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  • Yucca (plant, genus Yucca)

    Yucca, (genus Yucca), genus of about 40 species of succulent plants in the agave subfamily of the asparagus family (Asparagaceae), native to southern North America. Most species of yucca are stemless, with a rosette of stiff sword-shaped leaves at the base and clusters of waxy white flowers. The

  • Yucca aloifolia (plant)

    yucca: Spanish bayonet (Y. aloifolia), Spanish dagger (Y. gloriosa), and Adam’s needle (Y. filamentosa) are commonly cultivated as ornamentals for their unusual appearance and attractive flower clusters.

  • Yucca brevifolia (plant)

    Agavoideae: of the genus Yucca, including Joshua trees (Y. brevifolia) and Spanish daggers (Y. gloriosa), are popular as ornamentals for their woody stems and spiny leaves. Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) is cultivated for its fragrant volatile oil and has spikes of white flowers.

  • Yucca filamentosa (plant)

    yucca: gloriosa), and Adam’s needle (Y. filamentosa) are commonly cultivated as ornamentals for their unusual appearance and attractive flower clusters.

  • Yucca gloriosa (plant)

    Agavoideae: brevifolia) and Spanish daggers (Y. gloriosa), are popular as ornamentals for their woody stems and spiny leaves. Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) is cultivated for its fragrant volatile oil and has spikes of white flowers.

  • Yucca House National Monument (national monument, Colorado, United States)

    Yucca House National Monument, the ruins of prehistoric Native American pueblos, located 15 miles (24 km) south of the town of Cortez in the southwestern corner of Colorado, U.S., near Mesa Verde National Park. Occupying about 10 acres (4 hectares)—34 acres (14 hectares) including a privately owned

  • yucca moth (insect)

    Yucca moth, (genus Tegeticula), any of four species of insects of the Prodoxidae family of moths (order Lepidoptera). The adults are small, diurnal, and have tiny spines covering their wings. Each of the four species is adapted to a particular species of yucca. The moths emerge when the yucca

  • Yuch’?n-ni (archaeological site, Korea)

    pottery: Korea: Nevertheless, one such excavation at Yuch’?n-ni has disclosed shards of both the celadon glaze and of white porcelain from which it seems evident that white porcelain resembling both the Yingqing and Ding types was made (see above China: Song dynasty). The earliest vessels were probably fairly close copies of Chinese…

  • Yuchi (people)

    Native American dance: Northeast and Southeast Indians: The Creek, Yuchi, Seminole, and other tribes of the southeastern United States greatly emphasize the summer green corn harvest ceremony, or Busk. Before the removal of many of those tribes to reservations in Oklahoma, they acquired a few dances outside their own traditions. They carried the stomp…

  • Yuci (China)

    Jinzhong, city, central Shanxi sheng (province), northeast-central China. It is situated on the Xiao River, about 15 miles (25 km) south of Taiyuan, the provincial capital. Jinzhong was created in 1999 by amalgamating the city of Yuci and Jinzhong prefecture, with the former Yuci becoming a

  • Yudenich, Nikolay (Russian general)

    Nikolay Yudenich, commander of the White forces in the northwest during the Russian Civil War (1918–20). Having entered the Imperial Army in 1879, Yudenich graduated from the General Staff Academy in 1887, served on the General Staff from 1887 until 1902, and then became a regimental commander.

  • Yudenich, Nikolay Nikolayevich (Russian general)

    Nikolay Yudenich, commander of the White forces in the northwest during the Russian Civil War (1918–20). Having entered the Imperial Army in 1879, Yudenich graduated from the General Staff Academy in 1887, served on the General Staff from 1887 until 1902, and then became a regimental commander.

  • Yudhisthira (legendary Indian king)

    Kaithal: …to have been founded by Yudhisthira, a Pandava king in the ancient epic poem Mahabharata, and it was later a Muslim cultural centre. Of historical interest are the large bathing tank (reservoir) and tombs of several saints dating from the 13th century ce. An agricultural market centre, it was constituted…

  • Yudhoyono, Susilo Bambang (president of Indonesia)

    Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, Indonesian military officer, politician, and government official who was the first popularly elected president of Indonesia (2004–14). Yudhoyono was born into a well-to-do family of aristocratic background. Following in the footsteps of his father, a middle-ranking

  • Yudi (Chinese deity)

