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  • Telmun (ancient kingdom, Persian Gulf)

    Dilmun, Sumerian name of an ancient independent kingdom that flourished c. 2000 bce, centred on Bahrain Island in the Persian Gulf. Dilmun is mentioned as a commercial centre in Sumerian economic texts of the late 4th millennium bce, when it was a transshipment point for goods between Sumer and the

  • Telnet (networking protocol)

    Telnet, networking protocol used for remotely accessing a computer system. The first version of Telnet resulted from work on ARPANET, the precursor to the Internet (see DARPA), in the late 1960s. Computer users needed a way to remotely connect different types of computers. In response a committee

  • Telok Anson (Malaysia)

    Teluk Intan, port, northwestern Peninsular (West) Malaysia. It lies on a deltaic peninsula formed by the confluence of the Perak and Bidor rivers. Formerly called Telong Melintang, the port was renamed in the 1880s for Lieutenant Governor George Anson of Penang (or Pinang). It is now an

  • telolecithal yolk (embryology)

    yolk: …of the egg are termed telolecithal. This occurs in many invertebrates and in all vertebrates lower than marsupial mammals. In arthropods, the yolk is massed near the centre of the egg; such eggs are termed centrolecithal.

  • telome theory (botany)

    fern: Evolutionary development: …been offered, of which the telome theory (that the leaf arose from fusions and rearrangements of branching stem systems) and the enation theory (that the leaf arose from simple enations, or outgrowths) are the two most popular. The true story seems to be lost in antiquity and perhaps will never…

  • telomerase (enzyme)

    cancer: Telomeres and the immortal cell: …a formerly quiescent enzyme called telomerase becomes activated. This enzyme prevents the telomeres from shortening further and thereby prolongs the life of the cell.

  • telomerase reverse transcriptase (biochemistry)

    Thomas Robert Cech: …and his research team discovered telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic subunit of an enzyme called telomerase, which is responsible for regulating the length of telomeres. (Telomeres form the end segments of chromosomes.) Four years later his lab also located the “protection of telomeres protein” (POT1) that caps the end…

  • telomerase RNA component (genetics)

    aging: Genetic theories: …in a gene known as TERC (telomerase RNA [ribonucleic acid] component), which encodes an RNA segment of an enzyme known as telomerase, have been associated with reduced telomere length and an increased rate of biological aging. Telomerase normally functions to prevent the overshortening of telomeres, but in the presence of…

  • telomere (DNA segment)

    Telomere, segment of DNA occurring at the ends of chromosomes in eukaryotic cells (cells containing a clearly defined nucleus). Telomeres are made up of repeated segments of DNA that consist of the sequence 5′-TTAGGG-3′ (in which T, A, and G are the bases thymine, adenine, and guanine,

  • telonea (tax)

    France: Frankish fiscal law: …of a growing number of telonea (taxes collected on the circulation and sale of goods).

  • Telong Melintang (Malaysia)

    Teluk Intan, port, northwestern Peninsular (West) Malaysia. It lies on a deltaic peninsula formed by the confluence of the Perak and Bidor rivers. Formerly called Telong Melintang, the port was renamed in the 1880s for Lieutenant Governor George Anson of Penang (or Pinang). It is now an

  • telophase (biology)

    cell: Mitosis and cytokinesis: Finally, in telophase a new nuclear envelope forms around each set of unraveling chromatids.

  • Telophorus quadricolor (bird)

    shrike: …gorgeous, or four-coloured, bush-shrike (Telophorus quadricolor) is green above and golden below, with black-bordered red throat. Some authors equate the genus Chlorophoneus with Telophorus.

  • Teloschistales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Teloschistales Forms lichens; found on rocks close to the sea; thallus sometimes composed of granules; may have poorly defined lobed margins; includes orange sea lichen and shore lichen (yellow scales); included in subclass Lecanoromycetidae; example genera include Caloplaca, Teloschistes, and Xanthoria. Order Agyriales

  • Telospora (protozoan)

    Telosporidian, any spore-forming protozoan of the class Telospora (sometimes called Telosporida), characterized by naked or encapsulated spores and no polar capsules. The life cycle typically alternates between asexual and sexual phases; the latter produces infective stages (sporozoites) in which

  • Telosporida (protozoan)

