You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Türkmenbashi Peninsula (peninsula, Turkmenistan)

    Caspian Sea: Shoreline features: …the low, hilly Cheleken and Türkmenbashi peninsulas. Just to the north, behind the east shore of the middle Caspian, is the Kara-Bogaz-Gol (Garabogazk?l), formerly a shallow gulf of the Caspian but now a large lagoonlike embayment that is separated from the sea by a man-made embankment. For the most part,…

  • Türkmenbashy (Turkmenistan)

    Turkmenbashi, port city, western Turkmenistan. The city was renamed in 1993 by Turkmenistan’s dictator-president, Saparmurad Niyazov, who patterned the new name after his own formal title of Turkmenbashi (“Head of the Turkmen”). The city lies on the eastern shore of the Caspian Sea, at the foot of

  • Turkmenchay, Treaty of (Russia-Iran [1828])

    Azerbaijan: Russian suzerainty: …of Golestān (Gulistan; 1813) and Turkmenchay (Torkmānchāy; 1828) established a new border between the empires. Russia acquired Baku, Shirvan, Ganja, Nakhichevan (Nax??van), and Yerevan. Henceforth the Azerbaijani Turks of Caucasia were separated from the majority of their linguistic and religious compatriots, who remained in Iran. Azerbaijanis on both sides of…

  • Türkmenistan

    Turkmenistan, country of Central Asia. It is the second largest state in Central Asia, after Kazakhstan, and is the southernmost of the region’s five republics. After Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan is the least densely populated of the Central Asian states. Much of its waterless expanse is inhospitable

  • Turkmenistan

    Turkmenistan, country of Central Asia. It is the second largest state in Central Asia, after Kazakhstan, and is the southernmost of the region’s five republics. After Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan is the least densely populated of the Central Asian states. Much of its waterless expanse is inhospitable

  • Turkmenistan, flag of

    national flag consisting of a green field (background) with a white crescent and five stars; near the hoist a claret (Bordeaux-red) stripe bears five carpet patterns and an olive wreath. The flag’s width-to-length ratio is 1 to 2.The Turkmen Soviet Socialist Republic, as the country was known under

  • Turkmenistan, history of

    Turkmenistan: History: It is possible to follow the development of human habitats in southern Turkmenistan from Paleolithic times to the present. Some of the earliest traces of agriculture in Central Asia were discovered some 20 miles (32 km) north…

  • Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India Pipeline (pipeline project, Asia)

    Turkmenistan: Resources and power: …pipeline delivering natural gas from Turkmenistan to Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India (known by the acronym TAPI) began in 2018.

  • Turkmennama (work by Berdymukhammedov)

    Turkmenistan: Presidency of Gurbanguly Berdymukhammedov: …Rukhnama, students began reading Berdymukhammedov’s Turkmennama (“Story of the Turkmens”). In 2015 a golden statute of Berdymukhammedov was unveiled in central Ashgabat.

  • Turkmeny (people)

    Turkmen, people who speak a language belonging to the southwestern branch of the Turkic languages. The majority live in Turkmenistan and in neighbouring parts of Central Asia and numbered more than 6 million at the beginning of the 21st century. About one-third of the total population lives in

  • Turkoglu, Hedo (Turkish basketball player)

    Orlando Magic: The Magic added free-agent forwards Hedo Turkoglu and Rashard Lewis, and the team reached the second round of the playoffs in 2007–08. Behind the exceptional play of the star trio, the Magic once again advanced to the NBA finals during the 2008–09 season, where it lost to the Lakers in…

  • Turkoman (people)

    Turkmen, people who speak a language belonging to the southwestern branch of the Turkic languages. The majority live in Turkmenistan and in neighbouring parts of Central Asia and numbered more than 6 million at the beginning of the 21st century. About one-third of the total population lives in

  • Turkoman rug

    rug and carpet: Turkistan: The Turkmen people emerged during the late first millennium as pastoral nomads in lands between powerful city-based states. Gradually they grew in power, and by the 19th century one tribe, the Tekke, had become dominant in the oases of Merv (now Mary) and Tedjend (now Tejen).…

  • Turks and Caicos Islands (islands, West Indies)

    Turks and Caicos Islands, overseas territory of the United Kingdom in the West Indies. It consists of two groups of islands lying on the southeastern periphery of The Bahamas, of which they form a physical part, and north of the island of Hispaniola. The islands include eight large cays (keys) and

