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  • -ty (numerical suffix)

    numerals and numeral systems: Number bases: …left”; the endings -teen and -ty both refer to ten, and hundred comes originally from a pre-Greek term meaning “ten times [ten].”

  • TY (Lesotho)

    Teyateyaneng, village, northwestern Lesotho, 19 miles (31 km) northeast of Maseru, on the country’s main north-south road. Teyateyaneng was named after the Teja-Tejane (“Quicksands”) River, which flows south of the village, and is often abbreviated as TY. The village is on a hilltop, the site of a

  • Tyagaraja (Indian composer)

    Tyagaraja, Indian composer of Karnatak songs of the genre kirtana, or kriti (devotional songs), and of ragas. He is the most prominent person in the history of southern Indian classical music, and he is venerated by contemporary Karnatak musicians. Tyagaraja is said to have composed the music and

  • Tyan Shan (mountains, Asia)

    Tien Shan, great mountain system of Central Asia. Its name is Chinese for “Celestial Mountains.” Stretching about 1,500 miles (2,500 km) from west-southwest to east-northeast, it mainly straddles the border between China and Kyrgyzstan and bisects the ancient territory of Turkistan. It is about 300

  • Tyana (ancient city, Anatolia)

    Anatolia: The Old Hittite Kingdom: …Edict of Telipinus are known: Tuwanuwa (classical Tyana, near modern Bor); Hupisna (classical Heraclea Cybistra; modern Ere?li); Parsuhanda (Purushkhanda; probably modern Acemh?yük); and Lusna (classical Lystra). With the exception of Landa (probably to the north), the sites are all located in the territory to the south of the K?z?l River…

  • Tyapi language

    Landuma: Their language, also called Landuma or Tyapi, belongs to the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo family and is related to Baga. The Landuma are agriculturalists—corn (maize), millet, groundnuts (peanuts), and rice being the major crops. Social organization centres in a paramount chief, with villages governed by subordinate chiefs. Marriage…

  • Tyard, Pontus de (French poet)

    Pontus de Tyard, Burgundian poet and member of the literary circle known as La Pléiade who was a forthright theorist and a popularizer of Renaissance learning for the elite. Tyard was seigneur (lord) of Bissy-sur-Fley and an associate of the Lyonese poets, especially Maurice Scève. In 1551 he

  • Tyazholy pesok (novel by Rybakov)

    Anatoly Rybakov: …II in Tyazhyoly pesok (1979; Heavy Sand), an epic novel that brought him an international audience. With the arrival of Premier Mikhail Gorbachev’s policy of glasnost, Rybakov was allowed to publish Deti Arbata (1987; Children of the Arbat), much of which had been suppressed for more than two decades. The…

  • tyba (musical instrument)

    pipa: …the contemporary pipa is the quxiang (“curved-neck”) pipa, which traveled from Persia by way of the Silk Road and reached western China in the 4th century ad. It had a pear-shaped wooden body with two crescent-shaped sound holes, a curved neck, four strings, and four frets. In performance it was…

  • Tybald, Simon (English archbishop)

    Simon Of Sudbury, archbishop of Canterbury from 1375 and chancellor of England from 1380 who lost his life in the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381. Simon served for 12 years as an auditor (judge) of the Rota at the papal Curia, and in 1359 Pope Innocent VI employed him in an attempt to persuade King E

  • Tybalt (fictional character)

    Romeo and Juliet: When Tybalt, a Capulet, seeks out Romeo in revenge for the insult of Romeo’s having dared to shower his attentions on Juliet, an ensuing scuffle ends in the death of Romeo’s dearest friend, Mercutio. Impelled by a code of honour among men, Romeo kills Tybalt and…

  • Tyburn (river, England, United Kingdom)

    Tyburn, small left-bank tributary of the River Thames, England, its course now wholly within London and below ground. Before it was culverted, the river traversed London from the heights of Hampstead through Regent’s Park to the lower areas of Westminster, where it entered the marshy floodplain of

  • Tyche (Greek goddess)

    Tyche, in Greek religion, the goddess of chance, with whom the Roman Fortuna was later identified; a capricious dispenser of good and ill fortune. The Greek poet Hesiod called her the daughter of the Titan Oceanus and his consort Tethys; other writers attributed her fatherhood to Zeus, the supreme

  • tychism (philosophy of science)

    Epicureanism: Criticism and evaluation: …century under the name of tychism by Charles Sanders Peirce, a logician and philosopher of science.

