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  • Thunberg, Greta (Swedish activist)

    Greta Thunberg, Swedish environmental activist who worked to address the problem of climate change, founding (2018) a movement known as Fridays for Future (also called School Strike for Climate). Thunberg’s mother was an opera singer, and her father was an actor. Greta was diagnosed with Asperger

  • Thunbergia (plant)

    Acanthaceae: …ornamentals as bear’s-breech (Acanthus mollis), clockvine (Thunbergia), shrimp plant (Justicia brandegeana), and caricature-plant (Graptophyllum pictum). The largest genera include Justicia (600 species; now comprising former segregate genera such as Jacobinia and Beloperone), Reullia (355),

  • thunder (meteorology)

    Thunder, sound caused by a lightning discharge. Lightning heats the air in its path and causes a large over-pressure of the air within its channel. The channel expands supersonically into the surrounding air as a shock wave and creates an acoustic signal that is heard as thunder. The loudest

  • Thunder Bay (bay, Ontario, Canada)

    Thunder Bay, inlet of northwestern Lake Superior, indenting the coast of west-central Ontario, Canada. The bay is 35 miles (55 km) long and 15 miles (24 km) wide; it receives the Kaministiquia and Current rivers. Pie Island lies at the entrance to the bay, and Sibley Provincial Park, 94 square

  • Thunder Bay (city, Ontario, Canada)

    Thunder Bay, city, seat of Thunder Bay district, west-central Ontario, Canada, on Lake Superior’s Thunder Bay, at the mouth of the Kaministiquia River. Probably first occupied by French fur traders as early as 1678, its site was permanently settled only after the birth of the towns Port Arthur and

  • Thunder Bay (film by Mann [1953])

    Anthony Mann: The 1950s: westerns: …standard Wild West venue for Thunder Bay (1953), a contemporary adventure starring Stewart and Dan Duryea as oil drillers who understandably upset the local shrimp fishermen when they start blasting off the Louisiana coast. The biopic The Glenn Miller Story (1954) was a well-mounted production that dramatized the late bandleader’s…

  • thunder cult (prehistoric religion)

    Thunder cult, prehistoric beliefs and practices that at times seem directed toward one aspect of the supreme sky god and at other times appear to be concerned with a separate thunder deity. Although beginning perhaps much earlier, the thunder cult became especially prominent in western Europe

  • Thunder Gulch (racehorse)

    D. Wayne Lukas: … races in a single year: Thunder Gulch claimed victory in both the Kentucky Derby and the Belmont, and Timber Country took the Preakness. After his Grindstone won the 1996 Kentucky Derby, Lukas became the first trainer to win six consecutive Triple Crown races.

  • Thunder Gultch (racehorse)

    Gary Stevens: Riding Thunder Gultch, he won both the Kentucky Derby and the Belmont Stakes in 1995. Two years later, aboard Silver Charm, he captured his third Kentucky Derby and his first Preakness. In 1998 he and Victory Gallop ended Real Quiet’s bid for the Triple Crown by…

  • Thunder in the East (film by Vidor [1952])

    Charles Vidor: Later films: Thunder in the East (1952) was an adventure movie starring Alan Ladd as a gunrunner in India and Deborah Kerr as the blind daughter of a missionary. With Rhapsody (1954), Vidor returned to the world of romance and music, but Elizabeth Taylor could not elevate…

  • Thunder over Mexico (film directed by Eisenstein)

    Sergei Eisenstein: …United States as the films Thunder over Mexico, Eisenstein in Mexico, and Death Day (1933–34). In 1940 a fourth film, entitled Time in the Sun, was made from the footage. A series of educational films about Mexico were also compiled by using extracts from the reels. None of those efforts…

  • Thunder over the Plains (film by DeToth [1953])

    Fess Parker: …such films as the western Thunder over the Plains (1953), the science-fiction cult hit Them! (1954), the war films Battle Cry (1955) and Hell Is for Heroes (1962), and the poignant family drama Old Yeller (1957). Parker retired from acting in the early 1970s and became a successful California real-estate…

  • thunder pumper (bird)

    bittern: The American bittern (B. lentiginosus), known locally as “stake driver” or “thunder pumper,” is slightly smaller. Other forms are the Australian bittern (B. poiciloptilus) and the South American, or pinnated, bittern (B. pinnatus).

