You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Tableau historique et critique de la poésie fran?aise et du théatre fran?ais au XVIe siècle (work by Sainte-Beuve)

    Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve: Early life and Romantic period: In his first book, Tableau historique et critique de la poésie fran?aise et du théatre fran?ais au XVIe siècle (1828; “Historical and Critical Description of French Poetry and Theatre in the Sixteenth Century”), he discovered, perhaps naturally, a Renaissance ancestry for Hugo and others of his new friends.

  • tableau mecanique (art)

    automaton: Automatons since the Renaissance: …century were tableaux mécaniques, or mechanical pictures. These framed painted landscapes, in which figures, windmills, and so forth spring to life by means of hidden clockwork, remained popular through the 19th century. A tableau designed for Mme de Pompadour (1759; Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, Paris) is a prime…

  • tableau vivant (theatre)

    stagecraft: Renaissance costume: Tableaux vivant and mimes were performed in costumes similar to those worn in the mystery and morality plays. With the gradual decline of church power and the revival of Classical ideas, Renaissance designers found their inspiration in the myths and legends of Greece and Rome.

  • tableaux (theatrical technique)

    Henri-René Lenormand: …struggles, he made use of tableaux, i.e., a succession of very short scenes occupying only part of the stage and serving to show the various facets of the characters’ inner personalities. Stage settings and effects that convey such symbolism are an essential element in many of his plays.

  • tableland (geography)

    Addis Ababa: …was situated on a high tableland and was found to be unsatisfactory because of extreme cold and an acute shortage of firewood. The empress Taitu, wife of Emperor Menilek II (reigned 1889–1913), persuaded the emperor to build a house near the hot springs at the foot of the tableland and…

  • tablemount (geology)

    Guyot, isolated submarine volcanic mountain with a flat summit more than 200 metres (660 feet) below sea level. Such flat tops may have diameters greater than 10 km (6 miles). (The term derives from the Swiss American geologist Arnold Henry Guyot.) In the Pacific Ocean, where guyots are most

  • tablero (architecture)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Teotihuacán: This exhibits the talud-tablero architectural motif that is typical of Teotihuacán culture: on each body or tier of a stepped pyramid is a rectangular frontal panel (tablero) supported by a sloping batter (talud). The tablero is surrounded by a kind of projecting frame, and the recessed portion of…

  • tables of discovery (science and philosophy)

    Western philosophy: The empiricism of Francis Bacon: …of what he called “tables of discovery.” He distinguished three kinds: tables of presence, of absence, and of degree (i.e., in the case of any two properties, such as heat and friction, instances in which they appear together, instances in which one appears without the other, and instances in…

  • tablet (pharmacology)

    pharmaceutical industry: Tablets: Tablets are by far the most common dosage form. Normally, they are intended for the oral or the sublingual routes of administration. They are made by compressing powdered drug along with various excipients in a tablet press. Excipients are more or less inert substances…

  • tablet computer

    Tablet computer, computer that is intermediate in size between a laptop computer and a smartphone. Early tablet computers used either a keyboard or a stylus to input information, but these methods were subsequently displaced by touch screens. The precursors to the tablet computer were devices such

  • Tabletop (mountain, Quebec, Canada)

    Mount Jacques Cartier, mountain on the north side of the Gaspé Peninsula in Gaspesian Provincial Park, eastern Quebec province, Canada. The highest peak in the well-forested Monts Chic-Choc (Shickshock Mountains), an extension of the Appalachians, is Mount Jacques Cartier, which has an elevation of

  • tableware

    Tableware, utensils used at the table for holding, serving, and handling food and drink. Tableware includes various types of containers (known as hollowware, q.v.), spoons and forks (flatware, q.v.), knives (cutlery, q.v.), and a variety of dishes and

  • Tablīghī Jamā?at (Pakistani organization)

    Pakistan: Religion: Another group, Tablīghī Jamā?at (founded 1926), headquartered in Raiwind, near Lahore, is a lay ministry group whose annual conference attracts hundreds of thousands of members from throughout the world. It is perhaps the largest grassroots Muslim organization in the world.

