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  • Thesiad of the Nuptials of Emilia (work by Boccaccio)

    Giovanni Boccaccio: Early works.: The Teseida (probably begun in Naples and finished in Florence, 1340–41) is an ambitious epic of 12 cantos in ottava rima in which the wars of Theseus serve as a background for the love of two friends, Arcita and Palemone, for the same woman, Emilia; Arcita…

  • Thesiger, Frederic John Napier, 1st Viscount, Baron Chelmsford of Chelmsford (British statesman)

    Frederic John Napier Thesiger, 1st Viscount Chelmsford, English colonial administrator and statesman who served for several years as governor of Queensland and New South Wales in Australia before becoming viceroy of India. As viceroy, he helped to institute reforms that increased Indian

  • Thesiger, Sir Wilfred (British explorer)

    Sir Wilfred Thesiger, British soldier and travel writer who was a colonial explorer in the tradition of Sir Richard Burton and T.E. Lawrence. His most important writings, based on his travels to remote areas of Africa and Asia, include descriptions of the societies of the Bedouins of the Arabian

  • Thesiger, Sir Wilfred Patrick (British explorer)

    Sir Wilfred Thesiger, British soldier and travel writer who was a colonial explorer in the tradition of Sir Richard Burton and T.E. Lawrence. His most important writings, based on his travels to remote areas of Africa and Asia, include descriptions of the societies of the Bedouins of the Arabian

  • thesis (prosody)

    arsis and thesis: thesis, in prosody, respectively, the accented and unaccented parts of a poetic foot. Arsis, a term of Greek origin meaning “the act of raising or lifting” or “raising the foot in beating time,” refers in Greek, or quantitative, verse to the lighter or shorter part…

  • thesis play (drama)

    Problem play, type of drama that developed in the 19th century to deal with controversial social issues in a realistic manner, to expose social ills, and to stimulate thought and discussion on the part of the audience. The genre had its beginnings in the work of the French dramatists Alexandre

  • Thesium (plant genus)

    bastard toadflax: …for plants of the genus Thesium, which also has species distributed throughout Africa, Asia, and South America. The bisexual yellow or yellowish green flowers are grouped in terminal clusters, and the one-seeded fruit is dry and green.

  • Thesmophoria (Greek religion)

    Thesmophoria, in Greek religion, ancient festival held in honour of Demeter Thesmophoros and celebrated by women in many parts of the Greek world. The meaning of the name Demeter Thesmophoros still remains a matter of disagreement, although a possible translation is “bringer of treasure or wealth,”

  • Thesmophoriazousai (play by Aristophanes)

    Women at the Thesmophoria, play by Aristophanes, performed in 411 bce. The play develops from Euripides’ discovery that the women of Athens, angered by his constant attacks upon them in his tragedies, mean to discuss during their coming festival (the Thesmophoria) the question of contriving his

  • Thesmophoriazusae (play by Aristophanes)

    Women at the Thesmophoria, play by Aristophanes, performed in 411 bce. The play develops from Euripides’ discovery that the women of Athens, angered by his constant attacks upon them in his tragedies, mean to discuss during their coming festival (the Thesmophoria) the question of contriving his

  • thesmothetai (Greco-Roman law)

    archon: Lastly there were six thesmotetai (“determiners of custom”), who dealt with miscellaneous judicial problems.

  • Thespiae (ancient city, Greece)

    Thespiae, ancient Greek city of Boeotia by the Thespius (modern Kanavári) River and at the eastern foot of Mt. Helicon; site of the “Eros” of Praxiteles, one of the most famous statues in the ancient world, and home of the sanctuaries and festivals of the Muses. Thespiae is important in Greek

  • Thespiai (ancient city, Greece)

    Thespiae, ancient Greek city of Boeotia by the Thespius (modern Kanavári) River and at the eastern foot of Mt. Helicon; site of the “Eros” of Praxiteles, one of the most famous statues in the ancient world, and home of the sanctuaries and festivals of the Muses. Thespiae is important in Greek

  • Thespis (Greek poet)

