You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • yellow water lily (plant)

    water lily: …Northern Hemisphere, includes the common yellow water lily, cow lily, or spatterdock (Nuphar advena) of eastern North America. The yellow water lily has submerged leaves that are thin and translucent and leathery floating leaves.

  • yellow weasel (mammal)

    Kolinsky, any of several species of Asian weasels. See

  • yellow whitlow grass (plant)

    whitlow grass: Yellow whitlow grass (D. aizoides) is a similar European species but bears yellow flowers. Twisted, or hoary, whitlow grass (D. incana) and the smaller D. norvegica have leaves on the stems and white flowers with notched petals.

  • Yellow Woman and a Beauty of the Spirit (work by Silko)

    Leslie Marmon Silko: Yellow Woman and a Beauty of the Spirit (1996) is a collection of essays on contemporary Native American life. In 1999 Silko released Gardens in the Dunes, a novel about a Native American girl who, having been captured by soldiers and separated from her family…

  • yellow wood sorrel (plant)

    Oxalis: …America, among which are the yellow wood sorrel (O. stricta), of the eastern United States and Canada, with yellow flowers; the violet wood sorrel (O. violacea), of the eastern United States, with rose-purple flowers; the redwood wood sorrel (O. oregana), of the coast redwood belt from California to Oregon, with…

  • yellow-backed duiker (antelope)

    duiker: …pounds), to that of the yellow-backed duiker (C. silvicultor), up to 87 cm (34 inches) high at the shoulder and weighing 80 kg (180 pounds). It appears that the structure of the forest undergrowth selects for shoulder heights that enable duikers and other forest ungulates to move through or beneath…

  • yellow-bellied sapsucker (bird)

    sapsucker: The yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius), about 20 cm (8 inches) long, breeds in northern regions (south in mountains) and migrates as far as the West Indies and Central America; red-breasted and red-naped races occur west of the Rocky Mountains. Both sexes of varius have bold head-markings.…

  • yellow-bellied sea snake (reptile)

    reptile: Distribution and ecology: The yellow-bellied sea snake (Pelamis platurus) spends all its life in marine environments. It feeds and gives birth far from any coastline and is helpless if washed ashore, whereas other sea snakes live in coastal waters of estuaries and coral reefs. The sea turtles are also predominately…

  • yellow-billed cuckoo (bird)

    cuckoo: …yellow-billed and black-billed cuckoos (Coccyzus americanus and C. erythropthalmus) and the mangrove cuckoo (C. minor), which is restricted in the United States to coastal southern Florida (also found in the West Indies and Mexico to northern South America); they are represented in Central and South America by about 12…

  • yellow-billed loon (bird)

    loon: …across Eurasia is the similar white- (or yellow-) billed diver (G. adamsii).

  • yellow-billed oxpecker (bird)

    oxpecker: Both species—the yellow-billed (B. africanus) and the red-billed (B. erythrorhynchus)—are brown birds 20 cm (8 inches) long, with wide bills, stiff tails, and sharp claws. They cling to cattle and big-game animals to remove ticks, flies, and maggots from their hides; when alarmed, the birds hiss, alerting…

  • yellow-billed spoonbill (bird)

    spoonbill: regia), and the yellow-billed, or yellow-legged, spoonbill (P. flavipes).

  • yellow-billed stork (bird)

    stork: The African wood stork (Ibis ibis), or yellow-billed stork, is about 100 cm (3 feet) tall, with a yellowish bill and red facial skin.

  • yellow-breasted bunting (bird)

    bunting: They include the colourful yellow-breasted bunting (Emberiza aureola), widespread across Siberia and northeastern Europe, and the reed bunting (E. schoeniclus), a chunky bird common to marshes across Europe and Asia.

  • yellow-breasted chat (bird)

    chat: The yellow-breasted chat (Icteria virens) of North America is, at 19 cm (7.5 inches), the largest member of the wood-warbler family Parulidae—if in fact it belongs there. Greenish-gray above and bright yellow below, with white “spectacles” (sexes alike), it skulks in thickets but may perch in…

  • yellow-breasted macaw (bird)

    macaw: One species, the blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna), has been recorded eating at least 20 species of plants, including many toxic to humans. In Manú National Park in Peru, the members of five macaw species converge by the hundreds at mineral-rich riverbanks to eat the clay there, which may…

  • yellow-crowned night heron (bird)

    heron: …and the Philippines; and the yellow-crowned night heron (Nyctanassa violacea) from the eastern and central United States to southern Brazil. Another night heron is the boat-billed heron, or boatbill (Cochlearius cochlearius), of Central and South America, placed by some authorities in its own family (Cochleariidae).

