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  • Tijuca (district, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

    Rio de Janeiro: North Zone: The generally middle-class district of Tijuca in the North Zone has its commercial centre at the Pra?a Saéz Pe?a, from which the subway begins its long horseshoe-shaped trajectory east to and through the Centre, then back south and southwest via Botafogo to its western terminus. To the west and north…

  • tik-tik fly (insect)

    Tsetse fly, (genus Glossina), any of about two to three dozen species of bloodsucking flies in the housefly family, Muscidae (order Diptera), that occur only in Africa and transmit sleeping sickness (African trypanosomiasis) in humans and a similar disease called nagana in domestic animals. Tsetse

  • tika (Indian philosophy)

    Indian philosophy: Forms of argument and presentation: …the bhashyas and write a tika (subcommentary). The usual order is sutra–bhashya–varttika (collection of critical notes)–tika. At any stage a person may introduce a new and original point of view, but at no stage can one claim originality for oneself. Not even authors of sutras could do that, for they…

  • Tikal (archaeological site, Guatemala)

    Tikal, city and ceremonial centre of the ancient Maya civilization. The largest urban centre in the southern Maya lowlands, it stood 19 miles (30 km) north of Lake Petén Itzá in what is now the northern part of the region of Petén, Guatemala, in a tropical rainforest. Uaxactún, a smaller Maya city,

  • Tikal National Park (national park, Guatemala)

    Guatemala: Services: …of departure for visits to Tikal National Park, which was designated a World Heritage site in 1979. Antigua Guatemala (also made a World Heritage site in 1979), the old colonial capital, has a wealth of ruins and “earthquake baroque” architecture. It has been revived as a tourist and cultural centre…

  • Tikal, Parque Nacional (national park, Guatemala)

    Guatemala: Services: …of departure for visits to Tikal National Park, which was designated a World Heritage site in 1979. Antigua Guatemala (also made a World Heritage site in 1979), the old colonial capital, has a wealth of ruins and “earthquake baroque” architecture. It has been revived as a tourist and cultural centre…

  • Tikamthe (Shawnee chief)

    Tecumseh, Shawnee Indian chief, orator, military leader, and advocate of intertribal Indian alliance who directed Indian resistance to white rule in the Ohio River valley. In the War of 1812 he joined British forces for the capture of Detroit and the invasion of Ohio. A decisive battle against

  • Tikar (people)

    Cameroon: Ethnic and linguistic composition: …western Semi-Bantu-speaking groups include the Tikar, who live in the Bamenda region and in the western high plateau.

  • Tikas, Louis (labour organizer)

    Ludlow Massacre: …striking leaders, including labour organizer Louis Tikas, were captured and killed by the National Guard; anecdotal evidence suggests that Tikas had been lured out to discuss a truce. As the strikers ran out of ammunition, they retreated from the camp into the surrounding countryside. Women and children, hiding from the…

  • Tikas, Vissarion (Greek archbishop)

    Archbishop Seraphim, Greek religious leader (born Aug. 15, 1913, Artesianon, Greece—died April 10, 1998, Athens, Greece), served as the head of the Orthodox Church in Greece from 1974. Conservative and anti-intellectual, he had a common touch that brought him great popularity. After receiving a d

  • Tikhomirov, Vasily Dmitrievich (Russian dancer)

    Vasily Dmitrievich Tikhomirov, ballet dancer and influential teacher who helped develop the vigorous style and technical virtuosity of the Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow. He trained such dancers as Mikhail Mordkin, Alexandre Volinine, and Yekaterina Geltzer, his first wife and frequent dance partner.

  • Tikhon, Saint (Russian Orthodox patriarch)

    Saint Tikhon, ; canonized Oct. 9, 1989), patriarch of the Russian Orthodox church following the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. At first sharply resisting the new Soviet state’s antiecclesiastical legislation, he refused to cooperate with a schismatic, state-supported, and politically oriented

  • Tikhonkaya (Russia)

    Birobidzhan, city and administrative centre of Yevreyskaya autonomous oblast (region), Khabarovsk kray (territory), far southeastern Siberia, Russia. The city is situated on the Bira River, a tributary of the Amur River, and on the Trans-Siberian Railroad. It was founded in 1928 as a railway

  • Tikhonov, Nikolay Aleksandrovich (premier of Soviet Union)

