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  • Tehillim (biblical literature)

    Psalms, book of the Old Testament composed of sacred songs, or of sacred poems meant to be sung. In the Hebrew Bible, Psalms begins the third and last section of the biblical canon, known as the Writings (Hebrew Ketuvim). In the original Hebrew text the book as a whole was not named, although the

  • Tehrān (national capital, Iran)

    Tehrān, the capital city of Iran and the centre of the province (ostān) of Tehrān, located in north-central Iran at the foot of the Elburz mountain range. Since its establishment as the capital city by āghā Mo?ammad Khān more than 200 years ago, Tehrān has grown from a small city to a major

  • Tehrān Conference (World War II)

    Tehrān Conference, (November 28–December 1, 1943), meeting between U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin in Tehrān during World War II. The chief discussion centred on the opening of a “second front” in western Europe.

  • Tehrān, University of (university, Tehrān, Iran)

    Shirin Ebadi: …a half years, from the University of Tehrān (1969). That same year she took an apprenticeship at the Department of Justice and became one of the first women judges in Iran. While serving as a judge, she also earned a doctorate in private law from the University of Tehrān (1971).…

  • Tehreek-e-Insaf (political party, Pakistan)

    Imran Khan: Entry into politics: …founded his own political party, Tehreek-e-Insaf (Justice Movement), in 1996. In national elections held the following year, the newly formed party won less than 1 percent of the vote and failed to win any seats in the National Assembly, but it fared slightly better in the 2002 elections, winning a…

  • Tehri (India)

    Tehri, town, west-central Uttarakhand state, northern India. It lies on the Bhagirathi River, about 25 miles (40 km) east-northeast of Dehra Dun. Formerly the princely state of Tehri, it was merged with the United Provinces (later Uttar Pradesh state) in 1949. The town is an agricultural trade

  • Tehri Dam (dam, India)

    Uttarakhand: Resources and power: The Tehri Dam on the Bhagirathi River, conceived in the mid-20th century and begun in the 1970s, is one of the largest hydroelectric projects in Asia. The project generated considerable controversy, however, and by the end of the first decade of the 21st century, it had…

  • Tehri-Garhwal (India)

    Tehri, town, west-central Uttarakhand state, northern India. It lies on the Bhagirathi River, about 25 miles (40 km) east-northeast of Dehra Dun. Formerly the princely state of Tehri, it was merged with the United Provinces (later Uttar Pradesh state) in 1949. The town is an agricultural trade

  • Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (militant organization, Pakistan)

    Peshawar school massacre: …the massacre was claimed by Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), the Pakistani branch of the Taliban, a militant Islamic movement. TTP leaders sought to justify the massacre as retribution for violent government attacks on its members. In the view of knowledgeable observers, the most probable provocation was Operation Zarb-e-Azb, a government anti-militant…

  • Tehuacán (Mexico)

    Tehuacán, city, southeastern Puebla estado (state), south-central Mexico. It is situated in the Tehuacán valley of the Sierra Madre Oriental, at an elevation of 5,500 feet (1,700 metres). Founded in 1540, Tehuacán is one of the oldest Spanish settlements in Mexico. Its hinterland yields corn

  • Tehuacán Valley (valley, Mexico)

    Mexico: Pre-Columbian Mexico: …archaeological discoveries made in the Tehuacán Valley of Puebla.

  • Tehuantepec, Gulf of (gulf, Mexico)

    Gulf of Tehuantepec, large widemouthed inlet of the Pacific Ocean, forming the southern shore of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, southeastern Mexico. The gulf extends approximately 300 miles (500 km) from Puerto Angel, in southern Oaxaca state, southeastward to Barra del Suchiate, in southeastern

  • Tehuantepec, Isthmus of (isthmus, Mexico)

    Isthmus of Tehuantepec, isthmus in southern Mexico, between the Gulf of Campeche on the Gulf of Mexico to the north, and the Gulf of Tehuantepec on the Pacific Ocean to the south. From gulf to gulf the isthmus is 137 miles (220 km) wide at its narrowest part; and it is 120 miles (193 km) from the

  • Tehuelche (language)

    South American Indian languages: Grammatical characteristics: …Chébero); others, like Ona and Tehuelche, with almost no affixing, are also rare.