  • yellow-crowned parrot (bird)

    parrot: The yellow-crowned parrot (A. ochrocephala) of Mexico, Central America, and from Ecuador to Brazil has some yellow on the head and neck, a red wing patch, and a yellow tail tip.

  • yellow-dog contract (labour)

    Yellow-dog contract, agreement between an employer and an employee in which the employee agrees, as a condition of employment, not to join a union during the course of his or her employment. Such contracts, used most widely in the United States in the 1920s, enabled employers to take legal action

  • yellow-eared bat

    leaf-nosed bat: …some species, such as the tent-making bat (Uroderma bilobatum), have striped faces. American leaf-nosed bats are 4–13.5 cm (1.6–5.3 inches) without the tail, which may be absent or up to 5.5 cm (2.2 inches) long. The largest member of the family is the spectral bat (Vampyrum spectrum), sometimes called a…

  • yellow-eyed penguin (bird)

    Yellow-eyed penguin, (Megadyptes antipodes), the only species of penguin (order Sphenisciformes) belonging to the genus Megadyptes and the only one characterized by pale yellow eyes, yellow eyebands, and yellow feathers that cover the upper part of the head. The geographic range of the species is

  • yellow-flowered gourd (plant)

    Yellow-flowered gourd, (subspecies Cucurbita pepo ovifera), annual trailing vine of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), grown for its attractive hard-shelled fruits. The yellow-flowered gourd is native to northern Mexico and eastern North America and has long been cultivated. Some varieties produce

  • yellow-fronted tinkerbird (bird)

    tinkerbird: …the best known is the yellow-fronted tinkerbird (P. chrysoconus) of east-central Africa. It is glossy black above, with yellow rump and forehead, white eye stripes, and black moustache mark; the breast is pale gray, the belly greenish yellow.

  • yellow-glazed ware (pottery)

    pottery: The United States: …made there were Rockingham and yellow-glazed ware. In the decade following the American Civil War, William Bloor, Isaac W. Knowles, and others introduced the production of whiteware. By the last decade of the 19th century, production had grown until it was the largest pottery-producing area in the world.

  • yellow-green algae (protist)

    Yellow-green algae, (class Xanthophyceae), class of approximately 600 species of algae in the division Chromophyta, most of which inhabit fresh water. Yellow-green algae vary in form and size from single-celled organisms to small filamentous forms or simple colonies. They were once classified with

  • yellow-legged spoonbill (bird)

    spoonbill: regia), and the yellow-billed, or yellow-legged, spoonbill (P. flavipes).

  • yellow-legged tinamou (bird)

    tinamou: General features: …several species, such as the yellow-legged tinamou (Crypturellus noctivagus zabele).

  • yellow-lipped sea krait (sea snake)

    sea snake: The yellow-lipped sea krait (L. colubrina) is a common species that possesses this pattern and has a yellow snout. Sea kraits are nocturnal, feeding primarily on eels at depths of less than 15 metres (49 feet). They go ashore to lay their eggs, climbing up into…

  • yellow-ridged toucan (bird)

    toucan: …the fiery-billed aracari, and the yellow-ridged toucan, describe their beaks, which are often brightly coloured in pastel shades of green, red, white, and yellow. This coloration is probably used by the birds for species recognition, as many toucans have similar body patterns and coloration—mainly black with a bold breast colour.…

  • yellow-rumped kinglet (bird)

    kinglet: …eyeline, and the flamecrest, or yellow-rumped kinglet (R. goodfellowi), of Taiwan is sometimes considered a subspecies of the firecrest. In the ruby-crowned kinglet (R. calendula) of North America, the crown mark is a mere tick of red, appearing on the male only and usually concealed.

  • yellow-rumped warbler (bird)

    wood warbler: …white, and yellow of the myrtle warbler (D. coronata). A common but less-striking species is the blackpoll warbler (D. striata). Some authors merge Dendroica in Vermivora, a less-colourful genus of 11 species, most of them well known in the United States.