  • tablinum (architecture)

    domus: …atrium and peristyle was the tablinum, an open living room that could be curtained off from public view. A hallway, or fauces, was positioned to one side of the tablinum, to provide convenient access to the peristyle.

  • tablita dance (dance)

    Native American dance: The Southwest: …of the Pueblos are the corn dances, or tablita dances, named for the women’s tablet crowns with cloud symbols. They recur at various times during the spring and summer, with most pageantry after Easter and on the pueblo’s saint’s day. The people pay homage to the patron saint in an…

  • tabloid (newspaper)

    history of publishing: Great Britain: Another Harmsworth innovation was the tabloid newspaper, which was to revolutionize the popular press in the 20th century. The term tabloid was coined by Harmsworth when he designed and edited an experimental issue of the New York World, produced for New Year’s Day, 1900. The tabloid halved the size of…

  • Tabloid (film by Morris [2010])

    Errol Morris: …behaviour and media hysteria in Tabloid, which focused on a 1970s scandal involving a former beauty pageant winner who falls in love with a Mormon missionary and allegedly abducts him. The Unknown Known (2013) consisted of a series of interviews with former U.S. secretary of defense Donald Rumsfeld regarding his…

  • tabloid journalism

    Tabloid journalism, type of popular, largely sensationalistic journalism that takes its name from the format of a small newspaper, roughly half the size of an ordinary broadsheet. Tabloid journalism is not, however, found only in newspapers, and not every newspaper that is printed in tabloid format

  • Taboga Island (island, Panama)

    Taboga Island, island in the Bay of Panama, central Panama. Taboga and its small neighbour, Taboguilla Island, lie 11 miles (18 km) south of Panama City, with which they are connected by boat service. Taboga, about 2 miles (3 km) long and 1 mile (1.6 km) wide, is known for its pineapples and

  • Tabone, Censu (Maltese ophthalmologist and politician)

    Censu Tabone, (Vincent Tabone), Maltese ophthalmologist and politician (born March 30, 1913, Victoria, Gozo, British Malta—died March 14, 2012, San Giljan, Malta), was the reform-minded fourth president of Malta (1989–94) and a respected physician who founded (1954) the Medical Association of Malta

  • Tabone, Vincent (Maltese ophthalmologist and politician)

    Censu Tabone, (Vincent Tabone), Maltese ophthalmologist and politician (born March 30, 1913, Victoria, Gozo, British Malta—died March 14, 2012, San Giljan, Malta), was the reform-minded fourth president of Malta (1989–94) and a respected physician who founded (1954) the Medical Association of Malta

  • taboo (sociology)

    Taboo, the prohibition of an action based on the belief that such behaviour is either too sacred and consecrated or too dangerous and accursed for ordinary individuals to undertake. The term taboo is of Polynesian origin and was first noted by Captain James Cook during his visit to Tonga in 1771;

  • Taboo (American musician)

    Black Eyed Peas: …Philippines) recruited MC and dancer Taboo (byname of Jaime Luis Gomez; b. July 14, 1975, East Los Angeles, California) to form the Black Eyed Peas. The group’s debut recording, Behind the Front (1998), gained attention for its positive socially conscious lyrics and musical dexterity.

  • Tábor (Czech Republic)

    Tábor, city, southern Czech Republic. It lies along a bend in the Lu?nice River 50 miles (80 km) south of Prague. Founded in 1420 by Jan ?i?ka and other followers of the Bohemian religious reformer Jan Hus, Tábor became the radical centre of the more militant members of the movement, known as the

  • tabor (musical instrument)

    Pipe and tabor, three-holed fipple, or whistle, flute played along with a small snare drum. The player holds the pipe with his left hand, stopping the holes with the thumb and the first and second fingers; the other two fingers support the instrument. A scale is obtained by overblowing, using the

  • Tabor, Mount (mountain, Lower Galilee, Israel)