  • Tehuelche (people)

    Tehuelche, South American Indians who formerly inhabited the Patagonian plains from the Strait of Magellan to the Negro River. They were divided into northern and southern branches. Each division had its own dialect; the northerners have been classified as horse nomads, the southerners as foot

  • Teiaiagon (Ontario, Canada)

    Toronto: Early settlement: …the Seneca occupied two sites—Teiaiagon, at the mouth of the Humber River, and Ganatsekwyagon, located near the mouth of the Rouge River. However, these sites were abandoned by the Seneca, and the Mississauga (Ojibwa) occupied the area by the end of that century.

  • Teicher, Lou (American pianist)

    Lou Teicher, (Louis Milton Teicher), American pianist (born Aug. 24, 1924, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.—died Aug. 3, 2008, Highlands, N.C.), performed in the 1960s with pianist Arthur Ferrante, and the two (billed as Ferrante & Teicher) became a sensation with their florid renditions on twin pianos of the

  • Teicher, Louis Milton (American pianist)

    Lou Teicher, (Louis Milton Teicher), American pianist (born Aug. 24, 1924, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.—died Aug. 3, 2008, Highlands, N.C.), performed in the 1960s with pianist Arthur Ferrante, and the two (billed as Ferrante & Teicher) became a sensation with their florid renditions on twin pianos of the

  • Teichman, Arthur Murray (American dancing instructor)

    Arthur Murray, American ballroom-dancing instructor and entrepreneur who established a successful mail-order dance-instruction business and, by 1965, more than 350 franchised dance studios, including nearly 50 in foreign countries. The son of an Austrian-born immigrant baker in Manhattan’s East

  • teicoplanin (biochemistry)

    MRSA: Treatment: In addition, the use of teicoplanin, an antibiotic derived from vancomycin, has given rise to teicoplanin-resistant MRSA strains. There are other agents available to treat MRSA infection, though many have limited therapeutic benefit, primarily because of severe side effects. These agents include linezolid, tigecycline, and daptomycin. In some cases, infection…

  • Teide National Park (national park, Spain)

    La Orotava: La Orotava’s valleys reach Teide National Park, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2007. The park is the location of a volcanic crater and Teide Peak, the highest point in Spain. Pop. (2007 est.) mun., 40,644.

  • Teide Peak (mountain, Canary Islands, Spain)

    Teide Peak, volcanic peak at the centre of the island of Tenerife, in the Santa Cruz de Tenerife provincia (province) of the Canary Islands comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), Spain. At 12,198 feet (3,718 metres), it is the highest point on Spanish soil. Teide is the peak atop El Pilón, a

  • Teignbridge (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Teignbridge, district in the south-central part of the administrative and historic county of Devon, southwestern England. It surrounds the valley of the River Teign between Dartmoor and the English Channel. Teignbridge’s varied coastline attracts tourists and retired residents to such communities

  • Teignmouth (England, United Kingdom)

    Teignmouth, town (parish), Teignbridge district, administrative and historic county of Devon, southwestern England. It lies along the north bank of the River Teign estuary where it joins the English Channel. The Saxon settlement of Tegutum was burned by the Danes in 970 and was razed by the French

  • Teiidae (lizard family)

    lizard: Annotated classification: Family Teiidae (racerunners, whiptails, and tegus) Osteoderms absent, supratemporal fossa open. Late Cretaceous to present. New World only, primarily in tropics and subtropics. Great variation in the family, including large terrestrial predators (Tupinambis), large semiaquatic snail eaters (Dracaena), and lacertid-like “racerunners” (Cnemidophorus).