    Nikolay Aleksandrovich Tikhonov, premier of the Soviet Union from 1980 to 1985, a staunch Communist Party member closely associated with the former Soviet president and Communist Party chairman Leonid Brezhnev. Born into a middle-class Ukrainian family, Tikhonov graduated from the Metallurgical

  • Tikhonov, Nikolay Semyonovich (Soviet writer)

    Nikolay Semyonovich Tikhonov, Soviet poet and prose writer, notable for his heroic war ballads and for his originality and poetic experimentation. Tikhonov was born into a middle-class family and received a rather poor formal education. He fought in a hussar regiment during World War I, later

  • Tikhonov, Viktor Vasilyevich (Soviet ice hockey player and coach)

    Viktor Vasilyevich Tikhonov, Soviet ice hockey player and coach (born June 4, 1930, Moscow, Russia, U.S.S.R.—died Nov. 24, 2014, Moscow, Russia), guided the Soviet Union’s national team to eight International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) world titles (1978–79, 1981–83, 1986, 1989–90) and two Winter

  • Tikhonov, Vyacheslav (Russian actor)

    Vyacheslav Tikhonov, Russian actor (born Feb. 8, 1928, Pavlovsky Posad, Russia, U.S.S.R.—died Dec. 4, 2009, Moscow, Russia), appeared in dozens of films, most famously as a Soviet war hero or spy. The aristocratically handsome, quintessentially Russian actor gained international renown for his turn

  • Tikhoretsk (Russia)

    Tikhoretsk, city and administrative centre of Tikhoretsk raion (sector), Krasnodar kray (territory), southwestern Russia. It is a railway junction and grain centre with flour mills and locomotive repair shops. An oil pipeline was opened in 1969 from the northern Caucasus to join an existing

  • Tikhy Don (work by Sholokhov)

    And Quiet Flows the Don: …first part of the novel Tikhy Don by Mikhail Sholokhov. The Russian novel was published between 1928 and 1940; the English translation of the first part appeared in 1934. The Don Flows Home to the Sea, part two of the original novel, was published in English translation in 1940.

  • TIKO (Madagascan company)

    Marc Ravalomanana: Early life and political career: His company, TIKO, would become the largest domestically owned business in Madagascar.

  • Tiko (Cameroon)

    Tiko, town and port located in southwestern Cameroon. It is situated along the Bimbia River at the Gulf of Guinea, 12 miles (19 km) east of Limbe (formerly Victoria). The port’s activity declined in the face of increasing competition from Douala and Limbe, but it remains significant as a

  • Tikrīt (Iraq)

    Tikrīt, city, capital of ?alā? al-Dīn mu?āfa?ah (governorate), north-central Iraq. It lies on the west bank of the Tigris River about 100 miles (160 km) northwest of Baghdad. In the 10th century Tikrīt had a noted fortress and was home to a large Christian monastery. Its wealth at that time derived

  • Tiktaalik roseae (fossil vertebrate)

    Tiktaalik roseae, an extinct fishlike aquatic animal that lived about 380–385 million years ago (during the earliest late Devonian Period) and was a very close relative of the direct ancestors of tetrapods (four-legged land vertebrates). The genus name, Tiktaalik, comes from the Inuktitut language

  • Tikuna (people)

    Tucuna, a South American Indian people living in Brazil, Peru, and Colombia, around the Amazon-Solim?es and Putomayo-I?á rivers. They numbered about 25,000 in the late 1980s. The Tucunan language does not appear to be related to any of the other languages spoken in the region. The Tucuna live in

  • Til Barsib (ancient city, Iraq)

    Mesopotamian art and architecture: Painting and decorative arts: …bce), a country palace at Til Barsip (modern Tall al-Ahmar) was decorated in this way, with the conventional motifs of relief designs rather clumsily adapted to this very different medium. A few years later, such paintings were extensively used to decorate both wall faces and ceilings in Sargon II’s palace…

  • Til Barsip (ancient city, Iraq)

    Mesopotamian art and architecture: Painting and decorative arts: …bce), a country palace at Til Barsip (modern Tall al-Ahmar) was decorated in this way, with the conventional motifs of relief designs rather clumsily adapted to this very different medium. A few years later, such paintings were extensively used to decorate both wall faces and ceilings in Sargon II’s palace…

  • tilak (Hindu symbolism)