  • Tycho (lunar crater)

    Tycho, conspicuous impact crater lying at the centre of the most extensive system of bright rays on the near side of the Moon. The rays, which are light-coloured streaks formed of material ejected from the impact, dominate the southern highlands and extend for more than 2,600 km (1,600 miles)

  • Tycho Brahe Planetarium (planetarium, Copenhagen, Denmark)

    Copenhagen: …the 16th-century astronomer is the Tycho Brahe Planetarium, which opened in 1989.

  • Tycho’s Nova (astronomy)

    Tycho’s Nova, one of the few recorded supernovas in the Milky Way Galaxy. The Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe first observed the “new star” on Nov. 11, 1572. Other European observers claimed to have noticed it as early as the preceding August, but Tycho’s precise measurements showed that it was not

  • Tychonic system (astronomy)

    Tychonic system, scheme for the structure of the solar system put forward in 1583 by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe. He retained from the ancient Ptolemaic system the idea of Earth as a fixed centre of the universe around which the Sun and Moon revolved, but he held that, as in the newer system

  • Tychy (Poland)

    Tychy, city, ?l?skie województwo (province), southern Poland. It lies on the Bielsko-Bia?a rail line on the southern edge of the Upper Silesia industrial district and is surrounded by the Pszczyna forests. Tychy was early known for its beer, its first brewery having opened in 1629, and, later, for

  • Tychyna, Pavlo (Ukrainian writer)

    Ukrainian literature: …of Volodymyr Vynnychenko’s prose, while Pavlo Tychyna was the leading Symbolist poet. Neoclassicism produced the poet Mykola Zerov, and Futurism was initiated by Mykhailo Semenko.

  • Tyconius (Christian theologian)

    Tyconius, one of the most important biblical theologians of 4th-century North African Latin Christianity. Although little is known of his life, his positions on the theology of the church (ecclesiology) ultimately provided his younger contemporary and the Church Father St. Augustine with crucial

  • Tyddewi (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Saint David’s, cathedral city, historic and present county of Pembrokeshire, southwestern Wales. It lies within Pembrokeshire Coast National Park in the River Alun valley near the tip of Saint David’s Head peninsula (the westernmost point in Wales). Situated in an area important for Celtic

  • Tydeus (Greek mythology)

    Oeneus: Their son, Tydeus, was exiled for murder, and Oeneus was deposed. Tydeus died on the expedition of the Seven Against Thebes, but his son Diomedes returned and restored Oeneus to the throne. Oeneus handed Calydon over to his son-in-law Andraemon, the husband of Gorge.

  • Tydings-McDuffie Act (United States [1934])

    Tydings-McDuffie Act, (1934), the U.S. statute that provided for Philippine independence, to take effect on July 4, 1946, after a 10-year transitional period of Commonwealth government. The bill was signed by U.S. Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt on March 24, 1934, and was sent to the Philippine Senate

  • Tye, Christopher (British composer)

    Christopher Tye, composer, poet, and organist who was an innovator in the style of English cathedral music perfected by Thomas Tallis, William Byrd, and Orlando Gibbons. Very little is known of Tye’s early life, but the first verifiable documentation states that he earned a bachelor of music degree

  • tyee (fish)

    Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) prized North Pacific food and sport fish of the family Salmonidae. It weighs up to 60 kg (130 pounds) and is silvery with round black spots. Spawning runs occur in spring, adults swimming as far as 3,200 km (2,000 miles) up the Yukon. Young chinook salmon

  • Tyers, Lake (lake, Victoria, Australia)

    Lake Tyers, coastal lake in Gippsland, on the eastern coast of Victoria, Australia, near the northeastern end of Ninety Mile Beach. The lake consists of two main channels; the eastern half curves northeasterly into the interior for about 10 miles (16 km), and the western channel extends

  • tyet (Egyptian ornament)

    Girdle tie, in Egyptian religion, protective amulet formed like a knot and made of gold, carnelian, or red glazed ware. Most samples of the girdle tie have been found tied around the necks of mummies; the amulets were intended to protect the dead from all that was harmful in the

  • tyfon (fog signal)

    lighthouse: Compressed air: …later compressed-air signal was the tyfon. Employing a metal diaphragm vibrated by differential air pressure, it was more compact and efficient than its predecessors.

