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  • third position (ballet)

    ballet position: In the third position, the heel of one foot rests against the instep of the other; both are firmly turned out, and the weight is divided between them. Used extensively in 18th-century social dances such as the minuet and gavotte, this position has almost disappeared from theatrical…

  • Third Programme (British radio program)

    radio: Growth of the BBC: The Third Programme, though it appealed to less than 10 percent of the British audience, was widely emulated in Europe and on the slowly growing number of American educational radio stations. Soon there were three separate BBC program services: Home, Light, and Third. Each of the…

  • third rail (mechanics)

    locomotive: …an overhead wire or a third rail beside the running rails. Third-rail supply is employed only by urban rapid-transit railroads operating on low-voltage direct current.

  • Third Reich (historical empire, Europe)

    Third Reich, official Nazi designation for the regime in Germany from January 1933 to May 1945, as the presumed successor of the medieval and early modern Holy Roman Empire of 800 to 1806 (the First Reich) and the German Empire of 1871 to 1918 (the Second Reich). With the onset of the Great

  • Third Republic (Burundian history)

    Burundi: The Third Republic: The crisis in church-state relations was the critical factor behind Maj. Pierre Buyoya’s decision to overthrow the Second Republic in September 1987 and proclaim a Third Republic. Buyoya, also a Tutsi-Bahima from Bururi, took the title of president and presided over a country…

  • Third Republic (French history)

    Third Republic, French government from 1870 to 1940. After the fall of the Second Empire and the suppression of the Paris Commune, the new Constitutional Laws of 1875 were adopted, establishing a regime based on parliamentary supremacy. Despite its series of short-lived governments, the Third

  • Third Republic (Madagascan history)

    Madagascar: The Third Republic: In February 1993 Zafy was elected the first president of the Third Republic. His term of office was marked by a continual instability that stemmed from several factors. First, his coalition of support was composed of several distinct party…

  • Third Republic (South Korean history)

    South Korea: The Third Republic: The election for president of the Third Republic took place on October 15, 1963. Park narrowly defeated the opposition candidate, Yun Po-S?n, former president (1960–62) of the Second Republic, who had remained in office as a figurehead at the request of the junta…

  • Third Republic, constitution of the (French history)

    Constitutional Laws of 1875, In France, a series of fundamental laws that, taken collectively, came to be known as the constitution of the Third Republic. It established a two-house legislature (with an indirectly elected Senate as a conservative check on the popularly elected Chamber of Deputies);

  • Third Rome (religious and political doctrine)

    Eastern Orthodoxy: The third Rome: At the Council of Florence, the Greek “metropolitan of Kiev and all Russia,” Isidore, was one of the major architects of the Union of Florence. Having signed the decree, he returned to Moscow in 1441 as a Roman…

  • Third Section of His Imperial Majesty’s Own Chancery in Russia (Russian political office)

    Third Department, office created by Emperor Nicholas I (July 15 [July 3, old style], 1826) to conduct secret police operations. Designed by Count A.Kh. Benckendorff, who was also its first chief administrator (1826–44), the department was responsible for political security. It conducted s

  • Third Seminole War (United States history [1855–1858])

    Seminole Wars: The Third Seminole War (1855–58) resulted from renewed efforts to track down the Seminole remnant remaining in Florida. It caused little bloodshed and ended with the United States paying the most resistant band of refugees to go West.

  • Third Servile War (ancient Rome)

    Third Servile War, (73–71 bce) slave rebellion against Rome led by the gladiator Spartacus. Spartacus was a Thracian who had served in the Roman army but seems to have deserted. He was captured and subsequently sold as a slave. Destined for the arena, in 73 bce he, with a band of his fellow

  • Third State Normal School (university, Saint Cloud, Minnesota, United States)

    Saint Cloud State University, coeducational institution of higher learning in St. Cloud, central Minnesota, U.S. It is part of the Minnesota State University system. St. Cloud State University opened in 1869 as Third State Normal School; initially, most of the students were women. In 1898 it began

  • Third Statute of Westminster (England [1290])

    Statute of Quia Emptores, English law of 1290 that forbade subinfeudation, the process whereby one tenant granted land to another who then considered the grantor his lord. Thus, after passage of the Quia Emptores, if A granted land to B in fee simple, B’s lord would not be A but A’s lord. The