  • Thunder Road (film by Ripley [1958])

    Thunder Road, American crime-drama film, released in 1958, that is a cult classic notable for its numerous car chases and Robert Mitchum’s performance. Mitchum played a Korean War veteran who returns to the Tennessee hills to run his family’s moonshine business. Soon, however, he becomes embroiled

  • Thunderball (film by Young [1965])

    Thunderball, British spy film, released in 1965, that is the fourth James Bond movie and one of the highest-grossing installments in the series. The crime organization SPECTRE hijacks two atomic bombs from a NATO training flight and threatens to destroy a major city unless its exorbitant financial

  • Thunderbird (automobile)

    Henry Ford II: …others, the Mustang and the Thunderbird, were immensely popular and are widely considered to be classics. By the mid-1950s Henry II had restored the company to financial health, and subsequently he greatly expanded Ford’s operations in overseas markets.

  • thunderbird (mythological bird)

    Thunderbird, in North American Indian mythology, a powerful spirit in the form of a bird. By its work, the earth was watered and vegetation grew. Lightning was believed to flash from its beak, and the beating of its wings was thought to represent the rolling of thunder. It was often portrayed with

  • Thunderbirds (United States Air Force aircraft squadron)

    Thunderbirds, U.S. Air Force fighter aircraft squadron that performs aerobatics at air shows and other events throughout the United States and around the world. The squadron includes six pilots, who fly with the team for two years (half the pilots are replaced each year), and some 135 support

  • Thunderbolt (film by Sturges)

    John Sturges: Early work: …than 40 documentaries, most notably Thunderbolt, on which he shared the credit with William Wyler; the classic film was shown to troops in 1945 but was not released in theatres for two more years.

  • Thunderbolt (aircraft)

    P-47, fighter and fighter-bomber used by the Allied air forces during World War II. A single-seat low-wing fighter developed for the U.S. Army Air Forces (USAAF) by Republic Aviation, it was the largest single-engined piston fighter ever produced. The P-47 originated with a June 1940 proposal by

  • Thunderbolts (comic book)

    Hawkeye: …before assuming leadership of the Thunderbolts, a team that proved to be one of Marvel’s most enduring creations of the 1990s. Although the premise of villains acting on the side of the law was not wholly original—John Ostrander’s Suicide Squad covered that ground a decade earlier—the monthly Thunderbolts comic focused…

  • Thunderchief (aircraft)

    military aircraft: Mach 2: Also outstanding was the Republic F-105 Thunderchief, one of the largest single-engined fighters ever built. Designed to carry a nuclear bomb internally as a low-altitude penetrator and therefore exceptionally fast at low altitudes, the F-105, with heavy loads of conventional bombs under the wings, carried out the brunt of U.S.…

  • thundercloud (meteorology)

    cloud: …three heights is called a cumulonimbus. A cloud at the surface is called a fog.

  • Thunderer, The (Baltic god)

    Pērkons, (Latvian: “Thunderer”) sky deity of Baltic religion, renowned as the guardian of law and order and as a fertility god. The oak, as the tree most often struck by lightning, is sacred to him. Pērkons is related in functions and image to the Slavic Perun, Germanic Thor, and Greek Zeus. Often

  • thunderhead (meteorology)

    cloud: …three heights is called a cumulonimbus. A cloud at the surface is called a fog.

  • Thunders, Johnny (American musician)

    the New York Dolls: ), lead guitarist Johnny Thunders (byname of John Genzale; b. July 15, 1952, New York—d. April 23, 1991, New Orleans, Louisiana), drummer Billy Murcia (b. 1951, New York—d. November 6, 1972, London, England), guitarist Sylvain Sylvain (byname of Sylvain Sylvain Mizrahi; b. February 14, 1951, Cairo, Egypt), drummer…

  • thunderstorm (meteorology)

    Thunderstorm, a violent, short-lived weather disturbance that is almost always associated with lightning, thunder, dense clouds, heavy rain or hail, and strong, gusty winds. Thunderstorms arise when layers of warm, moist air rise in a large, swift updraft to cooler regions of the atmosphere. There

  • Thunderstorm (play by Cao Yu)

    Cao Yu: …the four-act tragedy Leiyu (Thunderstorm; later adapted for film [1938] and as a dance-drama [1981]), was published. When it was performed in 1935 it instantly won Cao Yu fame as a huaju writer. His next works were Richu (1936; Sunrise; adapted as an opera [1982] and for film [1938…

