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  • Tiruchchirappalli (India)

    Tiruchchirappalli, city, east-central Tamil Nadu state, southeastern India. It lies at the head of the Kaveri (Cauvery) River delta, about 30 miles (50 km) west of Thanjavur. The city also includes administratively the pilgrimage centre of Srirangam. Tiruchchirappalli was an important regional

  • Tiruchelvam, Neelan (Sri Lankan lawyer and politician)

    Neelan Tiruchelvam, Sri Lankan lawyer and politician who was a reform-minded member of parliament for the moderate Tamil United Liberation Front, a Harvard University–educated legal scholar in the field of international human rights, director of the International Centre for Ethnic Studies in

  • Tiruchirappali (India)

    Tiruchchirappalli, city, east-central Tamil Nadu state, southeastern India. It lies at the head of the Kaveri (Cauvery) River delta, about 30 miles (50 km) west of Thanjavur. The city also includes administratively the pilgrimage centre of Srirangam. Tiruchchirappalli was an important regional

  • Tirukku?a? (work by Tiruvalluvar)

    Tirukkural, (Tamil: “Sacred Couplets”) the most celebrated of the Patiren-kirkkanakku (“Eighteen Ethical Works”) in Tamil literature and a work that has had an immense influence on Tamil culture and life. It is usually attributed to the poet Tiruvalluvar, who is thought to have lived in India in

  • Tirukkural (work by Tiruvalluvar)

    Tirukkural, (Tamil: “Sacred Couplets”) the most celebrated of the Patiren-kirkkanakku (“Eighteen Ethical Works”) in Tamil literature and a work that has had an immense influence on Tamil culture and life. It is usually attributed to the poet Tiruvalluvar, who is thought to have lived in India in

  • Tirukural (work by Tiruvalluvar)

    Tirukkural, (Tamil: “Sacred Couplets”) the most celebrated of the Patiren-kirkkanakku (“Eighteen Ethical Works”) in Tamil literature and a work that has had an immense influence on Tamil culture and life. It is usually attributed to the poet Tiruvalluvar, who is thought to have lived in India in

  • Tirumala (hill, India)

    Tirupati: The sacred hill of Tirumala is situated about 6 miles (10 km) northwest of Tirupati in Sri Venkateshwara Sanctuary and National Park. The hill was considered so holy that before 1870 non-Hindus were not permitted to ascend it. At the hill’s summit, at an elevation of 2,800 feet (850…

  • Tirumala (Vijayanagar ruler)

    Aravidu dynasty: Its founder was Tirumala, whose brother Rama Raya had been the masterful regent of the Sadasiva Raya of the Tuluva dynasty. Rama Raya’s death at the Battle of Rakasa-Tangadi (also known as Talikota) in 1565 and the subsequent destruction of Vijayanagar by the combined forces of the Muslim…

  • Tirumūlar (Indian mystic)

    South Asian arts: Bhakti poetry: Tirumūlar was a mystic and reformer in the so-called Siddhānta (Perfected Man) school of ?aivism, which rejected caste and asceticism, and believed that the body is the true temple of ?iva. There were 12 early Nāya?ār saints. Similar poets, in the tradition of devotion to…

  • Tirunelveli (India)

    Tirunelveli, city, southern Tamil Nadu state, southeastern India. It lies along the Tambraparni River slightly upstream from the town of Palayankottai, with which it is now merged administratively. Its name is derived from the Tamil words tiru (“holy”), nel (“paddy”), and veli (“fence”), referring

  • Tirupati (India)

    Tirupati, city, southeastern Andhra Pradesh state, southern India. It lies in the Palkonda Hills, about 8 miles (13 km) northeast of Chandragiri and 67 miles (108 km) northwest of Chennai in Tamil Nadu state. Tirupati is known as the abode of the Hindu god Venkateshvara, Lord of Seven Hills. The

  • Tiruppan (Indian poet-saint)

    Tiruppan, one of the “later” or “minor” South Indian poet-saint devotees of Vishnu known as the ā?vārs. Very little is known about either the work or the life of Tiruppan. His name means “the saint who was a bard,” and legend has it that Tiruppan was indeed a member of this group, which, by the 9th

  • Tiruppanalvar (Indian poet-saint)