  • tyg (mug)

    pottery: 17th-century slipware: …or more handles, known as tygs; and London for dishes with such pious exhortations as “Fast and Pray,” obviously inspired by the Puritans. Manufacture was also started in Staffordshire, and many surviving examples were signed by the potter in slip. The work of Thomas Toft is particularly valued. The best…

  • Tyger, The (poem by Blake)

    The Tyger, poem by William Blake, published in his Songs of Innocence and of Experience at the peak of his lyrical achievement. The tiger is the key image in the Songs of Experience, the embodiment of an implacable primal power. Its representation of a physicality that both attracts and terrifies

  • tygerware (pottery)

    Tigerware, 16th- and 17th-century German stoneware having a brown, mottled glaze, and made in the Rhenish centres of Cologne and Frechen, Ger. Tigerware was imported to England and imitated there in the different medium of delft, or tin-glazed earthenware; the imitations were also called t

  • Tygodnik Solidarno?? (Polish newspaper)

    Tadeusz Mazowiecki: …Mazowiecki the first editor of Tygodnik Solidarno?? (“Solidarity Weekly”), the new Solidarity newspaper. His ties to Wa??sa only deepened during the government’s suppression of the Solidarity movement from 1981 to 1988.

  • Tyiwara (Bambara religion)

    Chiwara, antelope figure of the Bambara (Bamana) people of Mali that represents the spirit that taught humans the fundamentals of agriculture. The Bambara honour Chiwara though art and dance. According to Bambara legend, Chiwara used his antlers and pointed stick to dig into the earth, making it

  • Tylenchulus semipenetrans (worm)

    plant disease: Nematode diseases: The citrus nematode (Tylenchulus semipenetrans) occurs wherever citrus is grown, exacting a heavy toll in fruit quality and production. Typical symptoms are a slow decline, yellowing and dying of leaves, and dieback of twigs and branches in many groves 15 years or older. Infested nursery stock…

  • Tylenol (drug)

    Tylenol, trademarked brand of acetaminophen, an aspirin-free pain reliever and fever reducer introduced in 1955 by McNeil Laboratories, Inc. (now part of the Johnson & Johnson pharmaceutical conglomerate). See

  • Tyler (Texas, United States)

    Tyler, city, seat (1846) of Smith county, northeastern Texas, U.S. It is located 100 miles (160 km) east-southeast of Dallas. Laid out in 1846 and named for President John Tyler, it was a farming centre until 1930, when the East Texas oil field was discovered. A transportation focus, Tyler became

  • Tyler Municipal Rose Garden and Museum (showcase, Tyler, Texas, United States)

    Tyler: …its flower industry, exemplified by Tyler Municipal Rose Garden and Museum (the country’s largest rose showcase), its annual Texas Rose Festival (October), and the Azalea and Spring Flower Trail. The city is the seat of Texas College (1894), Tyler Junior College (1926), and the University of Texas at Tyler (1971);…

  • Tyler Series

    mineral processing: Size analysis: …standard (now obsolete) was the Tyler Series, in which wire screens were identified by mesh size, as measured in wires or openings per inch. Modern standards now classify sieves according to the size of the aperture, as measured in millimetres or micrometres (10-6 metre).

  • Tyler, Anne (American writer)

    Anne Tyler, American novelist and short-story writer whose comedies of manners are marked by compassionate wit and precise details of domestic life. Tyler, the daughter of Quakers, spent her early years in North Carolina and in various Quaker communities in the Midwest and South. At age 16 she

  • Tyler, John (president of United States)

    John Tyler, 10th president of the United States (1841–45), who took office upon the death of Pres. William Henry Harrison. A maverick Democrat who refused allegiance to the program of party leader Andrew Jackson, Tyler was rejected in office by both the Democratic Party and the Whig Party and

  • Tyler, Judy (American actress)

    Jailhouse Rock: Peggy Van Alden (played by Judy Tyler) is the talent agent who helps him on his way up.