  • Thune, John (United States senator)

    John Thune, American politician who was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 2004 and began representing South Dakota the following year. He previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1997–2003). While in high school, Thune met U.S. Rep. Jim Abdnor, who sparked his interest in

  • Thune, John Randolph (United States senator)

    John Thune, American politician who was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 2004 and began representing South Dakota the following year. He previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1997–2003). While in high school, Thune met U.S. Rep. Jim Abdnor, who sparked his interest in

  • Thünen, Johann Heinrich von (German agriculturalist)

    Johann Heinrich von Thünen, German agriculturalist best known for his work on the relationship between the costs of commodity transportation and the location of production. In 1810 Thünen began gathering data for the book for which he is remembered, Der isolierte Staat (1826; “The Isolated State”).

  • Thunnupa (mythological character)

    Native American literature: South American and Caribbean rural cultures: …of the Aymara culture is Thunnupa, a bearded white man from the north who opposed polygamy and chicha, a beer commonly drunk at festivals. Animal tales are also very common in this culture, some having Aesop-like plots. Fox is the comical character in these tales, as he is in many…

  • Thunnus alalunga (fish)

    Albacore, (species Thunnus alalunga), large oceanic fish noted for its fine flesh. The bluefin tuna (T. thynnus) is also sometimes called albacore. See

  • Thunnus albacares (fish)

    tuna: …stripe on each side; the yellowfin, with yellow fins and a golden stripe on each side; and the bigeye, a robust fish with relatively large eyes.

  • Thunnus atlanticus (fish)

    tuna: obesus), blackfin tuna (T. atlanticus), and longtail tuna (T. tonggol). These different species range from moderate to very large in size. The giant of the group is the northern bluefin tuna, which grows to a maximum length and weight of about 4.3 metres (14 feet) and…

  • Thunnus maccoyii (fish)

    tuna: albacares), southern bluefin tuna (T. thynnus maccoyii), bigeye tuna (T. obesus), blackfin tuna (T. atlanticus), and longtail tuna (T. tonggol). These different species range from moderate to very large in size. The giant of the group is the northern bluefin tuna, which grows to a maximum…

  • Thunnus obesus (fish)

    tuna: …on each side; and the bigeye, a robust fish with relatively large eyes.

  • Thunnus thynnus (fish)

    tuna: …of the group is the northern bluefin tuna, which grows to a maximum length and weight of about 4.3 metres (14 feet) and 800 kg (1,800 pounds). The yellowfin tuna reaches a maximum weight of about 180 kg (397 pounds), and the albacore grows to about 36 kg (79 pounds).

  • Thunnus tonggol (fish)

    tuna: atlanticus), and longtail tuna (T. tonggol). These different species range from moderate to very large in size. The giant of the group is the northern bluefin tuna, which grows to a maximum length and weight of about 4.3 metres (14 feet) and 800 kg (1,800 pounds). The…

  • Thunor (Germanic deity)

    Thor, deity common to all the early Germanic peoples, a great warrior represented as a red-bearded, middle-aged man of enormous strength, an implacable foe to the harmful race of giants but benevolent toward mankind. His figure was generally secondary to that of the god Odin, who in some

  • Thupa ’Inka Yupanki (emperor of Incas)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Topa Inca Yupanqui: About 1471, Pachacuti Inca Yupanqui abdicated in favour of his son Topa Inca Yupanqui, thereby ensuring the peaceful succession to the throne. Topa Inca Yupanqui was a great conqueror who was to bring most of the Central Andes region under Inca rule.…

  • Thupa Wallpa (emperor of Incas)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Civil war on the eve of the Spanish conquest: …corporation of Pachacuti Inca Yupanqui); Topa Huallpa (Thupa Wallpa); and Paullu Topa (Pawllu Thupa).