  • Teika (Japanese poet)

    Fujiwara Sadaie, one of the greatest poets of his age and Japan’s most influential poetic theorist and critic until modern times. Fujiwara was the son and poetic heir of the gifted and influential Shunzei (or Toshinari, 1114–1204), compiler of the seventh Imperial anthology of Japanese poetry,

  • Teikoku Gikai (Japanese government)

    Diet, the national legislature of Japan. Under the Meiji Constitution of 1889, the Imperial Diet was established on the basis of two houses with coequal powers. The upper house, the House of Peers (Kizokuin), was almost wholly appointive. Initially, its membership was slightly less than 300, but it

  • teilchron (geology)

    biozone: …and teilzones are biochrons and teilchrons, respectively. Biozone is also used synonymously with the terms zone and range zone in stratigraphy.

  • Teilhard de Chardin, Pierre (French philosopher and paleontologist)

    Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, French philosopher and paleontologist known for his theory that man is evolving, mentally and socially, toward a final spiritual unity. Blending science and Christianity, he declared that the human epic resembles “nothing so much as a way of the Cross.” Various theories

  • Teilhardina magnoliana (fossil primate)

    Miocene Epoch: …a 55-million-year-old tarsier-like creature called Teilhardina magnoliana, is known in the southern United States, but all North American primates died out by the end of the Eocene Epoch (about 33.9 million years ago) as the region’s climate cooled. Elsewhere, the higher primates, especially the apes, underwent a great deal of…

  • teilzone (geology)

    biozone: …animal involved, is called a teilzone. The geological time units corresponding to biozones and teilzones are biochrons and teilchrons, respectively. Biozone is also used synonymously with the terms zone and range zone in stratigraphy.

  • Teimuraz I (king of Georgia)

    Georgian literature: Origins and early development: …personal, though ornate, poetry of King Teimuraz I; among his works is Tsigni da tsameba Ketevan dedoplisa (“The Book and Passion of Queen Saint Ketevan”), a gruesome account of his mother’s martyrdom written in 1625, soon after her death. Less-inspired authors were content to fabricate sequels to Rustaveli’s The Knight…

  • Teirlinck, Herman (Flemish author)

    Herman Teirlinck, Flemish novelist, poet, short-story writer, essayist, and playwright who is considered one of the four or five best modern Flemish writers. His dramas were a notable influence on post-World War I European theatre. Teirlinck’s first book, Verzen (1900), was a volume of poetry, but

  • Teirlinck, Herman Louis-Cesar (Flemish author)

    Herman Teirlinck, Flemish novelist, poet, short-story writer, essayist, and playwright who is considered one of the four or five best modern Flemish writers. His dramas were a notable influence on post-World War I European theatre. Teirlinck’s first book, Verzen (1900), was a volume of poetry, but

  • Teisheba (Armenian god)

    Teishebaini: …a statuette of the god Teisheba, after whom the town was named; numerous examples of gold and silver jewelry; and a particularly rich find of bronze armour and other war gear, including pointed helmets, shields, quivers, and belts. Also found in large quantity were stone seals and beads, carved ivory…

  • Teishebaini (Armenia)

    Teishebaini, ancient Urartian fortified town, located on the hill of Karmirblur, near the city of Yerevan in what is now Armenia. Russian excavations at Teishebaini concentrated on the citadel, which occupied the top of the hill and contained about 150 rooms. Among the most important objects

  • Teishin (Japanese nun)

    Ryōkan: …relationship with a young nun, Teishin, who after his death compiled Hachisu no tsuyu (1835; “Dew on the Lotus”), a collection of his haiku and waka poems. He also executed many pieces of calligraphy that are esteemed for their elegant beauty.

  • Teishitsu to shūkyō no kankei (work by Inoue)

    Inoue Tetsujirō: …the Imperial family and religion, Teishitsu to shūkyō no kankei, in 1890—the year in which the Imperial rescript on education was promulgated, demanding unquestioned acceptance of Imperial will and authority—considerably influenced public opinion. It attacked Christianity and urged the maintenance of Japan’s unique traditions. His most important anti-Christian polemic, however,…

  • Teisias (Greek poet)

    Stesichorus, Greek poet known for his distinctive choral lyric verse on epic themes. His name was originally Teisias, according to the Byzantine lexicon Suda (10th century ad). Stesichorus, which in Greek means “instructor of choruses,” was a byname derived from his professional activity, which he

  • Teispes (king of Persia)

