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  • Utah Lake (lake, Utah, United States)

    Utah Lake, freshwater lake in Utah county, north-central Utah, U.S. It covers 150 square miles (390 square km) and is 23 miles (37 km) long. Utah Lake drains through the Jordan River into Great Salt Lake to the northwest and is a remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville. It is the site of Utah Lake

  • Utah prairie dog (rodent)

    prairie dog: …of the Great Basin; the Utah prairie dog (C. parvidens) is restricted to the southern part of that state; and the Mexican prairie dog (C. mexicanus) occurs in northern Mexico.

  • Utah State Agricultural College (university, Logan, Utah, United States)

    Utah State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Logan, Utah, U.S. It is a comprehensive, land-grant university with about 45 academic departments within colleges of Agriculture, Business, Education, Engineering, Family Life, Natural Resources, Science, Humanities,

  • Utah State Development Center (school, American Fork, Utah, United States)

    American Fork: The Utah State Development Center (established as the Utah State Training School in 1931), a school for the mentally and physically disabled, is a major employer. The Timpanogos Cave National Monument is 7 miles (11 km) east. Pop. (1970) 7,713; (2000) 21,941; (2010) 26,263.

  • Utah State University (university, Logan, Utah, United States)

    Utah State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Logan, Utah, U.S. It is a comprehensive, land-grant university with about 45 academic departments within colleges of Agriculture, Business, Education, Engineering, Family Life, Natural Resources, Science, Humanities,

  • Utah Teapot (computer science)

    computer graphics: 3-D rendering: …into graphical images is the Utah Teapot, created at the University of Utah in 1975. Represented skeletally as a wire-frame image, the Utah Teapot is composed of many small polygons. However, even with hundreds of polygons, the image is not smooth. Smoother representations can be provided by Bezier curves, which…

  • Utah War (United States [1857–1858])

    Salt Lake City: History: officials led to the so-called Utah War of 1857–58, when General Albert Sidney Johnston’s troops marched through the city to establish Camp Floyd west of Utah Lake. Social and religious conflict between Mormons and non-Mormons continued to influence the life of the city for a century.

  • Utah, flag of (United States state flag)

    U.S. state flag consisting of a dark blue field (background) with the seal of the state in the centre. The width-to-length ratio is 3 to 5.The design of the seal was adopted in 1850 by the Territory of Utah and modified by the artist Harry Edwards when Utah became a state in 1896. He added a bald

  • Utah, University of (university, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States)

    University of Utah, public, coeducational institution of higher education in Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S. It is a comprehensive university with many research opportunities and academic programs. Through 16 colleges and schools it offers some 75 undergraduate degree programs and more than 90 graduate

  • Utah/United States Film Festival (American film festival)

    Sundance Film Festival, independent-film festival held in Park City, Utah, each January. It is one of the most respected and celebrated film festivals in the United States. The Sundance Film Festival began in September 1978 in Salt Lake City, Utah, under the name Utah/United States Film Festival.

  • utai (Japanese theatre)

    Noh theatre: The recitation (utai) is one of the most important elements in the performance. Each portion of the written text carries a prescription of the mode of recitation—as well as of accompanying movement or dance—although application of this may be varied slightly. Each type of dialogue and song…

  • Utamaro (Japanese artist)

    Utamaro, Japanese printmaker and painter who was one of the greatest artists of the ukiyo-e (“pictures of the floating world”) movement; he is known especially for his masterfully composed portraits of sensuous female beauties. Probably born in a provincial town, he went to Edo (now Tokyo) with his

  • Utashige (Japanese artist)

    Hiroshige, Japanese artist, one of the last great ukiyo-e (“pictures of the floating world”) masters of the colour woodblock print. His genius for landscape compositions was first recognized in the West by the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists. His print series Fifty-three Stations of the

  • UTC

    Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), international basis of civil and scientific time, which was introduced on January 1, 1960. The unit of UTC is the atomic second, and UTC is widely broadcast by radio signals. These signals ultimately furnish the basis for the setting of all public and private

  • UTC (American corporation)

    United Technologies Corporation (UTC), American multi-industry company with significant business concentrations in aerospace products and services, including jet engines. Formed in 1934 as United Aircraft Corporation, it adopted its present name in 1975. Headquarters are in Hartford, Connecticut.

