You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Tolbert, William R. (president of Liberia)

    William R. Tolbert, West African politician who was president of Liberia from 1971 to 1980. Tolbert graduated from Liberia College and entered politics in the early 1940s. In 1943 he was elected to the House of Representatives, where President William Tubman singled him out for the vice presidency.

  • Tolbert, William Richard, Jr. (president of Liberia)

    William R. Tolbert, West African politician who was president of Liberia from 1971 to 1980. Tolbert graduated from Liberia College and entered politics in the early 1940s. In 1943 he was elected to the House of Representatives, where President William Tubman singled him out for the vice presidency.

  • Tolbiacum, Battle of (European history)

    France: Frankish expansion: …Cologne about 495–496 at the Battle of Tolbiacum (Zülpich), the second by Clovis about 506, after his annexation of Cologne. Clovis thus extended his authority over most of the territory of the Alemanni. Some of the former inhabitants sought refuge in the Ostrogothic kingdom of Theodoric the Great, the most…

  • Tolbukhin (Bulgaria)

    Dobrich, town, northeastern Bulgaria. It lies on the road and railway line between Varna and Constan?a, Rom., and is a long-established market town. Under Turkish rule from the 15th century until 1878, the town was called Bazardzhik; after liberation it became Dobrich. While part of Romania from

  • tolbutamide (drug)

    Tolbutamide, drug used in the treatment of type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Tolbutamide stimulates the release of insulin from the pancreas, thereby reducing the concentration of glucose in the blood. Tolbutamide is one of a class of compounds called sulfonylureas and was the first agent

  • Toldi (poem by Arany)

    János Arany: …1847 with his popular epic Toldi, which was received with enthusiasm by a public craving for a national literature of quality in a language all could grasp. Sándor Pet?fi wrote a poem in its praise, and this was the beginning of a lifelong friendship.

  • Toldi estéje (poem by Arany)

    János Arany: …szerelme (1848–79; “Toldi’s Love”), and Toldi estéje (1854; “Toldi’s Evening”). Its hero, a youth of great physical strength, is taken from a verse chronicle written by Péter Ilosvai Selymes in the 16th century. Set in the 14th century, the first part of the trilogy relates the adventures of Toldi in…

  • Toldi szerelme (poem by Arany)

    János Arany: …is the trilogy Toldi (1847), Toldi szerelme (1848–79; “Toldi’s Love”), and Toldi estéje (1854; “Toldi’s Evening”). Its hero, a youth of great physical strength, is taken from a verse chronicle written by Péter Ilosvai Selymes in the 16th century. Set in the 14th century, the first part of the trilogy…

  • toldo (dwelling)

    South American nomad: Economic system: …skin-covered hut known as the toldo. The Yámana used a conical tepee-like shelter or a double lean-to. The Nambikwara used a lean-to in the dry season or camped under trees, sleeping on fire-warmed ground. During the rainy season a larger double lean-to was used. There were no permanent settlements, although…

  • Toldot Ya?aqov Yosef (work by Jacob Joseph of Polonnoye)

    Jacob Joseph Of Polonnoye: …main work was the controversial Toldot Ya?aqov Yosef (1780; “History of Jacob Joseph”), which not only related the teachings of the Ba?al Shem ?ov but also criticized traditional Jewish leadership and values. The work thus provoked anti-?asidic sentiment and was burned by some opponents of the movement. Other works include…

  • Toldy, John S. (Hungarian author)
  • t?le peinte (metalwork)

    Toleware, any object of japanned (varnished) tinplate and pewter. The term is derived from the French name for such objects, t?le peinte. The tinplate sheets of iron or steel dipped in molten tin or pewter (an alloy of tin and copper) were worked into a variety of domestic and decorative items,

  • Toledan school (Spanish translators’ school)

    Don Raimundo: …of Raimundo’s encouragement that the Toledan school of translators developed. Some effort to make available to Christians the learning of the Spanish Arabs had already begun, but Raimundo encouraged Spanish scholars to translate many important Arabic and Jewish works, unknown to Christians, into Latin. Soon foreign scholars arrived in Toledo…

  • Toledan Tables (astronomical tables)

    astronomy: The Islamic world: …of European astronomy was the Toledan Tables, compiled in Spain by a group of Muslim and Jewish astronomers, put into final form by Ibn al-Zarqallu around 1080, and translated into Latin soon after. (The Toledan Tables are mentioned by Chaucer in The Canterbury Tales.)