  • Thūpava?saya (work by Pārakrama Pa??ita)

    South Asian arts: Sinhalese literature: 10th century ad to 19th century: …of such chronicles is the Thūpava?saya (“Chronicle of the Great Stupa”), by Pārakrama Pa??ita. Subsequent chronicles, or genealogies of places, comprise the history of all of the major Buddhist monuments. Several chronicles were also inspired by the Tooth Relic, received from Kali?ga in the 4th century by King Kīrti?rīmēghavar?a. Such…

  • Thurber, James (American writer and cartoonist)

    James Thurber, American writer and cartoonist, whose well-known and highly acclaimed writings and drawings picture the urban man as one who escapes into fantasy because he is befuddled and beset by a world that he neither created nor understands. Thurber attended the Ohio State University from 1913

  • Thurber, James Grover (American writer and cartoonist)

    James Thurber, American writer and cartoonist, whose well-known and highly acclaimed writings and drawings picture the urban man as one who escapes into fantasy because he is befuddled and beset by a world that he neither created nor understands. Thurber attended the Ohio State University from 1913

  • Thurber, Jeannette Meyer (American music patron)

    Jeannette Meyer Thurber, American music patron who devoted her efforts to creating a government-funded music conservatory in the United States. Jeannette Meyer was privately educated in New York and Paris. In 1869 she married Francis B. Thurber, a wholesale grocer and later a lawyer. Influenced by

  • Thuret, Gustave-Adolphe (French botanist)

    Gustave-Adolphe Thuret, French botanist who gave the first accounts of fertilization in the brown algae. After receiving a law degree in 1838, Thuret began to study botany under Joseph Decaisne. He became interested in the history and behaviour of the marine algae and in about 1840 described the

  • Thurgau (canton, Switzerland)

    Thurgau, canton, northeastern Switzerland. It is bordered on the north by Lake Constance (Bodensee), by the Rhine River on the northwest, and by the cantons of Sankt Gallen on the south and Zürich and Schaffhausen on the west. With an area of 383 square miles (991 square km), it is divided into

  • Thurgood Marshall School of Law (school, Houston, Texas, United States)

    Texas Southern University: …School of Business; and the Thurgood Marshall School of Law. The Robert James Terry Library houses the Heartman Collection of African American history as well as the archives of alumna Barbara C. Jordan, U.S. congresswoman in 1972–78. Research is conducted at the Center for Excellence in Urban Education, the Research…

  • Thurgovie (canton, Switzerland)

    Thurgau, canton, northeastern Switzerland. It is bordered on the north by Lake Constance (Bodensee), by the Rhine River on the northwest, and by the cantons of Sankt Gallen on the south and Zürich and Schaffhausen on the west. With an area of 383 square miles (991 square km), it is divided into

  • Thuria (ancient city, Italy)

    Thurii, ancient Greek city of southern Italy, near the mouth of the Crathis River, in the province of Cosenza. After Sybaris was destroyed by Croton (448 bce), its citizens founded a new Sybaris with Athenian aid; the Athenians subsequently expelled the Sybarites, repopulated the city with

  • thurible (religious object)

    Thurible, vessel used in the Christian liturgy for the burning of aromatic incense strewn on lighted coals. Censers of terra-cotta or metal were widely used in Egypt, in the ancient Middle Eastern civilizations, including the Jewish, and in the classical world. Because they were destined chiefly

  • Thurii (ancient city, Italy)

    Thurii, ancient Greek city of southern Italy, near the mouth of the Crathis River, in the province of Cosenza. After Sybaris was destroyed by Croton (448 bce), its citizens founded a new Sybaris with Athenian aid; the Athenians subsequently expelled the Sybarites, repopulated the city with

  • Thüringen (historical region and state, Germany)

    Thuringia, historic region and Land (state) of east-central Germany. Thuringia is surrounded by the German states of Lower Saxony to the northwest, Saxony-Anhalt to the northeast, Saxony to the southeast, Bavaria to the south, and Hessen to the west. The capital is Erfurt. Area 6,244 square miles

  • Thüringen Becken (region, Germany)

    Thuringian Basin, fertile agricultural region of Germany, between the Harz mountains on the north and the Thuringian Forest range on the south. It extends westward from the Saxon lowland. The basin’s eastward-flowing streams, tributaries of the Saale River, swell—and sometimes flood—with snowmelt

  • Thüringerwald (mountains, Germany)

    Thuringian Forest, range of forested hills and mountains in Germany, extending in an irregular line from the neighbourhood of Eisenach in west-central Thuringia southeastward to the Bavarian frontier, where it merges with the Franconian Forest. Its breadth varies from 6 to 22 miles (10 to 35 km).