  • yellow-shafted flicker (bird)

    flicker: …and varied head markings—include the yellow-shafted flicker (C. auratus) of eastern North America, which has more than 100 local names. This golden-winged form, which measures about 33 cm (13 inches) in length, is replaced in the West (to Alaska) by the red-shafted flicker (C. cafer), considered by many authorities to…

  • yellow-tailed woolly monkey (primate)

    woolly monkey: The yellow-tailed, or Hendee’s, woolly monkey (Oreonax flavicauda) is very different from Lagothrix and is not closely related, hence its classification as a separate genus. This species has silky mahogany-coloured fur, a whitish nose, and a yellow stripe on the underside of the tail. It is…

  • yellow-throated marten (mammal)

    marten: The yellow-throated marten (M. flavigula), of the subgenus Charronia, is also called honey dog for its fondness for sweet food. It is found in southern Asia. Its head-and-body length is 56–61 cm (22–24 inches), and its tail is 38–43 cm (15–17 inches) long. It has a…

  • yellow-tufted woodpecker (bird)

    piciform: Reproduction: …11 different adults of the yellow-tufted woodpecker (M. cruentatus) were observed feeding young in three different nests in eastern Peru. Some of the adults fed young in two and even in all three nests. Andean flickers nest in loose colonies in banks and may be seen in groups of 10…

  • yellow-wattled lapwing (bird)

    lapwing: … (sometimes Lobivanellus) indicus, and the yellow-wattled lapwing (V. malabaricus), of southern Asia, have wattles on the face. Others are the gray-headed lapwing (Microsarcops cinereus), of eastern Asia, and the long-toed lapwing (Hemiparra crassirostris), of Africa.

  • yellow-winged bat (mammal)

    bat: Activity patterns: …flying fox (Pteropus samoensis), the yellow-winged bat (Lavia frons), and the greater sac-winged bat Saccopteryx bilineata, may forage actively during the day, but little is yet known of their special adaptations.

  • yellow-wort (plant)

    Gentianaceae: Major genera and species: …that close in the afternoon; yellow-wort (Blackstonia) has bright yellow flowers and broad leaves. Both genera contain species used in herbal remedies and in the making of dyes.

  • yellowberry (plant)

    Cloudberry, (Rubus chamaemorus), creeping herbaceous plant in the rose family (Rosaceae), native to the Arctic and subarctic regions of the north temperate zone, and its edible raspberry-like fruit. Eskimos and Sami collect the sweet juicy fruits in autumn to freeze for winter food. In markets of

  • yellowcress (plant)

    Yellow cress, (genus Rorippa), genus of some 85 species of plants in the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Most members of the genus are found in the Northern Hemisphere, especially in marshes and other moist habitats, and bear small four-petaled yellow or white flowers. Rorippa includes several

  • yellowfin sole (fish)

    dab: …and a yellow tail; the yellowfin sole, or Alaska dab (L. aspera), a brownish northern Pacific flatfish; and the longhead dab (L. proboscidea), a light-spotted, brownish northern Pacific fish with yellow on the edges of its body.

  • yellowfin tuna (fish)

    tuna: …stripe on each side; the yellowfin, with yellow fins and a golden stripe on each side; and the bigeye, a robust fish with relatively large eyes.

  • yellowhammer (bird)

    Yellowhammer, (Emberiza citrinella), Eurasian bird belonging to the family Emberizidae (order Passeriformes). The name is derived from the German Ammer, “bunting.” It is a 16-centimetre- (6-inch-) long streaked brown bird with yellow-tinged head and breast. Its rapid song is heard in fields from B

  • Yellowhammer State (state, United States)

    Alabama, constituent state of the United States of America, admitted to the union in 1819 as the 22nd state. Alabama forms a roughly rectangular shape on the map, elongated in a north-south direction. It is bordered by Tennessee to the north, Georgia to the east, and Mississippi to the west. The

  • Yellowhead Pass (pass, Alberta-British Columbia, Canada)

    Yellowhead Pass, route through the Rocky Mountains, at the Alberta–British Columbia border, Canada, just west of Jasper and leading from Jasper National Park into Mount Robson Provincial Park. It lies at 3,711 feet (1,131 m) above sea level. The pass was noted by Sandford Fleming in his railway

  • yellowheart (plant)

    prickly ash: West Indian satinwood, or yellowheart (Z. flavum), produces shiny golden brown timber for cabinetwork. Some species are cultivated as bonsai.