  • Ute (people)

    Ute, Numic-speaking group of North American Indians originally living in what is now western Colorado and eastern Utah; the latter state is named after them. When the Spanish Father Silvestre Vélez de Escalante traversed their territory in 1776 while seeking a route from Santa Fe (now in New

  • Ute (Colorado, United States)

    Grand Junction, city, seat (1883) of Mesa county, western Colorado, U.S. It lies in the Grand Valley (elevation 4,586 feet [1,398 metres]), at the confluence of the Colorado and Gunnison rivers. The area was settled by ranchers in 1881 after the expulsion of the Ute Indians and was first called Ute

  • Ute av verden (novel by Knausgaard)

    Karl Ove Knausgaard: …fame, but his first novel, Ute av verden (1998; “Out of the World”), was masterfully written and became the first debut novel to win the Norwegian Critics’ Prize. The novel, structured in three parts, told the story of a 30-something teacher who falls in love with one of his 13-year-old…

  • Ute Peak (mountain, New Mexico, United States)

    Taos: …region with isolated mountains, including Ute Peak (10,093 feet [3,076 metres]). The Rio Grande flows through the Picuris Range in a deep gorge, curving from north to southwest. Carson National Forest, including the Latir Peak and Wheeler Peak wildernesses, covers much of the county. The Taos and Picuris Pueblo Indian…

  • UTEC Lima (university, Lima, Peru)

    Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara: …followed, including the campus of Universidad de Ingeniería y Tecnología (UTEC) Lima (2015); the Toulouse School of Economics at the Université Toulouse 1 Capitole (2019), France; and the Institut Mines-Télécom (2019), Paris. The sloping concrete UTEC building recalls Lima’s seaside cliffs and Le Corbusier’s concrete works for Chandigarh, India. The…

  • Utelle (France)

    C?te d'Azur: Alpes-Maritimes include Gourdon, èze, Utelle, and Peille; many such towns are perched on cliffs. Their streets are narrow and paved with flagstones or cobbles; houses are built of stone and roofed with rounded tiles. The doors of larger houses feature elaborate bronze knockers and hinges of wrought iron. The…

  • uterine bleeding (pathology)

    Uterine bleeding, abnormal bleeding from the uterus, which is not related to menstruation. Menstruation is the normal cyclic bleeding that occurs when the egg has been released from the ovary and fertilization has not occurred. Other episodes of bleeding that cannot be considered part of the

  • uterine cancer (pathology)

    Uterine cancer, a disease characterized by the abnormal growth of cells in the uterus. Cancers affecting the lining of the uterus (endometrium) are the most common cancers of the female reproductive tract. Other uterine cancers, called uterine sarcomas, develop from underlying muscle or connective

  • uterine cervix (anatomy)

    Cervix, lowest region of the uterus; it attaches the uterus to the vagina and provides a passage between the vaginal cavity and the uterine cavity. The cervix, only about 4 centimetres (1.6 inches) long, projects about 2 centimetres into the upper vaginal cavity. The cervical opening into the

  • uterine contractions (childbirth)

    birth: First stage: dilatation: …in labour, uterine contractions, or labour pains, occur at intervals of 20 to 30 minutes and last about 40 seconds. They are then accompanied by slight pain, which usually is felt in the small of the back.

  • uterine fibroid (pathology)

    Uterine fibroid, benign tumour that originates from the smooth muscle wall of the uterus and may be single but usually occurs in clusters. They are most common in women of African descent and in women who have not borne children, and they are most often identified in women aged 30–45 years. New

  • uterine involution

    Puerperium, the period of adjustment after childbirth during which the mother’s reproductive system returns to its normal prepregnant state. It generally lasts six to eight weeks and ends with the first ovulation and the return of normal menstruation. Puerperal changes begin almost immediately

  • uterine leiomyomata (pathology)

    Uterine fibroid, benign tumour that originates from the smooth muscle wall of the uterus and may be single but usually occurs in clusters. They are most common in women of African descent and in women who have not borne children, and they are most often identified in women aged 30–45 years. New

  • uterine myoma (pathology)

    Uterine fibroid, benign tumour that originates from the smooth muscle wall of the uterus and may be single but usually occurs in clusters. They are most common in women of African descent and in women who have not borne children, and they are most often identified in women aged 30–45 years. New

  • uterine prolapse (pathology)

    birth: Uterine prolapse: Uterine prolapse, or a sliding of the uterus from its normal position in the pelvic cavity, may result from injuries to the pelvic supporting ligaments and muscles that occur during labour. Usually the diagnosis is made months or even years later, when the…

  • uterine sarcoma (pathology)

    uterine cancer: Other uterine cancers, called uterine sarcomas, develop from underlying muscle or connective tissue; they are much rarer. This article focuses on the development, diagnosis, and treatment of endometrial cancer.

