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  • Telesphorus, Saint (pope)

    Saint Telesphorus, ; feast day January 5), pope from about 125 to about 136. Telesphorus is said to have been a Greek, possibly from Calabria. Successor to St. Sixtus I, he was the eighth pope and a witness to the persecution of Christians by the Roman emperor Hadrian. He is considered the first

  • Telestacea (invertebrate order)

    cnidarian: Annotated classification: Order Telestacea Long axial polyps bear lateral polyps. Skeleton of spicules fused with a horny material. Tropical. Order Gorgonacea Sea fans and sea whips. Colonies commonly arborescent with axial skeleton of gorgonin and/or calcareous spicules. Polyps rarely dimorphic. Tropical and subtropical. Order

  • Telesterion (ancient building, Greece)

    Ictinus: …rebuilding and enlargement of the Telestrion hall at the temple to Demeter and Persephone at Eleusis in collaboration with Coroebus, Metagenes, and Xenocles. The Telestrion hall, where the Eleusinian Mysteries were performed, was a square hall with rock-cut seats. Ictinus probably worked at Eleusis about 430 bc, sometime after he…

  • Telesto (astronomy)

    Saturn: Orbital and rotational dynamics: Instead, Tethys’s two co-orbiters, Telesto and Calypso, are located at the stable Lagrangian points along Tethys’s orbit, leading and following Tethys by 60°, respectively, analogous to the Trojan asteroids in Jupiter’s orbit. Dione’s Trojan-like companions, Helene and Polydeuces, lead and follow it by 60°, respectively, on average.

  • telesurgery (medicine)

    robotic surgery: Historical developments: …concept of remote surgery, or telesurgery, was explored in the 1970s by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which was interested in its application for astronauts in orbit. The basic idea was that a machine equipped with surgical instruments could be located on a space station and controlled…

  • teletext (communications)

    television: Teletext: Although relatively unknown in North America, teletext is routine throughout Europe. Teletext uses the vertical blanking interval (see the section The picture signal: Wave form) to send text and simple graphic information for display on the picture screen. The information is organized into pages…

  • teletherapy (medical procedure)

    cancer: Radiation therapy: Teletherapy, or external radiation therapy, uses a device such as a clinical linear accelerator to deliver orthovoltage or supervoltage radiation at a distance from the patient. The energy beam can be modified to adapt the dose distribution to the volume of tissue being irradiated.

  • Teléthrion Mountain (mountain, Euboea, Greece)

    Euboea: … (3,251 feet [991 metres]) and Teléthrion Mountain (3,182 feet [970 metres]). From Teléthrion the range trends eastward to the coast. In the centre of the island rises Dhírfis Mountain (5,715 feet [1,742 metres]), while in the south óchi Mountain reaches 4,587 feet (1,398 metres). The east coast is rocky and…

  • teletriage (medical consultation)

    telemedicine: …specialized uses of telemedicine include teletriage, telesurgery and telediagnostics, and telecollaboration. Teletriage is a specialized type of teleconsultation that is applied to military scenarios in which a military physician receives online health advice from a remote medical expert. In telesurgery and telediagnostics, local and remote physicians share the same virtual…

  • Teletskoye, Lake (lake, Russia)

    Asia: Lakes: …furthermore, encircled by lava, and Lake Telets was gouged out by ancient glaciation. A number of lakes were formed as the result of landslides (Lake Sarez in the Pamirs), karst processes (the lakes of the western Taurus, in Turkey), or the formation of lava dams (Lake Jingpo in northeastern China…

  • telettrofono (telecommunication device)

    telephone: Early sound transmitters: …devices in his home called telettrofoni that he used to communicate between rooms, though he did not patent his inventions. By 1861 Johann Philipp Reis of Germany had designed several instruments for the transmission of sound. The transmitter Reis employed consisted of a membrane with a metallic strip that would…

  • Teletubbies (British television show)

    Teletubbies, British children’s television show featuring the carefree lives of four colourful, childlike creatures. The Teletubbies, portrayed by costumed actors, were soft, round humanoids of toddlerlike proportions, with simple, smiling faces, uniquely shaped aerial antennas on their heads,

  • Teletype (instrument)

    Teleprinter, any of various telegraphic instruments that transmit and receive printed messages and data via telephone cables or radio relay systems. Teleprinters became the most common telegraphic instruments shortly after entering commercial use in the 1920s. They were used by operators in local

  • Teletype Corporation (American company)

    teleprinter: In 1924 the Teletype Corporation introduced a series of teletypewriters which were so popular that the name Teletype became synonymous with teleprinters in the United States.