  • yellowjacket (insect)

    Yellow jacket, any of 35–40 species (genus Dolichovespula or Vespula) of social wasps, principally of the Northern Hemisphere. Despite the common name yellow jacket—which is used in reference to the typical coloration of the abdomen, with yellow and black markings—some species are white and black,

  • Yellowjacket (fictional character)

    Ant-Man and the Wasp: Ant-Man debuted in Tales to Astonish no. 27 (January 1962), and the Wasp first appeared in Tales to Astonish no. 44 (June 1963).

  • Yellowknife (people)

    Yellowknife, a small Athabaskan-speaking North American Indian tribe who traditionally lived northeast of the Great Bear and Great Slave lakes in what is now the Northwest Territories, Can. The name Yellowknife derives from the group’s use of yellow copper in making knives and other tools. In

  • Yellowknife (Northwest Territories, Canada)

    Yellowknife, city and capital (since 1967) of Northwest Territories, northwestern Canada. It lies on the north shore of Great Slave Lake, 5 miles (8 km) south of the mouth of the Yellowknife River. It was founded in 1935, one year after gold was discovered in the area, and derived its name from the

  • Yellowknife Group (geological feature, Canada)

    Precambrian: Age and occurrence of greenstone-granite belts: Yellowknife belts in the Slave province of Canada; the Abitibi, Wawa, Wabigoon, and Quetico belts of the Superior province of Canada; the Dharwar belts in India; and the Warrawoona and Yilgarn belts in Australia.

  • yellowlegs (bird)

    Yellowlegs, (genus Tringa), either of two species of American shorebirds with trim, gray-brown and white streaked bodies, long bills, and long, bright yellow legs. They belong to the genus Tringa of the family Scolopacidae; this family also includes the curlews, turnstones, sandpipers, and snipes.

  • Yellowman (Jamaican musician)

    dancehall music: The rise of deejay Yellowman in the early 1980s marked the transition from mainstream reggae to dancehall music that took place in Jamaican nightclubs. In addition to the explicitly political lyrics of songs of the early 1980s such as “Operation Eradication” and “Soldier Take Over,” Yellowman incorporated into his…

  • Yellowplush Correspondence, The (work by Thackeray)

    William Makepeace Thackeray: Early writings: These include The Yellowplush Correspondence, the memoirs and diary of a young cockney footman written in his own vocabulary and style; Major Gahagan (1838–39), a fantasy of soldiering in India; Catherine (1839–40), a burlesque of the popular “Newgate novels” of romanticized crime and low life, and itself…

  • yellows (plant disease)

    Fusarium wilt, widespread plant disease caused by many forms of the soil-inhabiting fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Several hundred plant species are susceptible, including economically important food crops such as sweet potatoes, tomatoes, legumes, melons, and bananas (in which the infection is known

  • Yellowstone (American television series)

    Kevin Costner: …a Montana ranching family in Yellowstone (2018– ). In the Netflix film The Highwaymen (2019), Costner played a former Texas Ranger searching for the outlaws Bonnie and Clyde. He then lent his voice to a contemplative Golden Retriever who narrates the story of his years as a companion to a…

  • Yellowstone Caldera (crater, Wyoming, United States)

    Yellowstone Caldera, enormous crater in the western-central portion of Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, that was formed by a cataclysmic volcanic eruption some 640,000 years ago. It measures approximately 30 by 45 miles (50 by 70 km), covering a large area of the park. Yellowstone

  • Yellowstone Falls (waterfall, United States)

    Yellowstone National Park: Physical features: The river’s Yellowstone Falls, located in the north-central part of the park, descend in two majestic cascades: the Upper Falls, with a drop of 114 feet (35 metres), and the Lower Falls, with a drop of 308 feet (94 metres). The falls constitute the western end of…

  • Yellowstone Lake (lake, Wyoming, United States)

    Yellowstone Lake, large natural lake in Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S. It lies at 7,730 feet (2,356 metres) above sea level and is the largest body of water in North America, and the second largest in the world, at so high an elevation. It is fed by some six dozen streams and

  • Yellowstone National Park (national park, United States)

    Yellowstone National Park, the oldest, one of the largest, and probably the best-known national park in the United States. It is situated principally in northwestern Wyoming and partly in southern Montana and eastern Idaho and includes the greatest concentration of hydrothermal features in the