  • third stream (music)

    jazz: Jazz meets classical and the third stream begins: It was also in the 1950s that a greater rapprochement between jazz and classical music began to emerge. Like Lewis, many other jazz musicians were studying much of the great classical literature, from Bach to Béla Bartók, to expand their musical horizons.…

  • Third style (Roman art)

    Western painting: Pagan Roman paintings: In the Third style, which covers most of the Augustan period, the central panel picture on a wall is no longer thought of as a scene through a window but as a real picture hung on or inserted into a screen or woven into a tapestry, which…

  • Third Symphony (work by Creston)

    Paul Creston: …with programmatic connotations, include the Third Symphony (1950) and the Lancaster Symphony (1970). His Corinthians XIII (1963), like the Third Symphony, uses themes from Gregorian chant. His belief that song and dance are the basis of music is reflected in the Invocation and Dance for orchestra (1953), in the two-part…

  • third theatre (theatrical system)

    Western theatre: Alternative theatre: …in Edinburgh, a profusion of “fringe” theatres sprang up in converted cellars, warehouses, and the back rooms of pubs. Rock music, Dada, and Antonin Artaud were inspiration for groups such as the People Show, Pip Simmons Theatre Group, and Ken Campbell’s Road Show. Other companies—Foco Novo, Portable Theatre, 7:84, Belt…

  • Third Wave Direct Action Corporation (American organization)

    feminism: Foundations: …1992) became in 1997 the Third Wave Foundation, dedicated to supporting “groups and individuals working towards gender, racial, economic, and social justice”; both were founded by (among others) Rebecca Walker, the daughter of the novelist and second-waver Alice Walker. Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards, authors of Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism,…

  • Third Wave Foundation (American organization)

    feminism: Foundations: …1992) became in 1997 the Third Wave Foundation, dedicated to supporting “groups and individuals working towards gender, racial, economic, and social justice”; both were founded by (among others) Rebecca Walker, the daughter of the novelist and second-waver Alice Walker. Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards, authors of Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism,…

  • third way (politics)

    Third way, in politics, a proposed alternative between two hitherto dominant models, namely left-wing and right-wing political groups. Historically, the term third way was used to refer to a variety of forms of government—from Nordic social democracy to fascism. At the end of the 20th century,

  • Third Way (Palestinian political party)

    Salam Fayyad: …November 2005 to found the Third Way Bloc with Palestinian educator Hanan Ashrawi. In the parliamentary election of January 2006, the party succeeded in winning two seats. The 2006 elections also saw the Islamic militant group Hamas emerge with a majority, and the tenuous coalition government that Hamas and Fatah…

  • Third Wedding, The (work by Tachtsis)

    Greek literature: Literature after 1922: …novel To tríto stefáni (1962; The Third Wedding) by Kóstas Tachtsís, the female narrator tells the story of her life with venomous verve, unwittingly exposing the oppressive nature of the Greek family. Yórgos Ioánnou’s part-fictional, part-autobiographical short prose pieces present a vivid picture of life in Thessaloníki (Salonika) and Athens…

  • Third Workshop (studio, Moscow, Russia)

    Yevgeny Bagrationovich Vakhtangov: …he took charge of the Third Workshop, which was a subsidiary studio of the Moscow Art Theatre, and gradually led that company toward a “fantastic realism.” He made use of masks, music, dance, and boldly abstract costume and scenery design in pursuit of a theatre that would offer the popular…

  • Third World (international relations)

    Third World, former political designation originally used (1963) to describe those states not part of the first world—the capitalist, economically developed states led by the U.S.—or the second world—the communist states led by the Soviet Union. When the term was introduced, the Third World

  • Third World America: How Our Politicians Are Abandoning the Middle Class and Betraying the American Dream (book by Huffington)

    Arianna Huffington: …Right Is Wrong (2008), and Third World America: How Our Politicians Are Abandoning the Middle Class and Betraying the American Dream (2010).