  • Teletypesetter (device)

    printing: Automatic composition (perforated tape): The Teletypesetter (TTS) system extends to slugcasting machines the principle of separation of function originally characteristic of the Monotype: it enables Linotype or Intertype machines to be controlled by a perforated tape produced on a separate keyboard, even situated in a different city, since the combination…

  • teletypewriter (instrument)

    Teleprinter, any of various telegraphic instruments that transmit and receive printed messages and data via telephone cables or radio relay systems. Teleprinters became the most common telegraphic instruments shortly after entering commercial use in the 1920s. They were used by operators in local

  • Teletypewriter Exchange Service (American telecommunication system)

    telegraph: Printing telegraphs: In 1932 AT&T inaugurated the Teletypewriter Exchange Service (TWX), a switched teleprinter network. Switching was accomplished manually until it was automated after World War II. In Europe a similar service called Telex was inaugurated in the early 1930s and was partially automated in Germany before World War II. In 1962…

  • teleutospore (biology)

    Teliospore, in fungi (kingdom Fungi), a thick-walled, winter or resting spore of rust fungi (phylum Basidiomycota) borne in a fruiting structure (telium) from which a club-shaped structure (basidium) is

  • televangelism (Christianity)

    Televangelism, Evangelism through religious programs on television. Such programs are usually hosted by a fundamentalist Protestant minister, who conducts services and often asks for donations. Billy Graham became known worldwide through his TV specials from the 1950s on. Other prominent

  • Television (American rock group)

    Television, American rock group that played a prominent role in the emergence of the punk–new-wave movement. With Television’s first single, “Little Johnny Jewel” (1975), and much-touted debut album, Marquee Moon (1977), the extended guitar solo found a place in a movement that generally rebelled

  • television (broadcasting)

    advertisement: …radio in the 1920s and television in the 1940s, and advertisements became more influential and complex, often based on the results of motivational research. In the second half of the 20th century, television was rivaled only by periodicals as the most popular medium for advertisements, which had so pervaded modern…

  • Television and Infra-Red Observation Satellite (United States weather satellite)

    TIROS, any of a series of U.S. meteorological satellites, the first of which was launched on April 1, 1960. The TIROS satellites comprised the first worldwide weather observation system. Equipped with specially designed miniature television cameras, infrared detectors, and videotape recorders, they

  • television camera

    television: Television cameras and displays: The television camera is a device that employs light-sensitive image sensors to convert an optical image into a sequence of electrical signals—in other words, to generate the primary components of the picture signal. The first sensors were mechanical…

  • television camera tube (instrument)

    television: Camera image sensors: Electronic camera tubes were one of the major inventions that led to the ultimate technological success of television. Today they have been replaced in most cameras by smaller, cheaper solid-state imagers such as charge-coupled devices. Nevertheless, they firmly established the principle of line scanning (introduced by…

  • television image

    television: Bandwidth requirements: The quality and quantity of television service are limited fundamentally by the rate at which it is feasible to transmit the picture information over the television channel. If, as is stated above, the televised image is dissected, within a few hundredths of a second, into approximately 200,000 pixels, then the…

  • television in the United States

    Television in the United States, the body of television programming created and broadcast in the United States. American TV programs, like American popular culture in general in the 20th and early 21st centuries, have spread far beyond the boundaries of the United States and have had a pervasive

  • Television Information Office (American organization)

    National Association of Broadcasters: Role in establishing industry guidelines: …1950s, the NAB organized the Television Information Office (TIO) to supply the public with positive information about the industry. As its first act, the TIO commissioned the Roper Survey to gauge public reaction to the scandals. In addition to publishing the survey report, the TIO developed television study guides for…

  • Television New Zealand Ltd.
  • television picture

    television: Bandwidth requirements: The quality and quantity of television service are limited fundamentally by the rate at which it is feasible to transmit the picture information over the television channel. If, as is stated above, the televised image is dissected, within a few hundredths of a second, into approximately 200,000 pixels, then the…