    Yudi, (Chinese: Jade Emperor) in Chinese religion, the most revered and popular of Chinese Daoist deities. In the official Daoist pantheon, he is an impassive sage-deity, but he is popularly viewed as a celestial sovereign who guides human affairs and rules an enormous heavenly bureaucracy

  • Yudi Shun (legendary emperor of China)

    Shun, in Chinese mythology, a legendary emperor (c. 23rd century bce) of the golden age of antiquity, singled out by Confucius as a model of integrity and resplendent virtue. His name is invariably associated with that of Yao, his legendary predecessor. Though Shun’s father repeatedly tried to

  • Yue (people)

    Yue, aboriginal people of South China who in the 5th–4th century bce formed a powerful kingdom in present-day Zhejiang and Fujian provinces. The name Vietnam means “south of the Yue,” and some Chinese scholars consider the Vietnamese to be descendants of the

  • Yue (ancient state, China)

    Fujian: History: …area was the kingdom of Yue, located south of Hangzhou Bay; it included what is now Fujian province. The lord of Yue was nominally a vassal of the Chinese king. The Yue and their culture are considered by some to have constituted one of the principal elements that merged to…

  • Yue Fei (Chinese general)

    Yue Fei, one of China’s greatest generals and national heroes. In 1126 North China was overrun by the nomadic Juchen (Jin), and the Song capital at Kaifeng was taken. The former emperor Huizong, who had abdicated in 1125, together with his son, the Qinzong emperor (reigned 1125/26–27), was carried

  • Yue languages

    Cantonese language, variety of Chinese spoken by more than 55 million people in Guangdong and southern Guangxi provinces of China, including the important cities of Canton, Hong Kong, and Macau. Throughout the world it is spoken by some 20 million more. In Vietnam alone, Cantonese (Yue) speakers

  • Yue ware (Chinese pottery)

    celadon: Yue ware, first made in the Han dynasty (206 bce–220 ce) in China, was the earliest celadon; the glaze used was olive or brownish green. Beginning in the late Han period, the kilns in Zhejiang, Guangdong, Jiangxi, and Fujian provinces became important celadon producers. The…

  • Yue yao (Chinese pottery)

    celadon: Yue ware, first made in the Han dynasty (206 bce–220 ce) in China, was the earliest celadon; the glaze used was olive or brownish green. Beginning in the late Han period, the kilns in Zhejiang, Guangdong, Jiangxi, and Fujian provinces became important celadon producers. The…

  • yuebai (pottery glaze)

    pottery: Underglaze blue and red: Clair de lune (yue bai, “moon white”), a cobalt glaze of the palest blue shade, was also used.

  • yuefu (Chinese poetic form)

    Yuefu, form of Chinese poetry derived from the folk-ballad tradition. The yuefu takes its name from the Yuefu (“Music Bureau”) created in 120 bc by Wudi of Han for the purpose of collecting songs and their musical scores for ceremonial occasions at court. The music for these songs was later lost,

  • Yuefu (ancient Chinese agency)

    Chinese literature: Poetry: …in 125 bce of the Yuefu, or Music Bureau, which had been established at least a century earlier to collect songs and their musical scores. Besides temple and court compositions of ceremonial verse, this office succeeded in preserving a number of songs sung or chanted by the ordinary people, including…

  • Yüeh (people)

    Yue, aboriginal people of South China who in the 5th–4th century bce formed a powerful kingdom in present-day Zhejiang and Fujian provinces. The name Vietnam means “south of the Yue,” and some Chinese scholars consider the Vietnamese to be descendants of the

  • Yüeh Fei (Chinese general)

    Yue Fei, one of China’s greatest generals and national heroes. In 1126 North China was overrun by the nomadic Juchen (Jin), and the Song capital at Kaifeng was taken. The former emperor Huizong, who had abdicated in 1125, together with his son, the Qinzong emperor (reigned 1125/26–27), was carried

  • Yüeh Fu (ancient Chinese agency)

    Chinese literature: Poetry: …in 125 bce of the Yuefu, or Music Bureau, which had been established at least a century earlier to collect songs and their musical scores. Besides temple and court compositions of ceremonial verse, this office succeeded in preserving a number of songs sung or chanted by the ordinary people, including…