  • Third World Cinema (cinema movement)

    Third Cinema, aesthetic and political cinematic movement in Third World countries (mainly in Latin America and Africa) meant as an alternative to Hollywood (First Cinema) and aesthetically oriented European films (Second Cinema). Third Cinema films aspire to be socially realistic portrayals of life

  • Third World debt (economics)

    Third World debt, debt accumulated by Third World (developing) countries. The term is typically used to refer specifically to the external debt those countries owe to developed countries and multilateral lending institutions. The rapid growth in the external debt of developing countries first

  • Third World Press (American company)

    Haki R. Madhubuti: …African American publishing outlet called Third World Press, and in 1969 he established the Institute of Positive Education, a community resource in Chicago that eventually oversaw two schools for black children. Among his poetry collections published under the Swahili name Haki R. Madhubuti are Book of Life (1973), Killing Memory,…

  • third-class mail

    postal system: United States: … consists of newspapers and magazines, third-class encompasses other printed matter and merchandise weighing less than one pound, and fourth-class mail is either merchandise or printed matter that weighs one pound or more. The addition of these classes allowed the post office to adopt more complicated rate structures that would take…

  • third-degree burn (injury)

    burn: Third-degree, or full-thickness, burns destroy the entire thickness of the skin. The surface of the wound is leathery and may be brown, tan, black, white, or red. There is no pain, because the pain receptors have been obliterated along with the rest of the dermis.…

  • third-generation computer (computing)

    computer: The IBM 360: …are commonly referred to as third-generation computers.

  • third-generation data network (telecommunications)

    mobile telephone: Development of cellular systems: …for a set of “third-generation” (3G) cellular standards, known collectively as IMT-2000. The 3G standards are based loosely on several attributes: the use of CDMA technology; the ability eventually to support three classes of users (vehicle-based, pedestrian, and fixed); and the ability to support voice, data, and multimedia services.…

  • third-man argument (philosophy)
  • third-party logistics

    logistics: …practice is referred to as third-party logistics.

  • third-wave feminism

    feminism: The third wave of feminism: The third wave of feminism emerged in the mid-1990s. It was led by so-called Generation Xers who, born in the 1960s and ’70s in the developed world, came of age in a media-saturated and culturally and economically diverse milieu. Although they…

  • Thirkell, Angela Margaret (British writer)

    Angela Thirkell, author of more than 30 lighthearted novels about English middle- and upper-class life in Barsetshire dealing with descendants of characters in Anthony Trollope’s novels set in the same fictional locale. The daughter of a classical scholar, Thirkell was also the cousin of Rudyard

  • Thirlestane, 1st Lord (lord chancellor of Scotland)

    John Maitland, 1st Lord Maitland, lord chancellor of Scotland from 1587 to 1595 and chief adviser to King James VI (later James I of Great Britain and Ireland). His father was the poet and statesman Sir Richard Maitland of Lethington, East Lothian, and his brother, William Maitland, was a prominent

  • Thirsk, Robert (Canadian astronaut)

    Robert Thirsk, the first Canadian astronaut to make a long-duration spaceflight. Thirsk received bachelor’s and master’s degrees, respectively, in mechanical engineering from the University of Calgary in 1976 and from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1978. He earned a doctorate in

  • Thirsk, Robert Brent (Canadian astronaut)

    Robert Thirsk, the first Canadian astronaut to make a long-duration spaceflight. Thirsk received bachelor’s and master’s degrees, respectively, in mechanical engineering from the University of Calgary in 1976 and from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1978. He earned a doctorate in

  • thirst (physiology)

    adipsia: …characterized by the lack of thirst even in the presence of dehydration. In adipsia the brain’s thirst centre, located in the hypothalamus, is damaged. People with adipsia have little or no sensation of thirst when they become dehydrated. These people must be instructed, even forced, to drink fluid at regular…

  • thirst centre (anatomy)

    human disease: Fluid and electrolyte balance: …for a few days, the thirst centre, located in the hypothalamus deep within the brain, would send out messages that would be translated into the feeling of thirst. At the same time a hormone from the posterior pituitary gland known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH; vasopressin) would be secreted. This hormone,…

  • thirsty glass (materials processing)

    industrial glass: The Vycor process: …shape, the glass (known as “thirsty” glass) may be used as a catalytic support, a molecular sieve, or a time-release capsule. It also may be used as a glass-polymer composite after polymeric liquids are aspirated into the pores and allowed to complete polymerization there. In addition, the porous silica can…

  • Thirteen (film by Hardwicke [2003])

    Holly Hunter: …troubled teenager in Catherine Hardwicke’s Thirteen (2003) and was nominated for an Oscar for best supporting actress for her performance. She voiced Elastigirl in the popular animated feature The Incredibles (2004) and its sequel, Incredibles 2 (2018). Hunter earned nominations for both a Golden Globe (2008) and an Emmy (2009)…

