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  • Theory of Communicative Action, The (work by Habermas)

    Jürgen Habermas: Philosophy and social theory: …Theorie des kommunikativen Handelns (1981; The Theory of Communicative Action). Drawing on the work of analytic (Anglo-American) philosophers (e.g., Ludwig Wittgenstein and J.L. Austin), Continental philosophers (Horkheimer, Adorno, Edmund Husserl, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Alfred Schutz, and Gy?rgy

  • Theory of Culture Change: The Methodology of Multilinear Evolution (work by Steward)

    Julian Steward: …theoretical work was anthologized in Theory of Culture Change: The Methodology of Multilinear Evolution (1955), in which he attempted to show that social systems arise out of patterns of resource exploitation which, in turn, are determined by the technological adaptation of a people to their natural environment. Although there are…

  • Theory of Everything, The (film by Marsh [2014])

    Eddie Redmayne: …legendary physicist Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything (2014).

  • Theory of Functions, The (work by Titchmarsh)

    Edward Charles Titchmarsh: …complex variable theory, he wrote The Theory of Functions (1932), which became a leading textbook on real and complex function theory and was translated into numerous languages.

  • Theory of Games and Economic Behavior, The (work by Morgenstern and von Neumann)

    Oskar Morgenstern: …John von Neumann he wrote Theory of Games and Economic Behavior (1944), applying Neumann’s theory of games of strategy (published 1928) to competitive business. Among his other books are On the Accuracy of Economic Observations (1950), Prolegomena to a Theory of Organization (1951), and Predictability of Stock Market Prices (1970;…

  • Theory of Games and Statistical Decisions (work by Blackwell and Girshick)

    David Blackwell: …many publications included the classic Theory of Games and Statistical Decisions (1954; with M.A. Girshick) and Basic Statistics (1969). Blackwell was elected (1976) an honorary fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and won the John von Neumann Theory Prize in 1979.

  • Theory of International Economic Policy, The (work by Meade)

    James Edward Meade: …early important work resulted in The Theory of International Economic Policy, which was published in two volumes—The Balance of Payments (1951) and Trade and Welfare (1955). In the first of these books he sought to synthesize Keynesian and neoclassical elements in a model designed to show the effects of various…

  • Theory of International Politics (book by Waltz)

    international relations: Structures, institutions, and levels of analysis: …the publication of Kenneth Waltz’s Theory of International Politics in 1979. Neorealism represented an effort to inject greater precision, or conceptual rigour, into realist theory. While retaining power as a central explanatory notion, Waltz’s neorealism also incorporated the idea of structure as it is reflected in alliances and other cooperative…

  • Theory of International Trade, The (work by Haberler)

    Gottfried von Haberler: …trade, and his major work, The Theory of International Trade (1937), is considered a classic. Particularly influential was his reformulation of the theory of comparative costs in terms of opportunity cost. He introduced the production substitution curve (now referred to as the production-possibility frontier), which offered a framework for considering…

  • Theory of Justice, A (work by Rawls)

    democracy: Rawls: In A Theory of Justice (1971), the American philosopher John Rawls attempted to develop a nonutilitarian justification of a democratic political order characterized by fairness, equality, and individual rights. Reviving the notion of a social contract, which had been dormant since the 18th century, he imagined…

  • Theory of Justice, The (work by Stammler)

    Rudolf Stammler: …translated by Isaac Husik as The Theory of Justice (1925).

  • Theory of Monopolistic Competition (work by Chamberlin)

    Edward Hastings Chamberlin: …thesis became the basis for Theory of Monopolistic Competition (1933), a book that spurred discussion of competition, especially between firms whose consumers have preferences for particular products and firms that control the prices of their products without being monopolists.

  • Theory of Moral Sentiments, The (work by Smith)

    Adam Smith: The Theory of Moral Sentiments: In 1759 Smith published his first work, The Theory of Moral Sentiments. Didactic, exhortative, and analytic by turns, it lays the psychological foundation on which The Wealth of Nations was later to be built. In it Smith described the principles…

  • Theory of Optimal Processes (work by Pontryagin)

    Lev Semyonovich Pontryagin: …led to his fundamental monograph, Theory of Optimal Processes (1961; English translation 1962). In later years he wrote several other expository works on mathematics.

