries, beginning east of Yichang (Hubei province), east-central China. The middle Yangtze Plain covers parts of northeastern Hunan, southeastern Hubei, and north-central Jiangxi

  • Yangtze River (river, China)

    Yangtze River, longest river in both China and Asia and third longest river in the world, with a length of 3,915 miles (6,300 kilometres). Its basin, extending for some 2,000 miles (3,200 km) from west to east and for more than 600 miles (1,000 km) from north to south, drains an area of 698,265

  • Yangtze River floods

    Yangtze River floods, floods of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) in central and eastern China that have occurred periodically and often have caused considerable destruction of property and loss of life. Among the most recent major flood events are those of 1870, 1931, 1954, 1998, and 2010. The

  • Yangtze valley climate

    Jiangsu: Climate: …climate may be distinguished: the Yangtze valley climate, in central and southern Jiangsu, and the North China climate, to the north of the old Huai River. The former is humid subtropical, while the latter is cool, temperate continental, with greater extremes of temperature. Nanjing in the south has a mean…

  • Yangtze-Huai plain (region, China)

    Jiangsu: Drainage: …what Chinese geographers call the Yangtze (Jiang)-Huai plain, built by the alluvium of the two rivers. The centre of this plain is only 6.5 to 13 feet (2 to 4 metres) above sea level, while its periphery stands at about 16 to 33 feet (5 to 10 metres). It is…

  • Yangzho Yong (lake, China)

    Tibet: Drainage and soils: …lie two other large lakes, Yamzho Yun (Yangzho Yong) and Puma Yung (Pumo). In western Tibet two adjoining lakes are located near the Nepal border—Lake Mapam, sacred to both Buddhists and Hindus, and Lake La’nga.

  • Yangzhou (China)

    Yangzhou, city, southwest-central Jiangsu province (sheng), eastern China. It lies to the north of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) at the southern terminus of the section of the Grand Canal that joins the Huai River to the Yangtze. Pop. (2002 est.) 548,204. In the 4th and 3rd centuries bce,

  • Yangzhou, Battle of (Chinese history [1645])

    Battle of Yangzhou, (May 1645). The Fall of Beijing in 1644 was followed by years of costly warfare, as the newly victorious Manchu fought to extend their rule over all of China. The siege of the city of Yangzhou was among the bloodiest episodes in the large-scale conflicts that preceded the

  • Yanito (dialect)

    Gibraltar: People: …an English dialect known as Yanito (Llanito), which is influenced by Spanish, Genoese, and Hebrew.

  • Yanji (China)

    Yanji, city, eastern Jilin sheng (province), far northeastern China. It is a county-level shi (municipality) and the administrative seat of Yanbian Chaoxianzu (Korean) Autonomous Prefecture, which covers a mountainous area on the North Korean–Chinese border, more than half of whose inhabitants are

  • Yanjing (national capital, China)

    Beijing, city, province-level shi (municipality), and capital of the People’s Republic of China. Few cities in the world have served for so long as the political headquarters and cultural centre of an area as immense as China. The city has been an integral part of China’s history over the past

  • Yank at Eton, A (film by Taurog [1942])

    Norman Taurog: Musical comedies and Boys Town: …Taurog had another hit with A Yank at Eton (1942), which starred Rooney as an American in England who alienates his classmates until another student (Freddie Bartholomew) shows him the ropes. Presenting Lily Mars (1943) was an adaptation of a Booth Tarkington novel about a small-town girl (Judy Garland) who…

  • Yank in the R.A.F., A (film by King [1941])

    Henry King: Films of the 1940s: Next was the hugely popular A Yank in the R.A.F. (1941), a World War II drama about a callow American pilot (Power) in London who reunites with a former girlfriend (Betty Grable) and then joins the Royal Air Force to impress her. The sentimental Remember the Day (1941) centres on…

  • Yankari National Park (park, Nigeria)

    Yankari National Park, park in Bauchi state, east-central Nigeria, southeast of Bauchi town. It was established as a game reserve in 1956 and became a national park in 1991. It covers 870 square miles (2,254 square km). The park, at an elevation of about 1,600 feet (500 m), has characteristic

  • Yankee (ship)

    privateer: brig Yankee alone seized or destroyed $5,000,000 worth of English property. France used many privateers during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars.

  • Yankee (nickname)

    Yankee, a native or citizen of the United States or, more narrowly, of the New England states of the United States (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut). The term Yankee is often associated with such characteristics as shrewdness, thrift, ingenuity, and

  • Yankee (Soviet submarine class)

    submarine: Strategic submarines: …of the Soviet Union’s 8,000-ton Yankee-class submarines were delivered, which carried 16 SS-N-6 missiles of 1,300-nautical-mile (2,400-km) range. These were followed a decade later by Delta-class vessels fitted with 16 SS-N-18 missiles. Each SS-N-18 had a range of 3,500 nautical miles (6,500 km). In 1982 the Soviet Union began to…

  • Yankee Clipper, the (American baseball player)

    Joe DiMaggio, American professional baseball player who was an outstanding hitter and fielder and one of the best all-around players in the history of the game. DiMaggio was the son of Italian immigrants who made their living by fishing. He quit school at 14 and at 17 joined his brother Vincent and

  • Yankee Doodle (song by Shuckburgh)

    American literature: Poets and poetry: …and songs such as “Yankee Doodle,” “Nathan Hale,” and “The Epilogue,” mostly set to popular British melodies and in manner resembling other British poems of the period.

