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  • Toda (Japan)

    Toda, city, Saitama ken (prefecture), Honshu, Japan, on the alluvial plain of the Ara River. During the Tokugawa era (1603–1867) it was a post town and ferry station. The city is now linked to Tokyo city by bridge and has developed into an industrial suburb of the Tokyo-Yokohama metropolitan area.

  • Toda (people)

    Teda, people of the eastern and central Sahara (Chad, Niger, and Libya). Their language, also called Teda (or Tedaga), is closely related to the Kanuri and Zaghawa languages, and it belongs to the Saharan group of the Nilo-Saharan language family. Teda has northern and southern groups; the term

  • Toda (people, India)

    Toda, pastoral tribe of the Nīlgiri Hills of southern India. Numbering only about 800 in the early 1960s, they were rapidly increasing in population because of improved health facilities. The Toda language is Dravidian but is the most aberrant of that linguistic stock. The Toda live in settlements

  • Toda Jōsei (Japanese philosopher)

    Sōka-gakkai: His chief disciple, Toda Jōsei, revived the organization in 1946, renaming it Sōka-gakkai.

  • Toda language

    Dravidian languages: South Dravidian languages: The remaining South Dravidian languages—Toda, Kota, Irula, and Kurumba—are spoken by Scheduled Tribes (officially recognized indigenous peoples) in the Nilgiri Hills of southwestern Tamil Nadu, near Karnataka. Badaga, a dialect of Kannada, is also spoken in the Nilgiri Hills.

  • Todaga (people)

    Teda, people of the eastern and central Sahara (Chad, Niger, and Libya). Their language, also called Teda (or Tedaga), is closely related to the Kanuri and Zaghawa languages, and it belongs to the Saharan group of the Nilo-Saharan language family. Teda has northern and southern groups; the term

  • Tōdai Temple (temple, Nara, Japan)

    Tōdai Temple, monumental Japanese temple and centre of the Kegon sect of Japanese Buddhism, located in Nara. The main buildings were constructed between 745 and 752 ce under the emperor Shōmu and marked the adoption of Buddhism as a state religion. The temple, built just west of the earlier Kinshō

  • Tōdai-ji (temple, Nara, Japan)

    Tōdai Temple, monumental Japanese temple and centre of the Kegon sect of Japanese Buddhism, located in Nara. The main buildings were constructed between 745 and 752 ce under the emperor Shōmu and marked the adoption of Buddhism as a state religion. The temple, built just west of the earlier Kinshō

  • Today (American television program)

    Katie Couric: …1990 she started appearing on Today, a morning news and entertainment show.

  • Today (paintings by Kawara)

    On Kawara: …perhaps his best-known project, the Today series (sometimes known as the Date series). For the project, on every day he was so inclined, Kawara made a monochromatic painting upon which in white paint he carefully painted the date on which the painting was made. He followed several rules: any painting…

  • Today (British newspaper)

    history of publishing: The emergence of national newspapers: Entitled Today, it was the first national British paper produced entirely with the new technology and without cooperation from the traditional print unions. The paper was purchased in 1987 by Rupert Murdoch, who closed it in 1995. Before the end of the 20th century, USA Today…

  • Today We Live (film by Hawks [1933])

    Howard Hawks: Early life and work: …own short stories for Hawks’s Today We Live (1933). Among the soon-to-be notable actors who appeared in this World War I drama were Gary Cooper, Robert Young, and Franchot Tone.

  • Todd of Trumpington, Alexander Robertus Todd, Baron (British biochemist)

    Alexander Robertus Todd, Baron Todd, British biochemist whose research on the structure and synthesis of nucleotides, nucleosides, and nucleotide coenzymes gained him the 1957 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. After receiving doctorates from the universities of Frankfurt am Main (1931) and Oxford (1933),

  • Todd River (river, Northern Territory, Australia)

    Todd River, intermittent river in south-central Northern Territory, Australia. It rises in the MacDonnell Ranges and flows southeast for 200 miles (320 km), passing through Heavitree Gap and the town of Alice Springs and across sandhill country, eventually disappearing in the Simpson Desert. Its

  • Todd, Dolley (American first lady)

    Dolley Madison, American first lady (1809–17), the wife of James Madison, fourth president of the United States. Raised in the plain style of her Quaker family, she was renowned for her charm, warmth, and ingenuity. Her popularity as manager of the White House made that task a responsibility of

  • Todd, Mabel Loomis (American writer and editor)

    Mabel Loomis Todd, American writer and editor who was largely responsible for editing the first posthumously published editions of the poems of Emily Dickinson. Mabel Loomis graduated from Georgetown Seminary in Washington, D.C., and then studied at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston.