  • Theory of Political Coalitions, The (work by Riker)

    political science: Theory of rational choice: In The Theory of Political Coalitions (1962), Riker demonstrated by mathematical reasoning why and how politicians form alliances. Riker and his followers applied this version of rational choice theory—which they variously called rational choice, public choice, social choice, formal modeling, or positive political theory—to explain almost…

  • Theory of Political Economy, The (work by Jevons)

    William Stanley Jevons: …logician and economist whose book The Theory of Political Economy (1871) expounded the “final” (marginal) utility theory of value. Jevons’s work, along with similar discoveries made by Karl Menger in Vienna (1871) and by Léon Walras in Switzerland (1874), marked the opening of a new period in the history of…

  • Theory of Science (work by Bolzano)

    metalogic: Satisfaction of a theory by a structure: finite and infinite models: …to the book Wissenschaftslehre (1837; Theory of Science) by Bernhard Bolzano, a Bohemian theologian and mathematician, and, in a more concrete context, to the introduction of models of non-Euclidean geometries about that time. In the mathematical treatment of logic, these concepts can be found in works of the late 19th-century…

  • Theory of Social and Economic Organization (work by Weber)

    organizational analysis: Origins of the discipline: and modernization (eventually published as Theory of Social and Economic Organization; 1947), Weber attributed the rise of organizations to the expansion of markets, to developments in the law, and especially to changes in the nature of authority.

  • Theory of Social Revolutions, The (work by Adams)

    Brooks Adams: In 1913 he published The Theory of Social Revolutions, a study of defects in the American form of government, developing the idea of the imminent danger in the existence of great wealth that exerted private power but declined to accept responsibility. After Henry Adams’ death, Adams prepared for publication…

  • Theory of Social Structure (work by Nadel)

    S.F. Nadel: In his posthumous Theory of Social Structure (1958), sometimes regarded as one of the 20th century’s foremost theoretical works in the social sciences, Nadel examined social roles, which he considered to be crucial in the analysis of social structure.

  • Theory of Sound, The (book by Rayleigh)

    Lord Rayleigh: …work on his great book, The Theory of Sound, in which he examined questions of vibrations and the resonance of elastic solids and gases. The first volume appeared in 1877, followed by a second in 1878, concentrating on acoustical propagation in material media. After some revision during his lifetime and…

  • Theory of Superconductivity (book by Schrieffer)

    John Robert Schrieffer: He published Theory of Superconductivity in 1964.

  • Theory of Systems of Rays (work by Hamilton)

    Sir William Rowan Hamilton: …first published mathematical paper, “Theory of Systems of Rays,” begins by proving that a system of light rays filling a region of space can be focused down to a single point by a suitably curved mirror if and only if those light rays are orthogonal to some series of…

  • Theory of the Consumption Function, A (work by Friedman)

    consumption: The rational optimization framework: economist Milton Friedman’s treatise A Theory of the Consumption Function (1957). The permanent income hypothesis omits the detailed treatment of demographics and retirement encompassed in the life-cycle model, focusing instead on the aspects that matter most for macroeconomic analysis, such as predictions about the nature of the consumption function,…

  • Theory of the Earth (work by Hutton)

    uniformitarianism: Hutton’s contributions: …published in two volumes as Theory of the Earth (1795)—at meetings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. Hutton showed that Earth had a long history that could be interpreted in terms of processes observed in the present. He showed, for instance, how soils were formed by the weathering of rocks…

  • Theory of the Good and the Right (work by Brandt)

    ethics: Moral realism: In A Theory of the Good and the Right (1979), Brandt went so far as to include in his idealized conditions a requirement that the person be motivated only by “rational desires”—that is, by the desires that he would have after undergoing cognitive psychotherapy (which enables…

  • Theory of the Leisure Class, The (work by Veblen)

    conspicuous consumption: …the term in his book The Theory of the Leisure Class (1899). The concept of conspicuous consumption can be illustrated by considering the motivation to drive a luxury car rather than an economy car. Any make of car provides transport to a destination, but the use of a luxury car…

  • Theory of the Location of Industries (work by Weber)

    location theory: …den Standort der Industrien (Theory of the Location of Industries, 1929). Weber’s theory, called the location triangle, sought the optimum location for the production of a good based on the fixed locations of the market and two raw material sources, which geographically form a triangle. He sought to determine…

  • Theory of the Novel, The (work by Lukacs)

    aesthetics: Marxist aesthetics: …Die Theorie des Romans (1920; The Theory of the Novel). Neither Lukács nor Benjamin produced a coherent aesthetics as defined in this article, although each was immensely influential on the practice of modern literary criticism whether Marxist or not in its ultimate inspiration.