  • Thuringia (historical region and state, Germany)

    Thuringia, historic region and Land (state) of east-central Germany. Thuringia is surrounded by the German states of Lower Saxony to the northwest, Saxony-Anhalt to the northeast, Saxony to the southeast, Bavaria to the south, and Hessen to the west. The capital is Erfurt. Area 6,244 square miles

  • Thuringian (historical people)

    Thuringia: History: The Germanic Thuringians appeared after about ad 350 and were conquered by the Huns in the second quarter of the 5th century, but by 500 they had established a large kingdom stretching from the Harz mountains to the Danube. As a result of the defeat of their…

  • Thuringian (language)

    Germany: Languages: …or Franconian, dialect and the Thuringian dialect helped to form the basis of modern standard German. The present-day influence of Thuringian is of greatest significance in Thuringia, Saxony, and Saxony-Anhalt states. East Franconian is spoken in northern Bavaria, South Franconian in northern Baden-Württemberg. The Rhenish Franconian dialect extends northwest from…

  • Thuringian Basin (region, Germany)

    Thuringian Basin, fertile agricultural region of Germany, between the Harz mountains on the north and the Thuringian Forest range on the south. It extends westward from the Saxon lowland. The basin’s eastward-flowing streams, tributaries of the Saale River, swell—and sometimes flood—with snowmelt

  • Thuringian Forest (mountains, Germany)

    Thuringian Forest, range of forested hills and mountains in Germany, extending in an irregular line from the neighbourhood of Eisenach in west-central Thuringia southeastward to the Bavarian frontier, where it merges with the Franconian Forest. Its breadth varies from 6 to 22 miles (10 to 35 km).

  • Thurium (ancient city, Italy)

    Thurii, ancient Greek city of southern Italy, near the mouth of the Crathis River, in the province of Cosenza. After Sybaris was destroyed by Croton (448 bce), its citizens founded a new Sybaris with Athenian aid; the Athenians subsequently expelled the Sybarites, repopulated the city with

  • Thurles (Ireland)

    Thurles, town, County Tipperary, Ireland, on the banks of the River Suir. The seat of the Roman Catholic archbishopric of Cashel and Emly, the town is a marketing centre for a large agricultural area; it has a sugar beet factory, and it is a well-known sporting centre. The Knights Templar held a

  • Thurloe, John (English statesman)

    John Thurloe, English secretary of state during Oliver Cromwell’s Protectorate. His voluminous correspondence provides one of the chief historical sources for the Cromwellian era. Thurloe entered politics as secretary to the Parliamentary leader Oliver St. John and in March 1652 was appointed

  • Thurlow of Ashfield and Thurlow, Edward Thurlow, 1st Baron (British statesman)

    Edward Thurlow, 1st Baron Thurlow, lord chancellor of England from June 1778 to April 1783 and from December 1783 to June 1792, who gained that office and continued to hold it under a variety of prime ministers by supporting the extreme conservatism of King George III. He was noted more for his

  • Thurman, Allen G. (American politician)

    United States presidential election of 1888: Tariff reform tensions: Allen G. Thurman filling the vice presidential slot on the ticket. (Thomas A. Hendricks, Cleveland’s first vice president, had died during the first year of his term, and the Constitution at the time did not allow for a replacement.) Later that month, the Republicans held…

  • Thurman, Howard (American theologian and scholar)

    Howard Thurman, American Baptist preacher and theologian, the first African American dean of chapel at a traditionally white American university, and a founder of the first interracial interfaith congregation in the United States. Thurman was the grandson of former slaves who stressed education as

  • Thurman, Howard Washington (American theologian and scholar)

    Howard Thurman, American Baptist preacher and theologian, the first African American dean of chapel at a traditionally white American university, and a founder of the first interracial interfaith congregation in the United States. Thurman was the grandson of former slaves who stressed education as

  • Thurman, Keith (American boxer)

    Manny Pacquiao: …decision over the previously undefeated Keith Thurman to take the WBA super welterweight belt and become, at 40 years old, the oldest welterweight champion in boxing history.