  • Yellowstone Plateau (plateau, United States)

    plateau: Geographic distribution: The Yellowstone Plateau in the United States, the Massif Central in France, and the Ethiopian Plateau in Africa are prominent examples. Most hot spots are associated with the upwelling of hot material in the asthenosphere, and the hot upwelling not only heats the overlying lithosphere and…

  • Yellowstone River (river, United States)

    Yellowstone River, river, noted for its scenic beauty, in the western United States. It flows through northwestern Wyoming, southern and eastern Montana, and northwestern North Dakota over a course of 692 miles (1,114 km). The river system drains about 70,000 square miles (181,300 square km). The

  • yellowtail flounder (fish)

    dab: Other species include the yellowtail flounder, or rusty dab (L. ferruginea), a reddish brown western Atlantic fish with rust-coloured spots and a yellow tail; the yellowfin sole, or Alaska dab (L. aspera), a brownish northern Pacific flatfish; and the longhead dab (L. proboscidea), a light-spotted, brownish northern Pacific fish…

  • yellowtail snapper (fish)

    snapper: …or greenish Atlantic fish; the yellowtail snapper (Ocyurus chrysurus), a swift-moving Atlantic species with a broad, yellow stripe from the nose to the wholly yellow tail; and the red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus), a bright-red fish (one of several red-coloured snappers) famed as food and found in rather deep Atlantic waters.

  • yellowthroat (genus of bird)

    wood warbler: The yellowthroats, any of the eight species of the genus Geothlypis, live in marshes and wet thickets. The male of the common yellowthroat (G. trichas)—often called the Maryland yellowthroat in the United States—is yellow with a black mask; his song, a strong repeated “wicheree,” is heard…

  • yellowwood (dye)

    fustic: Old fustic, or yellowwood, is derived from the heartwood of dyer’s mulberry, a large, tropical American tree (Chlorophora tinctoria, or Maclura tinctoria) of the mulberry family, Moraceae. The dye produces yellows on wool mordanted (fixed) with chromium salts.

  • yellowwood (plant, genus Cladrastis)

    yellowwood: The name yellowwood also refers to a genus of flowering plants, Cladrastis, with about six species in the legume family (Fabaceae). One species, C. kentukea, grows in eastern North America, and the remaining species occur in East Asia. Plants of Cladrastis are medium-sized trees with usually smooth…

  • yellowwood (tree, genus Podocarpus)

    Yellowwood, any of about 100 species of coniferous evergreen timber trees and shrubs constituting the conifer genus Podocarpus (family Podocarpaceae). Those are widely distributed in mountain forests of the Southern Hemisphere and occur as far north as Mexico, southern China, and southern Japan.

  • Yeltsin, Boris (president of Russia)

    Boris Yeltsin, Russian politician who became president of Russia in 1990. In 1991 he became the first popularly elected leader in the country’s history, guiding Russia through a stormy decade of political and economic retrenching until his resignation on the eve of 2000. Yeltsin attended the Urals

  • Yeltsin, Boris Nikolayevich (president of Russia)

    Boris Yeltsin, Russian politician who became president of Russia in 1990. In 1991 he became the first popularly elected leader in the country’s history, guiding Russia through a stormy decade of political and economic retrenching until his resignation on the eve of 2000. Yeltsin attended the Urals

  • Yelü (people)

    China: The Khitan: …of the ruling tribe, the Yelü, who for the sake of stability shifted to the Chinese clan system of orderly succession.

  • Yelü Chucai (Chinese statesman)

    Yelü Chucai, Chinese statesman of Khitan extraction, adviser to Genghis Khan and his son ?g?dei. He established a formal bureaucracy and rationalized taxation system for the Mongol-controlled portions of China. By persuading ?g?dei to spare the inhabitants of northern China in order to utilize

  • Yelü Dashi (emperor of Western Liao dynasty)

    Yelü Dashi, founder and first emperor (1124–43) of the Xi (Western) Liao dynasty (1124–1211) of Central Asia. Yelü was a member of the imperial family of the Liao dynasty (907–1125), which had been established by the Khitan (Chinese: Qidan) tribes and ruled much of Mongolia and Manchuria (now

  • Yelü Yi (emperor of Liao dynasty)