    Mount Tabor, historic elevation of northern Israel, in Lower Galilee near the edge of the Plain of Esdraelon (?Emeq Yizre?el). Though comparatively low (1,929 feet [588 m]), it dominates the level landscape around it, leading to the biblical expression “like Tabor among the mountains” (Jeremiah

  • Tabora (Tanzania)

    Tabora, town, west-central Tanzania. Lying on the Central Plateau at an elevation of 4,000 feet (1,200 m), it has a mean annual temperature of 73 °F (23 °C). The town has been the capital of the Nyamwezi people and was the major trade link between the coast and the Congo River basin prior to

  • taboret (musical instrument)

    Pipe and tabor, three-holed fipple, or whistle, flute played along with a small snare drum. The player holds the pipe with his left hand, stopping the holes with the thumb and the first and second fingers; the other two fingers support the instrument. A scale is obtained by overblowing, using the

  • taboret (furniture)

    Taboret, type of armless and backless seat or stool. Early taborets were probably named for their cylindrical shape, which resembled a drum (Old French: tabour). The name acquired a more specialized meaning in France in the late 17th century, when it referred to upholstered stools provided at the

  • Tábo?i (religious movement)

    Taborite, member of a militant group of Bohemian Hussite reformers who in 1420 gave the biblical name of Tabor (Czech: Tábor) to their fortified settlement south of Prague. Like their more moderate coreligionists, the Utraquists, they were strict biblicists and insisted on receiving a Eucharist of

  • Tabori, George (Hungarian-born writer and theatre director)

    George Tabori, (Gyorgy Tabori), Hungarian-born writer and theatre director (born May 24, 1914, Budapest, Austria-Hungary [now in Hungary]—died July 23, 2007, Berlin, Ger.), crafted plays, novels, and screenplays, many of which limned the emigrant experience and explored Germany’s relationship with

  • Tabori, Gyorgy (Hungarian-born writer and theatre director)

    George Tabori, (Gyorgy Tabori), Hungarian-born writer and theatre director (born May 24, 1914, Budapest, Austria-Hungary [now in Hungary]—died July 23, 2007, Berlin, Ger.), crafted plays, novels, and screenplays, many of which limned the emigrant experience and explored Germany’s relationship with

  • Taborites (religious movement)

    Taborite, member of a militant group of Bohemian Hussite reformers who in 1420 gave the biblical name of Tabor (Czech: Tábor) to their fortified settlement south of Prague. Like their more moderate coreligionists, the Utraquists, they were strict biblicists and insisted on receiving a Eucharist of

  • Tabot’ap (pagoda, Pulguk Temple, South Korea)

    Korean architecture: Unified Silla, or Great Silla, period (668–935): The other pagoda (Tabot’ap) is more elaborate and symbolizes the Prabhutaratna Buddha, or the Buddha of the Past. The arrangement apparently symbolizes the Buddhist legend that, when Shakyamuni preached the Avatamsaka-sutra, the pagoda of Prabhutaratna emerged out of the earth in witness of the greatness and truth of…

  • tabouret (furniture)

    Taboret, type of armless and backless seat or stool. Early taborets were probably named for their cylindrical shape, which resembled a drum (Old French: tabour). The name acquired a more specialized meaning in France in the late 17th century, when it referred to upholstered stools provided at the

  • Tabourot, Jehan (French dance theorist and historian)

    Thoinot Arbeau, theoretician and historian of the dance, whose Orchésographie (1588) contains carefully detailed, step-by-step descriptions of 16th-century and earlier dance forms. Ordained a priest in 1530, he became a canon at Langres (1547), where he was encouraged to pursue his studies by the

  • Tabqa Dam (dam, Syria)

    Euphrates Dam, dam on the Euphrates River in north-central Syria. The dam, which is located 30 miles (50 km) upriver from the town of Ar-Raqqah, was begun in 1968. Its construction prompted an intense archaeological excavation of the area around the town of ?abaqah. The dam is of earth-fill