    Tiruppan, one of the “later” or “minor” South Indian poet-saint devotees of Vishnu known as the ā?vārs. Very little is known about either the work or the life of Tiruppan. His name means “the saint who was a bard,” and legend has it that Tiruppan was indeed a member of this group, which, by the 9th

  • Tiruppur (India)

    Tiruppur, city, western Tamil Nadu state, south-central India. It lies on an upland plateau, on the Noyil River (a tributary of the Kaveri [Cauvery] River), about 25 miles (40 km) east of Coimbatore. Tiruppur is an active cotton-ginning and distribution centre with rail connections to Coimbatore

  • Tiruvachakam (collection by Manikkavachakar)

    Manikkavachakar: His best-known work is the Tiruvachakam, or “Blessed Utterance,” which became the inspiration for later Tamil bhakti poetry. The text is a collection of poems and songs dedicated to Shiva, who is said to take on human form and teach the means to salvation to people of all classes. The…

  • Tiruvalluvar (Indian poet)

    Tiruvalluvar, Tamil poet-saint known as the author of the Tirukkural (“Sacred Couplets”), considered a masterpiece of human thought, compared in India and abroad to the Bible, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, and the works of Plato. Little is known about the life of Tiruvalluvar except that he is

  • Tiruvanantapuram (India)

    Thiruvananthapuram, city, capital of Kerala state, southwestern India. It is situated along the Arabian Sea with isolated hills on a coastal plain. The community became prominent under Raja Martanda Varma, who made it the capital of his kingdom of Travancore in 1745. The city’s former name,

  • Tiryns (ancient city, Greece)

    Tiryns, prehistoric city in the Argolis, Greece, noted for its architectural remains of the Homeric period. Excavations show the area to have been inhabited from the Neolithic Age. Not later than the beginning of the Early Bronze Age, or Early Helladic Period (c. 3000–c. 2200 bc), a pre-Greek

  • ?’Tis Pity She’s a Whore (play by Ford)

    ’Tis Pity She’s a Whore, five-act tragedy by John Ford, performed sometime between 1629 and 1633 and published in 1633. The story concerns the incestuous love of Giovanni and his sister Annabella. When she is found to be pregnant, she agrees to marry her suitor Soranzo. The lovers’ secret is

  • Tisa River (river, Europe)

    Tisza River, a major tributary of the middle Danube River, rising in the Bukovina segment of the Carpathian Mountains. Its two headstreams, the Black and White Tisza, unite east of Sighet on the Ukraine-Romania border. From Sighet, Romania, the Tisza flows northwest through a small portion of

  • Tisbe reticulata (copepod)

    evolution: Overdominance: …in the marine copepod crustacean Tisbe reticulata. Three populations of colour variants (morphs) are found in the lagoon of Venice; they are known as violacea (homozygous genotype VVVV), maculata (homozygous genotype VMVM), and violacea-maculata (heterozygous genotype VVVM

  • Tiscapa, Lake (lake, Nicaragua)

    Nicaragua: Drainage: …properties ascribed to them; and Lake Tiscapa is located in the capital city.

  • Tisch School of the Arts (school, New York City, New York, United States)

    Lawrence Rhodes: …at the New York University Tisch School of the Arts, where he eventually became chairman of the dance department. From 1989 to 1999 he was artistic director of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens. In 2002 Rhodes became artistic director of the Juilliard School’s dance division; he held the post until 2017.

  • Tisch, Harry (German official)

    Harry Tisch, East German chairman of the Free German Trade Union Federation, 1975-89, and the first member of the East German Politboro to be tried for corruption in reunified Germany (b. March 18, 1927--d. June 18,

  • Tisch, Larry (American executive)

    Laurence Alan Tisch, (“Larry”), American entrepreneur, investor, and media executive (born March 5, 1923, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Nov. 15, 2003, New York, N.Y.), bought the Loews theatre chain in partnership with his brother, Bob, and built it into Loews Corp., a multibillion-dollar conglomerate. In 1

  • Tisch, Laurence Alan (American executive)

    Laurence Alan Tisch, (“Larry”), American entrepreneur, investor, and media executive (born March 5, 1923, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Nov. 15, 2003, New York, N.Y.), bought the Loews theatre chain in partnership with his brother, Bob, and built it into Loews Corp., a multibillion-dollar conglomerate. In 1