  • Todd, Mary Ann (American first lady)

    Mary Todd Lincoln, American first lady (1861–65), the wife of Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States. Happy and energetic in her youth, she suffered subsequent ill health and personal tragedies and behaved erratically in her later years. Mary Todd was the daughter of Robert Smith

  • Todd, Michael (American showman)

    Michael Todd, American showman with a flair for the flamboyant who is remembered as a film producer for Around the World in Eighty Days (1956). Todd made his first mark as a showman with a dancing revue at the Century of Progress exhibition in Chicago in 1933. He later wrote for the slapstick

  • Todd, Mike (American showman)

    Michael Todd, American showman with a flair for the flamboyant who is remembered as a film producer for Around the World in Eighty Days (1956). Todd made his first mark as a showman with a dancing revue at the Century of Progress exhibition in Chicago in 1933. He later wrote for the slapstick

  • Todd, Richard (Irish actor)

    Richard Todd, (Richard Andrew Palethorpe-Todd), Irish actor (born June 11, 1919, Dublin, Ire.—died Dec. 3, 2009, Little Humby, Lincolnshire, Eng.), earned a reputation for his intensity and force playing military men and dashing heroes in such films as Rob Roy, the Highland Rogue (1953), The Dam

  • Todd, Ron (British trade union leader)

    Ron Todd, British trade union leader (born March 11, 1927, London, Eng.—died April 30, 2005, Romford, Essex, Eng.), as the national organizer (1978–85) and general secretary (1985–92) of the Transport and General Workers’ Union (TGWU) and chairman (1985–92) of the Trades Union Congress (TUC) I

  • Todd, Ronald (British trade union leader)

    Ron Todd, British trade union leader (born March 11, 1927, London, Eng.—died April 30, 2005, Romford, Essex, Eng.), as the national organizer (1978–85) and general secretary (1985–92) of the Transport and General Workers’ Union (TGWU) and chairman (1985–92) of the Trades Union Congress (TUC) I

  • Todd, Sir Garfield (prime minister of Rhodesia and Nyasaland)

    Sir Garfield Todd, New Zealand-born politician (born July 13, 1908, Invercargill, N.Z.—died Oct. 13, 2002, Bulawayo, Zimb.), served from 1953 to 1958 as prime minister of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland (now divided into Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Malawi). In 1934 Todd went as a missionary to S

  • Todd, Sir Reginald Stephen Garfield (prime minister of Rhodesia and Nyasaland)

    Sir Garfield Todd, New Zealand-born politician (born July 13, 1908, Invercargill, N.Z.—died Oct. 13, 2002, Bulawayo, Zimb.), served from 1953 to 1958 as prime minister of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland (now divided into Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Malawi). In 1934 Todd went as a missionary to S

  • Todd, Thomas (United States jurist)

    Thomas Todd, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court (1807–26). Todd was admitted to the bar in 1786 and gained his first legal and political experience as a clerk for several citizens’ conventions called by the movement to separate Kentucky from its parent state, Virginia. After

  • Todd-AO (American film company and technique)

    Michael Todd: …the wide-screen film technique called Todd-AO, first used in the film version of Oklahoma! (1955). In October 1956 Around the World in Eighty Days in Todd-AO opened with a barrage of publicity generated by Todd. It won the Academy Award as best picture of the year.