    Thespis, Greek poet, said to have been born in the deme (district) of Icaria. According to ancient tradition, Thespis was the first actor in Greek drama. He was often called the inventor of tragedy, and his name was recorded as the first to stage a tragedy at the Great (or City) Dionysia (c. 534

  • Thessalía (region, Greece)

    Thessaly, region of northern Greece south of Macedonia (Modern Greek: Makedonía), lying between upland Epirus (ípeiros) and the Aegean Sea and comprising chiefly the fertile Tríkala and Lárissa lowlands. It is well delineated by topographical boundaries: the Khásia and Cambunian mountains to the

  • Thessalian League (ancient Greek history)

    Antigonus II Gonatas: …also the chief of the Thessalian League and on good terms with neighbouring Illyria and Thrace. He secured his position in Greece by keeping Macedonian occupation forces in the cities of Corinth, Chalcis on Euboea, and Demetrias in Thessaly, the three “shackles” of Hellas.

  • Thessalonians, letters of Paul to the (Bible)

    Letters of Paul to the Thessalonians, two New Testament letters written by Paul from Corinth, Greece, about ad 50 and addressed to the Christian community he had founded in Macedonia. The first letter was written after Timothy, his co-worker, returned from Thessalonia to report that the new

  • Thessalonica (Greece)

    Thessaloníki, city and dímos (municipality), Central Macedonia (Modern Greek: Kendrikí Makedonía), on the western Chalcidice (Chalkidikí) peninsula at the head of a bay on the Gulf of Thérmai (Therma?kós). An important industrial and commercial centre, second to Athens (Athína) in population and to

  • Thessaloníki (Greece)

    Thessaloníki, city and dímos (municipality), Central Macedonia (Modern Greek: Kendrikí Makedonía), on the western Chalcidice (Chalkidikí) peninsula at the head of a bay on the Gulf of Thérmai (Therma?kós). An important industrial and commercial centre, second to Athens (Athína) in population and to

  • Thessaly (region, Greece)

    Thessaly, region of northern Greece south of Macedonia (Modern Greek: Makedonía), lying between upland Epirus (ípeiros) and the Aegean Sea and comprising chiefly the fertile Tríkala and Lárissa lowlands. It is well delineated by topographical boundaries: the Khásia and Cambunian mountains to the

  • Theta Orionis (astronomy)

    star cluster: OB and T associations: …type of multiple star, the Trapezium (named for its prototype in Orion), as well as supergiants, binaries, gaseous nebulas, and globules. Associations are relatively homogeneous in age. The best distance determinations are from spectroscopic parallaxes of individual stars—i.e., estimates of their absolute magnitudes made from studies of their spectra. Most…

  • theta oscillation (physiology)

    neural oscillation: Types of brain rhythms: Large-amplitude theta oscillations (4–10 Hz) dominate the hippocampal-entorhinal system during spatial navigation and memory processing. Delta waves (0.5–1.5 Hz), the largest-amplitude waves in the neocortex (the cerebral cortex region associated with sight and hearing), are present during non-REM sleep. Beta rhythms (13–30 Hz) are present

  • theta wave (physiology)

    neural oscillation: Types of brain rhythms: Large-amplitude theta oscillations (4–10 Hz) dominate the hippocampal-entorhinal system during spatial navigation and memory processing. Delta waves (0.5–1.5 Hz), the largest-amplitude waves in the neocortex (the cerebral cortex region associated with sight and hearing), are present during non-REM sleep. Beta rhythms (13–30 Hz) are present

  • thetan (Scientology)

    Thetan, in Scientology, the authentic spiritual identity of an individual. It is similar to the soul, whose existence is taught by many religious traditions. L. Ron Hubbard (1911–86), Scientology’s founder, spoke of the experience of “exteriorization,” the separation of individual consciousness

  • thētes (Greek social class)

    ancient Greek civilization: The rejection of Cimon: …the interests of hoplites and thētes, now as at other normal times, coincided; both were denied the chance of standing for the archonship before 457 (the hoplites were admitted to it in that year). On the whole, it is the top two “Solonian” groups, the pentakosiomedimnoi and the cavalry class…