  • Tyler, Julia (American first lady)

    Julia Tyler, American first lady (June 26, 1844–March 4, 1845), the wife of John Tyler, 10th president of the United States. For eight months she presided over the White House with charming exuberance. Julia Gardiner, the daughter of David Gardiner, a lawyer and state senator, and Juliana McLachlan

  • Tyler, Letitia (American first lady)

    Letitia Tyler, American first lady (1841–42), the first wife of John Tyler, 10th president of the United States. Letitia Christian was the seventh of 12 children born to Robert Christian, a planter, and Mary Brown Christian. Although few records documenting her early life exist, historians have

  • Tyler, Letitia Christian (American first lady)

    Letitia Tyler, American first lady (1841–42), the first wife of John Tyler, 10th president of the United States. Letitia Christian was the seventh of 12 children born to Robert Christian, a planter, and Mary Brown Christian. Although few records documenting her early life exist, historians have

  • Tyler, Liv (American actress)

    Stella McCartney: …the 2001 Academy Award ceremonies), Liv Tyler, and Gwyneth Paltrow, and model Kate Moss.

  • Tyler, Moses Coit (American historian)

    Moses Coit Tyler, U.S. literary historian whose use of literary documents in the history of pre-Revolutionary American ideas was a major contribution to U.S. historiography. The descendant of an old New England family, Tyler was taken west in 1837 by his parents, who eventually settled in Detroit

  • Tyler, Royall (American author and lawyer)

    Royall Tyler, U.S. lawyer, teacher, and dramatist, author of the first American comedy, The Contrast (1787). After graduating from Harvard University, Tyler served in the U.S. Army and later became a lawyer. A meeting with Thomas Wignell, the star comedian of the American Company, in New York City,

  • Tyler, Steven (American singer)

    Aerosmith: Principal members were lead singer Steven Tyler (byname of Steven Tallarico; b. March 26, 1948, New York, New York, U.S.), lead guitarist Joe Perry (b. September 10, 1950, Boston, Massachusetts), guitarist Brad Whitford (b. February 23, 1952, Winchester, Massachusetts), bassist Tom Hamilton (b. December 31, 1951, Colorado Springs, Colorado), and…

  • Tyler, Walter (American art director)
  • Tyler, Walter (English revolutionary)

    Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381, the first great popular rebellion in English history; his leadership proved one of the chief factors in the success of protest against the harsh taxation of the poorer classes. Chosen as captain by the Kentish rebels on June 7, Tyler led them in

  • Tyler, Wat (English revolutionary)

    Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381, the first great popular rebellion in English history; his leadership proved one of the chief factors in the success of protest against the harsh taxation of the poorer classes. Chosen as captain by the Kentish rebels on June 7, Tyler led them in

  • Tyler, William Clark (American author and lawyer)

    Royall Tyler, U.S. lawyer, teacher, and dramatist, author of the first American comedy, The Contrast (1787). After graduating from Harvard University, Tyler served in the U.S. Army and later became a lawyer. A meeting with Thomas Wignell, the star comedian of the American Company, in New York City,

  • tyloma (dermatology)

    Callus, in dermatology, small area of thickened skin, the formation of which is caused by continued friction, pressure, or other physical or chemical irritation. Calluses form when mild but repeated injury causes the cells of the epidermis (the outermost layer of the skin) to become increasingly

  • Tylonycteris (genus of mammals)

    bat: Locomotion: …as the bamboo bats (Tylonycteris), have specialized wrist and sole pads for moving along and roosting on the smooth surface of leaves or bamboo stalks. Bats are not known to swim in nature except, perhaps, by accident. When they do fall into water, however, they generally swim competently.