  • Theory of Values: An Axiomatic Analysis of Economic Equilibrium (monograph by Debreu)

    Gerard Debreu: Debreu’s classic monograph, Theory of Value: An Axiomatic Analysis of Economic Equilibrium, was published in 1959. In it Debreu provided the mathematical underpinnings for the phenomenon of equilibrium in supply and demand that was first articulated (as the “invisible hand” that leads self-seeking men unwittingly to aid society)…

  • Theory of Vision, or Visual Language…Vindicated and Explained, The (book by Berkeley)

    George Berkeley: His American venture and ensuing years: Berkeley replied with The Theory of Vision, or Visual Language…Vindicated and Explained (1733). This fine work brought the metaphysics of the Essay into line with the Principles and added his doctrine of cause, admitting defects in the premises of the original Essay. Alciphron provoked replies from the satirist…

  • theory, scientific

    Scientific theory, systematic ideational structure of broad scope, conceived by the human imagination, that encompasses a family of empirical (experiential) laws regarding regularities existing in objects and events, both observed and posited. A scientific theory is a structure suggested by these

  • Theosophical Society (religious society)

    Buddhism: Contemporary revival: …through the activities of the Theosophical Society, one of whose leaders was the American Henry Olcott. The Sinhalese reformer Anagarika Dharmapala also exerted some influence, particularly through his work as one of the founders of the Mahabodhi Society, which focused its initial efforts on restoring Buddhist control of the pilgrimage…

  • theosophy (religious philosophy)

    Theosophy, occult movement originating in the 19th century with roots that can be traced to ancient Gnosticism and Neoplatonism. The term theosophy, derived from the Greek theos (“god”) and sophia (“wisdom”), is generally understood to mean “divine wisdom.” Forms of this doctrine were held in

  • Theotmalli (Germany)

    Detmold, city, North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), northwestern Germany. It lies on the eastern slope of the Teutoburg Forest (Teutoburger Wald), on the Werre River. The capital, from the 12th century, of the former principality and Land of Lippe, Detmold was chartered about 1350. About 3 miles (5

  • Theotokás, Geórgios (Greek author)

    Yórgos Theotokás, Greek novelist known for his clarity of expression and civilized writing. Theotokás studied in Athens, Paris, and London, and his first literary venture was an essay, “Free Spirit” (1929). He published three novels before World War II, Argo (1936), a panorama of life in Athens in

  • Theotokás, Yórgos (Greek author)

    Yórgos Theotokás, Greek novelist known for his clarity of expression and civilized writing. Theotokás studied in Athens, Paris, and London, and his first literary venture was an essay, “Free Spirit” (1929). He published three novels before World War II, Argo (1936), a panorama of life in Athens in

  • theotokion (Greek Orthodox music)

    troparion: …the middle of the church; theotokion, from Theotokos (Mother of God), is a type of hymn relating to the Virgin Mary; and staurotheotokion relates to the Virgin standing at the foot of the cross. There are also troparia for specific feasts and others that recur several times during the church…

  • Theotókis, Konstantínos (Greek author)

    Konstantínos Theotókis, Greek novelist of the realist school, whose clear and pure Demotic Greek was flavoured by Corfiote idioms. Born into an aristocratic family of Corfu, Theotókis was given a sound education. At first much under the influence of Friedrich Nietzsche, he later, in Germany, became

  • Theotokópoulos, Doménikos (Spanish artist)

    El Greco, master of Spanish painting, whose highly individual dramatic and expressionistic style met with the puzzlement of his contemporaries but gained newfound appreciation in the 20th century. He also worked as a sculptor and as an architect. El Greco never forgot that he was of Greek descent

  • Theotokos (Eastern Orthodoxy)

    Theotokos, (Greek: “God-Bearer”), in Eastern Orthodoxy, the designation of the Virgin Mary as mother of God. The term has had great historical importance because the Nestorians, who stressed the independence of the divine and human natures in Christ, opposed its use, on the ground that it

  • Thera (island, Greece)