  • toddler (human development)

    infant and toddler development: Toddler years: At the end of the first year of life, infants become toddlers. Between ages one and three, physical growth slows as toddlers learn to master motor and communication skills. Imitation continues to be a major element in normal development, often taking the shape…

  • toddler development

    Infant and toddler development, the physical, emotional, behavioral, and mental growth of children from ages 0 to 36 months. Different milestones characterize each stage of infant (0 to 12 months) and toddler (12 to 36 months) development. Although most healthy infants and toddlers reach each

  • toddy (palm beverage)

    coconut: Uses: Toddy, a beverage drunk fresh, fermented, or distilled, is produced from the sweetish sap yielded by the young flower stalks when wounded or cut; toddy is also a source of sugar and alcohol. Palm cabbage, the delicate young bud cut from the top of the…

  • toddy cat (mammal)

    civet: Except for the arboreal palm civets, such as Paradoxurus (also known as toddy cat because of its fondness for palm juice, or “toddy”) and Nandinia, civets are mainly terrestrial. The Sunda otter civet (Cynogale bennetti), the African civet (Civettictis civetta), and the rare Congo water civet (Genetta piscivora) are…

  • Todea (plant genus)

    fern: Annotated classification: cells; 4 genera (Osmunda, Osmundopteris, Todea, and Leptopteris) and 20 modern species, distributed nearly worldwide. Order Hymenophyllales Family Hymenophyllaceae (filmy ferns) Mostly rainforest epiphytes; mostly tiny ferns with blades only one cell thick between veins;

  • Todesengel (German physician)

    Josef Mengele, Nazi doctor at Auschwitz extermination camp (1943–45) who selected prisoners for execution in the gas chambers and conducted medical experiments on inmates in pseudoscientific racial studies. Mengele’s father was founder of a company that produced farm machinery, Firma Karl Mengele &

  • Todesfuge (poem by Celan)

    German literature: The post-1945 period: Stunde Null: Celan’s poem “Todesfuge” (“Death Fugue,” from his collection Mohn und Ged?chtnis [1952; “Poppy and Memory”]) is perhaps the best-known poem of the entire postwar period. Gottfried Benn’s lecture “Probleme der Lyrik” (1951; “Problems of the Lyric”), essentially a restatement of the formalist precepts of early 20th-century Modernism, enabled…

  • Todga (people)

    Teda, people of the eastern and central Sahara (Chad, Niger, and Libya). Their language, also called Teda (or Tedaga), is closely related to the Kanuri and Zaghawa languages, and it belongs to the Saharan group of the Nilo-Saharan language family. Teda has northern and southern groups; the term

  • Todi (Italy)

    Todi, town and episcopal see, Umbria regione, central Italy, south of Perugia. The town, on a hill overlooking the Tiber River, is of ancient Umbrian origin and served as an Etruscan fortress before becoming the Roman Tuder. Its extensive remains include an Etruscan necropolis, a Roman

  • Todidae (bird genus)

    Tody, any of five species of small, brilliantly coloured forest birds constituting the genus Todus of the order Coraciiformes. They occur in the West Indies. Four distinct but closely related broad-billed todies may be found on the islands of Cuba, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and Hispaniola (some

  • Todiramphus godeffroyi (bird)

    kingfisher: The Marquesan kingfisher (Todiramphus godeffroyi), one of the most endangered kingfishers, faces a different suite of threats. Once found on a handful of islands in the Marquesas chain, the species is now limited to only one, Tahuata. The bird’s decline has been attributed to habitat degradation…

  • Todleben, E. I. von (Russian military officer)

    Siege of Pleven: von Todleben, the engineer officer who had organized the defense of Sevastopol during the Crimean War, and Todleben pronounced in favour of a siege of Pleven. The other Turkish commanders did little to relieve the pressure on Osman Nuri Pa?a, who at last perceived that his…

  • Todman, Bill (American media producer)

    Mark Goodson: …his long association with fellow-producer Bill Todman after meeting him in 1941 while they were working on the radio quiz program Battle of the Boroughs. They sold Winner Take All to a radio station in 1946 and launched what would become a game show empire, including such radio shows as…

  • Todmorden (England, United Kingdom)

    Todmorden, town (parish), Calderdale metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, historic county of Yorkshire, northern England. It lies on the River Calder and the Rochdale Canal. Todmorden is surrounded by high moorland, and it is a junction for east-west rail routes across the

  • Todo sobre mi madre (film by Almodóvar [1999])

    Pedro Almodóvar: …Todo sobre mi madre (1999; All About My Mother), which he also wrote. The film—the bittersweet story of a woman’s search for her recently deceased son’s father—won an Academy Award for best foreign-language film, and Almodóvar was honoured as best director at the Cannes film festival. He received similar praise…

  • Todo verdor perecerá (work by Mallea)

    Eduardo Mallea: In Todo verdor perecerá (1941; All Green Shall Perish), which many consider his greatest work, he explored—by the use of interior monologue and flashback techniques—the anguish of a woman living in the provinces.