  • Yüeh Ling (Chinese astronomical work)

    astronomical map: Lunar mansions: …23 are mentioned in the Yüeh Ling, which may go back to 850 bce. In India a complete list of nakshatra are found in the Atharvaveda, providing evidence that the system was organized before 800 bce. The system of lunar mansions, however, may have a common origin even earlier in…

  • Yüeh ware (Chinese pottery)

    celadon: Yue ware, first made in the Han dynasty (206 bce–220 ce) in China, was the earliest celadon; the glaze used was olive or brownish green. Beginning in the late Han period, the kilns in Zhejiang, Guangdong, Jiangxi, and Fujian provinces became important celadon producers. The…

  • yüeh-ch’in (musical instrument)

    Yueqin, Chinese lute, one of a family of flat, round-bodied lutes found in Central and East Asia. The yueqin, which evolved from the ruan, has a length of some 18 inches (about 45 cm), with a short neck and a round resonator that is some 12 inches (30 cm) in diameter. It has two pairs of silk

  • Yüeh-chih (ancient people)

    Yuezhi, ancient people who ruled in Bactria and India from about 128 bce to about 450 ce. The Yuezhi are first mentioned in Chinese sources at the beginning of the 2nd century bce as nomads living in the western part of Gansu province, northwestern China. When Lao Shang (reigned c. 174–161 bce),

  • yüeh-fu (Chinese poetic form)

    Yuefu, form of Chinese poetry derived from the folk-ballad tradition. The yuefu takes its name from the Yuefu (“Music Bureau”) created in 120 bc by Wudi of Han for the purpose of collecting songs and their musical scores for ceremonial occasions at court. The music for these songs was later lost,

  • Yüeh-yang (China)

    Yueyang, city, northern Hunan sheng (province), southeast-central China. It is situated on the east bank of the outlet from the Dongting Lake into the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), some 5 miles (8 km) from the outlet’s confluence with the Yangtze. Its port on the Yangtze is known as Chenglingji. The

  • Yüeh-yü

    Cantonese language, variety of Chinese spoken by more than 55 million people in Guangdong and southern Guangxi provinces of China, including the important cities of Canton, Hong Kong, and Macau. Throughout the world it is spoken by some 20 million more. In Vietnam alone, Cantonese (Yue) speakers

  • Yueji (Chinese literature)

    Chinese music: Aesthetic principles and extramusical associations: …theory in the “Yueji” (“Annotations on Music”) section of the Liji with such comments as:

  • Yuen Ren Chao (Chinese linguist)

    Chinese languages: The 20th century: …scholar Lin Yutang, the linguist Zhao Yuanren, and others, was adopted. This attempt also was halted by war and revolution. A rival Communist effort known as Latinxua, or Latinization of 1930, fared no better. An attempt to simplify the language by reducing the number of characters to about 1,000 failed…

  • yueqin (musical instrument)

    Yueqin, Chinese lute, one of a family of flat, round-bodied lutes found in Central and East Asia. The yueqin, which evolved from the ruan, has a length of some 18 inches (about 45 cm), with a short neck and a round resonator that is some 12 inches (30 cm) in diameter. It has two pairs of silk

  • yueshan (musical instrument)

    qin: …called the “great mountain” (yueshan), the low bridge at the narrow end is called the “dragon’s gums” (longyin), and the two pegs for fastening the strings are called the “goose feet” (yanzhu). Each qin is given a unique name, which is engraved on the back side of the instrument,…

  • Yuexiu (district, Guangzhou, China)

    Guangzhou: Old City districts: Yuexiu district is the commercial and financial centre of Guangzhou, as well as the site of provincial and municipal government offices. Included within it are the city’s major hotels, department stores, and cinemas; traditional Chinese buildings are rarely found in this district, except in the…

  • Yuexiu Park (park, Guangzhou, China)

    Guangzhou: Old City districts: Yuexiu Park, in the northern part of the district, is one of the city’s largest green spaces. Within the park are artificial lakes, a five-story red pagoda (built in 1380) that now houses the Guangzhou Municipal Museum, a flower exhibition hall, and sports and recreational…

  • Yueyang (China)

    Yueyang, city, northern Hunan sheng (province), southeast-central China. It is situated on the east bank of the outlet from the Dongting Lake into the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), some 5 miles (8 km) from the outlet’s confluence with the Yangtze. Its port on the Yangtze is known as Chenglingji. The