  • Tisch, Preston Robert (American financier and philanthropist)

    Preston Robert Tisch, American financier and philanthropist (born April 29, 1926, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Nov. 15, 2005, New York, N.Y.), owned, with his brother, the Loews Hotel chain and, with the Mara family, the New York Giants football team. In the 1970s Tisch opened the restaurant at his R

  • Tisch, Steve (American producer and actor)
  • Tischbein, Johann Heinrich Wilhelm (German painter)

    Johann Heinrich Wilhelm Tischbein, German portraitist and friend of the writer J.W. von Goethe. Tischbein began his career painting portraits at the Prussian court in Berlin. In 1779 he went to Italy and in 1789 was appointed director of the art academy in Naples. Forced to leave in 1799 because of

  • Tischendorf, Konstantin von (German scholar)

    Konstantin von Tischendorf, German biblical critic who made extensive and invaluable contributions to biblical textual criticism, famous for his discovery of the Codex Sinaiticus, a celebrated manuscript of the Bible. While a student at the University of Leipzig, Tischendorf began his work on the

  • Tischendorf, Lobegott Friedrich Konstantin von (German scholar)

    Konstantin von Tischendorf, German biblical critic who made extensive and invaluable contributions to biblical textual criticism, famous for his discovery of the Codex Sinaiticus, a celebrated manuscript of the Bible. While a student at the University of Leipzig, Tischendorf began his work on the

  • Tischeriidae (insect)

    lepidopteran: Annotated classification: Family Tischeriidae (trumpet leaf miner moths) Approximately 80 species predominantly in North America; not found in Australia or the rest of Oceania. Superfamily Incurvarioidea More than 500 species; all females with an extensible, piercing ovipositor for inserting eggs into plant tissue. Family Incurvariidae

  • Tischerioidea (insect superfamily)

    lepidopteran: Annotated classification: Superfamily Tischerioidea Approximately 80 species in a single family. Family Tischeriidae (trumpet leaf miner moths) Approximately 80 species predominantly in North America; not found in Australia or the rest of Oceania. Superfamily Incurvarioidea

  • Tischreden (work by Luther)

    Martin Luther: Controversies after the Diet of Worms: Table Talks, a collection of Luther’s comments at the dinner table as recorded by one of his student boarders, pays tribute to “Dr. Katie” as a skillful household manager and as a partner in theological conversations. The couple had five children: Johannes, Magdalene, Martin, Paul,…

  • Tisci, Riccardo (Italian fashion designer)

    Hubert de Givenchy: Italian designer Riccardo Tisci took the reigns in 2005.

  • Tisdale, Elkanah (American cartoonist)

    gerrymandering: A satirical cartoon by Elkanah Tisdale that appeared in the Boston Gazette graphically transformed the districts into a fabulous animal, “The Gerry-mander,” fixing the term in the popular imagination.

  • Tisdale, Wayman Lawrence (American basketball player and musician)

    Wayman Lawrence Tisdale, American basketball player and smooth jazz musician (born June 9, 1964, Tulsa, Okla.—died May 15, 2009, Tulsa), after winning acclaim as a college and professional basketball player, became a top-selling smooth jazz recording artist. Tisdale was a star player at the

  • Tiselius, Arne (Swedish biochemist)

    Arne Tiselius, Swedish biochemist who won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1948 for his work on electrophoresis and adsorption analysis. As an assistant to The Svedberg at the University of Uppsala (1925–32), Tiselius developed the use of electrophoresis for the delicate task of separating proteins

  • Tiselius, Arne Wilhelm Kaurin (Swedish biochemist)

    Arne Tiselius, Swedish biochemist who won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1948 for his work on electrophoresis and adsorption analysis. As an assistant to The Svedberg at the University of Uppsala (1925–32), Tiselius developed the use of electrophoresis for the delicate task of separating proteins

  • Tish (Canadian magazine)

    Canadian literature: Poetry and poetics: …of the Vancouver poetry magazine Tish, explored his roots in the Kootenays in Pictograms from the Interior of B.C. (1975), later turning to his mixed heritage and Chinese background in Rooftops (1988) and So Far (1991). David Zieroth (who has also published as Dale Zieroth) recalled his childhood on a…