    Teispes, early Achaemenid Persian king (reigned c. 675–c. 640), the forefather of the great kings Darius I and Cyrus II. He was, perhaps, the son of Achaemenes, whose name was given to the Achaemenid dynasty. Teispes ruled the district of Anshan in Elam (north of the Persian Gulf) and tried to m

  • Teisserenc de Bort, Léon-Philippe (French meteorologist)

    Léon Teisserenc de Bort, French meteorologist who discovered the stratosphere, thus paving the way for further study of the upper atmosphere. In 1880 Teisserenc began his career in the meteorological department of the Administrative Centre of National Meteorology in Paris. He journeyed to Africa in

  • Teitelbaum, Alfred (American mathematician and logician)

    Alfred Tarski, Polish-born American mathematician and logician who made important studies of general algebra, measure theory, mathematical logic, set theory, and metamathematics. Tarski completed his education at the University of Warsaw (Ph.D., 1923). He taught in Warsaw until 1939, when he moved

  • Teitelbaum, Moses (American rabbi)

    Moses Teitelbaum, Hungarian-born rabbi (born Nov. 17, 1914, Ujfeherto, Hung.—died April 24, 2006, New York, N.Y.), served from 1979 until his death as the spiritual leader of the Satmar Hasidim, an ultra-Orthodox Jewish sect that increased its membership more than 50% under Teitelbaum’s l

  • Teitelboim, Volodia (Chilean writer and activist)

    Volodia Teitelboim, (Valentín Teitelboim Volosky), Chilean writer and activist (born March 17, 1916, Chillán, Chile—died Jan. 31, 2008, Santiago, Chile), exerted an extraordinary influence on Chilean life as a leading writer, literary critic, and member of the Politburo of the Chilean Communist

  • Teixeira Pinto (Guinea-Bissau)

    Canchungo, town located in northwestern Guinea-Bissau. Canchungo lies between the Cacheu and Mans?a rivers in an area of coastal lowlands and is a major producer of oil-palm vegetable oil for export. It is also a market centre for rice and coconuts grown nearby. The town is connected by road to

  • Teixeira, Pedro (Portuguese explorer)

    Amazon River: Early European exploration: Nearly a century later, Pedro Teixeira went from Belém, Brazil, to Quito, Ecuador, and the region increasingly became known through the explorations of the Portuguese. In 1743 the French naturalist Charles-Marie de La Condamine made a raft trip down the Amazon, during which he made geographic and ethnographic observations…

  • Tejano (people)

    Juan Seguín: …27, 1890, Nuevo Laredo, Mexico), Tejano (Texan of Hispanic descent) revolutionary and politician who helped establish the independence of Texas.

  • Tejano (music)

    Tejano, popular music style fusing Mexican, European, and U.S. influences. Its evolution began in northern Mexico (a variation known as norte?o) and Texas in the mid-19th century with the introduction of the accordion by German, Polish, and Czech immigrants. Distinguished primarily by

  • Tejen (river, Central Asia)

    Harīrūd, river, Central Asia. It rises on the western slopes of the rugged Selseleh-ye Kūh-e Bābā range, an outlier of the Hindu Kush mountains, in central Afghanistan. Flowing west past Chaghcharān and the ancient city of Herāt (whence its name is derived), then north, it forms sections of the

  • Tejen (Turkmenistan)

    Turkmenistan: Turkmen tribes and Russian invasion: …particularly in the town of Tejen, where many Russian settlers and officials were murdered.

  • Tejen Oasis (oasis, Turkmenistan)

    Turkmenistan: Oases: …stretch of the Karakum, the Tejen oasis formed along the Tejen River. Before the construction of the Karakum Canal, only small areas of wheat, barley, and melons could be cultivated because of the scarcity of water. After the oasis was crossed by the canal, however, and the Hauz-Khan Reservoir built,…

  • Tejero, Antonio (Spanish military officer)

    Spain: Transition to democracy: …military coup of Lieutenant Colonel Antonio Tejero, who occupied the Cortes (February 23, 1981) and held the government and the deputies captive for 18 hours. The coup attempt failed, however, because of King Juan Carlos’s resolute support of the democratic constitution. Calvo Sotelo, who was left with the task of…