  • uterine transplant (surgery)

    infertility: Treatment options: …uterus may be candidates for uterus transplantation in which a uterus from a healthy donor is transplanted into a recipient. Uterus transplant candidates and donors must meet specific medical criteria, including uterine absence or disease that has failed all other therapeutic options . The first birth of a healthy infant…

  • uterine tube (anatomy)

    Fallopian tube, either of a pair of long, narrow ducts located in the human female abdominal cavity that transport male sperm cells to the egg, provide a suitable environment for fertilization, and transport the egg from the ovary, where it is produced, to the central channel (lumen) of the uterus.

  • uterine tube, ampulla of (anatomy)

    fallopian tube: …the fallopian tube called the ampulla. The isthmus is a small region, only about 2 cm (0.8 inch) long, that connects the ampulla and infundibulum to the uterus. The final region of the fallopian tube, known as the intramural, or uterine, part, is located in the top portion (fundus) of…

  • uterus (anatomy)

    Uterus, an inverted pear-shaped muscular organ of the female reproductive system, located between the bladder and the rectum. It functions to nourish and house a fertilized egg until the fetus, or offspring, is ready to be delivered. The uterus has four major regions: the fundus is the broad curved

  • uterus transplant (surgery)

    infertility: Treatment options: …uterus may be candidates for uterus transplantation in which a uterus from a healthy donor is transplanted into a recipient. Uterus transplant candidates and donors must meet specific medical criteria, including uterine absence or disease that has failed all other therapeutic options . The first birth of a healthy infant…

  • UTG (political party, Australia)

    United Tasmania Group (UTG), Australian political party that was the world’s first green political party. The UTG was created on March 23, 1972, by protest groups opposed to the construction of a dam that was flooding Lake Pedder in the southwest of the Australian state of Tasmania. The UTG ran

  • Utgard (Germanic mythology)

    Yggdrasill: …Niflheim, the underworld; another into J?tunheim, land of the giants; and the third into Asgard, home of the gods. At its base were three wells: Urdarbrunnr (Well of Fate), from which the tree was watered by the Norns (the Fates); Hvergelmir (Roaring Kettle), in which dwelt Nidhogg, the monster that…

  • Uthagamandalam (India)

    Udhagamandalam, town, western Tamil Nadu state, southern India. It is situated in the Nilgiri Hills at an elevation of about 7,500 feet (2,300 metres) above sea level and is sheltered by several peaks—including Doda Betta (8,652 feet [2,637 metres]), the highest point in Tamil Nadu. It was founded

  • Uther Pendragon (legendary king of Britain)

    dragon: …been instituted as such by Uther Pendragon, father of King Arthur. In the 20th century the dragon was officially incorporated in the armorial bearings of the prince of Wales.

  • ?Uthmān (?af?id ruler)

    ?af?id dynasty: …power retained its vigour under ?Uthmān (1435–88), despite a rebellion (1435–52), but, after his reign, dynastic struggles heralded the decline of ?af?id power. The country fell into Arab hands, and Spaniards later established themselves on the coast. Finally, a struggle between Spanish and Turkish forces ended with Turkish supremacy and…

  • ?Uthmān (Ottoman sultan)

    Osman I, ruler of a Turkmen principality in northwestern Anatolia who is regarded as the founder of the Ottoman Turkish state. Both the name of the dynasty and the empire that the dynasty established are derived from the Arabic form (?Uthmān) of his name. Osman was descended from the Kay? branch of

  • ?Uthmān Bey al-Bardīsī (Mamlūk leader)

    Egypt: The French occupation and its consequences (1798–1805): The new Mamlūk leaders, ?Uthmān Bey al-Bardīsī (died 1806) and Mu?ammad Bey al-Alfī (died 1807), former retainers of Murād, headed rival factions and had in any case to reckon with the British and Ottoman occupation forces. In March 1803 the British troops were evacuated in accordance with the Treaty…