  • Todología (work by Vasconcelos)

    José Vasconcelos: …unity, is set forth in Todología (1952). He carried over his philosophy into his writings on Mexico, calling for a synthesis of Mexican life based upon the indigenous culture of the Indians, which transcended what he saw as the narrow limits of Western culture. He is most famous for his…

  • Todorov, Petko (Bulgarian writer)

    Bulgarian literature: Even more than Slaveykov, Petko Todorov, originator of the Bulgarian Romantic short story, believed that literature was sufficient unto itself; both in his Idilii (1908), prose poems inspired by folklore, and in several dramas based on Balkan mythology, notably Zidari (1906; “Masons”), is displayed his delicate poetic talent.

  • Todorov, Tzvetan (Franco-Bulgarian literary theorist and philosopher)

    Nancy Huston: …Franco-Bulgarian literary theorist and philosopher Tzvetan Todorov.

  • Todos lo saben (film by Farhadi [2018])

    Asghar Farhadi: …film Todos lo saben (2018; Everybody Knows), which starred Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem as Laura and Paco, former lovers who grow closer when Laura’s daughter is kidnapped.

  • Todos los fuegos el fuego (short stories by Cortázar)

    Julio Cortázar: …los fuegos el fuego (1966; All Fires the Fire, and Other Stories), Un tal Lucas (1979; A Certain Lucas), and Queremos tanto a Glenda, y otros relatos (1981; We Love Glenda So Much, and Other Tales). Cortázar also wrote poetry and plays and published numerous volumes of essays.

  • Todos los Santos, Lake (lake, Chile)

    Lake Todos los Santos, Lake, south-central Chile. It is located north of Puerto Montt. With neighbouring Lake Llanquihue, it is the best-known of Chilean lakes and is in a popular resort

  • Todos os Santos Bay (bay, Brazil)

    Todos os Santos Bay, sheltered bay of the Atlantic Ocean on the eastern coast of Brazil. A natural harbour, it is 25 miles (40 km) long and 20 miles (32 km) wide. Salvador, the principal seaport and capital of Bahia state, is on the peninsula that separates the bay from the Atlantic. Todos os

  • Todos Santos (California, United States)

    Concord, city, Contra Costa county, California, U.S. It lies 30 miles (50 km) east of San Francisco. The area was first inhabited by the Bay Miwok Indians and was explored by the Spanish in the late 18th century. A land grant, called Monte del Diablo, was made in 1834 to Don Salvio Pacheco. Laid

  • Todt, Fritz (German engineer)

    fortification: German channel defenses: The Germans employed Fritz Todt, the engineer who had designed the West Wall, and thousands of impressed labourers to construct permanent fortifications along the Belgian and French coasts facing the English Channel; this was the Atlantic Wall. The line consisted primarily of pillboxes and gun emplacements embedded in…

  • Todus (bird genus)

    Tody, any of five species of small, brilliantly coloured forest birds constituting the genus Todus of the order Coraciiformes. They occur in the West Indies. Four distinct but closely related broad-billed todies may be found on the islands of Cuba, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and Hispaniola (some

  • Todus angustirostris (bird)

    tody: The fifth, the narrow-billed tody (T. angustirostris), is found only on Hispaniola. About 9 to 12 cm (3.5 to 5 inches) long, all have grass-green backs and bright red bibs. They dig tiny nest burrows in sandbanks and feed on insects, caught on the wing.