  • Tejo River (river, Iberian Peninsula)

    Tagus River, longest waterway of the Iberian Peninsula. It rises in the Sierra de Albarracín of eastern Spain, at a point about 90 miles (150 km) from the Mediterranean coast, and flows westward across Spain and Portugal for 626 miles (1,007 km) to empty into the Atlantic Ocean near Lisbon. Its

  • Tejo, Rio (river, Iberian Peninsula)

    Tagus River, longest waterway of the Iberian Peninsula. It rises in the Sierra de Albarracín of eastern Spain, at a point about 90 miles (150 km) from the Mediterranean coast, and flows westward across Spain and Portugal for 626 miles (1,007 km) to empty into the Atlantic Ocean near Lisbon. Its

  • Tejpal temple (temple, Abu, India)

    Abu: Tejpal temple, built about 1200 ce, is known for the delicacy and richness of its carving, especially for that on the underside of its dome. The earlier Vimala Vasahi temple, built about 1031, is simpler and bolder in style. Abu was the headquarters of the…

  • Tejuco (Brazil)

    Diamantina, city, central Minas Gerais estado (state), southeastern Brazil. It lies in the mineral-laden Espinha?o Mountains at 4,140 feet (1,262 metres) above sea level. Formerly called Tejuco, the city has some colonial buildings and a diamond museum. Textile mills, diamond-cutting and

  • Tekahionwake (Canadian Indian poet)

    Pauline Johnson, Canadian Indian poet who celebrated the heritage of her people in poems that had immense appeal in her lifetime. The daughter of a Mohawk chief and an English mother, Johnson began publishing poetry in her teens. Using her Indian name, “Tekahionwake,” she toured Canada, England,

  • Tekakwitha, Catherine (Mohawk saint)

    St. Kateri Tekakwitha, ; canonized October 21, 2012; feast day in the U.S., July 14; feast day in Canada, April 17), the first North American Indian canonized as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. Tekakwitha was the child of a Mohawk father and a Christianized Algonquin mother. At age four she

  • Tekakwitha, St. Kateri (Mohawk saint)

    St. Kateri Tekakwitha, ; canonized October 21, 2012; feast day in the U.S., July 14; feast day in Canada, April 17), the first North American Indian canonized as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. Tekakwitha was the child of a Mohawk father and a Christianized Algonquin mother. At age four she

  • Tekapo, Lake (lake, New Zealand)

    Lake Tekapo, lake in central South Island, New Zealand, occupying 37 square miles (96 square km) of a valley that has been dammed by a moraine (glacial debris). The lake is about 15 miles (24 km) long and 3.5 miles (6 km) wide and drains a 550-square-mile (1,425-square-kilometre) basin. The lake’s

  • Teke (people)

    African art: Lower Congo (Kongo) cultural area: The Teke live on the banks of the Congo River. They are best known for their fetishes, called butti, which serve in the cult of a wide range of supernatural forces sent by the ancestors, who are not worshiped directly. Each figure has its own specific…

  • Teke, Kingdom of (historical kingdom, Africa)

    Kingdom of Anziku, historic African state on and north of the Congo River in the vicinity of Malebo Pool. The Teke people lived on the plateaus of the region from early times. It is not known when they organized as a kingdom, but by 1600 their state was a rival of the Kongo kingdom south of the

  • Tekesh, Mu?ammad ibn (Khwārezm-Shāh ruler)

    Khwārezm-Shāh Dynasty: ?Alā? ad-Dīn Mu?ammad (reigned 1200–20), the penultimate Khwārezm-Shāh, created a short-lived empire that stretched from the borders of India to those of Anatolia. The empire did not endure, however; the Mongol army of Genghis Khan conquered Transoxania in 1220. The last Khwārezm-Shāh, Jalāl ad-Dīn Mingburnu…

  • tekey? (instrument)