  • Tisha be-Av (Jewish fast)

    Tisha be-Av, in Judaism, traditional day of mourning for the destruction of the First and Second Temples. According to the Talmud, other disastrous events such as the following occurred on Av 9: the decree that the Jews would wander 40 years in the wilderness; the fall of Bethar in ad 135, ending

  • Tishbi (work by Levita)

    Elijah Bokher Levita: His lexicon Tishbi (1542) explained much of the Mishnaic Hebrew language and was a supplement to two important earlier dictionaries.

  • Tishman, John (American businessman)

    John Tishman, (John Louis Tishman), American businessman (born Jan. 24, 1926, New York, N.Y.—died Feb. 6, 2016, Bedford, N.Y.), as head of the construction division and later as chairman and CEO of Tishman Realty and Construction, supervised the building of the 100-story John Hancock Center in

  • Tishman, John Louis (American businessman)

    John Tishman, (John Louis Tishman), American businessman (born Jan. 24, 1926, New York, N.Y.—died Feb. 6, 2016, Bedford, N.Y.), as head of the construction division and later as chairman and CEO of Tishman Realty and Construction, supervised the building of the 100-story John Hancock Center in

  • Tishri (Jewish month)

    Judaism: Months and notable days: …notable days are as follows:

  • Tishtrya (Iranian god)

    ancient Iranian religion: Tishtrya and Tīri: ” Astral deities seem to have figured much more prominently in ancient Iranian religion than in Vedic religion, and this may well be attributed to the influence of Babylonian science on the Iranians, particularly the western groups. In the Avesta such stars and…

  • Tisi, Benvenuto (Italian painter)

    Benvenuto Garofalo, Italian painter, one of the most prolific 16th-century painters of the Ferrarese school. Garofalo’s first apprenticeship was with Domenico Panetti and later with the Cremonese painter Boccaccio Boccaccino. Garofalo’s two visits to Rome in the first and second decades of the

  • Tisi, Benvenuto (Italian painter)

    Benvenuto Garofalo, Italian painter, one of the most prolific 16th-century painters of the Ferrarese school. Garofalo’s first apprenticeship was with Domenico Panetti and later with the Cremonese painter Boccaccio Boccaccino. Garofalo’s two visits to Rome in the first and second decades of the

  • Tisiphone (Greek mythology)

    Furies: …them Allecto (“Unceasing in Anger”), Tisiphone (“Avenger of Murder”), and Megaera (“Jealous”). They lived in the underworld and ascended to earth to pursue the wicked. Being deities of the underworld, they were often identified with spirits of the fertility of the earth. Because the Greeks feared to utter the dreaded…

  • Tisisat Falls (waterfall, Ethiopia)

    river: Waterfalls: …Tugela Falls, in South Africa; Tisisat Falls, at the headwaters of the Blue Nile on the Ethiopian Plateau; and Angel Falls, in Venezuela.

  • Tiso, Josef (Slovak priest and statesman)

    Jozef Tiso, Slovak priest and statesman who fought for Slovak autonomy within the Czechoslovak nation during the interwar period and headed the German puppet state of independent Slovakia (1939–45) until he was overthrown by the Red Army and Czechoslovak Partisans at the end of World War II.

  • Tiso, Jozef (Slovak priest and statesman)

    Jozef Tiso, Slovak priest and statesman who fought for Slovak autonomy within the Czechoslovak nation during the interwar period and headed the German puppet state of independent Slovakia (1939–45) until he was overthrown by the Red Army and Czechoslovak Partisans at the end of World War II.