  • Thurman, Uma (American actress)

    Ethan Hawke: …years later he starred opposite Uma Thurman in the sci-fi thriller Gattaca; the couple married in 1998 and divorced in 2004. Hawke’s other films in the 1990s included Great Expectations (1998), a modern take on the classic novel by Charles Dickens; Linklater’s The Newton Boys (1998), about the adventures of…

  • Thurman, Wallace Henry (American writer)

    Wallace Henry Thurman, African-American editor, critic, novelist, and playwright associated with the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Thurman studied at the University of Utah and the University of Southern California, although he did not receive a degree. He moved to Harlem in 1925, and by the

  • Thurmond, James Strom (United States senator)

    Strom Thurmond, American politician, a prominent states’ rights and segregation advocate who ran for the presidency in 1948 on the Dixiecrat ticket and was one of the longest-serving senators in U.S. history (1954–2003). After graduating (1923) from Clemson College (now Clemson University) in South

  • Thurmond, Nate (American basketball player)

    Nate Thurmond, American basketball player who was one of the greatest centres in National Basketball Association (NBA) history. In the 1960s the NBA was ruled by big men. More specifically, it was two centres—the ultimate team player Bill Russell and the superhuman Wilt Chamberlain—whose rivalry

  • Thurmond, Nathaniel (American basketball player)

    Nate Thurmond, American basketball player who was one of the greatest centres in National Basketball Association (NBA) history. In the 1960s the NBA was ruled by big men. More specifically, it was two centres—the ultimate team player Bill Russell and the superhuman Wilt Chamberlain—whose rivalry

  • Thurmond, Paul (American politician)

    Tim Scott: …Tea Party factions, he defeated Paul Thurmond, son of the late Sen. Strom Thurmond, in the primary and easily won the general election. He assumed office in 2011. When James DeMint resigned in 2013, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley appointed Scott to fill his Senate seat. Scott won a special…

  • Thurmond, Strom (United States senator)

    Strom Thurmond, American politician, a prominent states’ rights and segregation advocate who ran for the presidency in 1948 on the Dixiecrat ticket and was one of the longest-serving senators in U.S. history (1954–2003). After graduating (1923) from Clemson College (now Clemson University) in South

  • Thurn and Taxis postal system (European history)

    Thurn and Taxis postal system, imperial and, after 1806, private postal system operated in western and central Europe by the noble house of Thurn and Taxis. At least two early ancestors of the family, then called Tassis, had operated courier services in the Italian city-states from about 1290, but

  • Thurneysen, Eduard (Swiss theologian)

    Karl Barth: …friend and colleague, the theologian Eduard Thurneysen, he initiated a radical change in Protestant thought, stressing the “wholly otherness of God” over the anthropocentrism of 19th-century liberal theology. Barth recovered the centrality of the doctrine of the Trinity within the dynamic and rational structure of Christian dogmatics; of particular importance…

  • Thurneysen, Rudolf (German linguist)

    Rudolf Thurneysen, German linguist and Celtic scholar who was one of the first to use the principles of modern historical linguistics in the field of Celtic studies. He was also an excellent Latinist. Thurneysen taught at the universities of Jena (1885–87), Freiburg (1887–1913), and Bonn (1913

  • Thurniaceae (plant family)

    Poales: Sedge group: group are Cyperaceae, Juncaceae, and Thurniaceae. The flowers of these families are usually small, greenish, and bisexual, and they are crowded into dense terminal or lateral clusters. The members of this group are pollinated typically by the wind. The plants grow from a horizontal or upright rootstock that produces one…

  • Thurnwald, Richard (German ethnologist)

    Richard Thurnwald, German anthropologist and sociologist known for his comparative studies of social institutions. Thurnwald’s views on social anthropology grew out of his intimate knowledge of various societies gained during field expeditions to the Solomon Islands and Micronesia (1906–09 and

  • Thurrock (unitary authority, England, United Kingdom)

    Thurrock, seaport and unitary authority, geographic and historic county of Essex, England. It occupies the north bank of the Thames estuary, about 15 miles (24 km) east of central London. Grays is the administrative centre. The southern part of the area was largely reclaimed from the Thames marshes

  • Thursbitch (novel by Garner)

    Alan Garner: Thursbitch (2003) intertwines events taking place in the titular English valley in the 18th and 21st centuries. The Stone Book Quartet—comprising The Stone Book (1976), Granny Reardun (1977), Tom Fobble’s Day (1977), and The Aimer Gate (1978)—is a series of fictionalized episodes from the lives…

  • Thursby, Emma Cecilia (American singer and educator)

    Emma Cecilia Thursby, American singer and educator who enjoyed a popular concert career in both Europe and the United States in the 1870s and ’80s. Thursby began singing in church at the age of five. Her musical training began at the Bethlehem (Pennsylvania) Female Seminary (now Moravian College)

  • Thursday (day)

    Thursday, fifth day of the week

  • Thursday Island (island, Queensland, Australia)