    Native American music: Aerophones: …free-reed bamboo instrument called the tekey?, which has a lamella inside the pipe. Although the player’s lips do not touch the lamella, it vibrates when he blows into the pipe. The tekey? is played in pairs; one is considered male, and the other is considered female. The Warao play another…

  • Tekezē River (river, Africa)

    Tekezē River, river, major tributary of the Atbara River, itself a tributary of the Nile. It rises near Lalībela, Ethiopia, and flows in a deep ravine, north and then west, where it forms part of the border between Ethiopia and Eritrea, to enter Sudan below Om Hajer. It joins the Atbara River 35

  • Tekezo River (river, Africa)

    Tekezē River, river, major tributary of the Atbara River, itself a tributary of the Nile. It rises near Lalībela, Ethiopia, and flows in a deep ravine, north and then west, where it forms part of the border between Ethiopia and Eritrea, to enter Sudan below Om Hajer. It joins the Atbara River 35

  • Tekin, Latife (Turkish writer)

    Turkish literature: Modern Turkish literature: …century were Orhan Pamuk and Latife Tekin. In very distinct ways, both expanded the scope of the novel in Turkish and opened up modern Turkish literature to readers in Europe and North America. To a large extent, their differences in social background and gender impelled them toward radically divergent literary…

  • Tekirda? (Turkey)

    Tekirda?, city, European Turkey, on the Sea of Marmara. Probably founded in the 7th century bce as a Greek settlement called Bisanthe, it was renamed Rhaedestus when it became the capital of Thrace in the 1st century bce. Taken by the Ottoman Turks in the second half of the 14th century, it was

  • Tekish (Khwārezm-Shah ruler)

    Iraq: The later ?Abbāsids (1152–1258): …was killed by the Khwārezm-Shah ?Alā? al-Din Tekish (1172–1200), the ruler of the province lying along the lower course of the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River) in Central Asia. When Tekish insisted on greater formal recognition from the caliph a few years later, al-Nā?ir refused, and inconclusive fighting broke out…

  • Tekka?kotā (archaeological site, India)

    India: Earliest settlements in peninsular India: …important sites are Brahmagiri and Tekkalkota in Karnataka and Utnur and Nagarajunikonda in Andhra Pradesh. At Tekkalkota three gold ornaments were excavated, indicating exploitation of local ore deposits, but no other metal objects have been found, suggesting a relative scarcity of metals. These early sites produced distinctive burnished gray pottery,…

  • Tekke (people)

    Turkmenistan: Turkmen tribes and Russian invasion: …ascendancy passed to the Yomuts, Tekkes, Ersaris, and Saryks, who began to move out of the desert into the oases of Khorezm and to the Atrek, Tejen, and Morghāb rivers and to adopt a settled way of life. There was bitter rivalry among the tribes, particularly between the Tekke and…

  • tekke (Islam)

    Zāwiyah, generally, in the Muslim world, a monastic complex, usually the centre or a settlement of a Sufi (mystical) brotherhood. In some Arabic countries the Arabic term zāwiyah is also used for any small private oratory not paid for by community funds. The first North African zāwiyah, dating from

  • Tekke carpet

    Tekke carpet, floor covering woven by the Tekke Turkmen, the major population group of Turkmenistan. Although elements of the tribe still migrated with their flocks until the Soviet era, most of them were sedentary during the 20th century. Their rugs are the most easily identifiable among the

  • Tekken (electronic game)

    electronic fighting game: Three-dimensional fighting games: Although Namco Limited’s Tekken (1994– ) came later, it has lasted through numerous sequels and been ported to most home video consoles. Another long-lasting series is Tecmo, Inc.’s Dead or Alive (1996– ), which is noteworthy for its introduction of a system of countermoves (and counters to counters,…

  • Tekla zone (region, Morocco)

    Tan-Tan: …1912) known variously as the Tekla zone, Tarfaya zone, or Spanish Southern Morocco. This region was returned to Morocco in 1958. It has been the site of warfare between Moroccan troops and the Western Saharan Polisario Front guerrillas; guerrillas raided the town twice in 1979.