  • Tabrau, Selat (strait, Asia)

    Johore Strait, northern arm of the Singapore Strait, 30 mi (50 km) long and 34–3 mi wide, between the Republic of Singapore and the region of Johor at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula. It is crossed by a rail and road causeway linking Johor Baharu, Malaysia, with Woodlands, Singapore. The

  • Tabrīz (Iran)

    Tabrīz, fourth largest city of Iran and capital of the East āz?arbāyjān province, lying about 4,485 feet (1,367 metres) above sea level in the extreme northwestern part of the country. The climate is continental: hot and dry in summer and severely cold in winter. The city lies in a valley

  • Tabrīz carpet

    Tabrīz carpet, floor covering handmade in or around Tabrīz, the principal city of northwestern Iran and one of its best-known carpet-producing centres. The identification of the court carpets of the early 16th-century ?afavid shahs who made Tabrīz their capital is no longer as simple as it once

  • Tabrīz school (painting)

    Tabrīz school, in painting, school of miniaturists founded by the Mongol Il-Khans early in the 14th century and active through the first half of the 16th century. The style represented the first full penetration of East Asian traditions into Islamic painting, an influence that was extreme at first

  • tabu (sociology)

    Taboo, the prohibition of an action based on the belief that such behaviour is either too sacred and consecrated or too dangerous and accursed for ordinary individuals to undertake. The term taboo is of Polynesian origin and was first noted by Captain James Cook during his visit to Tonga in 1771;

  • Tabu (film by Murnau [1931])

    F.W. Murnau: …the South Seas to film Tabu; Flaherty, however, objected to Murnau’s desire to incorporate a fictionalized love story into what was ostensibly an objective documentary of Polynesian life. Though he is credited as codirector, Flaherty withdrew from the production during its early stages, and the film is regarded as Murnau’s.…

  • Tabu Ley Rochereau (Congolese singer-songwriter)

    Tabu Ley Rochereau, (Pascal-Emmanuel Sinamoyi Tabu), Congolese singer-songwriter and politician (born Nov. 13, 1937?, Bandundu province, Belgian Congo [now Democratic Republic of the Congo]—died Nov. 30, 2013, Brussels, Belg.), was one of the leading figures of soukous dance music—a blend of

  • Tabu, Pascal-Emmanuel Sinamoyi (Congolese singer-songwriter)

    Tabu Ley Rochereau, (Pascal-Emmanuel Sinamoyi Tabu), Congolese singer-songwriter and politician (born Nov. 13, 1937?, Bandundu province, Belgian Congo [now Democratic Republic of the Congo]—died Nov. 30, 2013, Brussels, Belg.), was one of the leading figures of soukous dance music—a blend of

  • Tabuaeran Atoll (atoll, Kiribati)

    Tabuaeran Atoll, coral formation of the Northern Line Islands, part of Kiribati, in the west-central Pacific Ocean. Discovered in 1798 by an American trader and explorer, Edmund Fanning, the atoll is composed of several islets that surround a lagoon 32 miles (51 km) in circumference. It was annexed

  • Tabucchi, Antonio (Italian writer and scholar)

    Antonio Tabucchi, Italian writer and scholar (born Sept. 24, 1943, Pisa, Italy—died March 25, 2012, Lisbon, Port.), crafted lyrical yet frequently humorous stories and novels, many of which reflected his special love of Portugal, notably the melancholy and pantheistic elements in Portuguese

  • Tabūk (Saudi Arabia)

    Tabūk, oasis city, northwestern Saudi Arabia. The city is situated amid a grove of date palms. In former times it was a station on the Hejaz railway (now defunct). At the edge of the old part of Tabūk stands a Turkish fort, built in 1694. Present-day Tabūk is one of the fastest-growing industrial

  • Tabula Bantina (inscription)

    Italic languages: Oscan: …unknown town of Lucania, the Tabula Bantina is preserved, the most extensive Oscan inscription. It is a bronze tablet with penal laws concerning municipal administration, written in Latin letters during the first half of the 1st century bce. The oldest Oscan text of any length is the so-called Agnone Tablet…