  • television picture tube (instrument)

    television: Picture tubes: A typical television screen is located inside a slightly curved glass plate that closes the wide end, or face, of a highly evacuated, funnel-shaped CRT. Picture tubes vary widely in size and are usually measured diagonally across the tube face. Tubes…

  • television program

    Television in the United States: Overview: …Lucille Ball, but such high-quality programs were the exception; most of television during its formative years could be aptly described, as it was by one Broadway playwright, as “amateurs playing at home movies.” The underlying problem was not a shortage of talented writers, producers, and performers; there were plenty, but…

  • television program rating system (United States)

    Television in the United States: Conglomerates and codes: …with the introduction of a program ratings code and a requirement that all new television sets be equipped with a violent-program-blocking device known as a V-chip. Ratings codes were required to appear on the screen for 15 seconds at the beginning of each show: TV-Y designated appropriateness for all children;…

  • television receiver (instrument)

    television: Reception: At the television receiver the sound and picture carrier waves are picked up by the receiving antenna, producing currents that are identical in form to those flowing in the transmitter antenna but much weaker. These currents are conducted from the antenna to the receiver by a lead-in…

  • television rock (mineral)

    Ulexite, borate mineral, NaCaB5O6(ΟH)6·5H2O, that consists of hydrated sodium and calcium borate. Individual crystals are colourless and have a vitreous lustre, whereas the more common nodular, rounded, or lenslike crystal aggregates (often resembling cotton balls) are white and have a silky or

  • television serial (broadcasting)

    Soap opera, broadcast dramatic serial program, so called in the United States because most of its major sponsors for many years were manufacturers of soap and detergents. The soap opera is characterized by a permanent cast of actors, a continuing story, emphasis on dialogue instead of action, a

  • television set (instrument)

    television: Reception: At the television receiver the sound and picture carrier waves are picked up by the receiving antenna, producing currents that are identical in form to those flowing in the transmitter antenna but much weaker. These currents are conducted from the antenna to the receiver by a lead-in…

  • television technology

    Television (TV), the electronic delivery of moving images and sound from a source to a receiver. By extending the senses of vision and hearing beyond the limits of physical distance, television has had a considerable influence on society. Conceived in the early 20th century as a possible medium for

  • television tube (instrument)

    television: Picture tubes: A typical television screen is located inside a slightly curved glass plate that closes the wide end, or face, of a highly evacuated, funnel-shaped CRT. Picture tubes vary widely in size and are usually measured diagonally across the tube face. Tubes…

  • telex (communications)

    Telex, international message-transfer service consisting of a network of teleprinters connected by a system of switched exchanges. Subscribers to a telex service can exchange textual communications and data directly and securely with one another. Communication is opened by entering the assigned

  • Telford (England, United Kingdom)

    Telford, new town and urban area (from 2011 built-up area), Telford and Wrekin unitary authority, geographic and historic county of Shropshire, western England. It lies north and east of the hill of the Wrekin, which has an elevation of 1,335 feet (407 metres). Dawley, now part of Telford, was

  • Telford and Wrekin (unitary authority, England, United Kingdom)

    Telford and Wrekin, unitary authority, geographic and historic county of Shropshire, west-central England, in the east-central part of the county. The unitary authority, drained in the south by the River Severn, is a plain covered by glacial drift soils in the north. Historically important

  • Telford, Thomas (Scottish engineer)

    Thomas Telford, versatile Scottish civil engineer whose crowning achievement was the design and construction (1819–26) of the Menai Bridge in Wales. Telford began his career as a mason and educated himself to become an architect. In 1786 he was appointed surveyor of public works for Shropshire, a

  • telharmonium (musical instrument)

    Telharmonium, earliest musical instrument to generate sound electrically. It was invented in the United States by Thaddeus Cahill and introduced in 1906. The electrophonic instrument was of the electromechanical type, and it used rotating electromagnetic generators (and thus was a predecessor of t

  • Telicomys gigantissimus (fossil rodent)

    pacarana: For example, Telicomys gigantissimus, from the Late Miocene Epoch (11.2 million to 5.3 million years ago) of Argentina, was about the size of a small rhinoceros, and another, of the genus Eumegamys, matched a hippopotamus in size.