    Telosporidian, any spore-forming protozoan of the class Telospora (sometimes called Telosporida), characterized by naked or encapsulated spores and no polar capsules. The life cycle typically alternates between asexual and sexual phases; the latter produces infective stages (sporozoites) in which

  • telosporidian (protozoan)

    Telosporidian, any spore-forming protozoan of the class Telospora (sometimes called Telosporida), characterized by naked or encapsulated spores and no polar capsules. The life cycle typically alternates between asexual and sexual phases; the latter produces infective stages (sporozoites) in which

  • telotaxis (animal behaviour)

    stereotyped response: Taxes: In telotaxis, known only for responses to light, attainment of orientation is direct and without trial movements. When between lights from two sources, the animal orients to one light, rather than to some intermediate point. The animal switches orientation from one source to the other at…

  • Telpochtli (Aztec god)

    Tezcatlipoca, (Nahuatl: “Smoking Mirror”) god of the Great Bear constellation and of the night sky, one of the major deities of the Aztec pantheon. Tezcatlipoca’s cult was brought to central Mexico by the Toltecs, Nahua-speaking warriors from the north, about the end of the 10th century ad.

  • Telpos-Iz, Mount (mountain, Russia)

    Ural Mountains: Physiography: …metres), and the highest peak, Mount Telpos-Iz, rises to 5,305 feet (1,617 metres). Many of the summits are flattened, the remnants of ancient peneplains (eroded surfaces of large area and slight relief) uplifted by geologically recent tectonic movements. In the north, intensive weathering has resulted in vast “seas of stone”…

  • telson (anatomy)

    apterygote: Modified abdominal structures: …aid in identification of the telson. The Protura, Collembola, and Monura lack cerci. In Diplura a pair of cerci arise from the small terminal segment. Cerci can be long with numerous segments, short with a central duct and terminal pore, or modified into a pair of pincers for holding prey.…

  • telsontail (arthropod)

    Proturan, any of a group of about 800 species of minute (0.5 to 2 mm [0.02 to 0.08 inch]), pale, wingless, blind, primitive insects that live in damp humus and soil and feed on decaying organic matter. Proturans, also known as telsontails, include some of the most primitive hexapods (i.e., animals

  • Telstar (recording by the Tornados)

    British Invasion: …(shortly after the Tornados’ “Telstar,” an instrumental smash that sent word of what was in store by becoming the first British record to top the American singles chart); the rest joined the hit parade in 1963.

  • Telstar (communications satellite)

    Telstar, series of communications satellites whose successful launching, beginning in 1962, inaugurated a new age in electronic communications. The first experimental communications satellite was made in 1960 by John Robinson Pierce of Bell Telephone Laboratories in the United States, who seized

  • Telugu (people)

    India: The Andhras and their successors: The Andhras are listed among the tribal peoples in the Mauryan empire. Possibly they rose to being local officials and then, on the disintegration of the empire, gradually became independent rulers of the northwestern Deccan. It cannot be ascertained for certain…

  • Telugu Desam Party (political party, India)

    Telugu Desam Party (TDP), regional political party in Andhra Pradesh state, southeastern India. It also at times had a strong presence in national politics in New Delhi. The TDP was formed in March 1982 by Nandamuri Taraka Rama Rao (popularly known as NTR), a former star and director of

  • Telugu language

    Telugu language, largest member of the Dravidian language family. Primarily spoken in southeastern India, it is the official language of the states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. In the early 21st century Telugu had more than 75 million speakers. The first written materials in the language date

  • Telugu literature

    Telugu literature, body of writings in Telugu, a Dravidian language spoken in an area north of Madras, India, and running inland to Bellary. The literature, beginning in the 10th or 11th century, is mainly poetry and secular and religious epics, with the ?ataka (“century” of verses) as a very

  • Telugu Nation Party (political party, India)

    Telugu Desam Party (TDP), regional political party in Andhra Pradesh state, southeastern India. It also at times had a strong presence in national politics in New Delhi. The TDP was formed in March 1982 by Nandamuri Taraka Rama Rao (popularly known as NTR), a former star and director of

  • Teluk Intan (Malaysia)

    Teluk Intan, port, northwestern Peninsular (West) Malaysia. It lies on a deltaic peninsula formed by the confluence of the Perak and Bidor rivers. Formerly called Telong Melintang, the port was renamed in the 1880s for Lieutenant Governor George Anson of Penang (or Pinang). It is now an