    Tilak, in Hinduism, a mark, generally made on the forehead, indicating a person’s sectarian affiliation. The marks are made by hand or with a metal stamp, using ash from a sacrificial fire, sandalwood paste, turmeric, cow dung, clay, charcoal, or red lead. Among some sects the mark is made on 2, 5,

  • Tilak, Bal Gangadhar (Indian political leader)

    Bal Gangadhar Tilak, scholar, mathematician, philosopher, and ardent nationalist who helped lay the foundation for India’s independence by building his own defiance of British rule into a national movement. He founded (1914) and served as president of the Indian Home Rule League. In 1916 he

  • tilaka (Hindu symbolism)

    Tilak, in Hinduism, a mark, generally made on the forehead, indicating a person’s sectarian affiliation. The marks are made by hand or with a metal stamp, using ash from a sacrificial fire, sandalwood paste, turmeric, cow dung, clay, charcoal, or red lead. Among some sects the mark is made on 2, 5,

  • tilapia (fish grouping)

    Tilapia, common name used for certain species of fishes belonging to the family Cichlidae (order Perciformes), represented by numerous, mostly freshwater species native to Africa. Tilapias are perhaps best known because of their potential as an easily raised and harvested food fish. Their

  • Tilapia (fish genus)

    cichlid: …many species of the genus Tilapia and also to certain other Old World genera.

  • Tilapia macrocephala (fish)

    perciform: Use as food: The African mouthbreeder (Tilapia macrocephala; Cichlidae) has been successfully introduced in many areas and is valued for its rapid rate of reproduction and growth, providing a source of low-cost protein.

  • Tilapia mossambica (fish)

    cichlid: A notable cichlid is Tilapia mossambica, a prolific African species that is now cultivated in many regions as a source of food.

  • Tilarán, Cordillera de (mountains, Central America)

    Costa Rica: Relief: …the Cordillera de Guanacaste, the Cordillera de Tilarán, and the Cordillera Central. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1983, the Cordillera de Talamanca is a massive granite batholith, quite different geologically from the volcanically active northern ranges. Costa Rica’s highest point, Mount Chirripó (12,530 feet [3,819 metres]), is in…

  • Tilberis, Elizabeth Jane Kelly (British journalist)

    Elizabeth Jane Kelly Tilberis, (“Liz”), British journalist who rose through the ranks at British Vogue to become (1987) its editor but in 1992 was hired away by Harper’s Bazaar, to which she brought new class and elegance; she accompanied her struggle against ovarian cancer, recounted in her book

  • Tilburg (Netherlands)

    Tilburg, gemeente (municipality), southern Netherlands, on the Wilhelmina Canal. A small village until 1800, it grew rapidly into one of the chief industrial centres of the south, specializing in woolen textiles. However, textiles have been severely eclipsed, and the town’s main industries are now

  • Tilbury (England, United Kingdom)

    Tilbury, port in Thurrock unitary authority, historic county of Essex, eastern England. It lies along the north bank of the River Thames estuary opposite Gravesend, 26 miles (42 km) downstream of London Bridge. It is famous for its docks; constructed in 1884–86, they have been extensively

  • Tilbury Town (fictional town)

    Edwin Arlington Robinson: …a small New England village, Tilbury Town, very much like the Gardiner, Maine, in which he grew up.

  • Tilden, Bill (American tennis player)

    Bill Tilden, American tennis player who dominated the game for more than a decade, winning seven U.S. championships (now the U.S. Open), three Wimbledon Championships, and two professional titles. His overpowering play and temperamental personality made him one of the most colourful sports figures

  • Tilden, Samuel J. (American politician)

    Samuel J. Tilden, lawyer, governor of New York, and Democratic presidential candidate in the disputed election of 1876. Tilden attended Yale College and the University of the City of New York for brief periods and studied law. He began to practice law in New York City in 1841. Despite frequent

  • Tilden, Samuel Jones (American politician)

    Samuel J. Tilden, lawyer, governor of New York, and Democratic presidential candidate in the disputed election of 1876. Tilden attended Yale College and the University of the City of New York for brief periods and studied law. He began to practice law in New York City in 1841. Despite frequent

  • Tilden, W. A. (British chemist)

    rubber: The rise of synthetic rubber: …and in 1882 another Briton, W.A. Tilden, produced isoprene by the destructive distillation of turpentine. Tilden also assigned isoprene the structural formula CH2=C(CH3)―CH=CH2.