  • thirteen (number)

    number symbolism: 13: Triskaidekaphobes believe 13 to be unlucky, especially when the 13th day of the month is a Friday, a fear that was reinforced by the explosion that almost wrecked the Apollo 13 lunar spacecraft in 1970. Skeptics note that it returned to Earth safely, unlike…

  • Thirteen Articles (Church of England)

    Thirty-nine Articles: …been partly derived from the Thirteen Articles of 1538, designed as the basis of an agreement between Henry VIII and the German Lutheran princes, which had been influenced by the Lutheran Augsburg Confession (1530).

  • Thirteen Articles of Faith (Judaism)

    Thirteen Articles of Faith, a summary of the basic tenets of Judaism as perceived by the 12th-century Jewish philosopher Moses Maimonides. They first appeared in his commentary on the Mishna, Kitāb al-Sirāj, as an elaboration on the section Sanhedrin 10, which sets forth the reasons why a Jew would

  • thirteen colonies (British and United States history)

    American colonies, the 13 British colonies that were established during the 17th and early 18th centuries in what is now a part of the eastern United States. The colonies grew both geographically along the Atlantic coast and westward and numerically to 13 from the time of their founding to the

  • Thirteen Most Pleasant and Delectable Questions of Love (work by Boccaccio)

    Giovanni Boccaccio: Early works.: …themes derived from medieval romances: Il filocolo (c. 1336; “The Love Afflicted”), a prose work in five books on the loves and adventures of Florio and Biancofiore (Floire and Blanchefleur); and Il filostrato (c. 1338; “The Love Struck”), a short poem in ottava rima (a stanza form composed of eight…

  • Thirteen Offices (Chinese politics)

    Kangxi: Early life: …was to replace the so-called Thirteen Offices (Shisan Yanmen) with a Neiwufu (Dorgi Yamun), or Office of Household. The Thirteen Offices, all organized solely by Chinese eunuchs, had been the abomination of the Manchus ever since they had been introduced by the late emperor, to handle affairs of the imperial…

  • Thirteen Principles (Judaism)

    Thirteen Articles of Faith, a summary of the basic tenets of Judaism as perceived by the 12th-century Jewish philosopher Moses Maimonides. They first appeared in his commentary on the Mishna, Kitāb al-Sirāj, as an elaboration on the section Sanhedrin 10, which sets forth the reasons why a Jew would

  • Thirteen Principles of Faith (creed by Maimonides)

    creed: Judaism: …most enduring has been Maimonides’ Thirteen Principles of Faith, but these have never become formally binding. The Reform movement’s doctrinal declarations, such as the Pittsburgh Platform (1885), have been without lasting influence. The reason for this paucity of creeds is that Jewish identity has been chiefly defined in terms of…

  • Thirteen Towers of Chankillo (archaeological site, Peru)

    Chankillo, archaeological site erected between 200 and 300 bce in the desert of the Sechín River basin in the Ancash region of Peru. The site is about 9 miles (14 km) from the Pacific coast and consists of a hilltop building complex encircled by thick, gated walls, a row running north-south of 13

  • Thirteen Years’ War (Polish history)

    Thirteen Years’ War, (1454–66), war between Poland and the Teutonic Knights that began as a revolt by the Prussian populace against their overlords, the Teutonic Knights, and was concluded by the Treaty of Toruń (Thorn; Oct. 19, 1466). In 1454 rebel Prussian groups petitioned Casimir IV of Poland

  • Thirteenth Amendment (United States Constitution)

    Thirteenth Amendment, amendment (1865) to the Constitution of the United States that formally abolished slavery. Although the words slavery and slave are never mentioned in the Constitution, the Thirteenth Amendment abrogated those sections of the Constitution which had tacitly codified the

  • Thirteenth Chair, The (film by Browning [1929])

    Tod Browning: The MGM and Universal years: Browning’s first talkie was The Thirteenth Chair (1929). Chaney was not yet open to the notion of making a sound picture, so Hungarian actor Bela Lugosi was recruited to play the police inspector investigating a murder at a seance. Chaney finally made one sound film, a remake of The…

  • Thirteenth Sun, The (novel by Worku)

    Daniachew Worku: …for his novel in English, The Thirteenth Sun (1973).