  • Thetford (England, United Kingdom)

    Thetford, town (parish), Breckland district, administrative and historic county of Norfolk, eastern England. It lies on the edge of Thetford Chase Forest. The town possesses the remains of a Cluniac priory, a Benedictine nunnery, and a large medieval mound known as Castle Hill. Excavations have

  • thetin (chemical compound)

    organosulfur compound: Sulfonium and oxosulfonium salts; sulfur ylides: …source of the methyl group; thetin or 3-dimethylsulfonium propanoate, (CH3)2S+CH2CH2CO2?; and certain (2-hydroxyethyl)dimethylsulfoxonium salts, (CH3)2S+(O)CH2CH2OH. The latter two compounds occur in marine organisms. Thetin is an example of a zwitterion, a compound that is an internal ion pair; in the

  • Thetis (Greek mythology)

    Thetis, in Greek mythology, a Nereid loved by Zeus and Poseidon. When Themis (goddess of Justice), however, revealed that Thetis was destined to bear a son who would be mightier than his father, the two gods gave her to Peleus, king of the Myrmidons of Thessaly. Thetis, unwilling to wed a mortal,

  • Thetis Regio (region, Venus)

    Aphrodite Terra: … in the central part and Thetis Regio farther east. Ovda spans about 4,000 km (2,500 miles) from north to south; Thetis, about 3,000 km (1,900 miles). Both are composed primarily of tessera (Latin: “mosaic tile”) terrain. Extraordinarily rugged and highly deformed, tessera terrain typically displays several different trends of parallel…

  • Theudebald (king of Reims)

    Theodebald, Merovingian king of Reims from 547, in succession to his father, Theodebert I. He proved incapable of continuing the latter’s dynamic policies, especially in Italy. He left no son, and on his death his kingdom passed to his granduncle, Chlotar

  • Theudebert I (king of Reims)

    Theodebert I, Merovingian king of Reims who succeeded his father, Theodoric I, in late 533 and greatly expanded the area under Frankish hegemony. A proven soldier before he came to the throne, Theodebert exploited the war in Italy between Byzantium and the Ostrogoths to gain extensive territory in

  • Theudebert II (king of Austrasia)

    Theodebert II, Merovingian king of Austrasia. Theodebert succeeded his father, Childebert II, on the throne of Austrasia in 595 while his brother, Theodoric II, mounted that of Burgundy. Their grandmother Brunhild exercised at first a joint regency over both kingdoms, but in 599 the Austrasian

  • Theudesgesel (Visigoth king of Spain)

    Theudis: …at Sevilla and succeeded by Theudigisel (Theudesgesil).

  • Theudigisel (Visigoth king of Spain)

    Theudis: …at Sevilla and succeeded by Theudigisel (Theudesgesil).

  • Theudis (Visigoth king of Spain)

    Theudis, the first Visigothic king of Spain (531–548), in the sense that he was the first to reside there permanently. An Ostrogoth, he had been sent to Spain with an army by Theodoric the Great. There he acquired great possessions in the valley of the Ebro by marriage with a Roman lady. Theodoric

  • Theudowald (king of Reims)

    Theodebald, Merovingian king of Reims from 547, in succession to his father, Theodebert I. He proved incapable of continuing the latter’s dynamic policies, especially in Italy. He left no son, and on his death his kingdom passed to his granduncle, Chlotar

  • Theumba, Inshata (American author and activist)

    Susette La Flesche, Native American writer, lecturer, and activist in the cause of American Indian rights. La Flesche was the daughter of an Omaha chief who was the son of a French trader and an Omaha woman. The father was familiar with both cultures, and though he lived as an Indian he sent his

  • theurgy (occult practice)

    Judaism: Nature and characteristics: into the divine nature), occultism, theurgy (the art of compelling or persuading divine powers), or even magic.