    Thera, island, southernmost island of the Cyclades (Modern Greek: Kykládes) group, southeastern Greece, in the Aegean Sea, sometimes included in the Southern Sporades group. It constitutes a dímos (municipality) within the South Aegean (Nótio Aigaío) periféreia (region). Geologically, Thera is the

  • Thera, eruption of (volcanic eruption, Thera, Greece [about 1500 BCE])

    Eruption of Thera, devastating Bronze Age eruption of a long-dormant volcano on the Aegean island of Thera, about 70 miles (110 km) north of Crete. Earthquakes, perhaps contemporaneous with the eruption, shattered Knossos and damaged other settlements in northern Crete. The Thera eruption is

  • Theragatha (Buddhist text)

    Ananda: …ascribed to him in the Theragatha. According to tradition, he lived to the age of 120.

  • Theragāthā/Therīgāthā (Buddhist text)

    Theragāthā/Therīgāthā, (Sanskrit: “Hymns of the Elders/Senior Nuns”) Buddhist lyrics, included in the Suttanipāta (one of the earliest books of the Pāli canon, appearing in the late Khuddaka Nikaya [“Short Collection”] of the Sutta Pitaka). In the works 264 monks speak of their inner experiences

  • theralite (mineral)

    Theralite, any member of a group of intrusive igneous rocks that contain labradorite (basic plagioclase feldspar), nepheline, and titaniferous augite. Theralites are classified in the nepheline-tephrite group in this series (see also nephelinite). Olivine, biotite, orthoclase feldspar, and an

  • Theramenes (Greek politician and general)

    Theramenes, Athenian politician and general, active in the last years of the Peloponnesian War (431–404 bc) and controversial in his own lifetime and since. His father, Hagnon, a contemporary of Pericles, served repeatedly as one of the 10 annual generals of Athens. In 411 Theramenes emerged as one

  • Theranos, Inc. (American company)

    Elizabeth Holmes: …of the medical diagnostic company Theranos Inc. Holmes was placed on the Forbes list of the 400 richest Americans in 2014, and that year she was dubbed the world’s youngest self-made woman billionaire. By June 2016, however, Forbes had dramatically reduced its estimate of her net worth in light of…

  • Therapeutae (Jewish sect)

    Therapeutae, Jewish sect of ascetics closely resembling the Essenes, believed to have settled on the shores of Lake Mareotis in the vicinity of Alexandria, Egypt, during the 1st century ad. The only original account of this community is given in De vita contemplativa (On the Contemplative Life),

  • Therapeutai (Jewish sect)

    Therapeutae, Jewish sect of ascetics closely resembling the Essenes, believed to have settled on the shores of Lake Mareotis in the vicinity of Alexandria, Egypt, during the 1st century ad. The only original account of this community is given in De vita contemplativa (On the Contemplative Life),

  • Therapeutes (Jewish sect)

    Therapeutae, Jewish sect of ascetics closely resembling the Essenes, believed to have settled on the shores of Lake Mareotis in the vicinity of Alexandria, Egypt, during the 1st century ad. The only original account of this community is given in De vita contemplativa (On the Contemplative Life),

  • therapeutic abortion

    pregnancy: Abortion: A therapeutic abortion is the interruption of a pregnancy before the 20th week of gestation because it endangers the mother’s life or health or because the baby presumably would not be normal. An elective abortion is the interruption of a pregnancy before the 20th week of…

  • therapeutic cloning (medicine and genetics)

    cloning: Therapeutic cloning: Therapeutic cloning is intended to use cloned embryos for the purpose of extracting stem cells from them, without ever implanting the embryos in a womb. Therapeutic cloning enables the cultivation of stem cells that are genetically identical to a patient. The stem cells…

  • therapeutic diet (nutrition)

    history of medicine: India: Dietetic treatment was important and preceded any medicinal treatment. Fats were much used, internally and externally. The most important methods of active treatment were referred to as the “five procedures”: the administration of emetics, purgatives, water enemas, oil enemas, and sneezing powders. Inhalations were frequently…

  • therapeutic index (pharmacology)

    Therapeutic index, margin of safety that exists between the dose of a drug that produces the desired effect and the dose that produces unwanted and possibly dangerous side effects. This relationship is defined as the ratio LD50:ED50, where LD50 is the dose at which a drug kills 50 percent of a test