  • Tilden, William Tatem II (American tennis player)

    Bill Tilden, American tennis player who dominated the game for more than a decade, winning seven U.S. championships (now the U.S. Open), three Wimbledon Championships, and two professional titles. His overpowering play and temperamental personality made him one of the most colourful sports figures

  • Tilden-Hayes affair (United States history)

    United States: The Ulysses S. Grant administrations, 1869–77: >disputed election of 1876 strengthened Hayes’s intention to work with the Southern whites, even if it meant abandoning the few Radical regimes that remained in the South. In an election marked by widespread fraud and many irregularities, the Democratic candidate, Samuel J. Tilden, received the…

  • Tildy, Zoltán (president of Hungary)

    Zoltán Tildy, non-Communist statesman who was president of Hungary for a short time after World War II and a member of the 1956 anti-Soviet revolutionary government. Trained as a Protestant reformed minister, Tildy studied theology in Belfast, Ire. After his return to Hungary, he taught at a high

  • tile

    Tile, thin, flat slab or block used structurally or decoratively in building. Traditionally, tiles have been made of glazed or unglazed fired clay, but modern tiles are also made of plastic, glass, asphalt, or asbestos cement. Acoustical tiles are manufactured from fibreboard or other

  • tile ore (ore)

    cuprite: Tile ore is a soft, earthy variety that is brick-red to brownish red; it often contains admixed hematite or limonite and has been formed by the alteration of chalcopyrite.

  • tile system (agriculture)

    land reclamation: Reclamation of swampy lands: …water may be removed through tile lines installed beneath the surface of the soil. The tiles are traditionally made of fired clay or concrete, although corrugated plastic tubing is also commonly used. The spacing of the tile lines is governed by the permeability of the soil. The more permeable the…

  • tile, roofing (construction)

    tile: Roof tiles of some Greek temples were made of marble; in ancient Rome, of bronze. Stone slabs used for roofing in parts of England are called tiles. Many rough forms of terra-cotta are called tiles when used structurally. The steel forms for casting certain types…

  • Tiled Garden (installation by Wang Shu)

    Wang Shu: …Shu also made the installation Tiled Garden (2006) for the Venice Biennale. The garden consisted of a sea of tens of thousands of tiles that had been salvaged from Chinese demolition sites, laid in meditative rows, and made accessible to the viewer by means of a bamboo bridge.

  • tilefish (fish)

    Tilefish, any of about 40 species of elongated marine fishes in the family Malacanthidae (order Perciformes), with representatives occurring in tropical and warm temperate seas. Malacanthidae is formally divided into the subfamilies Malacanthinae and Latilinae; however, some taxonomists consider

  • Tiles, House of (ancient building, Lerna, Greece)

    Aegean civilizations: The Early Bronze Age (c. 3000–2200): The so-called House of Tiles at Lerna, destroyed by fire toward the end of the period, appears to have been an important focus for the community. A massive rectangle two stories high, with a roofed balcony upstairs, the structure takes its name from the baked clay tiles…

  • Tilghman, B. C. (American chemist)

    papermaking: Chemical wood pulp: …defibring wood was observed by B.C. Tilghman, a U.S. chemist, as early as 1857. Several years later he renewed his experiments and, in 1867, was granted a patent for making paper pulp from vegetable material. He used high temperature and pressure and observed that the presence of a base such…

  • Tilghman, Lloyd (Confederate general)

    Battle of Fort Henry: …2,500 Confederate defenders under General Lloyd Tilghman fought briefly, then retreated 12 miles (19 km) overland to nearby Fort Donelson to prepare a stronger defensive line.

  • Tilia (plant)

    Linden, any of several trees of the genus Tilia of the hibiscus, or mallow, family (Malvaceae), native to the Northern Hemisphere. Of the approximately 30 species, a few are outstanding as ornamental and shade trees. They are among the most graceful of deciduous trees, with heart-shaped, coarsely

  • Tilia americana (tree)

    linden: The American linden, basswood, or whitewood (T. americana), a large shade tree, reaching 40 metres (130 feet) in height, provides wood for beehives, crating, furniture, and excelsior. It is a popular bee tree, linden honey being pale and of distinctive flavour. Small-leaf, or little-leaf, linden (T.…

  • Tilia caroliniana (plant)

    linden: Carolina linden (T. caroliniana) and white basswood (T. heterophylla), from the eastern United States, are native on moist soils; they are bee trees that yield a fragrant honey.