  • Theutberga (queen of Lotharingia)

    Lothar (II): …by his father to marry Theutberga, a sister of Hicbert, the lay abbot of St. Maurice. Theutberga, however, remained childless, and from 857 the king tried to have the marriage dissolved and to take his mistress Waldrada, by whom he had had children, as his legitimate wife and queen. He…

  • Theveste (Algeria)

    Tébessa, town, northeastern Algeria. It is located 146 miles (235 km) by road south of Annaba and 12 miles (19 km) west of the frontier with Tunisia. Tébessa was an outpost of Carthage in the 7th century bce and a Roman garrison town in 146 bce. It declined in the 5th and 6th centuries ce and

  • They All Kissed the Bride (film by Hall [1942])

    Alexander Hall: The Columbia years: They All Kissed the Bride (1942), however, was more of a struggle, with Joan Crawford trying unsuccessfully to reposition herself as a light comedienne; she was supported by the ubiquitous Douglas. In 1942 Hall directed My Sister Eileen, which was adapted from the Broadway hit…

  • They All Laughed (film by Bogdanovich [1981])

    Peter Bogdanovich: The 1980s and beyond: They All Laughed (1981) was a quirky romantic comedy about three private detectives who fall in love with the women they are hired to follow. It featured an appealing cast that included Gazzara, Audrey Hepburn, Colleen Camp, and John Ritter but was perhaps best remembered…

  • They Also Ran (work by Stone)

    Irving Stone: …Darrow for the Defense (1941); They Also Ran (1943), biographies of 19 defeated presidential candidates; Immortal Wife (1944), the story of Jesse Benton Frémont, wife of the explorer John Frémont; President’s Lady (1951), based on the life of Rachel Jackson, wife of the seventh U.S. president; Love Is Eternal (1954),…

  • They Call Me Mister Tibbs! (film by Douglas [1970])

    Gordon Douglas: Later films: …credits from the 1970s included They Call Me Mister Tibbs! (1970), a sequel to In the Heat of the Night (1967), with Sidney Poitier as detective Virgil Tibbs, and Slaughter’s Big Rip-Off (1973), a blaxploitation entry featuring Jim Brown and Ed McMahon. His final movie, Viva Knievel! (1978), starred motorcycle…

  • They Came from Within (film by Cronenberg [1975])

    David Cronenberg: Early life and career: …directed his first commercial film, Shivers (1975; also released as They Came from Within), a low-budget horror picture about an artificially engineered parasite that transforms the well-to-do residents of an apartment complex into lustful maniacs. While the lurid nature of the film was interpreted by some viewers as a mere…

  • They Came like Swallows (novel by Maxwell)

    William Maxwell: They Came like Swallows (1937) tells how an epidemic of influenza affects a close family. The Folded Leaf (1945), perhaps Maxwell’s best-known work, describes the friendship of two small-town boys through their adolescence and college years. In Time Will Darken It (1948) a long visit…

  • They Came to Cordura (film by Rossen [1959])

    Robert Rossen: After the blacklist: The 1959 historical drama They Came to Cordura set Gary Cooper and Rita Hayworth during the days of Pancho Villa in Mexico; although a solid production, it was a disappointment at the box office.

  • They Dare Not Love (film by Whale [1941])

    James Whale: Last films: …jungles of South America, and They Dare Not Love (1941), set in war-torn Europe, starred George Brent as a noble Austrian prince who sacrifices himself to the Nazis. Dissatisfied with the material he was being offered, Whale made an army training film, Personnel Placement in the Army (1942), went into…

  • They Died with Their Boots On (film by Walsh [1941])

    Errol Flynn: …Santa Fe Trail (1940), and They Died with Their Boots On (1941), and he portrayed boxer James J. Corbett in Gentleman Jim (1942). Unable to serve in World War II because of various physical ailments, he instead acted the part of a soldier in several films, including Desperate Journey (1942)…

  • They Drive by Night (film by Walsh [1940])

    Raoul Walsh: At Warner Brothers: The Roaring Twenties, High Sierra, and White Heat: They Drive by Night (1940) began as a flavourful story of two brothers’ (Humphrey Bogart and Raft, surprisingly well matched) struggles in the trucking business but shifted halfway through to become a murder story (taken in part from Archie Mayo’s Bordertown [1935]).