  • Turks and Caicos National Museum (museum, Cockburn Town, Turks and Caicos)

    Cockburn Town: The Turks and Caicos National Museum is located near the waterfront in a historic building called Guinep House, a former private dwelling believed to date from the early 19th century. The museum displays items related to the islands’ history, cultural heritage, and natural history. It features…

  • Turks Islands (islands, West Indies)

    Turks and Caicos Islands, overseas territory of the United Kingdom in the West Indies. It consists of two groups of islands lying on the southeastern periphery of The Bahamas, of which they form a physical part, and north of the island of Hispaniola. The islands include eight large cays (keys) and

  • Turku (Finland)

    Turku, city, southwestern Finland, at the mouth of the Aura River, west-northwest of Helsinki. Finland’s oldest city, it was originally a trading centre a few miles north of its present site, to which it was transferred at the beginning of the 13th century. It received its first known charter in

  • Turku cemetery chapel (chapel, Turku, Finland)

    Erik Bryggman: …be the chapel of the Turku cemetery (1938–41), which, though in the functionalist idiom, makes a strong emotional appeal, particularly through the use of light entering the interior as an architectural element.

  • Turla River (river, Europe)

    Dniester River, river of southwestern Ukraine and of Moldova, rising on the north side of the Carpathian Mountains and flowing south and east for 840 miles (1,352 km) to the Black Sea near Odessa. It is the second longest river in Ukraine and the main water artery of Moldova. The Dniester and its

  • Turlington, Christy (American fashion model)

    Christy Turlington, American fashion model best known as a face of the cosmetics company Maybelline and the Calvin Klein fashion house. Turlington appeared on more than 500 magazine covers and walked the runways for the world’s top fashion houses, including Chanel and Valentino. Turlington was

  • Turlington, Christy Nicole (American fashion model)

    Christy Turlington, American fashion model best known as a face of the cosmetics company Maybelline and the Calvin Klein fashion house. Turlington appeared on more than 500 magazine covers and walked the runways for the world’s top fashion houses, including Chanel and Valentino. Turlington was

  • Turloch O’Connor (king of Connaught)

    Turloch O’Connor, king of Connaught and from 1121 the most powerful Irish prince. In 1118 he divided Munster into two coequal kingdoms; in 1125 he deposed the king of Meath and appointed three kings in his stead; in 1126 he made his son Conchobar king of Dublin and Leinster; and in 1129 he built

  • Turlock (California, United States)

    Turlock, city, Stanislaus county, central California, U.S. It lies in the San Joaquin Valley, 40 miles (65 km) southeast of Stockton. It was founded in 1871 by John Mitchell, a grain farmer. After the Central Pacific Railroad was extended through the valley in the 1870s, Turlock (from the Irish

  • Turlough O’Conor (king of Connaught)

    Turloch O’Connor, king of Connaught and from 1121 the most powerful Irish prince. In 1118 he divided Munster into two coequal kingdoms; in 1125 he deposed the king of Meath and appointed three kings in his stead; in 1126 he made his son Conchobar king of Dublin and Leinster; and in 1129 he built

  • Turly (American fashion model)

    Christy Turlington, American fashion model best known as a face of the cosmetics company Maybelline and the Calvin Klein fashion house. Turlington appeared on more than 500 magazine covers and walked the runways for the world’s top fashion houses, including Chanel and Valentino. Turlington was

  • Turmair, Johannes (German humanist and historian)

    Aventinus, Humanist and historian sometimes called the “Bavarian Herodotus.” A student at the universities of Ingolstadt, Vienna, Kraków, and Paris, Aventinus served as tutor (1509–17) to the younger brothers of Duke William IV of Bavaria, during which time he published a Latin grammar and a h

  • Turmel, Nycole (Canadian politician)

    New Democratic Party: Onetime union leader Nycole Turmel, his handpicked successor, served as interim leader until March 2012, when she was replaced by Thomas Mulcair, an MP from Quebec.