  • Todus subulatus (bird)

    tody: Four distinct but closely related broad-billed todies may be found on the islands of Cuba, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and Hispaniola (some systems of classification group them in a single species, Todus subulatus). The fifth, the narrow-billed tody (T. angustirostris), is found only on Hispaniola. About 9 to 12 cm (3.5…

  • tody (bird genus)

    Tody, any of five species of small, brilliantly coloured forest birds constituting the genus Todus of the order Coraciiformes. They occur in the West Indies. Four distinct but closely related broad-billed todies may be found on the islands of Cuba, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and Hispaniola (some

  • toe (anatomy)

    artiodactyl: Limb adaptations for fast running: Pigs have four toes on each foot, but only two of them touch the ground. Their limbs are short and not very advanced. Peccaries have lost the outer accessory hind hoof in the back leg. All four toes of each foot of hippopotamuses touch the ground, and the…

  • TOE (physics)

    subatomic particle: A theory of everything: While GUTs resolve some of the problems with the Standard Model, they remain inadequate in a number of respects. They give no explanation, for example, for the number of pairs of quarks and leptons; they even raise the question of why such…

  • toe overhead lift (ice skating)

    figure skating: Lifts: In the toe overhead lift the couple skates down the ice with the man facing forward and the woman backward. She taps her toe into the ice, assisting her takeoff, as the man lifts her into an overhead position before placing her back on the ice.

  • toe pick (skating)

    ice skating: …were the addition of the toe pick, a group of sawlike teeth located at the toe of the blade, which enabled skaters to obtain better purchase in the ice when doing certain jumps, and the innovation of the “closed-toe” blade of one-piece steel, which added strength to the skate and…

  • Toeban (Indonesia)

    Tuban, city, northwestern East Java (Jawa Timur) propinsi (or provinsi; province), northern Java, Indonesia. It is a fishing port on the Java Sea, about 50 miles (80 km) northwest of Surabaya. Road and railway link it with Babat to the south, and it is connected by road with Rembang and Kudus to

  • toebiter (larva)

    dobsonfly: The larvae, sometimes known as hellgrammites or toe-biters, are aquatic and are eaten by fish, especially bass; they often are used as fish bait by anglers. Mature larvae migrate from their freshwater habitat to wet soil, moss, or decaying vegetation near the water to form pupal cells from which adults…

  • Tōei Company, Ltd. (Japanese company)

    Tōei Company, Ltd., leading Japanese motion-picture studio, the films of which are usually dramas and thrillers for children and rural audiences. Tōei was formed in 1951 from the Tōyoko and ōizumi Studios and the Tokyo Motion Picture Distribution Company. By 1954 it was producing two full-length

  • Toelle, Kathleen Joan (American author and forensic anthropologist)

    Kathy Reichs, American forensic anthropologist and author of a popular series of mystery books centring on the protagonist Temperance (“Bones”) Brennan. Reichs studied anthropology at American University, earning a B.A. in 1971. She then received an M.A. (1972) and a Ph.D. (1975) in physical

  • Toemoek-Hoemak Gebergte (mountains, South America)

    Tumuc-Humac Mountains, mountain range that forms the Brazilian border with French Guiana and Suriname. An eastern extension of the Acarai Mountains, the range extends for about 180 miles (290 km) in an east-west direction and attains elevations of 2,800 feet (850 m). The range constitutes part of t

  • Toeplitz, Jerzy Bonawentura (Polish historian)

    Jerzy Bonawentura Toeplitz, Ukrainian-born Polish motion-picture historian who was the first director of the Polish national film school at Lodz, 1949-52 and 1957-68, and of the Australian Film and Television School in Sydney, 1973-79 (b. Nov. 24, 1909--d. July 24,

  • Toeschi, Carlo Giuseppe (Italian composer)

    Mannheim school: …Holzbauer; Franz Xaver Richter; and Carlo Giuseppe Toeschi. These men established the supremacy of the Mannheim school and, in their orchestral works, initiated many of the effects that were to popularize it. The composers of the second generation are Anton Filtz; Johann Christian Cannabich, who perfected the orchestra; Anton and…

  • Toews, Jonathan (Canadian hockey player)

    Jonathan Toews, Canadian professional ice hockey player who, with the Chicago Blackhawks of the National Hockey League (NHL), won three Stanley Cup championships (2010, 2013, and 2015). In 2005 Toews enrolled at the University of North Dakota, where he played centre on the school’s hockey team. He

  • Tofalar (people)