  • They Gave Him a Gun (film by Van Dyke [1937])

    W.S. Van Dyke: Powell and Loy, Eddy and MacDonald: They Gave Him a Gun (1937) combined several genres, notably war drama and film noir, as Tone portrayed a meek clerk who takes up a life of crime after serving in World War I, despite the best efforts of his friend (Tracy) to save him.…

  • They Had to See Paris (film by Borzage [1929])

    Frank Borzage: Borzage’s first sound picture, They Had to See Paris (1929), starred popular entertainer Will Rogers and became one of Fox’s biggest hits of the year. Song o’ My Heart (1930) starred Irish tenor John McCormack as a great singer who retires to a small Irish village after the woman…

  • They Knew What They Wanted (film by Kanin [1940])

    Garson Kanin: Film directing: …next movie, the romantic drama They Knew What They Wanted, was one of the year’s biggest disappointments despite the presence of Carole Lombard and Charles Laughton. Tom, Dick, and Harry (1941) was a light comedy starring Rogers as a small-town telephone operator who must choose between three suitors (Burgess Meredith,…

  • They Knew What They Wanted (play by Howard)

    Sidney Howard: Howard’s best-known plays are They Knew What They Wanted (1924), a mellow story of an aging Italian immigrant in California and his mail-order bride that won the Pulitzer Prize in 1925 and was the basis of Frank Loesser’s musical The Most Happy Fella (1957); The Silver Cord (1926), a…

  • They Live by Night (film by Ray [1948])

    Nicholas Ray: First films: …at RKO, where he directed They Live by Night (1948) from his own adaptation of Edward Anderson’s 1937 novel Thieves Like Us. Farley Granger and Cathy O’Donnell played a young couple whose na?ve flirtation with crime spells their doom in this seminal film noir, which ranks as one of Hollywood’s…

  • They Might Be Giants (film by Harvey [1971])

    George C. Scott: …have become cult favourites are They Might Be Giants (1971), The Day of the Dolphin (1973), Islands in the Stream (1977), Movie, Movie (1978), and Hardcore (1979). During his later years, Scott’s appearances on television and on the New York stage overshadowed his film work. On Broadway, he starred in…

  • They Shall Have Music (film by Mayo [1939])

    Archie Mayo: Films of the 1930s: They Shall Have Music (1939), a sentimental drama about an inner-city music school, starred classical violinist Jascha Heifetz as himself; the film was written by John Howard Lawson.

  • They Shall Have Stars (novel by Blish)

    James Blish: ” A prequel, They Shall Have Stars (1956), is about the invention of the spindizzy amid the decline of Western civilization in the early 21st century. A new interstellar civilization emerges in A Life for the Stars (1962) when Earth’s cities use the spindizzies to escape their home…

  • They Shall Not Grow Old (film by Jackson [2018])

    Peter Jackson: …acclaimed World War I documentary They Shall Not Grow Old, which featured never-before-seen footage that Jackson and his team had restored and colourized.

  • They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (film by Pollack [1969])

    Sydney Pollack: Film directing: With They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (1969), however, he had his first critical and commercial success. The Depression-era drama was a powerful adaptation of Horace McCoy’s 1935 existential novel about a dance marathon that ends tragically for several of its desperate contestants. Three of the four…

  • They Were Defeated (work by Macaulay)

    Dame Rose Macaulay: …in English Literature (1931) and They Were Defeated (1932), a study of the poet Robert Herrick, were among her best works of literary criticism. In addition to travel books, They Went to Portugal (1946) and Fabled Shore (1949), she produced three volumes of verse. She was created Dame Commander of…

  • They Were Expendable (film by Ford [1945])

    They Were Expendable, American war film, released in 1945, that was based on a book of the same name by William L. White. It is notable for its stark portrayal of bravery in the face of sometimes hopeless situations during World War II, and it became a well-respected depiction of that war. Lieut.