  • Toledo (Philippines)

    Toledo, city, on the western coast of Cebu island, central Philippines. It was the site of the country’s largest copper mine until it closed in 1994 after being flooded; operations resumed at the mine in 2008. The ore is extracted by strip or open-cut mining, concentrated, and trucked to the port

  • Toledo (Ohio, United States)

    Toledo, city, seat (1835) of Lucas county, northwestern Ohio, U.S., at the mouth of the Maumee River (bridged). It lies along Maumee Bay (southwestern tip of Lake Erie), about 55 miles (89 km) southwest of Detroit, Mich., and is a principal Great Lakes port, being the hub of a metropolitan complex

  • Toledo (province, Spain)

    Toledo, provincia (province) in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Castile–La Mancha, south-central Spain. It is bordered by the provinces of ávila and Madrid to the north, Cuenca to the east, Ciudad Real to the south, and Cáceres and Badajoz to the west. Most of the province is

  • Toledo (Spain)

    Toledo, city, capital of Toledo provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Castile–La Mancha, south-central Spain. It is situated on a rugged promontory washed on three sides by the Tagus River, 42 miles (67 km) south-southwest of Madrid. Of ancient origin, Toledo is

  • Toledo Manrique, Alejandro Celestino (president of Peru)

    Alejandro Toledo, Peruvian economist who served as president of Peru (2001–06). He was the country’s first democratically elected president of indigenous ancestry. He is known fondly by his supporters as “El Cholo” (“The Indian”). Toledo was the son of impoverished Quechuan farmers and grew up

  • Toledo University of Arts and Trades (university, Toledo, Ohio, United States)

    University of Toledo, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Toledo, Ohio, U.S. It offers more than 300 undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs through 13 schools and colleges. The main campus is in west Toledo; in addition there are the Scott Park campus of Energy and

  • Toledo War of 1835 (United States history)

    Michigan: Statehood and growth: …until 1837 by the so-called Toledo War, a boundary dispute with Ohio. The “war” centred on what was known as the Toledo Strip, a narrow piece of land on the southern Michigan border that ran westward from Toledo (on Lake Erie) to the Indiana border. According to the Ordinance of…

  • Toledo, Alejandro (president of Peru)

    Alejandro Toledo, Peruvian economist who served as president of Peru (2001–06). He was the country’s first democratically elected president of indigenous ancestry. He is known fondly by his supporters as “El Cholo” (“The Indian”). Toledo was the son of impoverished Quechuan farmers and grew up

  • Toledo, councils of (Roman Catholicism)

    Councils of Toledo, 18 councils of the Roman Catholic church in Spain, held in Toledo from about 400 to 702. At least 11 of these councils were considered national or plenary; the rest were provincial or local. The acts of all except the 18th have been preserved. A majority of those attending the

  • Toledo, Francisco de (Spanish viceroy)

    Peru: Colonial period: …until the viceregal administration of Francisco de Toledo (1569–81) was systematic control of the huge Indian population attempted. Toledo adapted Indian institutions to the purposes of Spanish authority. He ordered Indian chieftains to administer local Indian affairs according to native customs and traditions and made them responsible for collecting tribute…

  • Toledo, Juan Bautista de (Spanish architect)

    El Escorial: …was begun in 1563 by Juan Bautista de Toledo, a Renaissance Spanish architect who had worked earlier in Italy, and was completed after his death in 1567 by Juan de Herrera.

  • Toledo, Kingdom of (region, Spain)

    New Castile, historic provincial region, central upland Spain. It generally includes the area of the Moorish kingdom of Toledo annexed to the former kingdom of Castile in the 11th century ad. In modern Spanish geographic usage, New Castile as an administrative region included the provinces of C

  • Toledo, Siege of (Spanish history)

    Siege of Toledo, (1085). The Siege of Toledo was a key moment in the struggle between the Christians and Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula. The city was the capital of the Taifa kingdom of al-Andalus and its fall to King Alfonso VI of Castile spurred the Reconquista, the Christian conquest of Muslim

  • Toledo, University of (university, Toledo, Ohio, United States)

    University of Toledo, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Toledo, Ohio, U.S. It offers more than 300 undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs through 13 schools and colleges. The main campus is in west Toledo; in addition there are the Scott Park campus of Energy and

  • Toledo, Via (street, Naples, Italy)