  • Télimélé (Guinea)

    Télimélé, town, western Guinea. It is situated at the junction of trade routes from Kindia, Pita, Gaoual, and Boké. A trading centre (cattle, rice, millet, and oranges) for the Muslim Fulani (Peul) people of the Fouta Djallon plateau, it is also a regional collecting point for livestock sent to the

  • Telingana (state, India)

    Telangana, constituent state of south-central India. It is bordered by the states of Maharashtra to the north, Chhattisgarh and Odisha to the northeast, Andhra Pradesh to the southeast and south, and Karnataka to the west. The area of what is now Telangana constituted the north-central and

  • telinite (maceral)

    coal: Macerals: , telinite (the brighter parts of vitrinite that make up cell walls) and collinite (clear vitrinite that occupies the spaces between cell walls).

  • teliospore (biology)

    Teliospore, in fungi (kingdom Fungi), a thick-walled, winter or resting spore of rust fungi (phylum Basidiomycota) borne in a fruiting structure (telium) from which a club-shaped structure (basidium) is

  • Telipinu (Anatolian god)

    Anatolian religion: The pantheon: Telipinu was another son of the weather god and had similar attributes. He was a central figure in the Hittite myths.

  • Telipinus (Hittite king)

    Telipinus, last king of the Hittite Old Kingdom in Anatolia (reigned c. 1525–c. 1500 bc). Telipinus seized the throne during a dynastic power struggle, and during his reign he attempted to end lawlessness and to regulate the royal succession. His stipulations, now called the Edict of Telipinus,

  • Telipinus (king of Aleppo)

    Anatolia: The Hittite empire to c. 1180 bce: …his capital, leaving his son Telipinus, known as Telipinus the Priest, to arrange the defense of the Syrian provinces. His task may have been complicated by a new situation that had arisen in the remnants of the Mitannian state. The Mitannian king, Tushratta, was assassinated, and his successor, King Artatama,…

  • Telipinus the Priest (king of Aleppo)

    Anatolia: The Hittite empire to c. 1180 bce: …his capital, leaving his son Telipinus, known as Telipinus the Priest, to arrange the defense of the Syrian provinces. His task may have been complicated by a new situation that had arisen in the remnants of the Mitannian state. The Mitannian king, Tushratta, was assassinated, and his successor, King Artatama,…

  • Telipinus, Edict of (ancient document)

    Labarnas I: …later Hittite text called the Edict of Telipinus, which states that from his capital, Kussara, in central Anatolia, Labarnas extended his territory south to the Mediterranean coast and installed his sons as governors in a number of conquered cities, such as Tuwanuwa, Hupisna, Landa, and Lusna (perhaps the classical Tyana,…

  • Telkes, Mária (American physical chemist and biophysicist)

    Mária Telkes, Hungarian-born American physical chemist and biophysicist best known for her invention of the solar distiller and the first solar-powered heating system designed for residences. She also invented other devices capable of storing energy captured from sunlight. Telkes, daughter of

  • Tell (region, North Africa)

    Algeria: Land: …northernmost, generally known as the Tell, is subject to the moderating influences of the Mediterranean and consists largely of the Atlas Mountains, which separate the coastal plains from the second region in the south. This southern region, almost entirely desert, forms the majority of the country’s territory and is situated…

  • tell (mound)

    Tell, (“hill” or “small elevation”), in Middle Eastern archaeology, a raised mound marking the site of an ancient city. For specific sites, see under substantive word (e.g., ?asi, Tel). The shape of a tell is generally that of a low truncated cone. In ancient times, houses were constructed of

  • Tell Ahmar (ancient city, Iraq)

    Mesopotamian art and architecture: Painting and decorative arts: …bce), a country palace at Til Barsip (modern Tall al-Ahmar) was decorated in this way, with the conventional motifs of relief designs rather clumsily adapted to this very different medium. A few years later, such paintings were extensively used to decorate both wall faces and ceilings in Sargon II’s palace…

  • Tell Atlas (mountains, Africa)

    Tell Atlas, range of the Atlas Mountains in North Africa, extending about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) from eastern Morocco through Algeria to Tunisia. In Morocco, from Ceuta east to Melilla (150 miles [240 km]), the Er-Rif mountain range of the Tell Atlas faces the Mediterranean Sea, and there, as a

  • Tell Beit Mirsim (ancient city, West Bank)

    Kiriath-sepher, ancient town of Palestine, located near Hebron in the West Bank. According to the Bible, the town was taken from the Canaanites either by Caleb’s son-in-law Othniel or by Joshua himself. Tall Bayt Mirsham (Tell Beit Mirsim) was excavated (1926–32) by W.F. Albright, who uncovered