  • Thirteenth Woman, and Other Stories, The (short stories by Davis)

    Lydia Davis: Her first story collection, The Thirteenth Woman, and Other Stories, was published in 1976, but it was not until 11 years later—with Break It Down (1986), her fourth collection—that she was a finalist for a significant literary prize, the 1987 PEN/Hemingway Award. She subsequently gained a strong following, particularly…

  • Thirty Acres (novel by Panneton)

    Ringuet: His next effort, Trente arpents, was first published in Paris. Skillfully styled and presenting an unsentimental view of rural versus urban life, the book was an immediate success and was rapidly translated into several languages. Also noteworthy is Le Poids du jour (1948; “The Heaviness of the Day”),…

  • Thirty Days’ War (1897)

    Greco-Turkish wars: The first war, also called the Thirty Days’ War, took place against a background of growing Greek concern over conditions in Crete, which was under Turkish domination and where relations between the Christians and their Muslim rulers had been deteriorating steadily. The outbreak in 1896 of…

  • Thirty Poems (poetry by Merton)

    Thomas Merton: …works were collections of poems—Thirty Poems (1944), A Man in the Divided Sea (1946), and Figures for an Apocalypse (1948). With the publication of the autobiographical Seven Storey Mountain (1948), he gained an international reputation. His early works are strictly spiritual, but his writings of the early 1960s tend…

  • Thirty Seconds over Tokyo (film by LeRoy [1944])

    Thirty Seconds over Tokyo, American war film, released in 1944, that depicted the U.S. air raid on Tokyo and other Japanese cities following Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor (1941). Written by Dalton Trumbo, the movie was based on the 1943 memoir by Capt. Ted W. Lawson, a pilot involved in the

  • Thirty Thousand Islands (islands, Ontario, Canada)

    Georgian Bay: The Thirty Thousand Islands that lie along the bay’s eastern shore constitute another popular summer resort area.

  • Thirty Tyrants (Greek dictators)

    Thirty Tyrants, (404–403 bc) Spartan-imposed oligarchy that ruled Athens after the Peloponnesian War. Thirty commissioners were appointed to the oligarchy, which had an extremist conservative core, led by Critias. Their oppressive regime fostered a bloody purge, in which perhaps 1,500 residents

  • Thirty Years’ Peace (Greek history)

    Callias: …to have helped formulate the Thirty Years’ Treaty between Athens and Sparta in 446/445.

  • Thirty Years’ View (work by Benton)

    Thomas Hart Benton: …his years in the Senate, Thirty Years’ View, 2 vol. (1854–56), was eloquent with agrarian and Jacksonian Democratic faith, opposition to slavery extension, and concern for the imperiled Union. He produced a learned Examination of the Supreme Court’s Dred Scott decision in 1858 (which reaffirmed that the status of slaves,…

  • Thirty Years’ War (European history)

    Thirty Years’ War, (1618–48), in European history, a series of wars fought by various nations for various reasons, including religious, dynastic, territorial, and commercial rivalries. Its destructive campaigns and battles occurred over most of Europe, and, when it ended with the Treaty of

  • Thirty, Battle of the (French history [1351])

    Battle of the Thirty, French Combat Des Trentes, (March 27, 1351), episode in the struggle for the succession to the duchy of Brittany between Charles of Blois, supported by the King of France, and John of Montfort, supported by the King of England. Battles are usually fought by many thousands of

  • Thirty-nine Articles (Church of England)

    Thirty-nine Articles, the doctrinal statement of the Church of England. With the Book of Common Prayer, they present the liturgy and doctrine of that church. The Thirty-nine Articles developed from the Forty-two Articles, written by Archbishop Thomas Cranmer in 1553 “for the avoiding of controversy

  • Thirty-Nine Steps (work by Buchan)

    John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir: His Thirty-Nine Steps (1915) was the most popular of his series of secret-service thrillers and the first of many to feature Richard Hannay. The 1935 film of The Thirty-Nine Steps, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, is often acclaimed a classic motion-picture thriller.