  • Telukbetung (Indonesia)

    Bandar Lampung, kota (city), capital of Lampung propinsi (or provinsi; province), Indonesia. It lies at the head of Lampung Bay on the south coast of the island of Sumatra. Bandar Lampung was created in the 1980s from the amalgamation of the former provincial capital, Tanjungkarang, with the port

  • telum figure (devotional image)

    Telum figure, small, devotional image carved from wood or stone, probably used in private rather than communal ancestor worship in primitive societies. Telum figures are known on the northwestern coast of New Guinea and in the Dogon art of Sudan. Extant examples from both regions are rare, probably

  • Telychian Stage (geology and stratigraphy)

    Telychian Stage, last of three stages of the Llandovery Series, encompassing all rocks deposited during the Telychian Age (438.5 million to 433.4 million years ago) of the Silurian Period. The name of the interval is derived from the Pen-lan-Telych Farm near Llandovery, Powys, Wales. In 1984 the

  • Telynegion (poems by Gruffydd and Roberts)

    William John Gruffydd: …Roberts, the book of poems Telynegion (1900; “Lyrics”), naturalized the romantic lyric in Wales. Other works include Caneuon a cherddi (1906; “Songs and Poems”), Llenyddiaeth Cymru o 1450 hyd 1600 (1922; “History of Welsh Literature, 1450–1600”), Ynys yr hud (1923; “The Enchanted Island”), Caniadau (1932; “Poems”), and Hen atgofion (1936;…

  • TEM (instrument)

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM), type of electron microscope that has three essential systems: (1) an electron gun, which produces the electron beam, and the condenser system, which focuses the beam onto the object, (2) the image-producing system, consisting of the objective lens, movable

  • Tema (Ghana)

    Tema, city and port, southeastern Ghana. It lies along the Gulf of Guinea (an embayment of the Atlantic Ocean), 18 miles (29 km) east of Accra. By 1950 Takoradi and Ghana’s older open-sea ports proved unable to handle Ghana’s increased international trade. Construction of a second deepwater harbour

  • Temanu, Mount (mountain, Bora-Bora, French Polynesia)

    Bora-Bora: …miles (4 km) wide, has Mount Otemanu (Temanu; 2,385 feet [727 metres]) and twin-peaked Mount Pahia (2,159 feet [658 metres]) as its highest peaks. It is surrounded by coral reefs. On the west side of Bora-Bora is a large lagoon in which the smaller islands of Toopua and Toopua Iti…

  • Temaru, Oscar (French-Polynesian politician)

    French Polynesia: History: Oscar Temaru, a pro-independence leader, was elected president that year and served briefly before losing to his predecessor, Gaston Flosse, who at that time was opposed to independence. Over the next decade, the presidency rotated among several politicians—including Temaru, Flosse, and Gaston Tong Sang, who…

  • Temasek

    Singapore, city-state located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, about 85 miles (137 kilometres) north of the Equator. It consists of the diamond-shaped Singapore Island and some 60 small islets; the main island occupies all but about 18 square miles of this combined area. The main island

  • Témbi (valley, Greece)

    Vale of Tempe, narrow valley between the southern Olympus (Modern Greek: ólympos) and northern Ossa (Kíssavos or óssa) massifs of northeastern Thessaly (Thessalía), Greece. The valley is lined by cliffs that rise to 1,650 feet (500 m) on the south; in places it is only 90 to 165 feet (27 to 50 m)

  • Tembi (river, Guinea)

    Niger River: Physiography: Issuing as the Tembi from a deep ravine 2,800 feet (850 metres) above sea level, it flows due north over the first 100 miles (160 km). It then follows a northeasterly direction, during the course of which it receives its upper tributaries—the Mafou, the Niandan, the Milo, and…

  • Temblor Range (mountains, California, United States)

    Temblor Range, segment of the Coast Ranges (see Pacific mountain system), south-central California, U.S. It extends southeastward for about 50 miles (80 km) from northwestern Kern county to the San Emigdio Mountains near the southern end of the Central Valley. Peaks average about 3,500 feet (1,100

  • Tembo, Biggie (Zimbabwean musician)

    Biggie Tembo, (RODWELL MARASHA), Zimbabwean musician who found international popularity in the early 1980s as a member of the Bhundu Boys "jit-jive" dance band (b. Sept. 30, 1958--d. July 30,

  • Tembu (people)

    Tembu, Bantu-speaking people who inhabit the upper reaches of the Mzimvubu River in Eastern province, South Africa. The Tembu speak a dialect of Xhosa, a Bantu language of the Nguni group that is closely related to Zulu. In the early years of the 19th century the Tembu shared the cultural p

  • Temelín (Czech Republic)

    Czech Republic: Resources and power: … plants located in Dukovany and Temelín, as well as nuclear power from Slovakia, have reduced the country’s dependence on coal only slightly; about three-fourths of the Czech Republic’s electricity is derived from fossil fuels.