  • Tell el-Amarna style

    Amarna style, revolutionary style of Egyptian art created by Amenhotep IV, who took the name Akhenaton during his reign (1353–36 bce) in the 18th dynasty. Akhenaton’s alteration of the artistic and religious life of ancient Egypt was drastic, if short-lived. His innovations were centred upon a new

  • Tell Freedom: Memories of Africa (memoir by Abrahams)

    Peter Abrahams: He also wrote the memoirs Tell Freedom: Memories of Africa (1954; new ed. 1970) and The Coyaba Chronicles: Reflections on the Black Experience in the 20th Century (2000).

  • Tell Leilan (Syria)

    Shubat Enlil, ancient city in northeastern Syria. Excavations of the mound at the site were begun by Harvey Weiss of Yale University in 1979. His work uncovered archaeological remains dating from about 5000 bc to 1726 bc, when the once-flourishing city was destroyed by Babylon. Shubat Enlil was the

  • Tell Mama (song by Carter)

    soul music: …Shoals, Alabama, to record “Tell Mama” (1967), one of the decade’s enduring soul anthems, written by singer and songwriter Clarence Carter. Percy Sledge’s supersmooth “When a Man Loves a Woman” (1966), recorded in nearby Sheffield, became the first Southern soul song to reach number one on the pop charts.

  • Tell Me a Riddle: A Collection (work by Olsen)

    Tillie Olsen: Major period: …title story for the collection Tell Me a Riddle (1961). After a Ford Foundation grant, she won a fellowship (1962–64) to Radcliffe College. Her 1963 Radcliffe seminar talk explaining how talents can be thwarted coincided with the publication of Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique and helped inform the women’s movement.…

  • Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon (film by Preminger [1970])

    Otto Preminger: Later films: …were followed by the offbeat Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon (1970), a fable about love and friendship. Liza Minnelli gave one of her most acclaimed nonmusical performances as a young woman who is disfigured by her boyfriend; at the hospital she meets several patients, and they move…

  • Tell Morning This (novel by Tennant)

    Kylie Tennant: …Ride On, Stranger (1943), and Tell Morning This (1967)—Tennant lived in poor areas of the city and took jobs ranging from social worker to barmaid. In preparation for The Battlers (1941), about migrant workers, Tennant traveled for months with the unemployed along the roads of Australia, and several years later…

  • Tell, Wilhelm (Swiss hero)

    William Tell, Swiss legendary hero who symbolized the struggle for political and individual freedom. The historical existence of Tell is disputed. According to popular legend, he was a peasant from Bürglen in the canton of Uri in the 13th and early 14th centuries who defied Austrian authority, was

  • Tell, William (Swiss hero)

    William Tell, Swiss legendary hero who symbolized the struggle for political and individual freedom. The historical existence of Tell is disputed. According to popular legend, he was a peasant from Bürglen in the canton of Uri in the 13th and early 14th centuries who defied Austrian authority, was

  • Tell-Tale Heart, The (story by Poe)

    The Tell-Tale Heart, short Gothic horror story by Edgar Allan Poe, published in The Pioneer in 1843. Poe’s tale of murder and terror, told by a nameless homicidal madman, influenced later stream-of-consciousness fiction and helped secure the author’s reputation as master of the macabre. The

  • Tellado López, María del Socorro (Spanish romance novelist)

    Corín Tellado, (María del Socorro Tellado López), Spanish romance novelist (born April 25, 1927, Viavélez, Spain—died April 11, 2009, Gijón, Spain), produced more than 4,000 popular romance novellas that were widely read in both Spain and Latin America; many were turned into radio and television

  • Tellado, Corín (Spanish romance novelist)

    Corín Tellado, (María del Socorro Tellado López), Spanish romance novelist (born April 25, 1927, Viavélez, Spain—died April 11, 2009, Gijón, Spain), produced more than 4,000 popular romance novellas that were widely read in both Spain and Latin America; many were turned into radio and television

  • Telleli, Carmen Orlando (American boxer)

    Joey Giardello, (Carmine Orlando Tilelli), American boxer (born July 16, 1930, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Sept. 4, 2008, Cherry Hill, N.J.), as undisputed world middleweight champion (1963–65), defended his title with a win by unanimous decision on Dec. 14, 1964, against Rubin (“Hurricane”) Carter and