    Naples: Via Toledo: From Piazza Trieste e Trento, the teeming thoroughfare of Via Toledo—named for the Spanish viceroy Don Pedro di Toledo, who laid it out in 1536—passes north into the dense centre of Naples. Its innumerable shops interspersed with grand churches, Via Toledo is banked…

  • Toledot ha-Ari (anonymous work)

    Isaac ben Solomon Luria: …story is an anonymous biography, Toledot ha-Ari (“Life of the Ari”), written or perhaps edited some 20 years after his death, in which factual and legendary elements are indiscriminately mingled. According to the Toledot, Luria’s father died while Isaac was a child, and his mother took him to Egypt to…

  • Tolentino de Almeida, Nicolau (Portuguese poet)

    Nicolau Tolentino de Almeida, Portugal’s leading satirical poet of the 18th century. At age 20 Tolentino entered the University of Coimbra to study law; he interrupted his studies three years later to become a teacher of rhetoric. In 1776 he was appointed to a post in Lisbon and the following year

  • Tolentino, Peace of (1797)

    Italy: French invasion of Italy: …ceded to them in the Peace of Tolentino (February 19, 1797). French armies also occupied the duchy of Modena and most of the grand duchy of Tuscany, including the port of Livorno. After defeating the Austrians on Venetian territory during the winter of 1796–97, Napoleon turned his offensive northward, crossing…

  • Tolerable Upper Intake Level (nutrition)

    human nutrition: Dietary Reference Intakes: Lastly, the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) is the highest level of a daily nutrient intake that will most likely present no risk of adverse health effects in almost all individuals in the general population (see table).

  • tolerance (sociology)

    Toleration, a refusal to impose punitive sanctions for dissent from prevailing norms or policies or a deliberate choice not to interfere with behaviour of which one disapproves. Toleration may be exhibited by individuals, communities, or governments, and for a variety of reasons. One can find

  • tolerance (physiology)

    drug use: Physiological effects of addiction: Tolerance is a physiological phenomenon that requires the individual to use more and more of the drug in repeated efforts to achieve the same effect. At a cellular level this is characterized by a diminishing response to a foreign substance (drug) as a result of…

  • tolerance (industrial engineering)

    drafting: Dimensions and tolerances: …feature is known as the tolerance. In the example above the tolerance is 0.010 (that is, 2.005 ? 1.995) inch. Unsatisfactory tolerancy of mating parts ordinarily results in a machine with improper function or greatly reduced useful life. On the other hand, the cost of production increases greatly as tolerances…

  • tolerance limit (statistics)

    public opinion: Size and precision: …statistical reliability (also known as margin of error or tolerance limit) is the same for a smaller country such as Trinidad and Tobago (with a population of roughly 1.3 million) as it is for China (the most populous country in the world)—so long as the quantity and locations of sampling…

  • Toleranzpatent (Holy Roman Empire)

    Edict of Toleration, (Oct. 19, 1781), law promulgated by the Holy Roman emperor Joseph II granting limited freedom of worship to non-Roman Catholic Christians and removing civil disabilities to which they had been previously subject in the Austrian domains, while maintaining a privileged position

  • toleration (sociology)

    Toleration, a refusal to impose punitive sanctions for dissent from prevailing norms or policies or a deliberate choice not to interfere with behaviour of which one disapproves. Toleration may be exhibited by individuals, communities, or governments, and for a variety of reasons. One can find

  • Toleration Act (United States [1819])

    New Hampshire: Ethnic and religious origins: …discarded in 1819 by the Toleration Act passed by the legislature. Since then all churches have been privately supported, and any denomination may function freely.

  • Toleration Act (Great Britain [1689])

    Toleration Act, (May 24, 1689), act of Parliament granting freedom of worship to Nonconformists (i.e., dissenting Protestants such as Baptists and Congregationalists). It was one of a series of measures that firmly established the Glorious Revolution (1688–89) in England. The Toleration Act

  • Toleration, Edict of (Holy Roman Empire)

    Edict of Toleration, (Oct. 19, 1781), law promulgated by the Holy Roman emperor Joseph II granting limited freedom of worship to non-Roman Catholic Christians and removing civil disabilities to which they had been previously subject in the Austrian domains, while maintaining a privileged position