  • Temen (people)

    Temne, group of some 1.6 million people of central and northwestern Sierra Leone who speak a language (also called Temne) of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo family. The Temne are mainly farmers whose staple crop is rice, supplemented by peanuts (groundnuts), cotton, cassava, and millet; cash

  • temenggong (Malayan official)

    Temenggong, in the traditional Malay states, an official who was responsible for maintaining law and order and for commanding the police and army. This important nonhereditary position became delineated during the development of the 15th-century Malaccan state, which emerged as an intermediate

  • temenos (Greek religion)

    Greek religion: Shrines and temples: Fundamental was the precinct (temenos) allotted to the deity, containing the altar, temple (if any), and other sacral or natural features, such as the sacred olive in the temenos of Pandrosos on the Athenian Acropolis. Naoi (temples—literally “dwellings”—that housed the god’s image) were already known in Homeric times and,…

  • Temer Lulia, Michel Miguel Elias (president of Brazil)

    Michel Temer, Brazilian politician who became president of Brazil in August 2016 after the Senate ousted Dilma Rousseff in an impeachment vote. He was the eighth and youngest son of Lebanese immigrants who had arrived in Brazil in 1925. Temer studied law at the University of S?o Paulo and the

  • Temer, Michel (president of Brazil)

    Michel Temer, Brazilian politician who became president of Brazil in August 2016 after the Senate ousted Dilma Rousseff in an impeachment vote. He was the eighth and youngest son of Lebanese immigrants who had arrived in Brazil in 1925. Temer studied law at the University of S?o Paulo and the

  • Temerloh (Malaysia)

    Temerloh, town, central Peninsular (West) Malaysia, on the Pahang River. The town’s residents are primarily engaged in rubber tapping and paddy (rice) farming. Local villagers ferry downriver to trade their produce at a market near the town mosque. Temerloh is a transit point for ferries bound for

  • Temes River (river, Europe)

    Timi? River, river, rising in the Cernei Mountains at the western end of the Southern Carpathian Mountains in Romania, and flowing north, west, then south in an arc through Caransebe? and Lugoj to enter the Danube River at Pan?evo, east of Belgrade, Serbia, after a course of 211 miles (340 km). Its

  • Temeser Banat (historical region, Europe)

    Banat, ethnically mixed historic region of eastern Europe; it is bounded by Transylvania and Walachia in the east, by the Tisza River in the west, by the Mures River in the north, and by the Danube River in the south. After 1920 Banat was divided among the states of Romania, Yugoslavia, and

  • Temesiensis (Romania)

    Timi?oara, city, capital of Timi? jude? (county), western Romania. The city lies along the canalized Bega River. Nearby archaeological finds indicate settlements of Neolithic and Roman origins. First documented in 1212 as the Roman castrum (fort) Temesiensis, Timi?oara in the 14th century became a

  • Temesvár (Romania)

    Timi?oara, city, capital of Timi? jude? (county), western Romania. The city lies along the canalized Bega River. Nearby archaeological finds indicate settlements of Neolithic and Roman origins. First documented in 1212 as the Roman castrum (fort) Temesiensis, Timi?oara in the 14th century became a

  • Temiar language

    Senoic languages: The main languages, Semai and Temiar, are spoken in the Main Range of the Malay Peninsula. Together their speakers number some 33,000.