  • Yankee Doodle Dandy (film by Curtiz [1942])

    Yankee Doodle Dandy, American biopic film, released in 1942, that focused on the life of vaudevillian, composer, and Broadway luminary George M. Cohan and featured an Academy Award-winning performance by James Cagney. This remarkable life story, though somewhat distorted and sanitized in this

  • Yankee from Olympus (work by Bowen)

    biography: Interpretative biography: … (1937), and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Yankee from Olympus (1944). She molds her sources into a vivid narrative, worked up into dramatic scenes that always have some warranty of documentation—the dialogue, for example, is sometimes devised from the indirect discourse of letter or diary. She does not invent materials; but she…

  • Yankee Hotel Foxtrot (album by Wilco)

    Wilco: …making of the 2002 album Yankee Hotel Foxtrot proved to be a turning point, with the band transforming a series of disappointments into a triumphant release. Coomer had been ousted during the recording sessions (he was replaced by drummer Kotche), and Bennett was fired soon after the album was finished,…

  • Yankee Stadium (stadium, New York City, New York, United States)

    stadium: Modern stadiums: …in this trend was triple-tiered Yankee Stadium, New York, built in 1923 (demolished 2009–10).

  • Yankees (American baseball team)

    New York Yankees, American professional baseball team based in the borough of the Bronx in New York City. One of the most famous and successful franchises in all of sports, the Yankees have won a record 27 World Series titles and 40 American League (AL) pennants. The franchise began in 1901 in

  • Yankovic, Frank John (American musician)

    Frankie Yankovic, American musician who was known as the "polka king" for half a century of performing and brought nationwide attention to the Slovenian-style polka; in 1986 he won polka’s first Grammy award (b. July 28, 1915, Davis, W.Va.--d. Oct. 14, 1998, New Port Richey,

  • Yankovic, Frankie (American musician)

    Frankie Yankovic, American musician who was known as the "polka king" for half a century of performing and brought nationwide attention to the Slovenian-style polka; in 1986 he won polka’s first Grammy award (b. July 28, 1915, Davis, W.Va.--d. Oct. 14, 1998, New Port Richey,

  • Yankovsky, Oleg (Russian actor)

    Oleg Yankovsky, (Oleg Ivanovich Yankovsky), Russian actor (born Feb. 23, 1944, Jezkazgan, Kazakhstan, U.S.S.R. [now in Kazakhstan]—died May 20, 2009, Moscow, Russia), won critical and commercial acclaim as one of the U.S.S.R.’s most popular figures of stage and screen. Yankovsky was admired for his

  • Yankovsky, Oleg Ivanovich (Russian actor)

    Oleg Yankovsky, (Oleg Ivanovich Yankovsky), Russian actor (born Feb. 23, 1944, Jezkazgan, Kazakhstan, U.S.S.R. [now in Kazakhstan]—died May 20, 2009, Moscow, Russia), won critical and commercial acclaim as one of the U.S.S.R.’s most popular figures of stage and screen. Yankovsky was admired for his

  • Yanks (film by Schlesinger [1979])

    John Schlesinger: Films of the late 1960s and ’70s: Yanks (1979) was a melodramatic World War II romance set in England, with Richard Gere and Lisa Eichhorn as lovers, whereas Honky Tonk Freeway (1981) was a broad satire of American culture. Better received were a pair of made-for-television films that featured Bates: An Englishman…

  • Yankton (people)

    Yankton, a major division of the Sioux (q.v.), or Dakota, confederation of American

  • Yankton (South Dakota, United States)

    Yankton, city, seat (1862) of Yankton county, southeastern South Dakota, U.S. The city lies along the Missouri River near its confluence with the James River, on the Nebraska border, about 60 miles (100 km) southwest of Sioux Falls. Yankton is just east of Gavins Point Dam and Lewis and Clark Lake.

  • Yanluo Wang (Chinese mythology)

    Shiwang: …first judge was held by Yanluo Wang (a Chinese form of the Indian lord of death, Yama), but he was demoted to the fifth court because of his leniency. The second king has jurisdiction over the region that punishes dishonest go-betweens, fraudulent trustees, and ignorant doctors. The third king punishes…

  • Yannai (Jewish poet)

    piyyut: …poetry were Yose ben Yose, Yannai, and his pupil Eleazar Kalir, none of whose dates can be fixed with certainty.

  • Yanni (Greek-American musician and composer)

    Yanni, Greek-born American composer and keyboardist who was a leading figure in late 20th-century New Age music—a characteristically nonarousing genre of popular music, often entirely instrumental and used for relaxation or meditation. Yanni Chryssomallis was born into a middle-class family in

  • Yannina (Greece)

    Ioánnina, city and dímos (municipality), periféreia (region) of Epirus (Modern Greek: ípeiros), northwestern Greece. It is located on a plateau on the western side of Lake Ioánnina (ancient Pambotis), facing the gray limestone mass of Mount Mitsikéli. Ioánnina was first mentioned in ecclesiastical

  • Yanoam? (people)

    Yanomami, South American Indians, speakers of a Xirianá language, who live in the remote forest of the Orinoco River basin in southern Venezuela and the northernmost reaches of the Amazon River basin in northern Brazil. In the early 21st century the Yanomami probably numbered about 32,000

  • Yanofsky, Charles (American geneticist)

    Charles Yanofsky, American geneticist who demonstrated the colinearity of gene and protein structures. Yanofsky was educated at the City College of New York and at Yale University (Ph.D., 1951), where he studied chemistry and microbiology. While at Yale he showed that a suppressor mutation (change

  • Yanofsky, Daniel Abraham (Canadian chess player)

    Daniel Abraham Yanofsky, (“Abe”), Polish-born Canadian chess master (born March 25, 1926, Brody, Pol.—died March 5, 2000, Winnipeg, Man.), was Canada’s first chess grandmaster and an eight-time national champion. He was a chess prodigy who, by the age of 12, was champion of Manitoba. In 1939, as C

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