    Abaoji, leader of the nomadic Mongol-speaking Khitan tribes who occupied the northern border of China. Elected to a three-year term as great khan of the Khitans, Abaoji refused to resign at the end of his term but made himself king of the Khitan nation. After the collapse in 907 of Tang rule in

  • Yelwa (Nigeria)

    Yelwa, town, seat of the traditional Yauri emirate, Kebbi state, northwestern Nigeria. It lies on the road between Kontagora and Birnin Kebbi. An early Niger River settlement of the Reshe (Gungawa) people, it was ruled by the kings of Yauri from their capital at Bin Yauri, 8.5 miles (14 km)

  • Yelyn Valley (valley, Mongolia)

    Mongolia: The plateau and desert belt: In addition, the range’s scenic Yolyn Am (Lammergeier Valley)—now a national park, with a deep gorge containing a small perennial glacier—is surrounded by towering rocky cliffs where lammergeiers (bearded vultures) roost.

  • Yelysavethrad (Ukraine)

    Kirovohrad, city, south-central Ukraine. It lies along the upper Inhul River where the latter is crossed by the Kremenchuk-Odessa railway. Founded as a fortress in 1754, it was made a city, Yelysavethrad (Russian: Yelizavetgrad, or Elizavetgrad), in 1765 and developed as the centre of a rich

  • Yemaja (Yoruban deity)

    Yemonja, Yoruban deity celebrated as the giver of life and as the metaphysical mother of all orisha (deities) within the Yoruba spiritual pantheon. Yemonja’s name is derived from the Yoruba words Yeye or Iya (“mother”), omo (“child/children”), and eja (“fish”) and thus literally means “Mother whose

  • Yemen

    Yemen, country situated at the southwestern corner of the Arabian Peninsula. It is mostly mountainous and generally arid, though there are broad patches with sufficient precipitation to make agriculture successful. The people speak various dialects of Arabic and are mostly Muslims (see Islam). The

  • Yemen (Aden) (former country, Yemen)

    Yemen: Two Yemeni states: …Aden renamed the country the People’s Republic of South Yemen. Short of resources and unable to obtain any significant amounts of aid, either from the Western states or from those in the Arab world, it began to drift toward the Soviet Union, which eagerly provided economic and technical assistance in…

  • Yemen (?an?ā?) (former country, Yemen)

    Yemen: Two Yemeni states: …the Yemen Arab Republic (North Yemen). The young imam escaped from his battered palace, fled into the northern highlands, and began the traditional process of rallying the tribes to his cause. The new republic called upon Egypt for assistance, and Egyptian troops and equipment arrived almost immediately to defend…

  • Yemen Airways (airline, Yemen)

    Yemen: Transportation and telecommunications: Today, Yemenia (Yemen Airways) operates regular service to a large number of countries in the Red Sea region and to most other Arab states, as well as to a growing number of European transportation hubs. Major airports are at Aden, Sanaa, and Al-?udaydah. There are a number…

  • Yemen Arab Republic (former country, Yemen)

    Yemen: Two Yemeni states: …the Yemen Arab Republic (North Yemen). The young imam escaped from his battered palace, fled into the northern highlands, and began the traditional process of rallying the tribes to his cause. The new republic called upon Egypt for assistance, and Egyptian troops and equipment arrived almost immediately to defend…

  • Yemen Bank of Reconstruction and Development (bank, Yemen)

    Yemen: Finance: The Yemen Bank for Reconstruction and Development (1962) provides commercial and customer services. Banking is a small sector of the economy; services have traditionally been difficult to obtain since, because of a weak court system, collecting money owed has been difficult. Many Yemenis rely on informal…

  • Yemen Gate (gate, Sanaa, Yemen)

    Sanaa: The contemporary city: …Yemen Gate (Bāb al-Yaman), renamed Liberty Gate after the revolution of 1962. Old Sanaa includes 106 mosques, 12 hammams (baths), and 6,500 houses, all built before the 11th century ce. Multistoried tower houses, built of dark basalt stone and brick, are decorated with intricate frieze work and beautiful carved windows.…

  • Yemen Plateau (plateau, Arabia)

    Arabian Desert: Physical features: Much of the Yemen Plateau is at an elevation above 7,000 feet (2,100 metres). To the north and east elevations decrease. Steep cliffs and steep canyons descend from the highlands into adjacent seas to the south and west. The peninsula is bounded on its western margin by a…

  • Yemen Socialist Party (political party, Yemen)

    Yemen: Government and society: ” The Yemen Socialist Party (YSP), the only legal political organization, determined government policy and exercised control over the state administrative system, the legislature, and the military.