  • toleration, religious

    Czechoslovak history: Re-Catholicization and absolutist rule: …the peasants, and he granted religious toleration. After the long period of oppression, these were hailed as beacons of light, although they did not go as far as enlightened minds expected. In fact, Joseph’s Edict of Toleration was not followed by a mass defection from the Roman Catholic Church in…

  • Toletum (Spain)

    Toledo, city, capital of Toledo provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Castile–La Mancha, south-central Spain. It is situated on a rugged promontory washed on three sides by the Tagus River, 42 miles (67 km) south-southwest of Madrid. Of ancient origin, Toledo is

  • toleware (metalwork)

    Toleware, any object of japanned (varnished) tinplate and pewter. The term is derived from the French name for such objects, t?le peinte. The tinplate sheets of iron or steel dipped in molten tin or pewter (an alloy of tin and copper) were worked into a variety of domestic and decorative items,

  • Toliara (Madagascar)

    Toliara, town, southwestern Madagascar. The town is a port on Saint-Augustin Bay of the Mozambique Channel and serves as the outlet for the agricultural products of the hinterland. It also ships marine products, processes sisal, produces soap and food products, and has a livestock-breeding station

  • Toliary (Madagascar)

    Toliara, town, southwestern Madagascar. The town is a port on Saint-Augustin Bay of the Mozambique Channel and serves as the outlet for the agricultural products of the hinterland. It also ships marine products, processes sisal, produces soap and food products, and has a livestock-breeding station

  • Toliattigrad (Russia)

    Tolyatti, city, Samara oblast (province), western Russia, on the Volga River. Founded as a fortress in 1738 and known as Stavropol, it was given city status in 1780 and again in 1946. Overshadowed by Samara, it remained unimportant until the beginning in 1950 of the huge V.I. Lenin barrage (dam)

  • Tolima (department, Colombia)

    Tolima, departamento, central Colombia, extending from the Andean Cordillera (mountains) Central across the Magdalena River valley to the Cordillera Oriental. Created in 1861, the department ranks first in Colombia in the production of rice and sesame; other crops grown in Tolima include cotton,

  • Tolima, Mount (mountain, Colombia)

    Mount Tolima, volcano in the Cordillera Central of the Andes Mountains, west-central Colombia. It is 17,105 feet (5,215 metres)

  • Tolima, Nevado del (mountain, Colombia)

    Mount Tolima, volcano in the Cordillera Central of the Andes Mountains, west-central Colombia. It is 17,105 feet (5,215 metres)

  • Tolita, La (archaeological site, Ecuador)

    Native American art: Colombia, Ecuador, and Brazil: …Ecuador the goldwork found at La Tolita is legendary and shows a skill in casting and overlay that did not seem to exist elsewhere in the region. In Peru most surviving goldwork was created by the Chimú and Nazca peoples. Yet, that this was a well-advanced art as early as…

  • Tolkappiyam (ancient Tamil text)

    South Asian arts: ?a?gam literature: The Tolkāppiyam was ascribed to the second ?a?gam, the eight anthologies and 10 long poems to the third; according to tradition, nothing is extant from the first ?a?gam. The early literature, itself known as Sa?gam, comprises 2,381 poems, ranging from four to nearly 800 lines each…

  • Tolkien (film by Karukoski [2019])

    Nicholas Hoult: …from 2019 included the biopic Tolkien, about the early years of the famed writer.

  • Tolkien, J. R. R. (English author)

    J.R.R. Tolkien, English writer and scholar who achieved fame with his children’s book The Hobbit (1937) and his richly inventive epic fantasy The Lord of the Rings (1954–55). At age four Tolkien, with his mother and younger brother, settled near Birmingham, England, after his father, a bank

  • Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel (English author)

    J.R.R. Tolkien, English writer and scholar who achieved fame with his children’s book The Hobbit (1937) and his richly inventive epic fantasy The Lord of the Rings (1954–55). At age four Tolkien, with his mother and younger brother, settled near Birmingham, England, after his father, a bank

  • toll

    Toll, sum levied on users of certain roads, highways, canals, bridges, tunnels, ferries, and other such conveniences, primarily to pay the construction and maintenance costs for those structures. Tolls were known in the ancient world and were especially popular in the European Middle Ages, when

  • toll office (telephone communications)

    telephone: The switching network: Atoll office was involved in switching traffic over long-distance (or toll) circuits.