  • Tabula Peutingeriana (ancient map)

    Peutinger Table, copy of a Roman map, made in 1265 by a monk of Colmar (Alsace) on 12 sheets of parchment. Eleven of the sheets are now in the Nationalbibliothek in Vienna. The dimensions are 268 by 13 13 inches (6.82 by 0.34 metres). The copy was found by Conradus Celtis in 1494 and was bequeathed

  • tabula rasa (philosophy)

    Tabula rasa, (Latin: “scraped tablet”—i.e., “clean slate”) in epistemology (theory of knowledge) and psychology, a supposed condition that empiricists attribute to the human mind before ideas have been imprinted on it by the reaction of the senses to the external world of objects. Comparison of the

  • Tabulae eclipsium (work by Peuerbach)

    Georg von Peuerbach: …influential set of eclipse tables, Tabulae eclipsium (c. 1459), based on the Alfonsine Tables, that circulated widely in manuscript before the first Viennese edition (1514). Peuerbach composed other treatises, most still in manuscript, devoted to elementary arithmetic, sine tables, calculating devices, and the construction of astronomical instruments (gnomons, astrolabes, and…

  • Tabulae Iguvinae (bronze inscriptions)

    Iguvine Tables, a set of seven inscribed bronze tables found in 1444 at Iguvium (modern Gubbio, Italy), an Umbrian town. The tables are written in the Umbrian language, four and part of a fifth using the Umbrian script, the rest Latin characters. The earliest appear to date from the 3rd or 2nd

  • Tabulae prutenicae (astronomy)

    physical science: Astronomy: …astronomer Erasmus Reinhold published the Tabulae prutenicae (“Prutenic Tables”), computed by Copernican methods. The tables were more accurate and more up-to-date than their 13th-century predecessor and became indispensable to both astronomers and astrologers.

  • Tabulae Rudolphinae (astronomy)

    Rudolphine Tables, planetary tables and star catalog published in 1627 by Johannes Kepler, based principally on the observations of Tycho Brahe. The best of the pretelescopic catalogs, it is accurate to a few minutes of arc and contains positions for 1,005 stars (increased by Kepler from Tycho’s 7

  • tabular alumina (aluminum oxide)

    aluminum processing: Aluminum oxide: Tabular alumina is aluminum oxide that has been heated to temperatures above 1,650 °C (3,000 °F). Composed of tabletlike crystals, it has high heat capacity and thermal conductivity as well as exceptional strength and volume stability at high temperatures. For these reasons, a major use…

  • tabular summary (statistics)

    statistics: Tabular methods: The most commonly used tabular summary of data for a single variable is a frequency distribution. A frequency distribution shows the number of data values in each of several nonoverlapping classes. Another tabular summary, called a relative frequency distribution, shows the fraction, or…

  • Tabulata (fossil coral)

    Tabulata, major division of extinct coral animals found as fossils in Ordovician to Jurassic marine rocks (488 million to 146 million years old). Tabulata is characterized by the presence of interior platforms, or tabulae, and by a general lack of vertical walls, or septa. Colonial masses of these

  • tabulating machine (device)

    Herman Hollerith: ), American inventor of a tabulating machine that was an important precursor of the electronic computer.

  • Tabulatura nova (work by Scheidt)

    Samuel Scheidt: The publication of his Tabulatura nova (three parts, 1624) was an important event in the history of organ music. The title refers to the musical notation used: keyboard tablature in the Italian sense (i.e., staff notation, rather than the alphabetical tablature used in earlier German organ music). The collection…

  • Tabūn (anthropological and archaeological site, Israel)

    Tabūn, site of paleoanthropological excavations in a deep rock shelter located on the edge of Mount Carmel and facing the Mediterranean Sea in northern Israel. Artifacts discovered in a long sequence of deposits at this site document patterns of change in stone-tool manufacture during the Lower and

  • tabun (chemical compound)

    anticholinesterase: …effective agricultural insecticides, while sarin, tabun, and soman are nerve gases designed for use in chemical warfare to induce nausea, vomiting, convulsions, and death in humans.