  • Thirty-nine Steps, The (film by Hitchcock [1935])

    The 39 Steps, British suspense film, released in 1935, that helped establish Alfred Hitchcock as one of the leading directors in the genre and employed themes that became hallmarks of his movies. While vacationing in London, Richard Hannay (played by Robert Donat) befriends a scared woman (Lucie

  • thirty-seven (Burmese religion)

    nat: …group collectively called the “thirty-seven,” made up of spirits of human beings who have died violent deaths. They are capable of protecting the believer when kept properly propitiated and of causing harm when offended or ignored.

  • Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (work by Hokusai)

    Hokusai: Mature years.: …of books and prints, his “Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji” is particularly notable (see photograph). Published from about 1826 to 1833, this famous series (including supplements, a total of 46 colour prints) marked a summit in the history of the Japanese landscape print; in grandeur of concept and skill of…

  • Thirty-three Variations on a Waltz by Diabelli (work by Beethoven)

    Diabelli Variations, Op. 120, group of musical variations for solo piano by Ludwig van Beethoven, completed in 1823 and considered one of his monumental works for the instrument. By manipulating tempi, dynamics, and themes and by adding ornamentation, parodic elements, and references to the works

  • thirtysomething (American television show)

    Thirtysomething, American television drama about the lives of young urban professionals that was broadcast on the American Broadcasting Co. (ABC) network for four seasons (1987–91). Initially panned by some critics as self-indulgent, the show built up a loyal following among its baby boomer

  • Thirukkural (work by Tiruvalluvar)

    Tirukkural, (Tamil: “Sacred Couplets”) the most celebrated of the Patiren-kirkkanakku (“Eighteen Ethical Works”) in Tamil literature and a work that has had an immense influence on Tamil culture and life. It is usually attributed to the poet Tiruvalluvar, who is thought to have lived in India in

  • Thiruvalluvar (Indian poet)

    Tiruvalluvar, Tamil poet-saint known as the author of the Tirukkural (“Sacred Couplets”), considered a masterpiece of human thought, compared in India and abroad to the Bible, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, and the works of Plato. Little is known about the life of Tiruvalluvar except that he is

  • Thiruvananthapuram (India)

    Thiruvananthapuram, city, capital of Kerala state, southwestern India. It is situated along the Arabian Sea with isolated hills on a coastal plain. The community became prominent under Raja Martanda Varma, who made it the capital of his kingdom of Travancore in 1745. The city’s former name,

  • Thiry, Marcel (Belgian author)

    Marcel Thiry, Belgian poet, novelist, short-story writer, and essayist whose work reflects his experiences of foreign lands and cultures. Thiry volunteered for service during World War I. Francophilic and pro-Walloon, he was elected to the Belgian Parliament in 1968 representing the Rassemblement

  • This (Egypt)

    Jirjā: …was probably the town of This (Tny), ancestral home of the 1st dynasty (c. 2925–c. 2775 bce), which unified Egypt. Its present name derives from the ancient Coptic monastery of Mar Girgis, dedicated to St. George. In the 14th century ce it became a centre of the Hawwārah, an Arabized…

  • This Above All (film by Litvak [1942])

    Anatole Litvak: The Hollywood years: …made one picture, the patriotic This Above All (1942) with Tyrone Power and Joan Fontaine, before joining the army’s Special Service Division during World War II. There he worked with Frank Capra on the Why We Fight series of documentaries, codirecting (uncredited) Prelude to War (1942), The Nazis Strike

  • This American Life (American radio and television program)

    Ira Glass: …later adapted for television) called This American Life.

  • This Book Will Save Your Life (novel by Homes)

    A.M. Homes: This Book Will Save Your Life (2006) marked a shift in tone for Homes. Though retaining the wry observations and sense of the surreal that were her bailiwick, the novel, an ultimately redemptive tale about a stockbroker undergoing an existential crisis in Los Angeles, largely…

  • This Boy’s Life (film by Caton-Jones [1993])

    Leonardo DiCaprio: …opposite Robert De Niro in This Boy’s Life (1993). DiCaprio earned rave reviews, and for his next film, What’s Eating Gilbert Grape (1993), he received an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor for his realistic portrayal of a teenager with an intellectual disability. Several independent movies followed, including The…

  • This Business of Living (work by Pavese)

    Cesare Pavese: …Business of Living, New York, The Burning Brand: Diaries 1935–1950, both 1961).