  • turmeric (plant)

    Turmeric, (Curcuma longa), perennial herbaceous plant of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae), the tuberous rhizomes, or underground stems, of which have been used from antiquity as a condiment, a textile dye, and medically as an aromatic stimulant. Native to southern India and Indonesia, turmeric is

  • Turn Again Tiger (work by Selvon)

    Samuel Selvon: Its sequel, Turn Again Tiger (1958), follows the protagonist on a journey to his homeland. In this novel, which is perhaps his best, Selvon made extensive and striking use of dialect. The Lonely Londoners (1956) describes apparently naive immigrants living by their wits in a hostile city.…

  • turn and slip indicator (instrument)

    avionics: include the altimeter, Machmeter, turn and slip indicator, and varied devices that show airspeed, vertical velocity, and angle of attack. Communications instruments include two-way radios allowing direct voice communication between the aircraft and the ground as well as other aircraft; these operate across a wide spectrum, ranging from high…

  • Turn of the Screw, The (novella by James)

    The Turn of the Screw, novella by Henry James, published serially in Collier’s Weekly in 1898 and published in book form later that year. One of the world’s most famous ghost stories, the tale is told mostly through the journal of a governess and depicts her struggle to save her two young charges

  • Turn Up Charlie (British television series)

    Idris Elba: …in the British TV series Turn Up Charlie, which he cocreated. He then played the villain in the action movie Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw (2019), a spin-off from the long-running franchise. His other credits from 2019 included the family musical Cats, a film adaptation of Andrew Lloyd…

  • Turn, Magic Wheel (novel by Powell)

    Dawn Powell: …the publication of the novel Turn, Magic Wheel (1936), Powell mastered her sharp comical writing style that satirized the Greenwich Village literary café culture, the scene in which she herself was a permanent fixture along with writers John Dos Passos and E.E. Cummings and critic Edmund Wilson, among others. Turn,…

  • turn-based strategy game (electronic game genre)

    electronic strategy game: …types of electronic strategy games: turn-based strategy (TBS) and real-time strategy (RTS). Although some TBS games have experimented with multiplayer support, the slow pace of waiting for each player to finish managing all of his or her resources and units has limited their appeal. On the other hand, players expect…

  • Turnabout Theatre (theatre, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    puppetry: Styles of puppet theatre: …a theatre in Hollywood, the Turnabout Theatre, that combined human and puppet stages at opposite ends of the auditorium and attracted fashionable audiences for its songs and sketches from 1941 to 1956. Bil Baird ran a puppet theatre in Greenwich Village, New York City, for some years from 1967 and…

  • turnbuckle (device)

    Turnbuckle, mechanical device that connects the threaded ends of two rods and permits them to be adjusted for length or tension. The turnbuckle has two collinear holes, one of which has right-hand threads and the other left-hand threads that mate with the right- and left-hand threads on the ends

  • Turnbull’s blue (pigment)

    Prussian blue: Turnbull’s blue, formed by the reaction of ferricyanides and ferrous salts, has the same chemical composition as the iron blues (MFe2[CN]6, in which M represents an ion such as sodium or potassium).

  • Turnbull, Colin Macmillan (American anthropologist)

    Colin Macmillan Turnbull, British-born anthropologist (born Nov. 23, 1924, Harrow, England—died July 28, 1994, Kilmarnock, Va.), conducted extensive field studies in Africa among the Mbuti Pygmies in the Belgian Congo (now Zaire) and the Ik hunters of northern Uganda and recorded his experiences i

  • Turnbull, Herbert Westren (English mathematician)

    Herbert Westren Turnbull, English mathematician who made contributions to algebraic invariant theory and to the history of mathematics. After serving as lecturer at St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge (1909), the University of Liverpool (1910), and the University of Hong Kong (1912), Turnbull became

  • Turnbull, Malcolm (prime minister of Australia)

    Malcolm Turnbull, Australian politician who was MP for Wentworth (2004–18), leader of the Liberal Party of Australia (2008–09; 2015–18), and prime minister of Australia (2015–18). Turnbull’s parents separated when he was a child, and he was raised by his father in the suburbs of Sydney. He attended

  • Turnbull, Malcolm Bligh (prime minister of Australia)

    Malcolm Turnbull, Australian politician who was MP for Wentworth (2004–18), leader of the Liberal Party of Australia (2008–09; 2015–18), and prime minister of Australia (2015–18). Turnbull’s parents separated when he was a child, and he was raised by his father in the suburbs of Sydney. He attended

  • Turnbull, Sir Richard (British governor of Tanganyika)

    Julius Nyerere: …Nyerere and the British governor, Sir Richard Turnbull. Tanganyika finally gained responsible self-government in September 1960, and Nyerere became chief minister at this time. Tanganyika became independent on December 9, 1961, with Nyerere as its first prime minister. The next month, however, he resigned from this position to devote his…

  • Turner (gymnast)

    gymnastics: History: The Turners remaining in Prussia went underground until the ban on gymnastics was lifted by King Frederick William IV in 1842.