  • Tabwa (people)

    Tabwa, a people who live mainly on the southwestern shores of Lake Tanganyika, on the high grassy plateaus of the Marungu massif in extreme southeastern Congo (Kinshasa). Some also live in northeasternmost Zambia and along the Luapula River. Tabwa speak a Bantu language closely related to those o

  • Tabwémasana (mountain, Vanuatu)

    Vanuatu: Land: The highest point is Tabwémasana, 6,165 feet (1,879 metres), on Espiritu Santo, the largest island. There are two seasons—hot and wet from November to April, and cooler and drier from May to October. The southeast trades are the prevailing winds, although northerlies during the hot season provide most of…

  • TAC (American architectural group)

    The Architects Collaborative, association of architects specializing in school buildings that was founded in 1946 in Cambridge, Mass., U.S., by Walter Gropius. The original partners included Norman Fletcher, John Harkness, Sarah Harkness, Robert McMillan, Louis McMillen, and Benjamin Thompson.

  • Tac üt-tevarih (work by Sadeddin)

    Hoca Sadeddin: …the author of the renowned Tac üt-tevarih (“Crown of Histories”), which covers the period from the origins of the Ottoman Empire to the end of the reign of Selim I (1520).

  • tacamahac (plant)

    Balsam poplar, North American poplar (Populus balsamifera), native from Labrador to Alaska and across the extreme northern U.S. Often cultivated as a shade tree, it has buds thickly coated with an aromatic resin that is used to make cough syrups. It grows best in northwestern

  • Tacaná (volcano, Mexico-Guatemala)

    Chiapas Highlands: The Tacaná Volcano, located on the southern extreme of the highlands at the Mexico–Guatemala border, rises to 13,484 feet (4,110 metres).

  • Tacapae (Tunisia)

    Gabès, town in southeastern Tunisia. Situated on a Mediterranean oasis along the Gulf of Gabes, the town is located at the mouth of the Wadi Qābis (Oued Gabès), which has its source 6 miles (10 km) upstream at the Ras al-Oued (springs), the town’s main water source. The town’s remains attest to

  • Tacape (Tunisia)

    Gabès, town in southeastern Tunisia. Situated on a Mediterranean oasis along the Gulf of Gabes, the town is located at the mouth of the Wadi Qābis (Oued Gabès), which has its source 6 miles (10 km) upstream at the Ras al-Oued (springs), the town’s main water source. The town’s remains attest to

  • Tacarigua Lake (lake, Venezuela)

    Lake Valencia, lake in Carabobo and Aragua estados (states), central Venezuela. Lying in a basin in the Cordillera de la Costa (Maritime Andes) of the central highlands at an elevation of 1,362 ft (415 m) above sea level, Lake Valencia measures approximately 18 mi (29 km) from east to west and 10

  • Tacca (plant genus)

    Dioscoreales: Members of the genus Tacca, or bat flower, are understory herbs found in tropical wet forests, primarily in Southeast Asia, and are sometimes grown as ornamentals. Their umbel-like inflorescences have conspicuous, often dark maroon or black, filiform bracts subtending the flowers. Tacca was placed in its own family, Taccaceae,…

  • Tacca, Pietro (Italian sculptor)

    Cosimo II: …a diplomat); and the sculptor Pietro Tacca began his bronzes for the monument to Ferdinand I. Cosimo abandoned all banking and commerce on his own account, for he considered it demeaning and distracting from the course of political governance.

  • taccavi (loan)

    India: Society and the state under the Tughluqs: …history to advance loans (taccavi) to the villagers for rehabilitation following a disastrous famine. He also proposed a grand scheme for improving cropping patterns and extending cultivation. Fīrūz Tughluq created the biggest network of canals known in premodern India, wrote off the loans granted earlier to the peasants by…

  • Tachard, Gui (French missionary)

    Phaulkon-Tachard conspiracy: …to Siam’s King Narai, and Gui Tachard, a French Jesuit missionary.