  • Tylonycteris pachypus (mammal)

    vesper bat: The lesser bamboo bat, one of the smallest of bats, is about 4 cm (1.5 inches) in head and body length; it weighs about 2 grams (0.07 ounce) and has a wingspan of 15 cm (6 inches). Other species range up to 10 cm (4 inches)…

  • tylopod (mammal)

    Tylopod, any of the pad-footed, even-toed, hoofed mammals of the suborder Tylopoda (order Artiodactyla). This group contains three extinct families and one living family, Camelidae, which contains the camels and the lamoids—the llama, alpaca, guanaco, and vicu?a. The chief distinguishing features

  • Tylopoda (mammal)

    Tylopod, any of the pad-footed, even-toed, hoofed mammals of the suborder Tylopoda (order Artiodactyla). This group contains three extinct families and one living family, Camelidae, which contains the camels and the lamoids—the llama, alpaca, guanaco, and vicu?a. The chief distinguishing features

  • Tylor, Sir Edward Burnett (British anthropologist)

    Sir Edward Burnett Tylor, English anthropologist regarded as the founder of cultural anthropology. His most important work, Primitive Culture (1871), influenced in part by Darwin’s theory of biological evolution, developed the theory of an evolutionary, progressive relationship from primitive to

  • tylose (plant structure)

    angiosperm: Secondary vascular system: Tyloses are balloonlike outgrowths of parenchyma cells that bulge through the circular bordered pits of vessel members and block water movement. The presence of tyloses in white oaks makes their wood watertight, which is why it is preferred in casks and shipbuilding to red oak,…

  • tylosis (plant structure)

    angiosperm: Secondary vascular system: Tyloses are balloonlike outgrowths of parenchyma cells that bulge through the circular bordered pits of vessel members and block water movement. The presence of tyloses in white oaks makes their wood watertight, which is why it is preferred in casks and shipbuilding to red oak,…

  • Tym (river, Russia)

    Ob River: Physiography: …the Vasyugan (left), and the Tym and Vakh rivers (both right). Down to the Vasyugan confluence the river passes through the southern belt of the taiga, thereafter entering the middle belt. Below the Vakh confluence the middle Ob changes its course from northwesterly to westerly and receives more tributaries: the…

  • tymbal (zoology)

    homopteran: Sound production: …insect sound-producing mechanism known, the tymbal organ. A pair of tymbals, circular membranes supported by heavy chitinous rings, occur on the dorsolateral surface of the first abdominal segment. Contraction of a large tymbal muscle attached to the membrane causes distortion of the tymbal, producing a sharp click or pulse. The…

  • Tyminski, Stanislaw (Polish politician)

    Poland: Transitioning from communism: …by supporting the dark-horse candidate Stanis?aw Tyminski, a Polish émigré businessman from Canada who finished second in the balloting. The succession of cabinets in the early 1990s included one government headed by Jan Olszewski, which fell as a result of a clumsy attempt to produce a list of former high-ranking…

  • Tymoshenko, Yulia (prime minister of Ukraine)

    Yulia Tymoshenko, Ukrainian businesswoman and politician who served as prime minister of Ukraine (2005, 2007–10). Tymoshenko’s family lineage has been reported variously as Ukrainian, Russian, Latvian, and Jewish. She married Oleksandr Tymoshenko in 1979 and gave birth to a daughter the following

  • Tymoshenko, Yuliya (prime minister of Ukraine)

    Yulia Tymoshenko, Ukrainian businesswoman and politician who served as prime minister of Ukraine (2005, 2007–10). Tymoshenko’s family lineage has been reported variously as Ukrainian, Russian, Latvian, and Jewish. She married Oleksandr Tymoshenko in 1979 and gave birth to a daughter the following

  • tympan (printing)

    printmaking: Lithography: Last comes the tympan, a sheet of smooth, tough material that can withstand great pressure without stretching. After the bed is raised to printing position, grease is spread evenly in front of the scraping bar on the tympan to allow it to slide easily. Then the print is…

  • tympana (insect anatomy)

    grasshopper: …hears by means of a tympanal organ situated either at the base of the abdomen (Acrididae) or at the base of each front tibia (Tettigoniidae). Its sense of vision is in the compound eyes, while change in light intensity is perceived in the simple eyes (or ocelli). Although most grasshoppers…

  • tympanal organ (insect anatomy)

    grasshopper: …hears by means of a tympanal organ situated either at the base of the abdomen (Acrididae) or at the base of each front tibia (Tettigoniidae). Its sense of vision is in the compound eyes, while change in light intensity is perceived in the simple eyes (or ocelli). Although most grasshoppers…