  • Toll pathway (genetics)

    Jules Hoffmann: …signaling pathway, known as the Toll (from the German word meaning “amazing” or “great”) signaling pathway, resulted in reduced survival of Drosophila following fungal infection. The discovery was crucial because it revealed that the Toll pathway serves as a microbial sensor, activating intracellular signaling molecules in the presence of potentially…

  • Toll signaling pathway (genetics)

    Jules Hoffmann: …signaling pathway, known as the Toll (from the German word meaning “amazing” or “great”) signaling pathway, resulted in reduced survival of Drosophila following fungal infection. The discovery was crucial because it revealed that the Toll pathway serves as a microbial sensor, activating intracellular signaling molecules in the presence of potentially…

  • Toll, John (American cinematographer)
  • toll-like receptor 4 (gene)

    Bruce A. Beutler: …a mouse gene known as Tlr4 (toll-like receptor 4) that contribute to septic shock. Whereas the normal Tlr4 protein recognizes LPS and thereby mediates the immune response to bacteria carrying the toxin, the mutated version results in unchecked bacterial growth, such that when the body reacts, large quantities of bacteria-destroying…

  • Tollan (ancient city, Mexico)

    Tula, ancient capital of the Toltecs in Mexico, it was primarily important from approximately ad 850 to 1150. Although its exact location is not certain, an archaeological site near the contemporary town of Tula in Hidalgo state has been the persistent choice of historians. The archaeological

  • Tolland (county, Connecticut, United States)

    Tolland, county, north-central Connecticut, U.S. It is bordered to the north by Massachusetts and consists of an upland region forested by hardwoods and white pines. The county is drained by the Skungamaug, Willimantic, Fenton, and Hop rivers. Lakes include Mashapaug Pond and Wangumbaug and

  • Toller (breed of dog)

    Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever, breed of sporting dog developed in Canada in the 19th century to lure ducks within gunshot range. The dogs toll (entice) the ducks to approach by their antics onshore and retrieve the downed birds for the hunter. The smallest of the retrievers, the “toller”

  • Toller (play by Dorst)

    Tankred Dorst: …occurred with his 1968 play Toller, a drama based on the life of the writer Ernst Toller that examines the relationship between literature and politics. In the 1970s Dorst began to collaborate with Ursula Ehler, his wife, on a series of plays and novels. Most important is the Merz cycle,…

  • Toller, Ernst (German writer)

    Ernst Toller, dramatist, poet, and political activist, who was a prominent exponent of Marxism and pacifism in Germany in the 1920s. His Expressionist plays embodied his spirit of social protest. Toller studied at Grenoble University in France but went back to Germany in 1914 to join the army.

  • Tolley, Cyril (British golfer)

    golf: British tournaments and players: …by many outstanding players, including Cyril Tolley, Amateur champion in 1920 and 1929; Roger Wethered, Amateur champion in 1923; and Scots Hector Thomson, Jack McLean, and A.T. Kyle.

  • Tollund Man (preserved human remains, northern Europe)

    bog body: Tollund Man is perhaps the most famous bog person. His remains, as well as those of Elling Woman, which were found nearby, are on display at the Silkeborg Museum in Silkeborg, Denmark.

  • tollway (transportation)

    roads and highways: …charges is known as a tollway. In the United Kingdom freeways and expressways are referred to as motorways.

  • Tollymore Forest Park (park, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Down: Tollymore Forest Park, about 1,200 acres (500 hectares) of forest on the slopes of the Mourne Mountains in southern Down, was the first such park established in Northern Ireland (1955). Area former district, 249 square miles (646 square km). Pop. (2011) 69,731.

  • Tolman, Edward C. (American psychologist)

    Edward C. Tolman, American psychologist who developed a system of psychology known as purposive, or molar, behaviourism, which attempts to explore the entire action of the total organism. Brother of the chemist and physicist Richard C. Tolman, Edward Tolman taught psychology at the University of

  • Tolman, Edward Chace (American psychologist)

    Edward C. Tolman, American psychologist who developed a system of psychology known as purposive, or molar, behaviourism, which attempts to explore the entire action of the total organism. Brother of the chemist and physicist Richard C. Tolman, Edward Tolman taught psychology at the University of

  • Tolman, Richard C. (American physicist)

    Richard C. Tolman, U.S. physical chemist and physicist who demonstrated the electron to be the charge-carrying particle in the flow of electricity in metals and determined its mass. Tolman became professor and dean of graduate studies at the California Institute of Technology (1922–48), Pasadena.