  • Turner Bostley, Cathy (American speed skater)

    Cathy Turner, American short-track speed skater who came out of retirement to capture a gold medal at the sport’s Olympic debut (1992). Known for her aggressive style of skating, she defended her title in 1994. Turner began speed skating as a child, specializing in the fast-paced short-track

  • Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (American company)

    WarnerMedia: Warner: …were sold in 1986 to Turner Broadcasting System, which in turn merged with Time Warner Inc. in 1996.) Television also presented new opportunities for Warner Brothers, where the hit series Maverick (1957) and 77 Sunset Strip (1958) were made. In 1967 Jack Warner sold his remaining stake in the company…

  • Turner Classic Movies (American company)

    Television in the United States: The 1990s: the loss of shared experience: …old movies (American Movie Classics, Turner Classic Movies), home improvement and gardening (Home and Garden Television [HGTV]), comedy (Comedy Central), documentaries (Discovery Channel), animals (Animal Planet), and a host of other interests. The Golf Channel and the Game Show Network were perhaps the most emblematic of how far target programming…

  • Turner Diaries, The (novel by Pierce)

    The Turner Diaries, novel by William Luther Pierce (under the pseudonym Andrew Macdonald), published in 1978. An apocalyptic tale of genocide against racial minorities set in a near-future America, The Turner Diaries has been referred to as “the bible of the racist right,” a “handbook for white

  • Turner Joy (United States ship)

    Gulf of Tonkin incident: >Turner Joy of the U.S. Seventh Fleet and that led to the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, which allowed President Lyndon B. Johnson to greatly escalate U.S. military involvement in the Vietnam War.

  • Turner Network Television (American cable network)

    Ted Turner: Media empire: …news channel, and TNT (Turner Network Television; 1988). Through the Turner Broadcasting System, he also purchased the Atlanta Braves major league baseball team in 1976 and the Atlanta Hawks professional basketball team in 1977. In 1986 he bought the MGM/UA Entertainment Company, which included Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s library of more than…

  • Turner Prize (British arts award)

    Turner Prize, award given annually to a visual artist born in or based in Great Britain in recognition of an outstanding exhibition or other presentation of his or her work. It is considered the highest honour in the British art world. Named for English Romantic painter J.M.W. Turner, the prize was

  • Turner syndrome (pathology)

    Turner syndrome, relatively uncommon sex-chromosome disorder that causes aberrant sexual development in human females. Turner syndrome occurs when one sex chromosome is deleted, so that instead of the normal 46 chromosomes, of which two are sex chromosomes (XX in females and XY in males), the

  • Turner Ward Knob (mountain, United States)

    Boston Mountains: Several peaks, including Turner Ward Knob and Brannon Mountain, exceed 2,400 feet (730 m). The rugged mountains, 30 to 35 miles (50 to 55 km) wide with gorgelike valleys, embrace a division of the Ozark National Forest, Buffalo National River, and Devil’s Den State Park, Arkansas.

  • Turner’s syndrome (pathology)

    Turner syndrome, relatively uncommon sex-chromosome disorder that causes aberrant sexual development in human females. Turner syndrome occurs when one sex chromosome is deleted, so that instead of the normal 46 chromosomes, of which two are sex chromosomes (XX in females and XY in males), the

  • Turner, Albert (American activist)

    Albert Turner, American civil rights activist (born Feb. 29, 1936, Marion, Ala.—died April 13, 2000, Selma, Ala.), was a leader in the civil rights movement in the American South and an adviser to Martin Luther King, Jr. Turner was the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s field secretary in A

  • Turner, Annie (American relief worker and reformer)

    Annie Turner Wittenmyer, American relief worker and reformer who helped supply medical aid and dietary assistance to army hospitals during the Civil War and was subsequently an influential organizer in the temperance movement. Wittenmyer and her husband settled in Keokuk, Iowa, in 1850. At the

  • Turner, Big Joe (American singer)

    Big Joe Turner, American blues singer, or “shouter,” whose music included jazz, rhythm and blues, and boogie-woogie. He has been credited as a progenitor of jump blues and of early rock and roll. Singing in his youth in church choirs and informally for tips, Turner drew attention as a singing

  • Turner, Billy (American racehorse trainer)

    Seattle Slew: Breeding and early years: …Maryland to be trained by Billy Turner.