  • therapeutic mask

    mask: Therapeutic uses: …to prevent and to cure disease. In some cultures, the masked members of secret societies could drive disease demons from entire villages. Among the best known of these groups was the False Face Society of the Iroquois people. These professional healers performed violent pantomimes to exorcise the dreaded gahadogoka gogosa…

  • therapeutic radiology

    Radiation therapy, the use of ionizing radiation (high-energy radiation that displaces electrons from atoms and molecules) to destroy cancer cells. Radiation has been present throughout the evolution of life on Earth. However, with the discovery of X-rays in 1895 by German physicist Wilhelm Conrad

  • therapeutic recreation

    Recreation therapy, use of recreation by qualified professionals (recreation therapists) to promote independent functioning and to enhance the health and well-being of people with illnesses and disabling conditions. Recreation therapy often occurs in hospitals and other treatment facilities and is

  • therapeutics (medicine)

    Therapeutics, treatment and care of a patient for the purpose of both preventing and combating disease or alleviating pain or injury. The term comes from the Greek therapeutikos, which means “inclined to serve.” In a broad sense, therapeutics means serving and caring for the patient in a

  • Theraphosa (spider genus)

    tarantula: …and belong to the genus Theraphosa. The goliath bird-eating spider (T. leblondi or T. blondi) has a body length up to 7.5 cm (almost 3 inches) and in rare instances has been known to capture and eat small avian prey. Both the pinkfoot goliath (T. apophysis) and the goliath bird-eating…

  • Theraphosa apophysis (spider)

    tarantula: Both the pinkfoot goliath (T. apophysis) and the goliath bird-eating spider can attain leg spans of about 30 cm (12 inches). The pinkfoot is distinguished by its pale pink feet, which fade when the spider molts.

  • Theraphosa blondi (arachnid)

    spider: Size range: …the largest mygalomorphs include the goliath bird-eating spider (Theraphosa leblondi or T. blondi), found in parts of the Amazon, and the pinkfoot goliath (T. apophysis), limited to southern Venezuela. The smallest spiders belong to several families found in the tropics, and information about them first became known in the 1980s.

  • Theraphosa leblondi (arachnid)

    spider: Size range: …the largest mygalomorphs include the goliath bird-eating spider (Theraphosa leblondi or T. blondi), found in parts of the Amazon, and the pinkfoot goliath (T. apophysis), limited to southern Venezuela. The smallest spiders belong to several families found in the tropics, and information about them first became known in the 1980s.

  • Theraphosidae (spider)

    Tarantula, (family Theraphosidae), any of numerous hairy and generally large spiders found in the southwestern United States, Mexico, and tropical America. Tarantulas are mygalomorphs (suborder Orthognatha), and thus they have jaws that move forward and down (rather than sideways and together,

  • Therapon jarbua (fish)

    tigerfish: The three-striped tigerfish (Therapon jarbua) is a common, vertically striped species about 30 cm (12 inches) long. It has sharp spines on its gill covers, which can wound a careless handler.

  • Theraponidae (fish family)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Terapontidae (grunters, tigerfishes, or tigerperches) Typical percoids of small bass type; colours dull or silvery or with horizontal dark stripes; dorsal fin notched, spinous part longer than soft part; some species make grunting sounds. About 45 species, Indian and western Pacific oceans and in fresh…

  • therapsid (fossil tetrapod order)

    Therapsid, any member of a major order (Therapsida) of reptiles of Permian and Triassic time (from 299 million to 200 million years ago). Therapsids were the stock that gave rise to mammals. As early as the preceding Carboniferous Period (from 359 million to 299 million years ago), there appeared a

  • Therapsida (fossil tetrapod order)

    Therapsid, any member of a major order (Therapsida) of reptiles of Permian and Triassic time (from 299 million to 200 million years ago). Therapsids were the stock that gave rise to mammals. As early as the preceding Carboniferous Period (from 359 million to 299 million years ago), there appeared a

  • therapy (medicine)

    Therapeutics, treatment and care of a patient for the purpose of both preventing and combating disease or alleviating pain or injury. The term comes from the Greek therapeutikos, which means “inclined to serve.” In a broad sense, therapeutics means serving and caring for the patient in a

  • therapy robot

    rehabilitation robot: …of rehabilitation robot is a therapy robot, which is sometimes called a rehabilitator. Research in neuroscience has shown that the brain and spinal cord retain a remarkable ability to adapt, even after injury, through the use of practiced movements. Therapy robots are machines or tools for rehabilitation therapists that allow…