    Tofalar, Turkic-speaking people of southern Siberia who numbered about 800 in the mid-1980s. Their traditional habitat was the northern slopes of the Eastern Sayan Mountains, where they lived by nomadic hunting and reindeer breeding. Of all the peoples of Siberia, only the Tofalar failed to develop

  • TOFC

    railroad: Development: …the rail piggybacking of highway trailers on flatcars (TOFC), which the Southern Pacific Railroad pioneered in 1953. By 1958 the practice had been adopted by 42 railroads; and by the beginning of the 1980s U.S. railroads were recording more than two million piggyback carloadings a year. In Europe, few railroads…

  • tofet (archaeology)

    Nora: …bc) is evidenced by a tophet, where the ashes and burned bones of children were buried in great jars under stelae carved with a temple facade and an image of the goddess Tanit. The Roman city dates from the late 1st century ad; a fine theatre, an aqueduct, a temple…

  • toffee (food)

    taffy: Toffee, a brittle confection of English origin, is a highly cooked mixture of syrup and butter to which nutmeats, flavourings, and colourings are commonly added during cooling.

  • Toffler, Alvin (American futurist)

    Alvin Toffler, (Alvin Eugene Toffler), American futurologist (born Oct. 4, 1928, New York, N.Y.—died June 27, 2016, Los Angeles, Calif.), wrote the immensely influential best-selling books Future Shock (1970) and The Third Wave (1980), in which he attempted to prognosticate and describe the

  • Toffler, Alvin Eugene (American futurist)

    Alvin Toffler, (Alvin Eugene Toffler), American futurologist (born Oct. 4, 1928, New York, N.Y.—died June 27, 2016, Los Angeles, Calif.), wrote the immensely influential best-selling books Future Shock (1970) and The Third Wave (1980), in which he attempted to prognosticate and describe the

  • Toft, Ralph (English potter)

    Thomas Toft: This group includes Ralph Toft, working in Staffordshire from 1670 to 1680, who may or may not have been related to Thomas Toft.

  • Toft, Thomas (English potter)

    Thomas Toft, one of the most prominent of the English potters working in Staffordshire during the 17th century. The Staffordshire potters were known for the excellence of their slipware, a kind of coarse earthenware decorated with a coloured clay and water mixture of creamlike consistency called

  • tofu (food)

    Tofu, soft, relatively flavourless food product made from soybeans. Tofu is an important source of protein in the cuisines of China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. It is believed to date from the Han dynasty (206 bce–220 ce). Tofu is made from dried soybeans that are soaked in water, crushed,

  • toga (clothing)

    Toga, characteristic loose, draped outer garment of Roman citizens. Adopted by the Romans from the Etruscans, it was originally worn by both sexes of all classes but was gradually abandoned by women, then by labouring people, and finally by the patricians themselves. Throughout the history of the

  • toga candida (clothing)

    toga: …candidates wore white togas (toga candida); freeborn boys, until puberty, wore a purple-bordered toga (toga praetexta); after reaching puberty, adolescents began to wear the plain man’s toga (toga pura, or toga virilis); people in mourning wore dark colours (toga pulla); and for triumphs and, in the later period, as…

  • toga picta (clothing)

    toga: …richly embroidered and patterned (toga picta). After about 100 ce the toga began to diminish in length.

  • toga praetexta (clothing)

    toga: …wore a purple-bordered toga (toga praetexta); after reaching puberty, adolescents began to wear the plain man’s toga (toga pura, or toga virilis); people in mourning wore dark colours (toga pulla); and for triumphs and, in the later period, as worn by consuls, the toga was richly embroidered and patterned…

  • toga pulla (clothing)

    toga: …mourning wore dark colours (toga pulla); and for triumphs and, in the later period, as worn by consuls, the toga was richly embroidered and patterned (toga picta). After about 100 ce the toga began to diminish in length.

  • toga pura (clothing)

    toga: …the plain man’s toga (toga pura, or toga virilis); people in mourning wore dark colours (toga pulla); and for triumphs and, in the later period, as worn by consuls, the toga was richly embroidered and patterned (toga picta). After about 100 ce the toga began to diminish in length.