  • Tolman, Richard Chace (American physicist)

    Richard C. Tolman, U.S. physical chemist and physicist who demonstrated the electron to be the charge-carrying particle in the flow of electricity in metals and determined its mass. Tolman became professor and dean of graduate studies at the California Institute of Technology (1922–48), Pasadena.

  • Tolman, Susan Lincoln (American missionary and educator)

    Susan Lincoln Tolman Mills, American missionary and educator who, with her husband, established what would become the first U.S. women’s college on the west coast. Susan Tolman graduated from Mount Holyoke Female Seminary (now Mount Holyoke College), South Hadley, Massachusetts, in 1845 and

  • Tolmeita (Libya)

    Ptolemais, coastal city of ancient Cyrenaica (now part of Libya). The site was easily defensible and provided the only safe anchorage between Euhesperides-Berenice (modern Benghazi) and Apollonia (modern Sūsah in Libya). In the 3rd century bc the city received the name Ptolemais from Ptolemy III,

  • Tolmer, Alex (Australian businessman)

    Hula Hoop: …in the 1950s Australian businessman Alex Tolmer was the first person to market a version made from a then-new material called plastic. In his Australian department store, Toltoys, Tolmer sold hundreds of thousands of Hula Hoops. American entrepreneurs Richard Knerr and Arthur Melin, the owners of the American toy company…

  • Tolmiea menziesii

    Pickaback plant, (Tolmiea menziesii), hairy-leaved herbaceous plant, in the family Saxifragaceae, native to western North America. The pickaback is a popular houseplant, particularly notable for its curious reproductive abilities: the leaves of the parent plant arise from an underground stem and,

  • Tolna (county, Hungary)

    Tolna, megye (county), south-central Hungary. It lies in the southern part of Transdanubia and borders the counties of Fejér to the north, Bács-Kiskun to the east, Baranya to the south, and Somogy to the west. Szekszárd has been the county seat since 1779. Other important towns include Bonyhád,

  • toloache (plant)

    datura: stramonium), toloache (D. innoxia), and sacred datura (D. wrightii), have long been used by various peoples, including Mexican Indians, in their religious ceremonies.

  • Toloache cult (religion)

    California Indian: Religion: … in the north and the Toloache in the south. Both involved the formal indoctrination of initiates and—potentially, depending upon the individual—a series of subsequent status promotions within the religious society; these processes could literally occupy initiates, members, and mentors throughout their lifetimes. Members of these religious societies exercised considerable economic,…

  • Tolosa (France)

    Toulouse, city, capital of Haute-Garonne département, Occitanie région, southern France. It is situated at the junction of the Canal Latéral à la Garonne and the Midi Canal, where the Garonne River curves northwest from the Pyrenean foothills. Founded in ancient times, it was the stronghold of the

  • Tolowa language

    Athabaskan language family: …only two languages, Hupa and Tolowa, are still spoken. The southwestern United States is home to the Apachean subgroup, which includes Navajo and the languages spoken by the Apache peoples. The Apachean languages are spoken mainly in Arizona and New Mexico. The languages spoken in the interior of Alaska and…

  • Tolpuddle Martyrs (English law case [1834])

    Tolpuddle Martyrs, six English farm labourers who were sentenced (March 1834) to seven years’ transportation to a penal colony in Australia for organizing trade-union activities in the Dorsetshire village of Tolpuddle. Their leaders, George and James Loveless (or Lovelace), had established a lodge

  • Tolsá, Manuel (Spanish-born sculptor and architect)

    Manuel Tolsá, Spanish-born sculptor and architect who introduced Neoclassicism to New Spain (Mexico). Tolsá studied Neoclassical sculpture at the Academia de San Carlos in Valencia, Spain. He gained acclaim early in his career and in 1790 was named director of sculpture at the Academia de San

  • Tolson, Melvin (American poet)

    Melvin Tolson, African-American poet who worked within the modernist tradition to explore African-American issues. His concern with poetic form and his abiding optimism set him apart from many of his contemporaries. Writing after the Harlem Renaissance but adhering to its ideals, Tolson was hopeful

  • Tolson, Melvin Beaunorus (American poet)

    Melvin Tolson, African-American poet who worked within the modernist tradition to explore African-American issues. His concern with poetic form and his abiding optimism set him apart from many of his contemporaries. Writing after the Harlem Renaissance but adhering to its ideals, Tolson was hopeful