  • teknonymy (kinship)

    South American Indian languages: Vocabulary: …parent after a child (called teknonymy) in some Arawakan groups; the repeated change of name according to various fixed stages of development, as in Guayaki; word taboo, forbidding either the pronunciation of one’s own name or the name of a deceased person, or both, as in the southernmost groups (Alacaluf,…

  • tekò-achy (religious concept)

    Native American religions: Prophetic movements and eschatology: …they had been overtaken by tekò-achy, the weight of accumulating imperfections that blot out the light of the sun and weigh humans down so that they are incapable of ecstatic flight into the Land Without Evil.

  • Tekrit (Iraq)

    Tikrīt, city, capital of ?alā? al-Dīn mu?āfa?ah (governorate), north-central Iraq. It lies on the west bank of the Tigris River about 100 miles (160 km) northwest of Baghdad. In the 10th century Tikrīt had a noted fortress and was home to a large Christian monastery. Its wealth at that time derived

  • Tekrur kingdom (historical kingdom, Africa)

    western Africa: The wider influence of the Sudanic kingdoms: …black kingdom evolved, that of Tekrur. Some Fulani participated in this kingdom and became Tukulor—the Tukulor and Fulani languages being practically identical. Some, however, chose not to accept the settled way of life and, to preserve their traditional pastoral and religious customs, migrated eastward over the savanna grasslands. Grazing land…

  • tektite (geology)

    Tektite, any of a class of small, natural glassy objects that are found only in certain areas of the Earth’s surface. The term is derived from the Greek word tēktos, meaning “melted,” or “molten.” Tektites have been the subject of intense scientific scrutiny throughout much of the 20th century

  • Tektite II (oceanography project)

    Sylvia Earle: …aquanauts as part of the Tektite II experiment, a project designed to explore the marine realm and test the viability of deepwater habitats and the health effects of prolonged living in underwater structures. The habitat was located about 15 metres (about 50 feet) below the surface of Great Lameshur Bay…

  • Tektiteko (Mayan language)

    Mesoamerican Indian languages: The classification and status of Mesoamerican languages: It is clear that the Huastecan branch was the first to separate off from the rest of the family. Next Yucatecan branched off, and then later the remaining Core Mayan separated into distinct branches. It appears that Cholan-Tzeltalan and Greater…

  • TEL (chemical compound)

    Tetraethyl lead (TEL), organometallic compound containing the toxic metal lead that for much of the 20th century was the chief antiknock agent for automotive gasoline, or petrol. Beginning in the 1970s, “leaded gasoline” was phased out, first in the United States and then in Europe and around the

  • tel (mound)

    Tell, (“hill” or “small elevation”), in Middle Eastern archaeology, a raised mound marking the site of an ancient city. For specific sites, see under substantive word (e.g., ?asi, Tel). The shape of a tell is generally that of a low truncated cone. In ancient times, houses were constructed of

  • Tel al-A?las (mountains, Africa)

    Tell Atlas, range of the Atlas Mountains in North Africa, extending about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) from eastern Morocco through Algeria to Tunisia. In Morocco, from Ceuta east to Melilla (150 miles [240 km]), the Er-Rif mountain range of the Tell Atlas faces the Mediterranean Sea, and there, as a

  • Tel Aviv (Israel)

    Tel Aviv–Yafo, major city and economic centre in Israel, situated on the Mediterranean coast some 40 miles (60 km) northwest of Jerusalem. Tel Aviv was founded in 1909 as a Jewish garden suburb of the ancient Mediterranean port of Jaffa (now Yafo), with which it was joined in 1950. By the beginning

  • Tel Aviv–Jaffa (Israel)

    Tel Aviv–Yafo, major city and economic centre in Israel, situated on the Mediterranean coast some 40 miles (60 km) northwest of Jerusalem. Tel Aviv was founded in 1909 as a Jewish garden suburb of the ancient Mediterranean port of Jaffa (now Yafo), with which it was joined in 1950. By the beginning

  • Tel Aviv–Joppa (Israel)

    Tel Aviv–Yafo, major city and economic centre in Israel, situated on the Mediterranean coast some 40 miles (60 km) northwest of Jerusalem. Tel Aviv was founded in 1909 as a Jewish garden suburb of the ancient Mediterranean port of Jaffa (now Yafo), with which it was joined in 1950. By the beginning