  • Temin, Howard Martin (American virologist)

    Howard Martin Temin, American virologist who in 1975 shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with his former professor Renato Dulbecco and another of Dulbecco’s students, David Baltimore, for his codiscovery of the enzyme reverse transcriptase. While working toward his Ph.D. under

  • Temirtaū (Kazakhstan)

    Temirtau, city, east-central Kazakhstan. It lies on the Samarkand Reservoir of the Nura River. The settlement, a satellite city of Qaraghandy (Karaganda), came into being when the reservoir was built in 1934; until 1945 it was called Samarkandsky. Later, small industrial plants were built there. In

  • Temirtau (Kazakhstan)

    Temirtau, city, east-central Kazakhstan. It lies on the Samarkand Reservoir of the Nura River. The settlement, a satellite city of Qaraghandy (Karaganda), came into being when the reservoir was built in 1934; until 1945 it was called Samarkandsky. Later, small industrial plants were built there. In

  • Temiskaming Shores (Ontario, Canada)

    Temiskaming Shores, city, Timiskaming district, eastern Ontario, Canada, at the northern end of Lake Timiskaming (an expansion of the Ottawa River), near the Quebec border. Originally known as Thornloe, the town developed on land that the provincial government opened for settlement in 1822. It was

  • Temman Shrine (shrine, ōsaka, Japan)

    Sugawara Michizane: …on July 25 at the Temman Shrine in ōsaka. There are also numerous local shrines throughout Japan at which schoolchildren buy amulets for luck during the period of school entrance examinations in the spring.

  • Temmei era (Japanese history)

    Japan: Political reform in the bakufu and the han: …a widespread famine during the Temmei era (1783–87), in which large numbers of people starved to death. An uncommon number of crop failures, fires, epidemics, and droughts reconfirmed peoples’ sense of divine displeasure with the performance of the ruler. The protests of the farmers were now most often directed against…

  • Temminck’s cat (mammal)

    golden cat: …(Catopuma temminckii), also known as Temminck’s cat.

  • temmoku ware (Chinese stoneware)

    Jian ware, dark brown or blackish Chinese stoneware made for domestic use chiefly during the Song dynasty (960–1279) and into the early 14th century. Jian ware was made in Fujian province, first in kilns at Jian’an and later at Jianyang. The clay used for Jian ware was of a very hard, coarse grain.

  • Temmu (emperor of Japan)

    epic: The epic in Japan: …the command of the emperor Temmu (672–686) and were used as basic materials for the compilation of the first national chronicles of Japan, the Kojiki (712; “Records of Ancient Matters”) and the Nihon shoki (720; “Chronicles of Japan”). The myths and legends that are contained in the earlier parts of…

  • Temne (people)

    Temne, group of some 1.6 million people of central and northwestern Sierra Leone who speak a language (also called Temne) of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo family. The Temne are mainly farmers whose staple crop is rice, supplemented by peanuts (groundnuts), cotton, cassava, and millet; cash

  • Temne language

    Temne: …speak a language (also called Temne) of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo family. The Temne are mainly farmers whose staple crop is rice, supplemented by peanuts (groundnuts), cotton, cassava, and millet; cash crops are palm kernels and kola nuts. Rice, cattle, and goats are also important. The household consists…

  • temnocephalid (flatworm)

    flatworm: Distribution and abundance: Except for the temnocephalids, flatworms are cosmopolitan in distribution. They occur in both fresh water and salt water and occasionally in moist terrestrial habitats, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. The temnocephalids, which are parasitic on freshwater crustaceans, occur primarily in Central and South America, Madagascar, New Zealand,…

  • temnospondyl (fossil amphibian subclass)

    amphibian: Annotated classification: …within the superorder Lepospondyli, and Temnospondylia and Lissamphibia are listed as separate subclasses. Groups indicated by a dagger (?) are known only from fossils.

  • Temnospondyli (fossil amphibian subclass)

    amphibian: Annotated classification: …within the superorder Lepospondyli, and Temnospondylia and Lissamphibia are listed as separate subclasses. Groups indicated by a dagger (?) are known only from fossils.

  • Temnothorax (insect genus)

    ant: …Protomognathus americanus raid nests of Temnothorax ants, stealing the latter’s pupae. The pupae are raised by P. americanus to serve as slaves, and, because the Temnothorax pupae become imprinted on the chemical odour of the slave-making ants, the captive ants forage and routinely return to the slave-making ant nest.