  • Yemen Uprising of 2011–2012

    In early 2011 a wave of pro-democracy protests swept the Middle East and North Africa, unseating leaders in Tunisia and Egypt and leading to sustained unrest in other countries, including Libya, Syria, and Bahrain. In Yemen pro-democracy activists and members of the opposition staged protests

  • Yemen’s Perilous State

    By early 2010 the struggle faced by Yemen and its Antiterrorist allies against al-Qaeda, the Islamic militant organization, had come to dominate that country’s narrative. Since 2007 the Yemeni state had been seriously challenged by a rebellion in the north, a secessionist movement in the south, and

  • Yemen, flag of

    horizontally striped red-white-black national flag. Its width-to-length ratio is approximately 2 to 3.In 1918, after decades of Ottoman domination, northern Yemen arose under its traditional religious leader—the imam—and proclaimed independence, which it maintained under a red flag with white

  • Yemen, history of

    Yemen: History: For more than two millennia prior to the arrival of Islam, Yemen was the home of a series of powerful and wealthy city-states and empires whose prosperity was largely based upon their control over the production of frankincense and myrrh, two…

  • Yemen, Republic of

    Yemen, country situated at the southwestern corner of the Arabian Peninsula. It is mostly mountainous and generally arid, though there are broad patches with sufficient precipitation to make agriculture successful. The people speak various dialects of Arabic and are mostly Muslims (see Islam). The

  • Yemeni Civil War ([2015-present])

    Qaboos bin Said: …blockade of Qatar, and the civil war in Yemen. At times, Qaboos was able to position himself as a trusted mediator in the region’s tensest situations, including an interim nuclear agreement between the United States and Iran in 2013.

  • Yemeni Congregation for Reform (political party, Yemen)

    Yemen: Unification of Yemen: The Islamic Reform Grouping (I?lā?), the main organized opposition to the unification regime since 1990, and the YSP both won strong minority representation. Holding virtually all the seats, the three parties formed a coalition government in May 1993, amid some hope that the political crisis had passed.

  • Yemeni Highlands (region, Arabia)

    Arabia: Geology: The Yemeni highlands are physiographically very different from those of the shield; they are not mountains but the deeply dissected edge of the Arabian plateau. From the west the formations rise abruptly from the narrow coastal plain in Yemen; they reach heights of about 10,000 to…

  • Yemeni Socialist Party (political party, Yemen)

    Yemen: Government and society: ” The Yemen Socialist Party (YSP), the only legal political organization, determined government policy and exercised control over the state administrative system, the legislature, and the military.

  • Yemenia (airline, Yemen)

    Yemen: Transportation and telecommunications: Today, Yemenia (Yemen Airways) operates regular service to a large number of countries in the Red Sea region and to most other Arab states, as well as to a growing number of European transportation hubs. Major airports are at Aden, Sanaa, and Al-?udaydah. There are a number…

  • Yemin Moshe (district, Jerusalem)

    Jerusalem: City layout: …such as Mishkenot Sha?ananim and Yemin Moshe, with its famous windmill landmark, have been reconstructed and resettled or turned into cultural centres. Others include the Bukharan Quarter; Me?a She?arim, founded by Orthodox Jews from eastern and central Europe, with its scores of small synagogues and yeshivas; and Ma?ane Yehuda, with…

  • Yemmiganur (India)

    Yemmiganur, town, western Andhra Pradesh state, southern India. It lies in the upland Rayalaseema region, about 10 miles (16 km) south of the Tungabhadra River and some 35 miles (56 km) west of the city of Kurnool. Yemmiganur was included in the Hindu kingdom of Vijayanagar, which flourished during

  • Yemoja (Yoruban deity)

    Yemonja, Yoruban deity celebrated as the giver of life and as the metaphysical mother of all orisha (deities) within the Yoruba spiritual pantheon. Yemonja’s name is derived from the Yoruba words Yeye or Iya (“mother”), omo (“child/children”), and eja (“fish”) and thus literally means “Mother whose

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
港台一级毛片免费观看