  • Yueyu

    Cantonese language, variety of Chinese spoken by more than 55 million people in Guangdong and southern Guangxi provinces of China, including the important cities of Canton, Hong Kong, and Macau. Throughout the world it is spoken by some 20 million more. In Vietnam alone, Cantonese (Yue) speakers

  • Yuezhi (ancient people)

    Yuezhi, ancient people who ruled in Bactria and India from about 128 bce to about 450 ce. The Yuezhi are first mentioned in Chinese sources at the beginning of the 2nd century bce as nomads living in the western part of Gansu province, northwestern China. When Lao Shang (reigned c. 174–161 bce),

  • Yuezhiuezhi (ancient people)

    Yuezhi, ancient people who ruled in Bactria and India from about 128 bce to about 450 ce. The Yuezhi are first mentioned in Chinese sources at the beginning of the 2nd century bce as nomads living in the western part of Gansu province, northwestern China. When Lao Shang (reigned c. 174–161 bce),

  • Yuezhou (China)

    Chinese pottery: The Han dynasty (206 bce–220 ce): …first made at Yuezhou (present Yuyao), Zhejiang province, during the Han dynasty, although all surviving specimens are later, most belonging to the Six Dynasties (220–589 ce). They have a stoneware body and an olive or brownish green glaze and belong to the family of celadons, a term that looms large…

  • Yuezhou (China)

    Yueyang, city, northern Hunan sheng (province), southeast-central China. It is situated on the east bank of the outlet from the Dongting Lake into the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), some 5 miles (8 km) from the outlet’s confluence with the Yangtze. Its port on the Yangtze is known as Chenglingji. The

  • Yug (language)

    Ket language: …a moribund close relative called Yug [Yugh], or Sym, is sometimes considered a dialect of Ket.)

  • Yug language

    Paleo-Siberian languages: Yeniseian, Luorawetlan, and Nivkh: …by about 500 persons, and Yug, with no more than 5 speakers. Kott (Kot; also called Assan or Asan), Arin, and Pumpokol, now extinct members of this group, were spoken chiefly to the south of the present-day locus of Ket and Yug.

  • yuga (Hinduism)

    Yuga, in Hindu cosmology, an age of humankind. Each yuga is progressively shorter than the preceding one, corresponding to a decline in the moral and physical state of humanity. Four such yugas (called Krita, Treta, Dvapara, and Kali, after the throws of an Indian game of dice) make up the mahayuga

  • yugei (Japanese society)

    Japan: The Yamato polity: …the court, such as the yugei, the quiver bearers, who were attached to the ōtomo clan, a major military support group for the Yamato ruling house.

  • Yugen (American poetry magazine)

    Amiri Baraka: …founded (1958) the poetry magazine Yugen, which published the work of Beat writers such as Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac; he edited the publication with his wife, Hettie Cohen. He began writing under the name LeRoi Jones in the late 1950s and produced his first major collection of poetry, Preface…

  • yūgen (Japanese art)

    Zeami: …or the representational aspect, and yūgen, the symbolic aspect and spiritual core of the Noh, which took precedence and which became the touchstone of excellence in the Noh. Zeami wrote, “The essence of yūgen is true beauty and gentleness,” but not mere outward beauty: it had to suggest behind the…

  • Yugh (language)

    Ket language: …a moribund close relative called Yug [Yugh], or Sym, is sometimes considered a dialect of Ket.)

  • Yugntruf (American journal)

    Yiddish literature: The 21st century: …in the New York journal Yugntruf were Hershl Glasser, Shmoyl Nydorf, Avrom Rosenblatt, Gitl Schaechter, Yermiahu Aaron Taub, and Sheva Zucker. Since the 1970s, this journal had sponsored a shraybkrayz (Yiddish writers’ circle). Yiddish culture clubs around the United States supported the publication of books by poets such as Sarah…

  • yugo (yoke)

    Native American art: Mexico and Middle America: …protective device—worn together with the yugo, or yoke, and the hacha, or axe—used in tlachtli, the ceremonial ball game. Tlachtli was not unlike modern football (soccer); the object was to propel a gutta-percha ball through the air without touching it with the hands; if it went through a small hole…

  • Yugoslav Air Transport (airline, Serbia)

    Serbia: Transportation: Yugoslav Air Transport, the country’s principal airline, maintained links with the rest of Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, North America, and Australia.