  • tympani (musical instrument)

    Timpani, (Italian: “drums”) orchestral kettledrums. The name has been applied to large kettledrums since at least the 17th century. The permanent orchestral use of timpani dates from the mid-17th century, early examples being in Matthew Locke’s Psyche (1673) and Jean-Baptiste Lully’s opera Thésée

  • tympanic annulus (anatomy)

    human ear: Tympanic membrane: …incomplete ring of bone, the tympanic annulus, which almost encircles it and holds it in place. The uppermost small area of the membrane where the ring is open, the pars flaccida, is slack, but the far greater portion, the pars tensa, is tightly stretched. The appearance and mobility of the…

  • tympanic cavity (anatomy)

    sound reception: The auditory mechanism in frogs: …the air-filled cavity of the middle ear. When the alternating pressures of sound waves cause the eardrum to vibrate, the vibrations are transmitted along the columella and through the oval window to the inner ear, where they are relayed to the round window in a path across the otic capsule…

  • tympanic membrane (anatomy)

    Tympanic membrane, thin layer of tissue in the human ear that receives sound vibrations from the outer air and transmits them to the auditory ossicles, which are tiny bones in the tympanic (middle-ear) cavity. It also serves as the lateral wall of the tympanic cavity, separating it from the

  • tympanic organ (insect anatomy)

    grasshopper: …hears by means of a tympanal organ situated either at the base of the abdomen (Acrididae) or at the base of each front tibia (Tettigoniidae). Its sense of vision is in the compound eyes, while change in light intensity is perceived in the simple eyes (or ocelli). Although most grasshoppers…

  • tympanometry (hearing test)

    human ear: Audiometry: …the ear as revealed by tympanometry. This test procedure consists in raising and lowering the air pressure in the middle ear to alter the stiffness in the tympanic membrane while measuring the changes in its compliance in terms of the amount of sound reflected from it.

  • tympanoplasty (surgery)

    ear disease: Chronic middle-ear infection: …operation is known as a tympanoplasty, or plastic reconstruction of the middle-ear cavity.

  • Tympanuchus cupido (bird)

    grouse: The greater prairie chicken (T. cupido) is a 45-cm (17.5-inch) bird with brown plumage strongly barred below and a short rounded dark tail; a male may weigh almost 1 kg. It occurs locally from Michigan to Saskatchewan, south to Missouri, New Mexico, and coastal Texas and…

  • Tympanuchus phasianellus (bird)

    grouse: …grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and the sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus). The former is the largest New World grouse, exceeded in the family only by the capercaillie. A male may be 75 cm (30 inches) long and weigh 3.5 kg (about 7.5 pounds). This species inhabits sagebrush flats. The sharptail, a 45-cm…

  • tympanum (architecture)

    Tympanum, in Classical architecture, the area enclosed by a pediment, whether triangular or segmental. In a triangular pediment, the area is defined by the horizontal cornice along the bottom and by the raking (sloping) cornice along the sides; in a segmental pediment, the sides have segmental

  • tympanum (anatomy)

    reptile: Hearing: …typically made up of a tympanum, a thin membrane located at the rear of the head; the stapes, a small bone running between the tympanum and the skull in the tympanic cavity (the middle ear); the inner ear; and a eustachian tube connecting the middle ear with the mouth cavity.…

  • tympany (musical instrument)

    Timpani, (Italian: “drums”) orchestral kettledrums. The name has been applied to large kettledrums since at least the 17th century. The permanent orchestral use of timpani dates from the mid-17th century, early examples being in Matthew Locke’s Psyche (1673) and Jean-Baptiste Lully’s opera Thésée

  • Tymphrestos, Mount (mountain, Greece)

    Greece: Central Greece: the Píndos Mountains: …two passes of Métsovon and Mount Timfristós divide the range into three units: a fairly open segment in the north where impervious shales and sandstones have weathered and formed into extensive upland valleys and gently inclining hills; the Píndos proper in the centre, some 20 miles (32 km) wide and…

  • Tynan, Katharine (Irish poet and novelist)