  • Tisquantum (Native American interpreter and guide)

    Squanto, Native American interpreter and guide. Squanto was born into the Pawtuxet people who occupied lands in present-day Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Little is known about his early life. Some authorities believe that he was taken from home to England in 1605 by George Weymouth and returned

  • Tissa (king of Sri Lanka)

    Mahavihara: …by the Sinhalese king Devanampiya Tissa not long after his conversion to Buddhism by the Indian monk Mahendra. Until about the 10th century, it was a great cultural and religious centre and the chief stronghold of Theravada Buddhism. Because of the extreme importance of Buddhism in Ceylon, the prestige of…

  • Tissandier, Albert (French aviator)

    airship: In 1883 Albert and Gaston Tissandier of France became the first to successfully power an airship using an electric motor. The first rigid airship, with a hull of aluminum sheeting, was built in Germany in 1897. Alberto Santos-Dumont, a Brazilian living in Paris, set a number of…

  • Tissandier, Gaston (French aviator)

    airship: In 1883 Albert and Gaston Tissandier of France became the first to successfully power an airship using an electric motor. The first rigid airship, with a hull of aluminum sheeting, was built in Germany in 1897. Alberto Santos-Dumont, a Brazilian living in Paris, set a number of records in…

  • Tissaphernes (Persian satrap)

    Tissaphernes, Persian satrap (governor) who played a leading part in Persia’s struggle to reconquer the Ionian Greek cities of Asia Minor that had been held by Athens since 449. In 413 Tissaphernes, who was then satrap of Lydia and Caria, formed an alliance with Sparta, and by the next year he h

  • Tisse, Eduard (Soviet cinematographer)

    history of the motion picture: The Soviet Union: …therefore enlisted the aid of Eduard Tisse, a brilliant cinematographer at the state-owned Goskino studios, beginning a lifelong artistic collaboration. Strike is a semidocumentary representation of the brutal suppression of a strike by tsarist factory owners and police. In addition to being Eisenstein’s first film, it was also the first…

  • Tisserand parameter (astronomy)

    comet: Dynamics: …involved a quantity called the Tisserand parameter:

  • Tisserand’s parameter (astronomy)

    comet: Dynamics: …involved a quantity called the Tisserand parameter:

  • Tisserand, Félix (French astronomer)

    Félix Tisserand, French astronomer noted for his textbook Traité de mécanique céleste, 4 vol. (1889–96; “Treatise on Celestial Mechanics”). This work, an update of Pierre-Simon Laplace’s work on the same subject, is still used as a sourcebook by authors writing on celestial mechanics. Before

  • Tisserand, Fran?ois-Félix (French astronomer)

    Félix Tisserand, French astronomer noted for his textbook Traité de mécanique céleste, 4 vol. (1889–96; “Treatise on Celestial Mechanics”). This work, an update of Pierre-Simon Laplace’s work on the same subject, is still used as a sourcebook by authors writing on celestial mechanics. Before

  • Tisserand, Gérard Marcel (French singer)

    Gérard Souzay, (Gérard Marcel Tisserand), French concert and opera singer (born Dec. 8, 1918, Angers, France—died Aug. 17, 2004, Antibes, France), performed in concerts and recitals around the world for more than three decades and made hundreds of recordings; he was best known for his sensitive i

  • Tissot, James (French artist)

    James Tissot, French painter, engraver, and enameler noted for his portraits of late Victorian society. After receiving a religious education, Tissot went to Paris at age 19 to study art. In 1859 he exhibited at the Salon (an official exhibition sponsored by the French government). Turning from his

  • Tissot, James-Joseph-Jacques (French artist)

    James Tissot, French painter, engraver, and enameler noted for his portraits of late Victorian society. After receiving a religious education, Tissot went to Paris at age 19 to study art. In 1859 he exhibited at the Salon (an official exhibition sponsored by the French government). Turning from his

  • tissue (biology)

    Tissue, in physiology, a level of organization in multicellular organisms; it consists of a group of structurally and functionally similar cells and their intercellular material. By definition, tissues are absent from unicellular organisms. Even among the simplest multicellular species, such as

  • tissue bank (medicine)

    transplant: Organ and tissue banks: Without a blood supply, organs deteriorate rapidly. Cooling can slow down the process but cannot stop it. Organs differ in their susceptibility to damage. At body temperature, irreversible destruction of the brain occurs after more than 3 to 5 minutes; of the heart,…

  • tissue culture (biology)

    Tissue culture, a method of biological research in which fragments of tissue from an animal or plant are transferred to an artificial environment in which they can continue to survive and function. The cultured tissue may consist of a single cell, a population of cells, or a whole or part of an

  • tissue engineering (biology)