  • They Who Step on the Tiger’s Tail (film by Kurosawa)

    Kurosawa Akira: First films: …no o fumu otokotachi (They Who Step on the Tiger’s Tail), a parody of a well-known Kabuki drama. The Allied occupation forces, however, prohibited the release of most films dealing with Japan’s feudal past, and this outstanding comedy was not distributed until 1952.

  • They Won’t Believe Me (film by Pichel [1947])

    Irving Pichel: Directing: …ventured into film noir with They Won’t Believe Me, a superior entry into the genre that made many wish that Pichel had worked in film noir more often. The movie featured a notable cast that included Susan Hayward, Jane Greer, and Robert Young, and it was highlighted by a wonderfully…

  • They Won’t Forget (film by LeRoy [1937])

    Mervyn LeRoy: At Warner Brothers in the 1930s: Little Caesar, I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang, and Gold Diggers of 1933: They Won’t Forget (1937) was the most serious drama LeRoy had been given in years. Based on a novel by Ward Greene that dramatized the 1913 rape and murder of a 15-year-old Atlanta girl (played by Lana Turner, who was under personal contract to LeRoy)…

  • THF (chemical compound)

    ether: Complexes of ethers with reagents: …as its liquid complex with tetrahydrofuran (THF). Similarly, gaseous boron trifluoride (BF3) is more easily used as its liquid complex with diethyl ether, called BF3 etherate, rather than as the toxic, corrosive gas.

  • THI (meteorological measurement)

    Temperature–humidity index (THI), combination of temperature and humidity that is a measure of the degree of discomfort experienced by an individual in warm weather; it was originally called the discomfort index. The index is essentially an effective temperature based on air temperature and

  • thiabendazole (drug)

    trichinosis: …anti-inflammatory drugs for symptomatic relief; thiabendazole has been reported to be highly effective in destroying the parasites in the digestive tract. There is no practical method for the large-scale detection of trichinous pork, and the surest safeguard remains the thorough cooking of pork.

  • thiamin (chemical compound)

    Thiamin, water-soluble organic compound that is necessary for carbohydrate metabolism in both plants and animals. It carries out these functions in its active form, as a component of the coenzyme thiamin pyrophosphate. Thiamin deficiency results in beriberi, a disease characterized by multiple

  • thiamin pyrophosphate (chemical compound)

    metabolism: The oxidation of pyruvate: …pyruvic acid decarboxylase (enzyme 1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP); in addition to carbon dioxide a hydroxyethyl–TPP–enzyme complex (“active acetaldehyde”) is formed [34]. Thiamine is vitamin B1; the biological role of TPP was first revealed by the inability of vitamin B1-deficient animals to oxidize pyruvate.

  • thiamine (chemical compound)

    Thiamin, water-soluble organic compound that is necessary for carbohydrate metabolism in both plants and animals. It carries out these functions in its active form, as a component of the coenzyme thiamin pyrophosphate. Thiamin deficiency results in beriberi, a disease characterized by multiple

  • thiamine deficiency (disease)

    Beriberi, nutritional disorder caused by a deficiency of thiamin (vitamin B1) and characterized by impairment of the nerves and heart. General symptoms include loss of appetite and overall lassitude, digestive irregularities, and a feeling of numbness and weakness in the limbs and extremities. (The

  • thiamine pyrophosphate (chemical compound)

    metabolism: The oxidation of pyruvate: …pyruvic acid decarboxylase (enzyme 1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP); in addition to carbon dioxide a hydroxyethyl–TPP–enzyme complex (“active acetaldehyde”) is formed [34]. Thiamine is vitamin B1; the biological role of TPP was first revealed by the inability of vitamin B1-deficient animals to oxidize pyruvate.

  • thiamylal (pharmacology)

    barbiturate: …such as thiopental sodium and thiamylal, are used intravenously to induce unconsciousness smoothly and rapidly in patients about to undergo surgery, after which gaseous anesthetics are used to maintain the unconscious state.