  • Yugoslav Army of the Fatherland (Serbian military organization)

    Chetnik, member of a Serbian nationalist guerrilla force that formed during World War II to resist the Axis invaders and Croatian collaborators but that primarily fought a civil war against the Yugoslav communist guerrillas, the Partisans. After the surrender of the Yugoslav royal army in April

  • Yugoslav Committee (Yugoslavian history)

    Serbia: The Corfu Declaration: …had set up a “Yugoslav Committee.” Aided by sympathetic British intellectuals, the committee had worked to improve the position of South Slavs within the Monarchy in any postwar settlement. One of the most important achievements of the committee was its discovery of the Treaty of London—a secret document drawn…

  • Yugoslav People’s Army (Yugoslavian armed force)

    Bosnia and Herzegovina: Security: The Yugoslav People’s Army was designed to repel invasion, and, as part of its strategy, it used the geographically central republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina as a storehouse for armaments and as the site of most military production. Bosnian Serb forces, aided by the Yugoslav People’s…

  • Yugoslav region

    Serbia, country in the west-central Balkans. For most of the 20th century, it was a part of Yugoslavia. The capital of Serbia is Belgrade (Beograd), a cosmopolitan city at the confluence of the Danube and Sava rivers; Stari Grad, Belgrade’s old town, is dominated by an ancient fortress called the

  • Yugoslav region

    North Macedonia, country of the south-central Balkans. It is bordered to the north by Kosovo and Serbia, to the east by Bulgaria, to the south by Greece, and to the west by Albania. The capital is Skopje. The Republic of North Macedonia is located in the northern part of the area traditionally

  • Yugoslav region (former federated nation [1929–2003])

    Yugoslavia, former federated country that was situated in the west-central part of the Balkan Peninsula. This article briefly examines the history of Yugoslavia from 1929 until 2003, when it became the federated union of Serbia and Montenegro (which further separated into its component parts in

  • Yugoslav region

    Croatia, country located in the northwestern part of the Balkan Peninsula. It is a small yet highly geographically diverse crescent-shaped country. Its capital is Zagreb, located in the north. The present-day republic is composed of the historically Croatian regions of Croatia-Slavonia (located in

  • Yugoslav region

    Slovenia, country in central Europe that was part of Yugoslavia for most of the 20th century. Slovenia is a small but topographically diverse country made up of portions of four major European geographic landscapes—the European Alps, the karstic Dinaric Alps, the Pannonian and Danubian lowlands and

  • Yugoslav region

    Bosnia and Herzegovina, country situated in the western Balkan Peninsula of Europe. The larger region of Bosnia occupies the northern and central parts of the country, and Herzegovina occupies the south and southwest. These historical regions do not correspond with the two autonomous political

  • Yugoslavia (historical nation, Europe [1929–1992])

    Kosovo: Kosovo in Yugoslavia: Serbia, which had won independence from the Ottoman Empire early in the 19th century, regained control of Kosovo in 1912, following the First Balkan War, but lost it again in 1915, during World War I. An occupation divided between Austria-Hungary and

  • Yugoslavia (former federated nation [1929–2003])

    Yugoslavia, former federated country that was situated in the west-central part of the Balkan Peninsula. This article briefly examines the history of Yugoslavia from 1929 until 2003, when it became the federated union of Serbia and Montenegro (which further separated into its component parts in

  • Yugoslavia (former federated nation [1929–2003])

    Yugoslavia, former federated country that was situated in the west-central part of the Balkan Peninsula. This article briefly examines the history of Yugoslavia from 1929 until 2003, when it became the federated union of Serbia and Montenegro (which further separated into its component parts in

  • Yugoslavia, flag of

    horizontally striped blue-white-red national flag. Its width-to-length ratio is 1 to 2.In 1699 Tsar Peter I (the Great) of Russia selected a new flag for his country as part of his modernization campaign. Consisting of equal horizontal stripes of white, blue, and red, it was adapted from the

  • Yugoslavia, Kingdom of (former federated nation [1929–2003])

    Yugoslavia, former federated country that was situated in the west-central part of the Balkan Peninsula. This article briefly examines the history of Yugoslavia from 1929 until 2003, when it became the federated union of Serbia and Montenegro (which further separated into its component parts in

  • Yugoslavia, Socialist Federal Republic of (former federated nation [1929–2003])