    Tissue engineering, scientific field concerned with the development of biological substitutes capable of replacing diseased or damaged tissue in humans. The term tissue engineering was introduced in the late 1980s. By the early 1990s the concept of applying engineering to the repair of biological

  • tissue expander (medicine)

    therapeutics: Reconstructive surgery: Tissue expanders are another way of creating extra tissue that can be used to cover a defect. Inflatable plastic reservoirs are implanted under the normal skin of an adjacent area. For several weeks the reservoir is expanded with saline to stretch the overlying skin, which…

  • tissue factor (biochemistry)

    bleeding and blood clotting: The extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation: …blood clotting is known as tissue factor, or tissue thromboplastin. Tissue factor is found in many of the cells of the body but is particularly abundant in those of the brain, lungs, and placenta. The pathway of blood coagulation activated by tissue factor, a protein extrinsic to blood, is known…

  • tissue plasminogen activator (protein)

    fibrinolytic drug: Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) stimulates fibrinolysis, and it has several important advantages over streptokinase and urokinase in treating coronary thrombosis. It binds readily to fibrin and, after intravenous administration, activates only the plasminogen that is bound to the clot; thus, fibrinolysis occurs in the absence…

  • tissue respiration (biochemistry)

    Cellular respiration, the process by which organisms combine oxygen with foodstuff molecules, diverting the chemical energy in these substances into life-sustaining activities and discarding, as waste products, carbon dioxide and water. Organisms that do not depend on oxygen degrade foodstuffs in a

  • tissue scaffold (biology)

    regenerative medicine: Tissue scaffolds and soluble repair factors: Scaffolds and soluble factors, such as proteins and small molecules, have been used to induce tissue repair by undamaged cells at the site of injury. These agents protect resident fibroblasts and adult stem cells and stimulate the migration of…

  • tissue stem cell (biology)

    stem cell: Adult stem cells: Some tissues in the adult body, such as the epidermis of the skin, the lining of the small intestine, and bone marrow, undergo continuous cellular turnover. They contain stem cells, which persist indefinitely, and a much larger number of “transit amplifying cells,”…

  • tissue system (biology)

    Tissue, in physiology, a level of organization in multicellular organisms; it consists of a group of structurally and functionally similar cells and their intercellular material. By definition, tissues are absent from unicellular organisms. Even among the simplest multicellular species, such as

  • tissue thromboplastin (biochemistry)

    bleeding and blood clotting: The extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation: …blood clotting is known as tissue factor, or tissue thromboplastin. Tissue factor is found in many of the cells of the body but is particularly abundant in those of the brain, lungs, and placenta. The pathway of blood coagulation activated by tissue factor, a protein extrinsic to blood, is known…

  • tissue typing (medicine)

    transplant: Selection of donor and tissue matching: Tissue typing involves the identification of an individual’s HLA antigens. Lymphocytes are used for typing. It is important also that the red blood cells be grouped, since red-cell-group antigens are present in other tissues and can cause graft rejection. Although transplantation antigens are numerous and…

  • tissue-inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (gene)

    macular degeneration: Other forms of macular degeneration: …in a gene known as TIMP3 (tissue-inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3). These forms of macular degeneration, with the exception of Stargardt macular dystrophy, are inherited as autosomal dominant traits; disease occurs when a mutant gene is inherited from one parent. All five of these genetic forms of macular degeneration are rare,…

  • Tista River (river, Asia)

    Tista River, a tributary of the Jamuna River (Brahmaputra River), flowing through India and Bangladesh. It rises in the Himalayas near Chunthang in Sikkim (India), flows to the south, cutting a deep gorge through the Siwalik Hills east of Darjiling (in West Bengal, India), and turns southeast to

  • Tistian Isthmus (isthmus, Nicaragua)

    Lake Nicaragua: Geography: …bridge between them, called the Tistian Isthmus. A third volcano associated with the lake is Mombacho, about 4,430 feet (1,350 metres) high, which stands on the western shore. Ometepe Island is the preeminent site in Nicaragua for pre-Columbian examples of statuary, ceramics, and other archaeological remains, some of which are…