    Katharine Tynan, Irish poet and novelist whose works are dominated by the combined influences of Roman Catholicism and Irish patriotism. Like the poet William Butler Yeats, she developed a deep and abiding interest in Celtic mythology. Her Collected Poems were published in 1930. A prodigious

  • Tynan, Kathleen Jeanette Halton (British author)

    Kathleen Jeanette Halton Tynan, British novelist and biographer who won acclaim for a 1987 biography of her late husband, drama critic Kenneth Tynan (b. Jan. 25, 1937--d. Jan. 10,

  • Tynan, Kenneth (British critic)

    Marlene Dietrich: …the words of the critic Kenneth Tynan: “She has sex, but no particular gender. She has the bearing of a man; the characters she plays love power and wear trousers. Her masculinity appeals to women and her sexuality to men.” But her personal magnetism went far beyond her masterful androgynous…

  • Tyndale, William (English scholar)

    William Tyndale, English biblical translator, humanist, and Protestant martyr. Tyndale was educated at the University of Oxford and became an instructor at the University of Cambridge, where, in 1521, he fell in with a group of humanist scholars meeting at the White Horse Inn. Tyndale became

  • Tyndall effect (physics)

    Tyndall effect, scattering of a beam of light by a medium containing small suspended particles—e.g., smoke or dust in a room, which makes visible a light beam entering a window. The effect is named for the 19th-century British physicist John Tyndall, who first studied it

  • Tyndall Glacier (glacier, Kenya)

    Mount Kenya: …glaciers, of which Lewis and Tyndall are the largest, feed the streams and marshes on the mountain’s slopes. A markedly radial drainage is characteristic, but all streams eventually flow into the Tana River or the Ewaso Ng’iro River.

  • Tyndall phenomenon (physics)

    Tyndall effect, scattering of a beam of light by a medium containing small suspended particles—e.g., smoke or dust in a room, which makes visible a light beam entering a window. The effect is named for the 19th-century British physicist John Tyndall, who first studied it

  • Tyndall scattering (physics)

    Tyndall effect, scattering of a beam of light by a medium containing small suspended particles—e.g., smoke or dust in a room, which makes visible a light beam entering a window. The effect is named for the 19th-century British physicist John Tyndall, who first studied it

  • Tyndall, John (Irish physicist)

    John Tyndall, Irish experimental physicist who, during his long residence in England, was an avid promoter of science in the Victorian era. Tyndall was born into a poor Protestant Irish family. After a thorough basic education he worked as a surveyor in Ireland and England (1839–47). When his

  • Tyndall, John Hutchyns (British political activist)

    John Hutchyns Tyndall, British political activist (born July 14, 1934, Exeter, Eng.—died July 19, 2005, Hove, East Sussex, Eng.), was a leading figure throughout his life in Britain’s far-right political fringe, notably as cofounder (1962) of the fascist British National Socialist Movement, as l

  • Tyne and Wear (region, England, United Kingdom)

    Tyne and Wear, metropolitan county in northeastern England. Named for its two main rivers, the Tyne and the Wear, it is bounded by the administrative counties of Northumberland (north and west) and Durham (south) and by the North Sea (east). It is an urban industrial region that comprises five

  • Tyne, River (river, England, United Kingdom)

    River Tyne, river in northern England, flowing for 62 miles (100 km) into the North Sea below Newcastle upon Tyne. It is formed near Hexham by the confluence of the North Tyne, with its tributary the Rede, and the South Tyne. From Wylam the Tyne is the boundary between the historic counties of

  • Tynedale (former district, England, United Kingdom)

    Tynedale, former district, administrative and historic county of Northumberland, northern England, in the western part of the county, bordered on the northwest by Scotland. Tynedale is an area of hills, both rounded and craggy, and bleak moorlands separated by the narrow, fertile valleys of the

  • Tyneman (Scottish military officer)

    Archibald Douglas, 4th earl of Douglas, Scottish commander in the Scottish and French wars with the English in the early 15th century. Son of the 3rd earl, Archibald the Grim, he married Margaret, daughter of the future Robert III of Scotland. As master of Douglas (1400) he defeated Sir Henry Percy

  • Tyner, Alfred McCoy (American musician)

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