  • Tilia cordata (plant)

    linden: Small-leaf, or little-leaf, linden (T. cordata), a European tree, is widely planted as a street tree. The hybrid Crimean linden (T. euchlora, a cross between T. cordata and T. dasystyla), which grows up to 20 metres (66 feet), has yielded a graceful pyramidal variety, the…

  • Tilia euchlora (plant)

    linden: The hybrid Crimean linden (T. euchlora, a cross between T. cordata and T. dasystyla), which grows up to 20 metres (66 feet), has yielded a graceful pyramidal variety, the Redmond linden (T. euchlora variety ‘Redmond’), having a single straight trunk.

  • Tilia europaea (tree)

    linden: The European linden, or common lime (T. europaea), is a natural hybrid between the big-leaf linden (T. platyphyllos) and little-leaf linden. Silver linden (T. tomentosa) is distinguished by its white-silvery underleaf; pendent silver linden (T. petiolaris) is valued for its weeping habit.

  • Tilia heterophylla (plant)

    linden: caroliniana) and white basswood (T. heterophylla), from the eastern United States, are native on moist soils; they are bee trees that yield a fragrant honey.

  • Tilimsān (Algeria)

    Tlemcen, town, northwestern Algeria, near the border with Morocco. Tlemcen is backed by the cliffs of the well-watered Tlemcen Mountains and overlooks the fertile Hennaya and Maghnia plains. Lying at an elevation of 2,648 feet (807 metres), Tlemcen is located sufficiently inland to avoid the

  • Tilimsen (Algeria)

    Tlemcen, town, northwestern Algeria, near the border with Morocco. Tlemcen is backed by the cliffs of the well-watered Tlemcen Mountains and overlooks the fertile Hennaya and Maghnia plains. Lying at an elevation of 2,648 feet (807 metres), Tlemcen is located sufficiently inland to avoid the

  • Tiliqua rugosa (reptile)

    lizard: Parental care: In Australia, juvenile sleepy lizards (Tiliqua rugosa) remain in their mother’s home range for an extended period, and this behaviour suggests that they gain a survival advantage by doing so. Female sleepy lizards and those of the Baudin Island spiny-tailed skink (Egernia stokesii aethiops) recognize their own offspring…

  • Tilka al-rā?i?ah (novel by Ibrāhīm)

    ?un? Allāh Ibrāhīm: The Smell of It, & Other Stories). The work’s descriptions of the experience of imprisonment made it politically subversive, and it shocked Egyptian censors with its frank treatment of sexuality between inmates. The book was banned in Egypt, and two decades passed before an uncensored…

  • till (geology)

    Till, in geology, unsorted material deposited directly by glacial ice and showing no stratification. Till is sometimes called boulder clay because it is composed of clay, boulders of intermediate sizes, or a mixture of these. The rock fragments are usually angular and sharp rather than rounded,

  • Till Damascus (work by Strindberg)

    August Strindberg: Late years: …a drama in three parts, To Damascus, in which he depicts himself as “the Stranger,” a wanderer seeking spiritual peace and finding it with another character, “the Lady,” who resembles both Siri and Frida.

  • Till Death Do Us Part (British television program)

    Cherie Booth: …the long-running BBC television series Till Death Do Us Part, his private life dissolved into alcoholism, philandering, and debt, and Smith and her children never benefited materially from his acting success. Cherie Booth attended Roman Catholic schools near Liverpool and subsequently studied law at the London School of Economics.

  • Till Death Us Do Part (British television program)

    All in the Family: …on the popular British comedy Till Death Us Do Part (1965–75) and was adapted for an American audience by producers Norman Lear and Alan (“Bud”) Yorkin. Breaking new ground with its often controversial subject matter, All in the Family became the top-rated show in the United States for five consecutive…

  • Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks (work by Strauss)

    Richard Strauss: Works: …Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche (1894–95; Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks), wherein Strauss found the exact instrumental sounds and colours to depict the 14th-century rogue Till’s adventures, from his scattering pots and pans in a market and mocking the clergy to his death-squawk on a D clarinet on the gallows. Also sprach…

  • Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche (work by Strauss)