  • Thiaridae (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: …1 group of families (Thiaridae, Pleuroceridae, Melanopsidae) especially abundant and varied in the Tennessee and Alabama river systems; 13 marine families, including worm shells (Vermetidae), horn shells (Potamididae), and button shells (Modulidae). Superfamily Strombacea

  • thiasoi (religious society)

    Greek religion: The Archaic period: …were reputed to wander in thiasoi (revel bands) about mountain slopes, such as Cithaeron or Parnassus; the practice persisted into Roman imperial times. They were also supposed, in their ecstasy, to practice the sparagmos, the tearing of living victims to pieces and feasting on their raw flesh (ōmophagia). While such…

  • Thiazi (Norse mythology)

    Skadi: …of her father, the giant Thiazi, Skadi took up arms and went to attack the rival tribe of the gods (the Aesir) in Asgard, home of the gods. The Aesir, wanting to appease her anger, offered her the choice of one of their number for a husband, with the stipulation…

  • thiazide (drug)

    pharmaceutical industry: Emergence of modern diseases and treatment: , the discovery of thiazide diuretics. For decreasing death and disability from cancer, one very important step was the development of cancer chemotherapy.

  • thiazine (chemical compound)

    Thiazine, any of three organic compounds of the heterocyclic series, having molecular structures that include a ring of four atoms of carbon and one each of nitrogen and sulfur. Many compounds of 1,4-thiazine are known, most of them derivatives of phenothiazine (C12H9NS), which was discovered in

  • thiazole (chemical compound)

    Thiazole, any of a class of organic compounds of the heterocyclic series characterized by a ring structure composed of three carbon atoms, one nitrogen atom, and one sulfur atom. This ring structure occurs in such important biologically active natural products as thiamine (vitamin B1), bacitracin,

  • thiazolidinedione (biochemistry)

    diabetes mellitus: Drugs used to control blood glucose levels: Thiazolidinediones, such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, act by reducing insulin resistance of muscle and adipose cells and by increasing glucose transport into these tissues. These agents can cause edema (fluid accumulation in tissues), liver toxicity, and adverse cardiovascular events in certain patients. Furthermore, oral hypoglycemic…

  • Thibaud (king of Reims)

    Theodebald, Merovingian king of Reims from 547, in succession to his father, Theodebert I. He proved incapable of continuing the latter’s dynamic policies, especially in Italy. He left no son, and on his death his kingdom passed to his granduncle, Chlotar

  • Thibaud le Chansonnier (king of Navarre)

    Theobald I, count of Troyes and of Champagne (from 1201), as Theobald IV, and king of Navarre (from 1234), the most famous of the aristocratic trouvères. He was the son of Theobald III of Champagne, who died before his son was born, and Blanche of Navarre. He lived for four years at the court of

  • Thibaud le Grand (count of Blois, Chartres, and Champagne)

    Theobald IV, count of Blois and of Chartres (from 1102) and count of Champagne (from 1125) as Theobald II. He was the grandson of Theobald III of Blois and William the Conqueror. Theobald IV reunited Champagne with Blois and thus again made his house a threat to the royal domains of France from

  • Thibaud le Posthume (king of Navarre)

    Theobald I, count of Troyes and of Champagne (from 1201), as Theobald IV, and king of Navarre (from 1234), the most famous of the aristocratic trouvères. He was the son of Theobald III of Champagne, who died before his son was born, and Blanche of Navarre. He lived for four years at the court of

  • Thibaud le Tricheur (count of Blois, Chartres, and Tours)

    Theobald I, count of Blois, Chartres, and Tours. Theobald earned his nickname “the Cheat” fighting with his neighbours, among them the kings of France, the dukes of Normandy, and the church of Reims. He seized the area around Blois about 940 and later augmented his holdings with the counties of

  • Thibaud le Vieil (count of Blois, Chartres, and Tours)

    Theobald I, count of Blois, Chartres, and Tours. Theobald earned his nickname “the Cheat” fighting with his neighbours, among them the kings of France, the dukes of Normandy, and the church of Reims. He seized the area around Blois about 940 and later augmented his holdings with the counties of