  • toga virilis (clothing)

    toga: …the plain man’s toga (toga pura, or toga virilis); people in mourning wore dark colours (toga pulla); and for triumphs and, in the later period, as worn by consuls, the toga was richly embroidered and patterned (toga picta). After about 100 ce the toga began to diminish in length.

  • tōgaku (music)

    Japanese music: Influence of Tang-dynasty China: …was called Tang music (tōgaku). In Japan, as in Korea, the establishment and maintenance of such a music has made it possible for modern listeners to hear foreign versions of famous pieces long forgotten in the country of their origin. For example, there are names of pieces played and…

  • Togaviridae (virus group)

    Togavirus, any of three genera of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) of the family Togaviridae. Flaviviruses, once considered to be of the Togaviridae, are now designated as members of a separate family, Flaviviridae. The togavirus genera are Alphavirus, which is carried by mosquitoes, and

  • togavirus (virus group)

    Togavirus, any of three genera of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) of the family Togaviridae. Flaviviruses, once considered to be of the Togaviridae, are now designated as members of a separate family, Flaviviridae. The togavirus genera are Alphavirus, which is carried by mosquitoes, and

  • Togbo (people)

    Banda, a people of the Central African Republic, some of whom also live in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Cameroon and possibly in Sudan. The Banda speak a language of the Adamawa-Ubangi subgroup of the Niger-Congo language family that is related to that of their Gbaya and Ngbandi

  • Together Again (film by Vidor [1944])

    Charles Vidor: Rita Hayworth: Cover Girl and Gilda: He then made Together Again (1944), a popular romantic comedy starring Charles Boyer and Irene Dunne as a sculptor and a mayor who is a widow, respectively. In A Song to Remember (1945), Cornel Wilde gave an Academy Award-nominated performance as Frédéric Chopin, and Merle Oberon

  • Together for Macedonia (political coalition, North Macedonia)

    North Macedonia: Political process: …for Macedonia, evolved into the Sun Coalition for Europe, which captured nearly one-fourth of the seats in parliament in the 2008 election. Other significant political parties include the Democratic Union for Integration and the Democratic Party of Albanians. At the beginning of the 21st century, a concentrated effort was made…

  • Together Through Life (album by Dylan)

    Bob Dylan: ” In 2009 Dylan released Together Through Life, which debuted at the top of the British and American album charts. He was still actively performing as he entered his 70s, and his 35th studio album, the rootsy Tempest (2012), found him as vigorous as ever. Dylan then turned his attention…

  • Toggenburg (breed of goat)

    Toggenburg, breed of dairy goat originating in the Toggenburg valley of Switzerland. The oldest breed of dairy goat in the United States, the Toggenburg has proved widely adaptable. It is characterized by a comparatively small, solid-coloured body of any shade of brown, white ears with a dark

  • Toggenburg Succession (Swiss history)

    Toggenburg Succession, in Swiss history, a long territorial dispute that gave rise to the Old Zürich War (1436–50) and the Second Villmergen War (1712). In the Middle Ages the counts of Toggenburg, as vassals of the German kings or Holy Roman emperors, held extensive possessions in what is now

  • Toggenburg War (Swiss history)

    Toggenburg Succession: …reassert his traditional rights over Toggenburg in order to strengthen Swiss Catholicism provoked the leading Protestant confederates, Zürich and Bern, to undertake the Toggenburg (or Second Villmergen) War, in which they quickly defeated the Abbot’s five Catholic supporters, Luzern, Uri, Schwyz, Unterwalden, and Zug. The final settlement, under which the…

  • toggle mechanism (machine part)

    Toggle mechanism, combination of solid, usually metallic links (bars), connected by pin (hinge) joints that are so arranged that a small force applied at one point can create a much larger force at another point. In the Figure, showing a toggle mechanism at work in a rock-crushing machine, the

  • toggle switch (electronics)

    electric switch: …of switches; a common type—the toggle, or tumbler, switch—is widely used in home lighting and other applications. The so-called mercury, or “silent,” switch is used extensively for controlling home lighting circuits. The oil switch has its live parts immersed in oil to reduce arcing. The aggregate of switching or circuit-breaking…

  • Toghril (Mongolian khan)

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