  • Tachardia (insect)

    insect: Insects as a source of raw materials: …the lac insect Kerria lacca (Homoptera), which is cultured for this purpose, is the source of commercial shellac.

  • tache d’huile strategy (guerrilla warfare)

    guerrilla warfare: Counterguerrilla warfare: …employed this tache d’huile, or oil-spot, strategy in Algeria, where he used the army not as an instrument of repression but, in conjunction with civil services, as a positive social force—“the organization on the march.”

  • Tachiagare Nippon (political party, Japan)

    Ishihara Shintarō: …Ishihara had helped form the Sunrise Party of Japan (Tachiagare Nippon), consisting of former LDP members and others who espoused nationalistic and other politically conservative policies. On October 31, 2012, he formally resigned as governor of Tokyo in order to seek election to a seat in the lower house of…

  • Tachibana Akemi (Japanese author)

    Japanese literature: Late Tokugawa period (c. 1770–1867): Tachibana Akemi proved that the tanka was not limited to descriptions of the sights of nature or disappointed love but could express joy over fish for dinner or wrath at political events. Some poets who felt that the tanka did not provide ample scope for…

  • Tachigali versicolor (plant)

    Suicide tree, (Tachigali versicolor), tropical tree of the pea family (Fabaceae), found in old-growth forests from Costa Rica to northern Colombia and named for its imminent demise after fruiting. The suicide tree possesses one of the densest and hardest woods of any Central American tree and is

  • Tachikawa (Japan)

    Tachikawa, city, Tokyo to (metropolis), Honshu, Japan. It lies along the Chūō Line (railway), east of Tokyo city. In 1922 an army airfield was constructed nearby, and large munitions and aircraft factories were concentrated in the city. After World War II the military installations were taken over

  • Tachikawa Keiji (Japanese business executive)

    Tachikawa Keiji, Japanese business executive who was a leader in Japan’s telecommunications industry through his decades-long association with Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT). After graduating from the University of Tokyo in 1962 with a bachelor’s degree in technology, Tachikawa

  • tachinid fly (insect)

    Tachinid fly, (family Tachinidae), any member of a family of insects in the fly order, Diptera. Adult tachinids superficially resemble houseflies. Most species range in size from 2 to 18 mm (0.08 to 0.7 inch) and are hairy and dull gray or black. Some are metallic green or blue. Larvae are internal

  • Tachinidae (insect)

    Tachinid fly, (family Tachinidae), any member of a family of insects in the fly order, Diptera. Adult tachinids superficially resemble houseflies. Most species range in size from 2 to 18 mm (0.08 to 0.7 inch) and are hairy and dull gray or black. Some are metallic green or blue. Larvae are internal

  • Táchira (state, Venezuela)

    Táchira, estado (state), western Venezuela. It is bounded on the west by Colombia, on the east by the Venezuelan states of Mérida and Barinas, on the north by the Venezuelan state of Zulia, and on the south by the Venezuelan state of Apure. The territory lies in the southwestern reaches of the

  • Tachism (painting)

    Tachism, (from tache, “spot”), style of painting practiced in Paris after World War II and through the 1950s that, like its American equivalent, Action painting, featured the intuitive, spontaneous gesture of the artist’s brushstroke. Developed by the young painters Hans Hartung, Gérard S

  • Tachisme (painting)

    Tachism, (from tache, “spot”), style of painting practiced in Paris after World War II and through the 1950s that, like its American equivalent, Action painting, featured the intuitive, spontaneous gesture of the artist’s brushstroke. Developed by the young painters Hans Hartung, Gérard S

  • tachistoscope (instrument)

    perception: Temporal (time) relations: …aid of instruments known as tachistoscopes that permit the durations of visual stimuli to be precisely controlled. Sophisticated electronic tachistoscopes flash reliably for periods as brief as one millisecond (one-thousandth of a second). Such precision permits study of the short-term development (microgenesis) of such percepts as those of simple geometric…