  • Temora (poem by Macpherson)

    James Macpherson: …Language (1760), Fingal (1762), and Temora (1763), claiming that much of their content was based on a 3rd-century Gaelic poet, Ossian. No Gaelic manuscripts date back beyond the 10th century. The authenticity of Ossian was supported by Blair, looked on with skepticism by the Scottish philosopher David Hume, admired with…

  • Temora (New South Wales, Australia)

    Temora, town, south-central New South Wales, Australia. It lies in the Western Slopes district of the fertile Riverina area. Founded in 1879 during a gold rush, the town derives its name from a Gaelic term meaning “an eminence commanding a wide view”; it was the name of a land claim established

  • Tempe (Arizona, United States)

    Tempe, city, Maricopa county, south-central Arizona, U.S. It lies along the Salt River and is a southern suburb of Phoenix. First settled (1872) by Charles Hayden, father of former Arizona senator Carl Hayden, it was called Hayden’s Ferry until renamed in 1880 for the Vale of Tempe, Greece. It is

  • Tempe, Vale of (valley, Greece)

    Vale of Tempe, narrow valley between the southern Olympus (Modern Greek: ólympos) and northern Ossa (Kíssavos or óssa) massifs of northeastern Thessaly (Thessalía), Greece. The valley is lined by cliffs that rise to 1,650 feet (500 m) on the south; in places it is only 90 to 165 feet (27 to 50 m)

  • Tempel 1 (comet)

    comet: Spacecraft exploration of comets: …spacecraft that would fly by Comet 9P/Tempel 1 and a daughter spacecraft that would be deliberately crashed into the comet nucleus. The mother spacecraft would take images of the impact. The daughter spacecraft contained its own camera system to image the nucleus surface up to the moment of impact. To…

  • Tempel-Tuttle Comet (astronomy)

    meteor shower: …period of its associated comet, Tempel-Tuttle), and occasional records of its appearances have been traced back to about ad 902. Since about 1945, radar observations have revealed meteor showers regularly occurring in the daylight sky, where they are invisible to the eye.

  • Tempelhof (area, Berlin, Germany)

    Tempelhof, area of Berlin, Germany. It is the site of an airport that became well known during the Soviet blockade of West Berlin (1948–49; see Berlin blockade and airlift); the airport was enlarged to serve as the main terminus for regular Allied airlifts of supplies. A statue commemorating the

  • Tempelhof Central Airport (airport, Berlin, Germany)

    airport: Evolution of airports: (Le Bourget), and Berlin (Tempelhof) were laid out on sites close to the city centres. Because even transport aircraft of the period were relatively light, paved runways were a rarity. Croydon, Tempelhof, and Le Bourget, for example, all operated from grass strips only. Early airports were also major centres…

  • Tempels, Placide (Belgian missionary)

    Bantu philosophy: …1945 by the Belgian missionary Placide Tempels, that popularized the notion of Bantu philosophy in Africa and in the West. That small book generated much controversy that played an important role in the development of contemporary African philosophy and inculturation theology. The merit of Tempels’s Bantu Philosophy resides not in…

  • tempera painting

    Tempera painting, painting executed with pigment ground in a water-miscible medium. The word tempera originally came from the verb temper, “to bring to a desired consistency.” Dry pigments are made usable by “tempering” them with a binding and adhesive vehicle. Such painting was distinguished from

  • temperament (music)

    Tuning and temperament, in music, the adjustment of one sound source, such as a voice or string, to produce a desired pitch in relation to a given pitch, and the modification of that tuning to lessen dissonance. The determination of pitch, the quality of sound that is described as ‘high” or “low,”

  • temperament (personality)

    Temperament, in psychology, an aspect of personality concerned with emotional dispositions and reactions and their speed and intensity; the term often is used to refer to the prevailing mood or mood pattern of a person. The notion of temperament in this sense originated with Galen, the Greek

  • Temperance Brennan (fictional character)

    Kathy Reichs: …the main character, forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan, from the earlier manuscript. In Brennan, Reichs created a memorable protagonist whose professional life paralleled her own. She gave meticulous accounts of Brennan’s forensic investigations, details of which she sometimes culled from her own lab work. Scribner, the first publisher to receive the…

  • temperance movement (social history)

    Temperance movement, movement dedicated to promoting moderation and, more often, complete abstinence in the use of intoxicating liquor (see alcohol consumption). Although an abstinence pledge had been introduced by churches as early as 1800, the earliest temperance organizations seem to have been

  • Temperantia Dish (pewter by Briot)

    metalwork: 16th century to modern: …most famous piece is the Temperantia Dish, which takes its name from the allegorical figure of Temperance or Temperantia that appears in the centre of it. It dates from 1585–90.