  • Tolstaya, Tatyana (Russian writer)

    Russia: The 20th century: Tatyana Tolstaya began to occupy a prominent role following the publication of her novel The Slynx (2000), a satire about a disastrous hypothetical future for Moscow. Some critics considered the decade the “twilight period in Russian literature,” because of the departure from traditional psychological novels…

  • Tolstoi, Leo (Russian writer)

    Leo Tolstoy, Russian author, a master of realistic fiction and one of the world’s greatest novelists. Tolstoy is best known for his two longest works, War and Peace (1865–69) and Anna Karenina (1875–77), which are commonly regarded as among the finest novels ever written. War and Peace in

  • Tolstoy Farm (colony, Johannesburg, South Africa)

    Mahatma Gandhi: The religious quest: …near Johannesburg; it was named Tolstoy Farm for the Russian writer and moralist, whom Gandhi admired and corresponded with. Those two settlements were the precursors of the more-famous ashrams (religious retreats; see ashrama) in India, at Sabarmati near Ahmedabad (Ahmadabad) and at Sevagram near Wardha.

  • Tolstoy Memorial Museum (museum, Yasnaya Polyana, Russia)

    Yasnaya Polyana: The Tolstoy Memorial Museum complex includes the Volkonsky mansion built in the Neoclassical style, a servants’ house, coach houses, a park extending to the Voronka River, and Tolstoy’s home, with his library of some 22,000 books. The building where Tolstoy organized a school for peasants in…

  • Tolstoy or Dostoevsky (work by Steiner)

    George Steiner: Steiner’s first book, Tolstoy or Dostoevsky (1959), compares the two authors on the basis of historical, biographical, and philosophical data. Language and Silence (1967) is a collection of essays that examines the dehumanizing effect that World War II and the Holocaust had on literature. Steiner considered himself “at…

  • Tolstoy, Aleksey Konstantinovich, Graf (Russian writer)

    Aleksey Konstantinovich, Count Tolstoy, Russian poet, novelist, and dramatist, an outstanding writer of humorous and satirical verse, serious poetry, and novels and dramas on historical themes. A distant relative of Leo Tolstoy, Aleksey Konstantinovich held various honorary posts at court and spent

  • Tolstoy, Aleksey Nikolayevich, Graf (Soviet writer)

    Aleksey Nikolayevich, Count Tolstoy, novelist and short-story writer, a former nobleman and “White” Russian émigré who became a supporter of the Soviet regime and an honoured artist of the Soviet Union. The son of a count distantly related to the great 19th-century novelist Leo Tolstoy, he studied

  • Tolstoy, Dmitry Andreyevich, Graf (Russian statesman)

    Dmitry Andreyevich, Count Tolstoy, tsarist Russian government official known for his reactionary policies. Tolstoy was appointed to the education ministry in 1866, charged with imposing strict discipline on both the students and teachers and keeping them from exposure to revolutionary doctrines

  • Tolstoy, Leo (Russian writer)

    Leo Tolstoy, Russian author, a master of realistic fiction and one of the world’s greatest novelists. Tolstoy is best known for his two longest works, War and Peace (1865–69) and Anna Karenina (1875–77), which are commonly regarded as among the finest novels ever written. War and Peace in

  • Tolstoy, Lev Nikolayevich, Count (Russian writer)

    Leo Tolstoy, Russian author, a master of realistic fiction and one of the world’s greatest novelists. Tolstoy is best known for his two longest works, War and Peace (1865–69) and Anna Karenina (1875–77), which are commonly regarded as among the finest novels ever written. War and Peace in

  • Tolstoy, Pyotr Andreyevich, Graf (Russian statesman)

    Pyotr Andreyevich, Count Tolstoy, diplomat and statesman who was a close collaborator and influential adviser of Peter I the Great of Russia (reigned 1682–1725). The son of Andrey Vasilyevich Tolstoy, a court official, Pyotr Tolstoy became a stolnik, or steward, for Tsar Alexis. In May 1682 he

  • Toltec (people)

    Toltec, Nahuatl-speaking tribe who held sway over what is now central Mexico from the 10th to the 12th century ce. The name has many meanings: an “urbanite,” a “cultured” person, and, literally, the “reed person,” derived from their urban centre, Tollan (“Place of the Reeds”), near the modern town

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
港台一级毛片免费观看