  • Theravada (Buddhism)

    Theravada, (Pali: “Way of the Elders”) major form of Buddhism prevalent in Sri Lanka (Ceylon), Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos. Theravada, like all other Buddhist schools, claims to adhere most closely to the original doctrines and practices taught by the Buddha. Theravadins accept as

  • Therayattam (Indian festival)

    South Asian arts: Folk dance: The Therayattam festival in Kerala is held to propitiate the gods and demons recognized by the pantheon of the Malayalis. The dancers, arrayed in awe-inspiring costumes and frightening masks, enact colourful rituals before the village shrine. A devotee makes an offering of a cock. The dancer…

  • There Goes My Heart (film by McLeod [1938])

    Norman Z. McLeod: Middle years: There Goes My Heart (1938) was just as bold about recycling Frank Capra’s It Happened One Night (1934); Virginia Bruce starred as a runaway heiress, and Fredric March was the reporter who falls in love with her. Topper Takes a Trip (1939) was the sequel…

  • There Is a God: How the World’s Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind (work by Flew and Varghese)

    Antony Flew: The 2007 book There Is a God: How the World’s Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind, cowritten by Flew and the Christian author Roy Abraham Varghese, further incensed atheist critics, particularly when it was revealed that Varghese and a ghostwriter did most of the writing.

  • There Is a Tree More Ancient Than Eden (novel by Forrest)

    Leon Forrest: …excerpts from his first novel, There Iis a Tree More Ancient than Eden, which was issued in book form in 1973, the year he began teaching English and African-American studies at Northwestern University.

  • There Is Confusion (novel by Fauset)

    Harlem Renaissance: Fiction: In There Is Confusion (1924) Jessie Redmon Fauset considered the transformation of mainstream culture effected by the new black middle class and by the black creative arts. Using the conventions of the novel of manners, Fauset advanced themes of racial uplift, patriotism, optimism for the future,…

  • There Shall Be No Night (play by Sherwood)

    Robert E. Sherwood: …Lincoln in Illinois (1939) and There Shall Be No Night (1941), in which his pacifist heroes decide to fight, Sherwood’s thesis is that only by losing his life for others can a man make his own life significant. In 1938 Sherwood formed, with Maxwell Anderson, Sidney Howard, Elmer Rice, and…

  • There Was a Crooked Man… (film by Mankiewicz [1970])

    Joseph L. Mankiewicz: Later films: There Was a Crooked Man… (1970) was a western in which Kirk Douglas played a robber who is caught and sent to prison, where his efforts to escape are thwarted by a reform-minded warden (Henry Fonda). Also in 1970 Mankiewicz codirected (with Sidney Lumet) the…

  • There Will Be Blood (film by Anderson [2007])

    Paul Thomas Anderson: Anderson’s There Will Be Blood (2007), based on the novel Oil! by Upton Sinclair, drew comparisons to such classic films as Citizen Kane and Giant upon its release. The tale of unchecked ambition and its ultimate cost starred Daniel Day-Lewis in an Academy Award-winning performance as…

  • There’s a Girl in My Soup (film by Boulting [1970])

    Peter Sellers: Toklas! (1968), and There’s a Girl in My Soup (1970). He would not truly hit his stride again until the mid-1970s, when he repeated the role of Inspector Clouseau in three profitable Pink Panther sequels.

  • There’s a Riot Going On (album by Yo La Tengo)

    Yo La Tengo: The contemplative There’s a Riot Going On (2018) was the band’s first digitally recorded and self-produced album.

  • There’s Always a Woman (film by Hall [1938])

    Alexander Hall: The Columbia years: His first film there was There’s Always a Woman (1938), which was inspired by the popular Thin Man series. The comedy featured Melvyn Douglas and Joan Blondell as a husband-and-wife crime-fighting team who spar in the best William Powell–Myrna Loy tradition. I Am the Law (1938) cast Edward G. Robinson…

  • There’s Always Tomorrow (film by Sirk [1956])

    Douglas Sirk: From All That Heaven Allows to Imitation of Life: …the Wind (1956), which followed There’s Always Tomorrow (1955). A sweeping melodrama with a stellar cast (Hudson, Robert Stack, Lauren Bacall, and Dorothy Malone), Written on the Wind is arguably Sirk’s masterpiece. Malone won a best supporting actress Academy Award for her performance as a sexually uninhibited woman who hates…