  • Uthman dan Fodio (Fulani leader)

    Usman dan Fodio, Fulani mystic, philosopher, and revolutionary reformer who, in a jihad (holy war) between 1804 and 1808, created a new Muslim state, the Fulani empire, in what is now northern Nigeria. Usman was born in the Hausa state of Gobir, in what is now northwestern Nigeria. His father,

  • ?Uthmān ibn Fūdī (Fulani leader)

    Usman dan Fodio, Fulani mystic, philosopher, and revolutionary reformer who, in a jihad (holy war) between 1804 and 1808, created a new Muslim state, the Fulani empire, in what is now northern Nigeria. Usman was born in the Hausa state of Gobir, in what is now northwestern Nigeria. His father,

  • ?Uthmān ibn Mu?ammar (Arab ruler)

    Saudi Arabia: Origins and early expansion: The ruler of ?Uyaynah, ?Uthmān ibn Mu?ammar, gladly welcomed the returning prodigal and even adhered to his doctrines. But many opposed him, and ?Abd al-Wahhāb’s preaching was put to a number of severe tests. The chief of the Al-Hasa region, who was of the influential Banū Khālid tribe, threatened…

  • ?Uthmān ibn ?Affān (Muslim caliph)

    ?Uthmān ibn ?Affān, third caliph to rule after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. He centralized the administration of the caliphate and established an official version of the Qur?ān. ?Uthmān is critically important in Islamic history because his death marked the beginning of open religious and

  • UTI (pathology)

    Urinary tract infection (UTI), in humans, inflammation of the renal system characterized by frequent and painful urination and caused by the invasion of microorganisms, usually bacteria, into the urethra and bladder. Infection of the urinary tract can result in either minor or major illness. For

  • uti possidetis (Roman law)

    international law: Territory: This doctrine, known as uti possidetis (Latin: “as you possess”), was established to ensure the stability of newly independent states whose colonial boundaries were often drawn arbitrarily.

  • UTICA (Tunisian organization)

    National Dialogue Quartet: …des Avocats de Tunisie), the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts (Union Tunisienne de l’Industrie, du Commerce et de l’Artisinat; UTICA), and the Tunisian Human Rights League (La Ligue Tunisienne pour la Défense des Droits de l’Homme; LTDH)—that was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2015 for its efforts…

  • Utica (New York, United States)

    Utica, city, seat (1798) of Oneida county, central New York, U.S., on the Mohawk River and New York State Canal System, 45 miles (72 km) east of Syracuse. The first settlers were Dutch and Palatinate Germans, and in 1758 the British built Old Fort Schuyler, near the site of an ancient Oneida Indian

  • Utica (Tunisia)

    Utica, traditionally the oldest Phoenician settlement on the coast of North Africa. It is located near the mouth of the Majardah (French Medjerda, ancient Bagradas) River 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Tunis in modern Tunisia. After its founding in the 8th or 7th century bc, Utica grew rapidly and

  • Utiguri (ancient people)

    Byzantine Empire: The last years of Justinian I: …themselves under attack from the Utigurs, a people whose support Justinian’s agents had earlier connived at and won by suitable bribes. The two peoples weakened each other in warfare, of which the episode of 559 was not the first instance, and that was precisely the result at which Byzantine diplomacy…

  • utilidor (engineering)

    Mackenzie River: The delta region: …town of Inuvik is a utilidor, a linear boxlike metal container raised slightly above the surface of the ground, in which the separate sewer, water, and heating pipes are placed. Mackenzie River water-transport routes terminate at Tuktoyaktuk on the Arctic coast northeast of the delta; there cargo is transferred to…

  • Utilitarian Society (British organization)

    John Stuart Mill: Early life and career: …among a few friends the Utilitarian Society, taking the word, as he tells us, from Annals of the Parish, a novel of Scottish country life by John Galt.