  • Tistou of the Green Fingers (work by Druon)

    children's literature: The 20th century: One is Maurice Druon, whose Tistou of the Green Fingers (1957; Eng. trans. 1958), a kind of children’s Candide, demonstrated how the moral tale, given sufficient sensitivity and humour, can be transmuted into art. Perhaps the most original temperament was that of Henri Bosco, author of four eerie, haunting Proven?al…

  • Tisza River (river, Europe)

    Tisza River, a major tributary of the middle Danube River, rising in the Bukovina segment of the Carpathian Mountains. Its two headstreams, the Black and White Tisza, unite east of Sighet on the Ukraine-Romania border. From Sighet, Romania, the Tisza flows northwest through a small portion of

  • Tisza, István, Gróf (prime minister of Hungary)

    István, Count Tisza, Hungarian statesman who became prime minister of Hungary as well as one of the most prominent defenders of the Austro-Hungarian dualist system of government. He was an opponent of voting franchise reform in Hungary, and he was a loyal supporter of the monarchy’s alliance with

  • Tisza, Kálmán (Hungarian statesman)

    Kálmán Tisza, Hungarian statesman and longtime premier who led the coalition that ruled Hungary for the last 30 years of his life. He made his country a strong, unified, and economically viable state within the Austro-Hungarian system of dual government. A member of an old Calvinist landowning

  • Tisza, Lake (lake, Hungary)

    Heves: The resulting reservoir, known as Lake Tisza, is the second largest body of water in the country and provides irrigation for the county’s farms. Lentils, tobacco, and melons are major crops. Viticulture—Mátraalja and Eger are well-known wine regions—and fruit growing are characteristic of the Mátra foothills, an area where horse…

  • Tiszaeszlár Affair (Hungarian history)

    Károly E?tv?s: …defendants in the widely publicized Tiszaeszlár case, in which local Jews were accused of using the blood of a murdered Christian girl for preparing matzo. His success in that case earned him an international reputation, though in Hungary he was the subject of widespread criticism. After a three-year break, he…

  • Tiszal?k Dam (dam, Hungary)

    Tisza River: The Tiszal?k Dam (1954) on the river’s upper course forms the largest reservoir in Hungary, provides hydroelectric power, and, with the Eastern Main Canal linking the Tisza and the Beretty? to the K?r?s, supplies year-round irrigation water to the Hajdúság and Hortobágy plains. The Tisza is…

  • Tiszántúl (region, Hungary)

    Hungary: Traditional regions: …Danube and Tisza rivers, and Transtisza (Tiszántúl), the region east of the Tisza. Kiskunság consists primarily of a mosaic of small landscape elements—sand dunes, loess plains, and floodplains. Kecskemét is the market centre for the region, which is also noted for its isolated farmsteads, known as tanyák. Several interesting groups…

  • Tiszaújváros (Hungary)

    Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén: Sárospatak, Szerencs, Sátoraljaújhely, Tiszaújváros, and Tokaj.

  • tit (bird)

    Titmouse, small cheery-voiced nonmigratory woodland bird. Along with the chickadees, titmice make up the family Paridae (order Passeriformes), with approximately 55 species throughout the world, mostly in the Northern Hemisphere. Bold and athletic, the titmice are among the best-loved visitors to

  • tit-babbler (bird)

    Tit-babbler, any of a number of birds belonging to the babbler family Timaliidae (order Passeriformes). The 35 to 40 species are small and short-billed, rather like titmice in appearance and behaviour but mostly somewhat larger with proportionately shorter tails. Tit-babblers are chunky birds, 10

  • Tit-Bits (British magazine)

    history of publishing: General periodicals: …to Tit-Bits (in 1968 restyled Titbits). It was a great success and formed the beginning of a publishing empire that was to include Country Life (founded 1897), Wide World Magazine (1898), and, above all, The Strand Magazine (1891–1950), one of the first monthly magazines of light literature with plenty of…

  • tit-shrike (bird)

    vanga-shrike: The smallest species is the red-tailed vanga-shrike, or tit-shrike (Calicalicus madagascariensis).

  • Titagarh (India)

    Titagarh, city, southeastern West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies just east of the Hugli (Hooghly) River, about 15 miles (25 km) north of central Kolkata (Calcutta), and is part of the Kolkata urban agglomeration. The city was once a fashionable residential district for Europeans.

  • Titan (astronomy)

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