  • Tellem (people)

    African art: Dogon and Tellem: …to an earlier population, the Tellem. These figures, usually of simplified and elongated form, often with hands raised, seem to be the prototype of the ancestor figures that the Dogon carve on the doors and locks of their houses and granaries; investigations have confirmed that the Tellem were ethnically a…

  • tellem figure (devotional image)

    Telum figure, small, devotional image carved from wood or stone, probably used in private rather than communal ancestor worship in primitive societies. Telum figures are known on the northwestern coast of New Guinea and in the Dogon art of Sudan. Extant examples from both regions are rare, probably

  • Teller Resolution (United States [1898])

    United States: The new American empire: By the so-called Teller Amendment to the war resolution, Congress had declared that the United States would not annex Cuba. This pledge was kept, although Cuba was forced in 1903 to sign a treaty making it virtually a protectorate of the United States. The Hawaiian Islands, annexed by…

  • Teller, Ede (American physicist)

    Edward Teller, Hungarian-born American nuclear physicist who participated in the production of the first atomic bomb (1945) and who led the development of the world’s first thermonuclear weapon, the hydrogen bomb. Teller was from a family of prosperous Hungarian Jews. After attending schools in

  • Teller, Edward (American physicist)

    Edward Teller, Hungarian-born American nuclear physicist who participated in the production of the first atomic bomb (1945) and who led the development of the world’s first thermonuclear weapon, the hydrogen bomb. Teller was from a family of prosperous Hungarian Jews. After attending schools in

  • Teller, Y. L. (American poet and journalist)

    Yiddish literature: Writers in New York: Y.L. Teller is another major American Yiddish poet and journalist who expressed the turbulence of his age. Younger than the founders of Introspectivism, he began writing in a dreamy, Symbolist mode. His early books Simboln (1930; “Symbols”) and Minyaturn (1934; “Miniatures”) emphasize the self and…

  • Teller, Yehuda Leyb (American poet and journalist)

    Yiddish literature: Writers in New York: Y.L. Teller is another major American Yiddish poet and journalist who expressed the turbulence of his age. Younger than the founders of Introspectivism, he began writing in a dreamy, Symbolist mode. His early books Simboln (1930; “Symbols”) and Minyaturn (1934; “Miniatures”) emphasize the self and…

  • Teller-Ulam configuration (physics)

    Edward Teller: …and a device using the Teller-Ulam configuration, as it is now known, was successfully tested at Enewetak atoll in the Pacific on Nov. 1, 1952; it yielded an explosion equivalent to 10 million tons (10 megatons) of TNT.

  • Telles, Lygia Fagundes (Brazilian author)

    Brazilian literature: The short story: …of the 20th century are Lygia Fagundes Telles, whose tales of women trapped in meaningless relationships sometimes take the form of political allegory, as in the collection Seminário dos ratos (1977; “Seminar of Rats”; Eng. trans. Tigrela and Other Stories); Sérgio Sant’Anna, a novelist whose stories in O concerto de…

  • Téllez, Gabriel (Spanish dramatist)

    Tirso de Molina, one of the outstanding dramatists of the Golden Age of Spanish literature. Tirso studied at the University of Alcalá and in 1601 was professed in the Mercedarian Order. As the order’s official historian he wrote Historia general de la orden de la Merced in 1637. He was also a

  • Tellicherry (India)

    Thalassery, town and port, northern Kerala state, southwestern India. It is situated on the Malabar Coast of the Arabian Sea. The town was established in 1683 by the British for the pepper and cardamom trade, and it was their first settlement on the Malabar Coast. A fort was built there in 1708 and

  • Tellier, Fran?ois-Michel Le, marquis de Louvois (French statesman)

    Fran?ois-Michel Le Tellier, marquis de Louvois, secretary of state for war under Louis XIV of France and his most influential minister in the period 1677–91. He contributed to the reorganization of the French army. Louvois was the son of one of the wealthiest and most powerful officials in France,

  • Tellier, Michel Le (French statesman)

    Michel Le Tellier, secretary of state for war (1643–77) and then chancellor who created the royal army that enabled King Louis XIV to impose his absolute rule on France and establish French hegemony in Europe. The son of a Parisian magistrate, Le Tellier became a procureur (attorney) for King Louis