  • temperate bass (fish)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Moronidae (temperate basses) Eocene to present. 2 dorsal fins connected at their bases. Most species slim-looking basses; well-known food and game fishes such as striped bass and white basses of the genus Morone. Some species anadromous. Weight to 50 kg (about 110 pounds) in striped bass.…

  • temperate climate (meteorology)

    South America: Temperate climates: The temperate climates have a greater range of temperatures than the tropical climates and may include extreme climatic variations. Those climates, characterized by lower winter temperatures, are south of the Tropic of Capricorn (in Paraguay, parts of Bolivia, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile) and…

  • temperate deciduous forest (ecology)

    temperate forest: Deciduous forests are found in regions of the Northern Hemisphere that have moist, warm summers and frosty winters—primarily eastern North America, eastern Asia, and western Europe. In contrast, evergreen forests—excepting boreal forests, which are covered in boreal forest—typically grow in areas with mild, nearly frost-free…

  • temperate desert

    desert: Environment: cold deserts occur in temperate regions at higher latitudes—and therefore colder temperatures—than those at which hot deserts are found. These dry environments are caused by either remoteness from the coast, which results in low atmospheric humidity from a lack of onshore winds, or the presence…

  • temperate evergreen forest (botany)

    temperate forest: Flora: The milder environments that support temperate evergreen forests generally lie closer to the Equator than do areas with temperate deciduous forest. They have richer biotas than the sclerophyllous or deciduous forests that grow in more stressful environments at similar latitudes, although they are less rich than the tropical rainforests where…

  • temperate forest (ecology)

    Temperate forest, vegetation type with a more or less continuous canopy of broad-leaved trees. Such forests occur between approximately 25° and 50° latitude in both hemispheres (see Figure 1). Toward the polar regions they grade into boreal forests, which are dominated by evergreen conifers, so

  • temperate glacier

    glacier: Mass balance: …of temperate ice; and a temperate glacier is at the melting temperature throughout its mass, but surface freezing occurs in winter. A polar or subpolar glacier may be frozen to its bed (cold-based), or it may be at the melting temperature at the bed (warm-based).

  • temperate grassland (geography)

    grassland: Origin: …tropical forest and desert; and temperate grasslands, which generally lie between deserts and temperate forests. Tropical grasslands occur in the same regions as savannas, and the distinction between these two vegetation types is rather arbitrary, depending on whether there are few or many trees. Likewise, temperate grasslands may have a…

  • temperate ocean bass (fish)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Acropomatidae (temperate ocean basses) Rare deepwater marine species similar to scombropids; anus located anteriorly from normal position at front of anal fin. Light organs present; midwater depths of 300–500 metres (1,000–1,650 feet). 8 genera, about 34 species; Atlantic and Indo-Pacific. Family Symphysanodontidae Deepwater marine species sometimes…

  • temperate phage (virus)

    episome: Some bacterial viruses, called temperate phages, carry DNA that can act as an episome. A bacterial cell into whose chromosome the viral DNA has become integrated is called a prophage. See lysogeny.

  • temperate rain climate

    K?ppen climate classification: Type C and D climates: Through a major portion of the middle and high latitudes (mostly from 25° to 70° N and S) lies a group of climates classified within the K?ppen scheme as C and D types. Most of these regions lie beneath the upper-level,…

  • temperate rain forest (botany)

    temperate forest: Flora: The milder environments that support temperate evergreen forests generally lie closer to the Equator than do areas with temperate deciduous forest. They have richer biotas than the sclerophyllous or deciduous forests that grow in more stressful environments at similar latitudes, although they are less rich than the tropical rainforests where…

  • temperate rainforest (botany)

    temperate forest: Flora: The milder environments that support temperate evergreen forests generally lie closer to the Equator than do areas with temperate deciduous forest. They have richer biotas than the sclerophyllous or deciduous forests that grow in more stressful environments at similar latitudes, although they are less rich than the tropical rainforests where…

  • temperate virus (infectious agent)

    virus: The cycle of infection: …viruses, particularly bacteriophages, are called temperate (or latent) because the infection does not immediately result in cell death. The viral genetic material remains dormant or is actually integrated into the genome of the host cell. Cells infected with temperate viruses are called lysogenic because the cells tend to be broken…

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