  • Tel Aviv–Yāfa (Israel)

    Tel Aviv–Yafo, major city and economic centre in Israel, situated on the Mediterranean coast some 40 miles (60 km) northwest of Jerusalem. Tel Aviv was founded in 1909 as a Jewish garden suburb of the ancient Mediterranean port of Jaffa (now Yafo), with which it was joined in 1950. By the beginning

  • Tel Aviv–Yafo (Israel)

    Tel Aviv–Yafo, major city and economic centre in Israel, situated on the Mediterranean coast some 40 miles (60 km) northwest of Jerusalem. Tel Aviv was founded in 1909 as a Jewish garden suburb of the ancient Mediterranean port of Jaffa (now Yafo), with which it was joined in 1950. By the beginning

  • Tel Chai (Israel)

    Tel ?ay, former settlement, now a national memorial, in Upper Galilee, northern Israel, near the Lebanese border. One of the first Jewish settlements in northern Palestine, it was intermittently inhabited from 1905, and permanently settled as a pastoral camp and border outpost in 1918. The name

  • Tel Gezer (ancient city, Israel)

    Gezer, ancient royal Canaanite city, near present-day Ramla, Israel. Gezer is often mentioned in the Old Testament and in the Egyptian records of the New Kingdom, from Thutmose III (1479–26 bc) to Merneptah (1213–04 bc). Gezer was abandoned about 900 bc and was little occupied thereafter. The

  • Tel ?ai (Israel)

    Tel ?ay, former settlement, now a national memorial, in Upper Galilee, northern Israel, near the Lebanese border. One of the first Jewish settlements in northern Palestine, it was intermittently inhabited from 1905, and permanently settled as a pastoral camp and border outpost in 1918. The name

  • Tel ?ay (Israel)

    Tel ?ay, former settlement, now a national memorial, in Upper Galilee, northern Israel, near the Lebanese border. One of the first Jewish settlements in northern Palestine, it was intermittently inhabited from 1905, and permanently settled as a pastoral camp and border outpost in 1918. The name

  • Tel Megiddo (ancient city, Palestine)

    Megiddo, important town of ancient Palestine, overlooking the Plain of Esdraelon (Valley of Jezreel). It lies about 18 miles (29 km) southeast of Haifa in northern Israel. Megiddo’s strategic location at the crossing of two military and trade routes gave the city an importance far beyond its size.

  • Tel Quel (French journal)

    Tel Quel, French avant-garde literary review published from 1960 to 1982 by éditions du Seuil. Founded by Philippe Sollers and other young writers, this eclectic magazine published works by such practitioners of the nouveau roman (“new novel”) as Alain Robbe-Grillet and Nathalie Sarraute, as well

  • Tela (Honduras)

    Tela, city and port, northern Honduras. It lies along Tela Bay, off the Gulf of Honduras. The old village of Tela lies across the Tela River from the modern port works and city, which were constructed by the United Fruit Company. Tela gained fame as a banana port, but it now exports coconuts and

  • Telakhon (Myanmar religion)

    Telakhon, one of the oldest Buddhist-influenced prophet cults among the Karen hill peoples of Myanmar (Burma). In their mythology, the restoration of their lost Golden Book by their white younger brothers heralds the millennium. Ywa, a withdrawn high god whose offer of the book to their ancestors

  • Telamon (Greek mythology)

    Phocus: Peleus and Telamon, Aeacus’s legitimate sons, resented Phocus’s superior athletic prowess. The mythography Bibliotheca (1st or 2nd century ad; Library) related that Peleus and Telamon, at the instigation of Endeis, their mother, plotted Phocus’s death, drawing lots to decide which should destroy him. The lot fell on…

  • Telangana (state, India)

    Telangana, constituent state of south-central India. It is bordered by the states of Maharashtra to the north, Chhattisgarh and Odisha to the northeast, Andhra Pradesh to the southeast and south, and Karnataka to the west. The area of what is now Telangana constituted the north-central and

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