  • Turner, Bulldog (American football player and coach)

    Clyde Turner, American football player and coach who was a centre and linebacker for the Chicago Bears for the 13 seasons from 1940 to 1952, during which the team, nicknamed the Monsters of the Midway, won the National Football League championship four times; he was named All-Pro six times and in

  • Turner, C. A. P. (American engineer)

    construction: The invention of reinforced concrete: …Minneapolis, Minnesota, the American engineer C.A.P. Turner employed concrete floor slabs without beams (called flat slabs or flat plates) that used diagonal and orthogonal patterns of reinforcing bars. The system still used today—which divides the bays between columns into column strips and middle strips and uses only an orthogonal arrangement…

  • Turner, Cathy (American speed skater)

    Cathy Turner, American short-track speed skater who came out of retirement to capture a gold medal at the sport’s Olympic debut (1992). Known for her aggressive style of skating, she defended her title in 1994. Turner began speed skating as a child, specializing in the fast-paced short-track

  • Turner, Cathy Ann (American speed skater)

    Cathy Turner, American short-track speed skater who came out of retirement to capture a gold medal at the sport’s Olympic debut (1992). Known for her aggressive style of skating, she defended her title in 1994. Turner began speed skating as a child, specializing in the fast-paced short-track

  • Turner, Charles Henry (American scientist)

    Charles Henry Turner , American behavioral scientist and early pioneer in the field of insect behaviour. He is best known for his work showing that social insects can modify their behaviour as a result of experience. Turner is also well known for his commitment to civil rights and for his attempts

  • Turner, Clyde (American football player and coach)

    Clyde Turner, American football player and coach who was a centre and linebacker for the Chicago Bears for the 13 seasons from 1940 to 1952, during which the team, nicknamed the Monsters of the Midway, won the National Football League championship four times; he was named All-Pro six times and in

  • Turner, Ethel (Australian author)

    Ethel Turner, Australian novelist and writer for children, whose popular novel Seven Little Australians (1894) was filmed (1939), twice dramatized for television, once in Great Britain (1953) and once in Australia (1973), and made into a musical (1978). Turner’s parents immigrated with her to

  • Turner, Ethel Sibyl (Australian author)

    Ethel Turner, Australian novelist and writer for children, whose popular novel Seven Little Australians (1894) was filmed (1939), twice dramatized for television, once in Great Britain (1953) and once in Australia (1973), and made into a musical (1978). Turner’s parents immigrated with her to

  • Turner, Frederick Jackson (American historian)

    Frederick Jackson Turner, American historian best known for the “frontier thesis.” The single most influential interpretation of the American past, it proposed that the distinctiveness of the United States was attributable to its long history of “westering.” Despite the fame of this monocausal

  • Turner, Grenville (English geochronologist)

    dating: Potassium–argon methods: Merrihue and English geochronologist Grenville Turner in 1966. In this technique, known as the argon-40–argon-39 method, both parent and daughter can be determined in the mass spectrometer as some of the potassium atoms in the sample are first converted to argon-39 in a nuclear reactor. In this way, the…

  • Turner, Henry MacNeal (American civil rights leader and religious leader)

    African Methodist Episcopal Church: … itself through the work of Bishop Henry Turner, who visited Liberia and Sierra Leone in 1891 and South Africa in 1896.