  • There’s No Business Like Show Business [1954] (film by Lang)

    Ethel Merman: …Dolly! Her later movies include There’s No Business Like Show Business (1954) and It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963). The apparently ageless first lady of the American musical comedy stage, Merman was noted for her unflagging humour only slightly less than for her brassy and powerful vocal style.…

  • There’s No Other (Like My Baby) (recording by the Crystals)

    the Crystals: …while rehearsing the single “There’s No Other (Like My Baby),” that the group met producer Phil Spector. In the recording studio, Spector gave the song a rhythm-and-blues feel and added the layered instrumentation that would later characterize his “wall of sound” production style. Released on Spector’s Philles label in…

  • There’s No Such Thing as Free Speech, and It’s a Good Thing, Too (work by Fish)

    Stanley Fish: Fish’s subsequent works included There’s No Such Thing As Free Speech, and It’s a Good Thing, Too (1994), Professional Correctness: Literary Studies and Political Change (1995), The Trouble with Principle (1999), and How Milton Works (2001). How to Write a Sentence: And How to Read One and Winning Arguments:…

  • There’s Something About Mary (film by Bobby and Peter Farrelly [1998])

    Ben Stiller: …vulgar (and wildly popular) comedy There’s Something About Mary (1998) that made him a big-screen star. After demonstrating his versatility with such roles as a heroin-addicted screenwriter in the drama Permanent Midnight (1998), Stiller elicited laughs in Meet the Parents (2000) as a man whose awkward attempts to impress his…

  • theremin (musical instrument)

    Theremin, electronic musical instrument invented in 1920 in the Soviet Union by Leon Theremin (also called Lev Termen). It consists of a box with radio tubes producing oscillations at two sound-wave frequencies above the range of hearing; together, they produce a lower audible frequency equal to

  • Theremin, Leon (Russian scientist)

    Leon Theremin, (LEV SERGEYEVICH TERMEN), Russian scientist and inventor (born Aug. 24, 1896, St. Petersburg, Russia—died Nov. 3, 1993, Moscow, Russia), created one of the first electronic instruments; originally called the etherophone but later renamed for its inventor, the theremin provided the e

  • thereminovox (musical instrument)

    Theremin, electronic musical instrument invented in 1920 in the Soviet Union by Leon Theremin (also called Lev Termen). It consists of a box with radio tubes producing oscillations at two sound-wave frequencies above the range of hearing; together, they produce a lower audible frequency equal to

  • thereminvox (musical instrument)

    Theremin, electronic musical instrument invented in 1920 in the Soviet Union by Leon Theremin (also called Lev Termen). It consists of a box with radio tubes producing oscillations at two sound-wave frequencies above the range of hearing; together, they produce a lower audible frequency equal to

  • Theresa, Maria (Holy Roman empress)

    Maria Theresa, archduchess of Austria and queen of Hungary and Bohemia (1740–80), wife and empress of the Holy Roman emperor Francis I (reigned 1745–65), and mother of the Holy Roman emperor Joseph II (reigned 1765–90). Upon her accession, the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–48) erupted,

  • Thérèse Desqueyroux (work by Mauriac)

    French literature: Politics subordinate to other concerns: Mauriac, Bernanos, and others: Thérèse Desqueyroux) and Noeud de vipères (1932; The Knot of Vipers), blind to the romance and thrill of the modern, deployed the traditional form of the French psychological novel to evoke the banal desolation of characters deprived of God’s grace and stranded in a desert…

  • Thérèse of Lisieux, St. (Roman Catholic nun)

    St. Thérèse of Lisieux, ; canonized May 17, 1925; feast day October 1), Carmelite nun whose service to her Roman Catholic order, although outwardly unremarkable, was later recognized for its exemplary spiritual accomplishments. She was named a doctor of the church by Pope John Paul II in 1997.

  • Thérèse Raquin (novel by Zola)

    Thérèse Raquin, novel by émile Zola, first published serially as Un Mariage d’amour in 1867 and published in book form with the present title in the same year. Believing that an author must simply establish his characters in their particular environment and then observe and record their actions as

  • Theresienstadt (concentration camp, Czech Republic)

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