    Thursday Island, island in the Torres Strait off northern Queensland, Australia. It is surrounded by Prince of Wales, Friday, Good’s, Hammond, Wednesday, and Horn islands, and it is the administrative centre for the area. The principal town is Port Kennedy, on the eastern shore. The mixed

  • Thurso (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Thurso, burgh (town) and Atlantic Ocean seaport, Highland council area, historic county of Caithness, Scotland, and the most northerly town on the mainland of Great Britain. It was the centre of Norse power on the mainland before the Scots defeated the Norsemen (Battle of Largs, 1263). It was made

  • Thurstan (archbishop of York)

    Thurstan, archbishop of York whose tenure was marked by disputes over precedence with the see of Canterbury and with the Scottish bishoprics. He was made archbishop by King Henry I in 1114, but had to wait for consecration by Pope Calixtus II until October 1119, because he refused to profess

  • Thurston Island (island, Antarctica)

    Richard E. Byrd: Antarctic expeditions: Byrd’s discovery of Thurston Island greatly decreased the length of unexplored coast of the continent.

  • Thurston Lava Tube (lava tube, Hawaii, United States)

    Kilauea: The Thurston Lava Tube, a 450-foot (135-metre) tunnel east of the caldera, was formed when a lava stream’s outer crust hardened while the molten lava continued its flow.

  • Thurston’s geometrization conjecture (mathematics)

    topology: Fundamental group: Thurston’s conjecture implies the Poincaré conjecture, and in recognition of his work toward proving these conjectures, the Russian mathematician Grigori Perelman was awarded a Fields Medal at the 2006 International Congress of Mathematicians.

  • Thurston, Howard (American magician)

    Howard Thurston, American magician who led the largest magic show in history. Thurston was originally a card manipulator and toured the world (1904–07) with a full-evening show. He returned to the United States to become successor to Harry Kellar, the leading American magician. For more than 20

  • Thurston, Lorrin A. (American politician)

    Lorrin A. Thurston, leader of Hawaiians who opposed the monarchy and favoured U.S. annexation of the islands. Thurston was the son of American missionaries in Hawaii. He attended Oahu College and then studied law with the attorney general of Hawaii. In 1880 Thurston went to the U.S. mainland to

  • Thurston, Lorrin Andrews (American politician)

    Lorrin A. Thurston, leader of Hawaiians who opposed the monarchy and favoured U.S. annexation of the islands. Thurston was the son of American missionaries in Hawaii. He attended Oahu College and then studied law with the attorney general of Hawaii. In 1880 Thurston went to the U.S. mainland to

  • Thurston, William Paul (American mathematician)

    William Paul Thurston, American mathematician who won the 1982 Fields Medal for his work in topology. Thurston was educated at New College, Sarasota, Florida (B.A., 1967), and the University of California, Berkeley (Ph.D., 1972). After a year at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New

  • Thurstone, L. L. (American psychologist)

    L. L. Thurstone, American psychologist who was instrumental in the development of psychometrics, the science that measures mental functions, and who developed statistical techniques for multiple-factor analysis of performance on psychological tests. Thurstone was originally interested in

  • Thurstone, Louis Leon (American psychologist)

    L. L. Thurstone, American psychologist who was instrumental in the development of psychometrics, the science that measures mental functions, and who developed statistical techniques for multiple-factor analysis of performance on psychological tests. Thurstone was originally interested in

  • Thus Spake Zarathustra (treatise by Nietzsche)

    Thus Spake Zarathustra, treatise by Friedrich Nietzsche, written in four parts and published in German between 1883 and 1885 as Also sprach Zarathustra. The work is incomplete, according to Nietzsche’s original plan, but it is the first thorough statement of Nietzsche’s mature philosophy and the

  • Thus Spoke Zarathustra (treatise by Nietzsche)

    Thus Spake Zarathustra, treatise by Friedrich Nietzsche, written in four parts and published in German between 1883 and 1885 as Also sprach Zarathustra. The work is incomplete, according to Nietzsche’s original plan, but it is the first thorough statement of Nietzsche’s mature philosophy and the

  • Thus Spoke Zarathustra (work by Strauss)

    Richard Strauss: Works: Also sprach Zarathustra (1896; Thus Spoke Zarathustra) is ostensibly a homage to the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche but is actually a concerto for orchestra in which the entities of man and nature are illustrated and contrasted by opposing tonalities.

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