  • Utilitarianism (work by Mill)

    John Stuart Mill: The later years: His Utilitarianism (in Fraser’s Magazine, 1861; separate publication, 1863) was a closely reasoned attempt to answer objections to his ethical theory and to remove misconceptions about it. He was especially anxious to make it clear that he included in “utility” the pleasures of the imagination and…

  • utilitarianism (philosophy)

    Utilitarianism, in normative ethics, a tradition stemming from the late 18th- and 19th-century English philosophers and economists Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill according to which an action is right if it tends to promote happiness and wrong if it tends to produce the reverse of happiness—not

  • utilitas (architecture)

    architecture: Utilitas: The notion that a building is defective unless the spaces provided are adequate and appropriate for their intended usage would seem obvious. Yet the statement itself has been a source of controversy since the 1960s. The main reasons for the controversy are: first, whereas…

  • utilities

    Public utility, enterprise that provides certain classes of services to the public, including common carrier transportation (buses, airlines, railroads, motor freight carriers, pipelines, etc.); telephone and telegraph; power, heat, and light; and community facilities for water, sanitation, and s

  • utility (economics)

    Utility and value, in economics, the determination of the prices of goods and services. The modern industrial economy is characterized by a high degree of interdependence of its parts. The supplier of components or raw materials, for example, must deliver the desired quantities of his products at

  • Utility Analysis and the Consumption Function (work by Brumberg and Modigliani)

    consumption: The rational optimization framework: …model, first articulated in “Utility Analysis and the Consumption Function” (1954) by economists Franco Modigliani and Richard Brumberg, proposes that households’ spending decisions are driven by household members’ assessments of expenditure needs and income over the remainder of their lives, taking into account predictable events such as a precipitous…

  • utility bicycle (vehicle)

    bicycle: Basic types: Utility bicycles are basic transportation in developing countries, where hundreds of millions are in service. In the developed world, utility bicycles are used by children or by adults for short trips. They have heavy frames, flat handlebars, wide tires and seats, simple brakes, and usually…

  • utility function (logic)

    economics: Theory of choice: …in a series of “utility functions.” A utility function (an equation similar to the production function) shows that the pleasure or satisfaction households derive from consumption will depend on the products they purchase and on how they consume these products. Utility functions provide a general description of the household’s…

  • utility industry

    cybercrime: Sabotage: …catastrophic damage could result from utility systems being compromised by hackers. Several utilities responded by giving the U.S. government permission to run an audit on their systems. In March 2009 the results began to leak out with a report in The Wall Street Journal. In particular, the report indicated that…

  • utility measure (logic)

    economics: Theory of choice: …in a series of “utility functions.” A utility function (an equation similar to the production function) shows that the pleasure or satisfaction households derive from consumption will depend on the products they purchase and on how they consume these products. Utility functions provide a general description of the household’s…

  • utility music (music)

    Gebrauchsmusik, (German: “music for use”) music intended, by virtue of its simplicity of technique and style, primarily for performance by the talented amateur rather than the virtuoso. Gebrauchsmusik is, in fact, a modern reaction against the intellectual and technical complexities of much 19th-

  • utility theory (mathematics)

    game theory: Utility theory: In the previous example it was tacitly assumed that the players were maximizing their average profits, but in practice players may consider other factors. For example, few people would risk a sure gain of $1,000,000 for an even chance of winning either $3,000,000…

  • utility value (logic)

    economics: Theory of choice: …in a series of “utility functions.” A utility function (an equation similar to the production function) shows that the pleasure or satisfaction households derive from consumption will depend on the products they purchase and on how they consume these products. Utility functions provide a general description of the household’s…

  • Utique (Tunisia)

    Utica, traditionally the oldest Phoenician settlement on the coast of North Africa. It is located near the mouth of the Majardah (French Medjerda, ancient Bagradas) River 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Tunis in modern Tunisia. After its founding in the 8th or 7th century bc, Utica grew rapidly and

  • Utje-?enovi?, Juraj (Hungarian cardinal)

    Gy?rgy Martinuzzi, Hungarian statesman and later cardinal who worked to restore and maintain the national unity of Hungary. Born of a Croatian father and a mother of the patrician Venetian family of Martinuzzi, Gy?rgy became a Paulist friar at the age of 28 after a brief military career. A skilled

  • Utkal Plains (plains, India)

    Utkal Plains, coastal plains in eastern Odisha state, eastern India. Extending over about 16,000 square miles (41,400 square km), the plains are bounded by the Lower Ganges (Ganga) Plain to the north, the Bay of Bengal to the east, the Tamilnad Plains to the south, and the Eastern Ghats to the

  • Utkala (state, India)

    Odisha, state of India. Located in the northeastern part of the country, it is bounded by the states of Jharkhand and West Bengal to the north and northeast, by the Bay of Bengal to the east, and by the states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana to the south and Chhattisgarh to the west. Before India

  • Utley, Adrian (British musician)

    Portishead: ), and guitarist Adrian Utley (b. April 27, 1957, Northampton, Northamptonshire, Eng.).