  • Turner, Herbert Hall (British astronomer)

    Herbert Hall Turner, English astronomer who pioneered many of the procedures now universally employed in determining stellar positions from astronomical photographs. In 1884 Turner was appointed chief assistant at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and in 1893 he became Savilian professor of

  • Turner, Ike (American musician)

    Ike Turner, American rhythm-and-blues and soul performer and producer who was best known for his work with Tina Turner. Ike Turner began playing piano as a child and by the late 1940s had played with a number of the leading blues musicians in the Mississippi Delta region. While in high school he

  • Turner, Izear Luster, Jr. (American musician)

    Ike Turner, American rhythm-and-blues and soul performer and producer who was best known for his work with Tina Turner. Ike Turner began playing piano as a child and by the late 1940s had played with a number of the leading blues musicians in the Mississippi Delta region. While in high school he

  • Turner, J. M. W. (English painter)

    J.M.W. Turner, English Romantic landscape painter whose expressionistic studies of light, colour, and atmosphere were unmatched in their range and sublimity. Turner was the son of a barber. At age 10 he was sent to live with an uncle at Brentford, Middlesex, where he attended school. Several

  • Turner, Joe (American singer)

    Big Joe Turner, American blues singer, or “shouter,” whose music included jazz, rhythm and blues, and boogie-woogie. He has been credited as a progenitor of jump blues and of early rock and roll. Singing in his youth in church choirs and informally for tips, Turner drew attention as a singing

  • Turner, John (British psychologist)

    Henri Tajfel: Social identity and intergroup relations: Tajfel and his student John Turner developed social identity theory in the 1970s. Among the key ideas of social identity theory are the following:

  • Turner, John Napier (prime minister of Canada)

    John Napier Turner, Canadian lawyer and politician who in June 1984 succeeded Pierre Elliott Trudeau as head of the Liberal Party and prime minister of Canada. In general elections of September of the same year, his party was routed by the Progressive Conservatives under Brian Mulroney. Turner’s

  • Turner, Joseph Mallord William (English painter)

    J.M.W. Turner, English Romantic landscape painter whose expressionistic studies of light, colour, and atmosphere were unmatched in their range and sublimity. Turner was the son of a barber. At age 10 he was sent to live with an uncle at Brentford, Middlesex, where he attended school. Several

  • Turner, Joseph Vernon (American singer)

    Big Joe Turner, American blues singer, or “shouter,” whose music included jazz, rhythm and blues, and boogie-woogie. He has been credited as a progenitor of jump blues and of early rock and roll. Singing in his youth in church choirs and informally for tips, Turner drew attention as a singing

  • Turner, Julia Jean Mildred Francis (American actress)

    Lana Turner, American film actress known for her glamorous looks and sexual allure. Though her skill as an actress was limited, Turner excelled in roles that highlighted her sexuality and working-class roots. She enjoyed her greatest popularity in the 1940s and ’50s, often playing the part of a

  • Turner, Kathleen (American actress)

    Michael Douglas: Noteworthy acting roles: He appeared with Kathleen Turner and Danny DeVito in the highly successful action-adventure Romancing the Stone (1984) and its sequel, The Jewel of the Nile (1985), and again teamed with the same costars for the popular dark comedy The War of the Roses (1989). One of Douglas’s most…

  • Turner, Lana (American actress)

    Lana Turner, American film actress known for her glamorous looks and sexual allure. Though her skill as an actress was limited, Turner excelled in roles that highlighted her sexuality and working-class roots. She enjoyed her greatest popularity in the 1940s and ’50s, often playing the part of a

  • Turner, Margaret Marian (American musician and radio personality)

    Marian McPartland, English-born American jazz musician and radio personality, best known in the United States for her National Public Radio program Piano Jazz. McPartland began playing the piano when she was three years old. She attended private schools and studied classical music at the Guildhall

  • Turner, Michael (American football player)

    Atlanta Falcons: …and newly acquired running back Michael Turner, the Falcons qualified for the play-offs by adding seven wins to the previous year’s total to compile an 11–5 record.

  • Turner, Nat (American slave and bondsman)

    Nat Turner, black American slave who led the only effective, sustained slave rebellion (August 1831) in U.S. history. Spreading terror throughout the white South, his action set off a new wave of oppressive legislation prohibiting the education, movement, and assembly of slaves and stiffened

  • Turner, Ralph E. (American historian)

    Ralph E. Turner, American cultural historian, professor at Yale from 1944 to 1961, and, as an American delegate to an educators’ conference in London (1944), one of the planners of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In his historical research he relied on

  • Turner, Ralph H. (American psychologist)

    social movement: Types of social movements: Turner and Killian argue that it is useful at times to categorize social movements on the basis of their public definition, the character of the opposition evoked, and the means of action available to the movement. This scheme is designed to eliminate the subjective evaluation…

  • Turner, Robert Edward, III (American entrepreneur)