    Richard Strauss: Works: …Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche (1894–95; Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks), wherein Strauss found the exact instrumental sounds and colours to depict the 14th-century rogue Till’s adventures, from his scattering pots and pans in a market and mocking the clergy to his death-squawk on a D clarinet on the gallows. Also sprach…

  • Till the Clouds Roll By (film by Whorf [1946])

    Tony Martin: …in the Jerome Kern biography Till the Clouds Roll By (1946) and the musical Casbah (1948; as the French gangster Pépé Le Moko). In 1948 he married the actress and dancer Cyd Charisse. Martin’s later films include the musical comedies Here Come the Girls (1953), in which he costarred with…

  • Till We Have Faces (novel by Lewis)

    Till We Have Faces, novel by C.S. Lewis, published in 1956, that retells the ancient myth of Cupid and Psyche. It was Lewis’s last fictional work. Reviews and sales were disappointing, probably because it was different from and more complex than the works that made him famous. But in a letter Lewis

  • Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold (novel by Lewis)

    Till We Have Faces, novel by C.S. Lewis, published in 1956, that retells the ancient myth of Cupid and Psyche. It was Lewis’s last fictional work. Reviews and sales were disappointing, probably because it was different from and more complex than the works that made him famous. But in a letter Lewis

  • Till, Emmett (American murder victim)

    Emmett Till, African American teenager whose murder catalyzed the emerging civil rights movement. Till was born to working-class parents on the South Side of Chicago. When he was barely 14 years old, Till took a trip to rural Mississippi to spend the summer with relatives. He had been warned by his

  • Till, Emmett Louis (American murder victim)

    Emmett Till, African American teenager whose murder catalyzed the emerging civil rights movement. Till was born to working-class parents on the South Side of Chicago. When he was barely 14 years old, Till took a trip to rural Mississippi to spend the summer with relatives. He had been warned by his

  • till-less agriculture (agriculture)

    Till-less agriculture, cultivation technique in which the soil is disturbed only along the slit or in the hole into which the seeds are planted; reserved detritus from previous crops covers and protects the seedbed. The practice is one of several primitive farming methods that have been revived a

  • tillage (agriculture)

    Tillage, in agriculture, the preparation of soil for planting and the cultivation of soil after planting. See cultivator; harrow;

  • Tillamook (Oregon, United States)

    Tillamook, city, seat (1873) of Tillamook county, northwestern Oregon, U.S., on the Trask River, at the head of Tillamook Bay, an inlet of the Pacific Ocean. Founded in 1851, the settlement was known successively as Lincoln and Hoquarton before being named in 1885 for the local Tillamook Indians.

  • tillana (southern Indian dance)

    South Asian arts: The bharata natyam school: The performance ends with tillana, a pure dance accompanied by meaningless musical syllables chanted to punctuate the rhythm. The dancer explodes into leaps and jumps forward and backward, from right and left, in a state of ecstasy. Tillana ends with three clangs of the cymbals while the dancer executes…

  • Tillandsia (plant genus)

    Tillandsia, the most widely distributed genus of the pineapple family (Bromeliaceae), containing about 500 species of tropical American plants. They are mainly perennial herbs that are epiphytic (supported by other plants and having aerial roots exposed to the humid atmosphere). The leaves of some

  • Tillandsia usneoides (plant)

    Spanish moss, (Tillandsia usneoides), epiphyte (a nonparasitic plant that is supported by another plant and has aerial roots exposed to the humid atmosphere) of the pineapple family (Bromeliaceae). It is found in southern North America, the West Indies, and Central and South America. The

  • Tillandsia xiphoides (plant)

    Tillandsia: …used for packing or upholstery; T. xiphoides, a South American species, has strongly scented flowers that are sometimes used locally in medicines for respiratory diseases.

  • Tillbake til fremtiden (work by Undset)

    Sigrid Undset: …published originally in English as Return to the Future (1942; Norwegian Tillbake til fremtiden).

  • Tilled Field, The (painting by Miró)

    Joan Miró: Paris and early work: …the renowned Farm (1921) and The Tilled Field (1923–24). He gradually removed the objects he portrayed from their natural context and reassembled them as if in accordance with a new, mysterious grammar, creating a ghostly, eerie impression.