  • tachometer (measurement device)

    Tachometer, device for indicating the angular (rotary) speed of a rotating shaft. The term is usually restricted to mechanical or electrical instruments that indicate instantaneous values of speed in revolutions per minute, rather than devices that count the number of revolutions in a measured

  • Tachornis (bird)

    apodiform: Reproduction and life cycle: The New World palm swifts (Tachornis), like those of the Old World, place their nests under palm leaves, but the nest itself is more elaborate, being a sack entered from below through a tubular tunnel. Most other swifts nest either inside a crevice or hole (such…

  • Tachos (king of Egypt)

    Tachos, second king (reigned 365–360 bc) of the 30th dynasty of Egypt; he led an unsuccessful attack on the Persians in Phoenicia. Tachos was aided in the undertaking by the aged Spartan king Agesilaus II, who led a body of Greek mercenaries, and by the Athenian fleet commander Chabrias. Tachos,

  • Tachtigers (Dutch literary movement)

    Netherlands: Queen Wilhelmina and World War I: …“Men of the ’Eighties” (Tachtigers) brought to the fore an emphasis on aesthetic values and spirituality; and early in the 20th century, a literature of social protest reemerged.

  • Tachtsis, Kostas (Greek author)

    Greek literature: Literature after 1922: … (1962; The Third Wedding) by Kóstas Tachtsís, the female narrator tells the story of her life with venomous verve, unwittingly exposing the oppressive nature of the Greek family. Yórgos Ioánnou’s part-fictional, part-autobiographical short prose pieces present a vivid picture of life in Thessaloníki (Salonika) and Athens from the 1930s to…

  • tachycardia (pathology)

    Tachycardia, a heart rate of more than 100 beats per minute. Tachycardia occurs normally during and after exercise or during emotional stress and represents no danger to healthy individuals. In some cases, however, tachycardia occurs without apparent cause or as a complication of a myocardial

  • Tachycneminae (amphibian subfamily)

    Anura: Annotated classification: (Africa), Leptopelinae (Africa), and Tachycneminae (Seychelles). Family Mantellidae No fossil record; 8 presacral vertebrae; vertebral column procoelous; intercalary cartilages present; 3 tarsals; aquatic larvae; 3 genera, 61 species; adult size 2–12 cm (1–5 inches). Madagascar. Family Microhylidae Miocene to present; 8

  • Tachyeres (bird)

    Steamer duck, (genus Tachyeres), any of four species of heavily built, big-billed sea ducks of southernmost South America and the Falkland Islands. The bird is named for its habit of running across the water with wings thrashing like a paddle-wheel steamboat. Of the four species, T. pteneres, T.

  • Tachyeres brachypterus (bird)

    steamer duck: Of the four species, T. pteneres, T. brachypterus, and T. leucocephalus are flightless and a bit larger than the mallard-size flying steamer duck, T. patachonicus. Steamer ducks are classified in a tribe of their own, Tachyerini, family Anatidae (order Anseriformes).

  • Tachyeres leucocephalus (bird)

    steamer duck: brachypterus, and T. leucocephalus are flightless and a bit larger than the mallard-size flying steamer duck, T. patachonicus. Steamer ducks are classified in a tribe of their own, Tachyerini, family Anatidae (order Anseriformes).

  • Tachyeres patachonicus (bird)

    steamer duck: …the mallard-size flying steamer duck, T. patachonicus. Steamer ducks are classified in a tribe of their own, Tachyerini, family Anatidae (order Anseriformes).

  • Tachyeres pteneres (bird)

    steamer duck: Of the four species, T. pteneres, T. brachypterus, and T. leucocephalus are flightless and a bit larger than the mallard-size flying steamer duck, T. patachonicus. Steamer ducks are classified in a tribe of their own, Tachyerini, family Anatidae (order Anseriformes).

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
港台一级毛片免费观看