  • This Changes Everything (work by Klein)

    Naomi Klein: In This Changes Everything (2014), Klein iterated the inherent conflicts between unchecked capitalist enterprise and the mitigation of global warming; a documentary based on the book and directed by Lewis was released in 2015. No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World…

  • This Day’s Death (novel by Rechy)

    John Rechy: …followed with Numbers (1967) and This Day’s Death (1969), both of which deal with obsession and identity. The Vampires (1971) concerns the nature of evil, and The Fourth Angel (1972) records the adventures of four thrill-seeking adolescents.

  • This Earth of Mankind (work by Pramoedya)

    Pramoedya Ananta Toer: …of these, Bumi manusia (1980; This Earth of Mankind) and Anak semua bangsa (1980; Child of All Nations), met with great critical and popular acclaim in Indonesia after their publication, but the government subsequently banned them from circulation, and the last two volumes of the tetralogy, Jejak langkah (1985; Footsteps)…

  • This Gun for Hire (film by Tuttle)

    film noir: The cinema of the disenchanted: …Maltese Falcon (1941), Frank Tuttle’s This Gun for Hire (1942), Otto Preminger’s Laura (1944), and Edward Dmytryk’s Murder, My Sweet (1944). Banned in occupied countries during the war, these films became available throughout Europe beginning in 1946. French cineastes admired them for their

  • This Happy Breed (film by Lean [1944])

    David Lean: …of these, the domestic drama This Happy Breed (1944), is today seen as hopelessly dated because of Coward’s patronizing treatment of the lower middle-class. The second was Coward’s classic supernatural comedy Blithe Spirit (1945), regarded as a good effort but little more than a stage play on celluloid. The last…

  • This Hour Has 22 Minutes (Canadian TV show)

    Rick Mercer: …Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) in This Hour Has 22 Minutes, an inventive sketch-comedy-based television show he created with several fellow Newfoundlanders.

  • This Is 40 (film by Apatow [2012])

    Judd Apatow: …a terminal blood disorder, and This Is 40 (2012), which revisited two supporting characters from Knocked Up now facing the midlife frustrations of marriage and family.

  • This Is a Recording (album by Tomlin)

    Lily Tomlin: …later featured on Tomlin’s album This Is a Recording (1971), which earned the comedian a Grammy Award, and several characters appeared in the Emmy Award-winning TV movie Lily (1973).

  • This Is It (film by Ortega [2009])

    Michael Jackson: Child molestation accusations, financial difficulties, and death: The documentary film This Is It, which drew from more than 100 hours of footage compiled during rehearsals for Jackson’s scheduled 50-concert comeback engagement in London, premiered in October 2009. Also in 2009 Jackson’s 14-minute music video “Thriller” (1983), directed by John Landis, was inducted into the National…

  • This is Moscow Speaking (work by Daniel)

    Yuly Markovich Daniel: …Arzhak as Govorit Moskva (1962; This Is Moscow Speaking, and Other Stories). In the title story, “This Is Moscow Speaking,” the Soviet government declares Public Murder Day—a day on which murder is legal. The day itself passes uneventfully, underscoring the apathy and passivity of the Soviet citizenry.

  • This Is Not a Film (film by Panahi [2011])

    Jafar Panahi: …directed īn Fīlm Nīst (2011; This Is Not a Film), which depicts a day in his life while he awaited the result of his appeal, denied in October 2011. The film was made clandestinely in Panahi’s Tehrān apartment and was smuggled out of Iran inside a USB stick hidden in…

  • This Is Not America (A Logo for America) (work by Jaar)

    Alfredo Jaar: …of his better-known works is This Is Not America (A Logo for America) (1987), a sequence of projections on a light board overlooking a U.S. Army recruitment station in Times Square. The projections included an outlined map of the United States with the words This Is Not America written across…

  • This Is Spin?al Tap (film by Reiner [1984])

    Rob Reiner: Success as a film director: …was the faux rock-and-roll documentary This Is Spinal Tap (1984). He created the feature with the comics Christopher Guest, Harry Shearer, and Michael McKean, who starred as the members of a dissipated heavy metal band. Reiner himself played Marty DiBergi, the director of the documentary. The stars improvised much of…

  • This Is the American Earth (work by Adams and Newhall)

    Ansel Adams: Later career: …most notable of these was This Is the American Earth (1960; with Newhall), published by the Sierra Club. It was one of the essential books in the reawakening of the conservation movement of the 1960s and ’70s, along with Aldo Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There…

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