  • Utnapishtim (Mesopotamian mythology)

    Utnapishtim, in the Babylonian Gilgamesh epic, survivor of a mythological flood whom Gilgamesh consults about the secret of immortality. Utnapishtim was the only man to escape death, since, having preserved human and animal life in the great boat he built, he and his wife were deified by the god

  • Uto (Egyptian goddess)

    Wadjet, cobra goddess of ancient Egypt. Depicted as a cobra twined around a papyrus stem, she was the tutelary goddess of Lower Egypt. Wadjet and Nekhbet, the vulture-goddess of Upper Egypt, were the protective goddesses of the king and were sometimes represented together on the king’s diadem,

  • Uto-Aztecan languages

    Uto-Aztecan languages, family of American Indian languages, one of the oldest and largest—both in terms of extent of distribution (Oregon to Panama) and number of languages and speakers. The Uto-Aztecan languages are generally recognized by modern linguists as falling into seven branches: Numic,

  • Utomlyonnyye solntsem (film by Mikhalkov [1994])
  • utopia (ideal community)

    Utopia, an ideal commonwealth whose inhabitants exist under seemingly perfect conditions. Hence utopian and utopianism are words used to denote visionary reform that tends to be impossibly idealistic. The word first occurred in Sir Thomas More’s Utopia, published in Latin as Libellus…de optimo

  • Utopia (work by More)

    Thomas More: The Utopia: In May 1515 More was appointed to a delegation to revise an Anglo-Flemish commercial treaty. The conference was held at Brugge, with long intervals that More used to visit other Belgian cities. He began in the Low Countries and completed after his return to…

  • Utopia 14 (novel by Vonnegut)

    Player Piano, first novel by Kurt Vonnegut, published in 1952 and reissued in 1954 as Utopia 14. This anti-utopian novel employs the standard science-fiction formula of a futuristic world run by machines and of one man’s futile rebellion against that

  • Utopia basin (impact basin, Mars)

    Mars: Sparsely cratered plains: …impact basin, informally called the Utopia basin (40° N, 250° W).

  • Utopia Planitia (region, Mars)

    Utopia Planitia, northern lava plain on the planet Mars that was selected as the landing site of the U.S. Viking 2 planetary probe. Photographs transmitted from the Viking 2 lander, which touched down at 47.97° N, 225.74° W, on September 3, 1976, depicted a boulder-strewn plain that superficially

  • utopian literature

    Thomas More: The Utopia: …a new literary genre, the utopian romance.

  • Utopian Plain (region, Mars)

    Utopia Planitia, northern lava plain on the planet Mars that was selected as the landing site of the U.S. Viking 2 planetary probe. Photographs transmitted from the Viking 2 lander, which touched down at 47.97° N, 225.74° W, on September 3, 1976, depicted a boulder-strewn plain that superficially

  • utopian poetry

    Utopian poetry, poetry that describes a utopia or any sort of utopian ideal. Sir Thomas More’s Utopia (1516)—the first printed work to use the term utopia, derived from the Greek words for “not” (ou) and “place” (topos)—is for many specialists the major starting point of utopian prose. The same

  • utopian socialism (social and political philosophy)

    Utopian socialism, Political and social idea of the mid-19th century. Adapted from such reformers as Robert Owen and Charles Fourier, utopian socialism drew from early communist and socialist ideas. Advocates included Louis Blanc, noted for his theory of worker-controlled “social workshops,” and

  • Ut?ya (island, Norway)

    Oslo and Ut?ya attacks of 2011: …Oslo and the island of Ut?ya in Norway on July 22, 2011, in which 77 people were killed—the deadliest incident on Norwegian soil since World War II.