    Yugoslavia, former federated country that was situated in the west-central part of the Balkan Peninsula. This article briefly examines the history of Yugoslavia from 1929 until 2003, when it became the federated union of Serbia and Montenegro (which further separated into its component parts in

  • Yugoslavism (Croatian history)

    Croatia: Croatian national revival: …the 1860s under the name Yugoslavism. The Yugoslavists, under the patronage of Bishop Josip Juraj ?trossmajer (Joseph George Strossmayer), advocated South Slav unity within a federated Habsburg state as the basis for an independent Balkan state. Croatian separatism and South Slav cooperation (Yugoslavism) thus became the two alternatives that would…

  • Yugyo Temple (temple, Fujisawa, Japan)

    Fujisawa: …is the site of the Shojoko Temple (Yugyo Temple; 1325), the main temple of the Ji (“Times”) sect of Pure Land Buddhism. Pop. (2010) 409,657; (2015) 423,894.

  • Yuhai (Chinese encyclopaedia)

    encyclopaedia: China: …of all Chinese encyclopaedias, the Yuhai (“Sea of Jade”), was compiled about 1267 by the renowned Song scholar Wang Yinglin (1223–92) and was reprinted in 240 volumes in 1738.

  • yuhangyuan

    Astronaut, designation, derived from the Greek words for “star” and “sailor,” commonly applied to an individual who has flown in outer space. More specifically, “astronaut” refers to those from the United States, Canada, Europe, and Japan who travel into space. Those Soviet and later Russian

  • Yuhanna, Mikhail (Iraqi public official)

    Tariq Aziz, Iraqi public official who served as foreign minister (1983–91) and deputy prime minister (1979–2003) in the Ba?thist government of Saddam Hussein. Tariq Aziz was born Mikhail Yuhanna to a Chaldean Catholic family in northern Iraq. He studied English at Baghdad University and worked as a

  • Yuhua tai (park area, Nanking, China)

    Nanjing: City layout: To the south is Yuhuatai (“Terrace of the Rain of Flowers”) district, noted for its five-colour pebbles and a communist martyrs’ memorial. To the northwest is Pukou, long a river port on the northern bank of the Yangtze and now also a rapidly developing industrial centre. Some other scenic…

  • Yuhuang (Chinese deity)

    Yudi, (Chinese: Jade Emperor) in Chinese religion, the most revered and popular of Chinese Daoist deities. In the official Daoist pantheon, he is an impassive sage-deity, but he is popularly viewed as a celestial sovereign who guides human affairs and rules an enormous heavenly bureaucracy

  • Yuhuang Shangdi (Chinese deity)

    Yudi, (Chinese: Jade Emperor) in Chinese religion, the most revered and popular of Chinese Daoist deities. In the official Daoist pantheon, he is an impassive sage-deity, but he is popularly viewed as a celestial sovereign who guides human affairs and rules an enormous heavenly bureaucracy

  • Yui Shōsetsu (Japanese rebel)

    Yui Shōsetsu, Japanese rebel whose attempted coup d’état against the Tokugawa shogunate led to increased efforts by the government to redirect the military ethos of the samurai (warrior) class toward administrative matters. A famous military teacher in the Japanese capital of Edo (now Tokyo), Yui

  • Yui-itsu Shintō (Japanese religious school)

    Yoshida Shintō, school of Shintō that upheld Shintō as a basic faith while teaching its unity with Buddhism and Confucianism. Yoshida Shintō took its name from its founder, Yoshida Kanetomo (1435–1511), who systematized teaching that had been transmitted by generations of the Yoshida family.

  • Yuima Koji (Indian sage)

    Bunsei: …of the semilegendary Indian sage Vimalakīrti, who is called Yuima Koji by the Japanese (1457; in the Yamato Bunkakan in Nara); and a boldly executed ink drawing of the legendary three monks from a Buddhist tale, “The Laughers of Tiger Valley.” From the late 17th century until the second half…

  • yujo kabuki (Japanese arts)

    Okuni: The popularity of onna (“women’s”) Kabuki remained high until women’s participation was officially banned in 1629 by the shogun (military ruler) Tokugawa Iemitsu, who thought that the sensuality of the dances had a deleterious effect on public morality. Not only were the dances considered suggestive, but the dancers…

  • Yuk language

    Yupik language, the western division of the Eskimo languages, spoken in southwestern Alaska and in

  • Yukaghir (people)

    Yukaghir, remnant of an ancient human population of the tundra and taiga zones of Arctic Siberia east of the Lena River in Russia, an area with one of the most severe climates in the inhabited world. Brought close to extinction by privation, encroachment, and diseases introduced by other groups,

  • Yukaghir and the Yukaghirized Tungus, The (work by Jochelson)

    Vladimir Ilich Jochelson: He wrote The Yukaghir and the Yukaghirized Tungus (1926) and Peoples of Asiatic Russia (1928).