  • Thibaud, Jacques (French musician)

    Jacques Thibaud, French violinist known for his performances of Mozart, Beethoven, and 19th-century French works. Thibaud studied at the Paris Conservatoire (first prize, 1896) and then played violin in a Paris café. He was invited to join the orchestra of édouard Colonne, the conductor noted for

  • Thibault, Girard (French fencer)

    sports: Sports in the Renaissance and modern periods: …fencers such as the famed Girard Thibault, whose L’Académie de l’espée (“Fencing Academy”) appeared in 1628, thought of their activity more as an art form than as a combat. Northern Europeans emulated them. Humanistically inclined Englishmen and Germans admired the cultivated Florentine game of calcio, a form of football that…

  • Thibault, Jacques-Anatole-Fran?ois (French writer)

    Anatole France, writer and ironic, skeptical, and urbane critic who was considered in his day the ideal French man of letters. He was elected to the French Academy in 1896 and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1921. The son of a bookseller, he spent most of his life around books. At

  • Thibault, Les (novel cycle by Martin du Gard)

    Les Thibault, eight-part novel cycle by Roger Martin du Gard, first published in 1922–40. The individual novels that make up the series are Le Cahier gris (1922; The Gray Notebook), Le Pénitencier (1922; The Penitentiary or The Reformatory), La Belle Saison (1923; The Springtime of Life or High

  • Thibault, Louis-Michel (French architect)

    Cape Town: The city layout: Louis-Michel Thibault, a French architect who arrived in 1783, designed much that was then fashionable, including the Old Supreme Court building, now the South African Cultural History Museum. Notable buildings of the period include the Old Town House and the Lutheran Church. Of the original…

  • Thibaults, The (novel cycle by Martin du Gard)

    Les Thibault, eight-part novel cycle by Roger Martin du Gard, first published in 1922–40. The individual novels that make up the series are Le Cahier gris (1922; The Gray Notebook), Le Pénitencier (1922; The Penitentiary or The Reformatory), La Belle Saison (1923; The Springtime of Life or High

  • Thibaut I (count of Blois)

    Blois: …of count was assumed by Thibaut I the Old, or the Cheat (d. c. 977), who founded the hereditary house of Blois. He enlarged his domain until it extended from the Indre River to the Eure.

  • Thibaut II the Great (count of Blois, Chartres, and Champagne)

    Theobald IV, count of Blois and of Chartres (from 1102) and count of Champagne (from 1125) as Theobald II. He was the grandson of Theobald III of Blois and William the Conqueror. Theobald IV reunited Champagne with Blois and thus again made his house a threat to the royal domains of France from

  • Thibaut III (count of Champagne)

    Crusades: The Fourth Crusade and the Latin empire of Constantinople: At a tournament held by Thibaut III of Champagne, several prominent French nobles took the cross. Among them was Geoffrey of Villehardouin, author of one of the principal accounts of the Crusade; other important nobles joined later, and contact was made with Venice to provide transport.

  • Thibaut IV (count of Champagne)

    Italy: The war in northern Italy: …support the Crusade mounted by Thibaut of Champagne in 1239 and delaying its departure for the East. Gregory wished to recall him to the program on which the papacy had been insisting since the reign of Innocent III, but Frederick’s own concerns were with his European domains. It was not…

  • Thibaut the Cheat (count of Blois)

    Blois: …of count was assumed by Thibaut I the Old, or the Cheat (d. c. 977), who founded the hereditary house of Blois. He enlarged his domain until it extended from the Indre River to the Eure.

  • Thibaut the Old (count of Blois)

    Blois: …of count was assumed by Thibaut I the Old, or the Cheat (d. c. 977), who founded the hereditary house of Blois. He enlarged his domain until it extended from the Indre River to the Eure.

  • Thibaut V (count of Blois)

    France: Principalities north of the Loire: …were divided under his sons Theobald V (1152–91) and Henry (1152–81), themselves prestigious lords; and the Champagne of Henry the Liberal was among the richest, best organized, and most cultured French lands of its day.

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