  • Ut?ya and Oslo attacks of 2011 (Norway)

    Oslo and Ut?ya attacks of 2011, terrorist attacks on Oslo and the island of Ut?ya in Norway on July 22, 2011, in which 77 people were killed—the deadliest incident on Norwegian soil since World War II. At 3:26 pm an explosion rocked downtown Oslo, shattering windows and damaging buildings. The

  • Ut?ya shooting massacre (Norway)

    Oslo and Ut?ya attacks of 2011, terrorist attacks on Oslo and the island of Ut?ya in Norway on July 22, 2011, in which 77 people were killed—the deadliest incident on Norwegian soil since World War II. At 3:26 pm an explosion rocked downtown Oslo, shattering windows and damaging buildings. The

  • UTP (chemical compound)

    metabolism: Fragmentation of other sugars: …reactions requiring as a coenzyme uridine triphosphate (UTP). Fructose may also be phosphorylated in animal cells through the action of hexokinase [1], in which case fructose 6-phosphate is the product, or in liver tissue via a fructokinase that gives rise to fructose 1-phosphate [17]. ATP supplies the phosphate group in…

  • Utpala (Indian author)

    Indian philosophy: Kashmiri Shaivism: … (8th–9th centuries; “Verses on Creation”), Utpala’s Pratyabhijna-sutra (c. 900; “Aphorisms on Recognition”), Abhinavagupta’s Paramarthasara (“The Essence of the Highest Truth”), Pratyabhijna-vimarshini (“Reflections on Recognition”), and Tantraloka (“Lights on the Doctrine”) in the 10th century, and Kshemaraja’s Shiva-sutra-vimarshini (“Reflections on the Aphorisms on Shiva”).

  • Utraquists (religious movement)

    Utraquist, any of the spiritual descendants of Jan Hus who believed that the laity, like the clergy, should receive the Eucharist under the forms of both bread and wine (Latin utraque, “each of two”; calix, “chalice”). Unlike the militant Taborites (also followers of Hus), the Utraquists were

  • Utre, Philipp von (German administrator)

    Philipp von Hutten, last German captain general of Venezuela. A relative of the humanist poet and satirist Ulrich von Hutten, he sailed to Venezuela under Georg Hohermuth (called George of Spires) to rule on behalf of the Augsburg banking house of Welser, which had been granted a concession by the

  • Utrecht (province, Netherlands)

    Utrecht, provincie, central Netherlands, the country’s smallest, with an area of 514 square miles (1,331 square km). It extends southward from the narrow Lake Eem, which separates Utrecht provincie from the South Flevoland polder of Flevoland provincie. Utrecht provincie lies between the

  • Utrecht (Netherlands)

    Utrecht, gemeente (municipality), central Netherlands. It lies along the Kromme Rijn (Winding, or Crooked, Rhine), Oude (Old) Rijn, and Vecht rivers and the Amsterdam–Rijn Canal. Its original Roman name, Trajectum ad Rhenum (Ford on the Rhine), later became Ultrajectum, and then Utrecht. The site

  • Utrecht Psalter (Carolingian codex)

    wind instrument: Developments in the Middle Ages: …and such documents as the Utrecht Psalter (c. 830; University Library, Utrecht, Netherlands) contain drawings showing instruments, but there is little to indicate a flourishing musical culture. The great centres of learning in general as well as the cultivation of music and the playing of instruments remained in the Middle…

  • Utrecht school (art)

    Utrecht school, principally a group of three Dutch painters—Dirck van Baburen (c. 1590–1624), Gerrit van Honthorst (1590–1656), and Hendrik Terbrugghen (1588–1629)—who went to Rome and fell fully under the pervasive influence of Caravaggio’s art before returning to Utrecht. Although none of them

  • Utrecht University (university, Utrecht, Netherlands)

    Utrecht University, state-supported coeducational institution of higher learning founded in 1636 at Utrecht, in the Netherlands. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Utrecht attracted many foreign students, especially from England and Scotland. James Boswell, Samuel Johnson’s biographer, studied law at

  • Utrecht, Peace of (European history)

    Treaties of Utrecht, (April 1713–September 1714), a series of treaties between France and other European powers (April 11, 1713 to Sept. 7, 1714) and another series between Spain and other powers (July 13, 1713 to June 26, 1714), concluding the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–14). France

  • Utrecht, treaties of (European history)

    Treaties of Utrecht, (April 1713–September 1714), a series of treaties between France and other European powers (April 11, 1713 to Sept. 7, 1714) and another series between Spain and other powers (July 13, 1713 to June 26, 1714), concluding the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–14). France

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