    Ted Turner, American broadcasting entrepreneur, philanthropist, sportsman, and environmentalist who founded a media empire that included several television channels that he created, notably CNN. Turner grew up in an affluent family; his father owned a successful billboard-advertising company. In

  • Turner, Rowley B. (British cyclist)

    bicycle: From boneshakers to bicycles: …Britain began in 1868, when Rowley B. Turner took a Michaux bicycle to Britain and showed it to his uncle, Josiah Turner, manager of the Coventry Sewing Machine Company. Rowley Turner ordered 400 machines, which were slated to be sold in Britain and France. Although the French sales were ultimately…

  • Turner, Sonny (American singer)

    the Platters: June 4, 2012), and Sonny Turner (b. 1939, Fairmont, West Virginia, U.S.).

  • Turner, Sophie (British actress)

    Jonas Brothers: …year Joe wed British actress Sophie Turner.

  • Turner, Ted (American entrepreneur)

    Ted Turner, American broadcasting entrepreneur, philanthropist, sportsman, and environmentalist who founded a media empire that included several television channels that he created, notably CNN. Turner grew up in an affluent family; his father owned a successful billboard-advertising company. In

  • Turner, Thomas (English pottery manufacturer)

    Caughley ware: …was extended in 1772 by Thomas Turner to make soaprock (steatitic) porcelain; a close connection existed with the Worcester porcelain factory, and from there Robert Hancock, the pioneer engraver of copper plates for transfer printing, joined Turner in 1775.

  • Turner, Tina (American-born singer)

    Tina Turner, American-born singer who found success in the rhythm-and-blues, soul, and rock genres in a career that spanned five decades. Turner was born into a sharecropping family in rural Tennessee. She began singing as a teenager and, after moving to St. Louis, Missouri, immersed herself in the

  • Turner, Victor (British anthropologist)

    rite of passage: Victor Turner and anti-structure: From the 1960s through the early 1980s, the classic structural functionalist view of rites of passage was challenged and revised. The charge was led by the British anthropologist Victor Turner, who acknowledged the contribution of structural functionalism to the study of…

  • Turner, William (English potter)

    ironstone china: …was achieved in 1800 by William Turner of the Lane End potteries at Longton, Staffordshire. In 1805 Turner sold his patent to Josiah Spode the Second, Stoke-upon-Trent, who called his bluish gray ceramic products stone china and new stone. A patent was granted to Charles James Mason, Lane Delph, in…

  • Turner, William (English botanist)

    William Turner, English naturalist, botanist, and theologian known as the “father of English botany.” His A New Herball was the first English herbal to include original material. Turner studied at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge. His dissatisfaction with derivative herbals led him to write Libellus de re

  • Turner, William Thomas (British ship captain)

    Lusitania: The ship’s captain, William Thomas Turner, chose to ignore these recommendations, and on the afternoon of May 7 the vessel was attacked. A torpedo struck and exploded amidships on the starboard side, and a heavier explosion followed, possibly caused by damage to the ship’s steam engines and pipes.…

  • Turneraceae (plant family)

    Malpighiales: Turneraceae: Members of Turneraceae, a family of 10 genera and 205 species, are found in the tropical and subtropical parts of the Americas, Africa, Madagascar, and the Mascarene Islands. Turnera (122 species) and Piriqueta (44 species) are both found in the Neotropics and Africa. Members…

  • turnery (carpentry)

    furniture industry: History: Turnery became a separate trade, while the cabinetmaker assembled the turned parts; veneer and marquetry cutting was not done by the cabinetmaker although he laid both; carving too called for the skill and experience and tools of a craftsman who did nothing else. Another specialist,…

  • Turnfest (German festival)

    gymnastics: History: …first German gymnastic festival (Turnfest) was held in Coburg in 1860. The festival attracted affiliated Turnverein clubs and marked the beginning of international competition, as the growing family of Turners outside of Germany were invited to participate. Americans had been introduced to gymnastics by followers of Jahn in the…

  • Turnhalle Alliance (political party, Namibia)

    Namibia: Independence: …main opposition party, the Democratic Turnhalle Alliance (heir to South Africa’s puppet government efforts and beneficiary of considerable South African funds for campaign financing), held almost one-third of the seats in the legislature but was neither particularly constructive nor totally obstructive. In the 1994 national elections, SWAPO consolidated its hold…

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
港台一级毛片免费观看