  • Tellinidae (mollusk)

    bivalve: External features: …brightly coloured, as in the Tellinidae. The shell is laterally compressed and thus more bladelike, but the adductor muscles are still of similar size (the isomyarian form). Such structural features adapt the animal for rapid movement through the sand; long siphons project to the surface above. Deep burrowing has been…

  • Tello obelisk (archaeology)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Chavín monuments and temples: …in which was found the Tello obelisk, a rectangular pillar carved in low relief to represent a caiman and covered with Chavín symbolic carvings, such as bands of teeth and animal heads. This is considered to be an object of worship like the Smiling God and Staff God. Carvings found…

  • Telloh (ancient city, Iraq)

    Lagash, one of the most important capital cities in ancient Sumer, located midway between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in southeastern Iraq. The ancient name of the mound of Telloh was actually Girsu, while Lagash originally denoted a site southeast of Girsu, later becoming the name of the whole

  • telluric current (geophysics)

    Telluric current, natural electric current flowing on and beneath the surface of the Earth and generally following a direction parallel to the Earth’s surface. Telluric currents arise from charges moving to attain equilibrium between regions of differing electric potentials; these differences in p

  • telluric-current method (geophysics)

    Earth exploration: Electrical and electromagnetic methods: …the above techniques is the telluric-current method, in which the electric current variations are measured simultaneously at two stations. Comparison of the data permits determining differences in the apparent resistivity with depth at the two stations.

  • Telluride (Colorado, United States)

    Telluride, town, seat (1883) of San Miguel county, southwestern Colorado, U.S., located on the western flank of the San Juan Mountains at an elevation of 8,750 feet (2,667 metres). Telluride sprang up in 1875 as a mining camp called Columbia and quickly flourished with the discovery of abundant

  • Telluride Film Festival (American film festival)

    Telluride Film Festival, film festival held annually in Telluride, Colo., during Labor Day weekend. Although no movie awards are given, the festival honours various filmmakers and others in the industry. The Telluride Film Festival was first held in 1974, at the Sheridan Opera House. Eventually

  • Telluride Sessions, The (album by Strength in Numbers)

    Béla Fleck: …in America (1989), Fleck recorded The Telluride Sessions (1989), a landmark bluegrass album, with the all-star acoustic group Strength in Numbers. By this time Fleck’s technical proficiency on the banjo and his adventurous musical experimentation had earned him an international following.

  • tellurium (chemical element)

    Tellurium (Te), semimetallic chemical element in the oxygen group (Group 16 [VIa] of the periodic table), closely allied with the element selenium in chemical and physical properties. Tellurium is a silvery white element with properties intermediate between those of metals and nonmetals; it makes

  • Tellus (Roman goddess)

    Tellus, ancient Roman earth goddess. Probably of great antiquity, she was concerned with the productivity of the earth and was later identified with the mother-goddess Cybele. Her temple on the Esquiline Hill dated from about 268 bc. Though she had no special priest, she was honoured in the F

  • Telmatobiinae (amphibian subfamily)

    Anura: Annotated classification: …4 subfamilies: Ceratophryinae (South America), Telmatobiinae (South and Central America, West Indies), Hylodinae (South America), and Leptodactylinae (South America and Central America). Family Myobatrachidae and Limnodynastidae Eocene to present; 8 presacral vertebrae; coccyx free, bicondylar; 21 genera, 110 species; adult length to about 10 cm (4 inches); 2

  • Telmatobius (amphibian genus)

    Lake Titicaca: A large frog (Telmatobius), which may reach a length of nearly a foot, inhabits the shallower regions of the lake.

  • Telmatobius culeus (amphibian)

    Lake Titicaca: A large frog (Telmatobius), which may reach a length of nearly a foot, inhabits the shallower regions of the lake.

  • Telmessus (Turkey)

    Fethiye, town, southwestern Turkey. It lies along a sheltered bay in the eastern part of the Gulf of Fethiye on the Mediterranean Sea that is backed by the western ranges of the Taurus Mountains. Much of the town is new, having been rebuilt after a disastrous earthquake in 1958. Fethiye’s enlarged

  • Telmex SA (Mexican company)

    Telmex SA, company that owns and operates most of Mexico’s telecommunications system. Headquarters are in Mexico City. Telmex provides fixed-line telephony services, including long-distance and international calling and Internet access services. It was established in 1990 following the

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