  • Yukaghir language

    Yukaghir language, language spoken by not more than a few hundred persons in the Kolyma River region of Sakha (Yakutiya) republic of Russia. Yukaghir was traditionally grouped in the catchall category of Paleo-Siberian languages with a number of languages that are not genetically related or

  • Yukagir (people)

    Yukaghir, remnant of an ancient human population of the tundra and taiga zones of Arctic Siberia east of the Lena River in Russia, an area with one of the most severe climates in the inhabited world. Brought close to extinction by privation, encroachment, and diseases introduced by other groups,

  • Yukagir language

    Yukaghir language, language spoken by not more than a few hundred persons in the Kolyma River region of Sakha (Yakutiya) republic of Russia. Yukaghir was traditionally grouped in the catchall category of Paleo-Siberian languages with a number of languages that are not genetically related or

  • yukata (clothing)

    Yukata, comfortable cotton kimono decorated with stencil-dyed patterns usually in shades of indigo, worn by Japanese men and women. The yukata was originally designed as a nightgown and for wear in the home after a bath. It has become accepted practice to wear a yukata on the street on warm summer

  • Yukawa Hideki (Japanese physicist)

    Yukawa Hideki , Japanese physicist and recipient of the 1949 Nobel Prize for Physics for research on the theory of elementary particles. Yukawa graduated from Kyōto Imperial University (now Kyōto University) in 1929 and became a lecturer there; in 1933 he moved to ōsaka Imperial University (now

  • Yukawa meson (physics)

    subatomic particle: The nuclear binding force: …bold step: he invented a new particle as the carrier of the nuclear binding force.

  • Yuki (people)

    Yuki: …four Yuki groups were the Yuki-proper, who lived along the upper reaches of the Eel River and its tributaries; the Huchnom of Redwood Valley to the west; the Coast Yuki, who were distributed farther westward along the redwood coast; and the Wappo, who occupied an enclave among the Pomo, some…

  • Yuki (family of peoples)

    Yuki, four groups of North American Indians who lived in the Coast Ranges and along the coast of what is now northwestern California, U.S. They spoke distinctive languages that are unaffiliated with any other known language. The four Yuki groups were the Yuki-proper, who lived along the upper

  • Yukiguni (novel by Kawabata)

    Snow Country, short novel by Kawabata Yasunari, published in Japanese in 1948 as Yukiguni. The work was begun in 1935 and completed in 1937, with a final version completed in 1947. It deals with psychological, social, and erotic interaction between an aesthete and a beautiful geisha and is set

  • Yukoku (work by Mishima)

    Mishima Yukio: The short story “Yukoku” (“Patriotism”) from the collection Death in Midsummer, and Other Stories (1966) revealed Mishima’s own political views and proved prophetic of his own end. The story describes, with obvious admiration, a young army officer who commits seppuku, or ritual disembowelment, to demonstrate his loyalty to the…

  • Yukon (territory, Canada)

    Yukon, territory of northwestern Canada, an area of rugged mountains and high plateaus. It is bounded by the Northwest Territories to the east, by British Columbia to the south, and by the U.S. state of Alaska to the west, and it extends northward above the Arctic Circle to the Beaufort Sea. The

  • Yukon College (college, Yukon, Canada)

    Yukon: Health, welfare, and education: …a territorial school system, and Yukon College, with its main campus at Whitehorse and a network of community branches, provides two years of university-level courses and a number of vocational and adult education programs.

  • Yukon Quest (dogsled race)

    Lance Mackey: …also began contending in the Yukon Quest, a 1,000-mile (1,609-km) dogsled race from Fairbanks, Alaska, to Whitehorse, Yukon, Can. He placed first every year from 2005, when he was a race rookie, to 2008, making him the first four-time winner of the event. Going into the 2007 Iditarod, Mackey had…

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