  • Tillemont, Louis-Sébastien Le Nain de (French historian)

    Sébastien Le Nain de Tillemont, French ecclesiastical historian who was one of the earliest scholars to provide a rigorous appraisal of preceding historical writing. His works were objective and among the first of modern historical works to include a critical discussion of the principal sources for

  • Tillemont, Sébastien Le Nain de (French historian)

    Sébastien Le Nain de Tillemont, French ecclesiastical historian who was one of the earliest scholars to provide a rigorous appraisal of preceding historical writing. His works were objective and among the first of modern historical works to include a critical discussion of the principal sources for

  • tiller (farm machine)

    Cultivator, farm implement or machine designed to stir the soil around a crop as it matures to promote growth and destroy weeds. Horse-drawn cultivators were introduced in the mid-19th century. By 1870 a farmer with two horses could cultivate as much as 15 acres (6 hectares) a day with a machine

  • tiller (boat part)

    rudder: …by a handle termed a tiller or helm. In larger vessels, the rudder is turned by hydraulic, steam, or electrical machinery.

  • Tiller, Terence (British writer)

    Terence Tiller, English playwright, translator, and poet whose best verse is noted for its highly wrought form and intense emotional content. Tiller taught medieval history at the University of Cambridge until 1939, when he began lecturing in English history and literature at Fu?ād I University,

  • Tiller, Terence Rogers (British writer)

    Terence Tiller, English playwright, translator, and poet whose best verse is noted for its highly wrought form and intense emotional content. Tiller taught medieval history at the University of Cambridge until 1939, when he began lecturing in English history and literature at Fu?ād I University,

  • Tiller, W. H. (British publisher)

    The Standard: Jeevanjee hired an English editor-reporter, W.H. Tiller, to oversee the newspaper’s operations. In 1910 the paper became a daily, changed its name to the East African Standard, and moved to Nairobi, which was then fast developing as a commercial centre. It had already come under British ownership. In its early…

  • Tillerson, Rex (American businessman and statesman)

    Rex W. Tillerson, American business executive who served as secretary of state (2017–18) in the administration of U.S. Pres. Donald Trump. He previously was chairman and CEO (2006–16) of Exxon Mobil Corporation. Tillerson grew up in Oklahoma and Texas—two of the country’s leading producers of

  • Tillerson, Rex W. (American businessman and statesman)

    Rex W. Tillerson, American business executive who served as secretary of state (2017–18) in the administration of U.S. Pres. Donald Trump. He previously was chairman and CEO (2006–16) of Exxon Mobil Corporation. Tillerson grew up in Oklahoma and Texas—two of the country’s leading producers of

  • Tilletia foetida (fungus)

    bunt: caries) or T. laevis (formerly T. foetida) causes normal kernels to be replaced by “smut balls” containing powdery masses of brownish black spores characterized by a dead-fish odour. Smut balls break open and contaminate healthy kernels during harvest, and the spores may remain alive in dry soil…

  • Tilletia laevis (fungus)

    bunt: caries) or T. laevis (formerly T. foetida) causes normal kernels to be replaced by “smut balls” containing powdery masses of brownish black spores characterized by a dead-fish odour. Smut balls break open and contaminate healthy kernels during harvest, and the spores may remain alive in dry soil…

  • Tilletia tritici (fungus)

    bunt: Infection by Tilletia tritici (formerly T. caries) or T. laevis (formerly T. foetida) causes normal kernels to be replaced by “smut balls” containing powdery masses of brownish black spores characterized by a dead-fish odour. Smut balls break open and contaminate healthy kernels during harvest, and the spores…

  • Tilletiales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Tilletiales Parasitic on grasses (family Poaceae); ballistospore-forming; primary basidiospores may conjugate, forming dikaryon capable of infecting hosts; example genera include Tilletia, Conidiosporomyces, and Erratomyces. Subphylum Agaricomycotina Parasitic or symbiotic on plants,

  • Tillett, Benjamin (British labour leader)

    Benjamin Tillett, English trade union leader who directed successful dock strikes in 1889 and 1911. Tillett was also an alderman of the London County Council (1892–98) and a Labour member of Parliament (for North Salford, Lancashire, in 1917–24 and in 1929–31). The son of a railway labourer,

  • Tillett, William S. (American biologist)

    Maclyn McCarty: , 1937) before joining William S. Tillett at New York University in 1940. Tillett not only introduced McCarty to the study of pneumococcic bacteria but also arranged for him to work with Avery in his laboratory at the Rockefeller Institute (now Rockefeller University) in New York City. McCarty became…

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