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  • Tundzha River (river, Bulgaria)

    Bulgaria: Drainage: Arda, Tundzha, and Yantra. Overall, more than half of the runoff drains to the Black Sea, and the rest flows to the Aegean Sea.

  • tune family (music)

    Tune family, in music, group of melodies interrelated by melodic correspondence, particularly in general melodic contour, important intervals, and prominent accented tones. There may be differences of rhythmic pattern, mode, and text among melodies within a group. Such groups of related melodies

  • Tune Stone (Norwegian artifact)

    Tune Stone, 5th-century monument bearing the most important Norwegian runic inscription, written vertically on two sides of the stone. Discovered in 1627 in southeastern Norway, it is now in Oslo. Authorities do not agree on the translation, but it is clear that WiwaR carved the runes in memory of

  • tuned circuit (electronics)

    Tuned circuit, any electrically conducting pathway containing both inductive and capacitive elements. If these elements are connected in series, the circuit presents low impedance to alternating current of the resonant frequency, which is determined by the values of the inductance and capacitance,

  • tuned glasses (musical instrument)

    Glass harmonica, musical instrument consisting of a set of graduated, tuned glass bowls sounded by the friction of wetted fingers on their rims. It was invented by Benjamin Franklin and was derived from the vérillon (musical glasses), a set of glasses, holding different amounts of water and thus

  • tuned port enclosure (sound)

    electromechanical transducer: Electromagnetic speakers: The tuned port or bass reflex enclosure achieves greater efficiency and extends the bass frequency range by carefully adjusting the shape and position of a hole or tube connecting the inside of the speaker box with the outside. The volume of the box thus acts as a type of…

  • túnel, El (novel by Sabato)

    Ernesto Sábato: The Outsider) won Sábato national and international notice. The protagonist of the novel is a typical existential antihero who is unable to communicate with anyone. Faced with the absurdity of the human condition, he withdraws from society. Sábato subsequently published nonfiction works such as Hombres…

  • tuner (electronics)

    television: Basic receiver circuits: The channel-switching mechanism (tuner) of the receiver connects this amplifier to one of several individual circuits, each circuit tuned to its respective channel. The amplifier magnifies the voltages of the incoming picture and sound carriers and their side bands in the desired channel by about 10 times, and…

  • Tung (people)

    Dong, an ethnic minority of China found in southeastern Guizhou province and in neighbouring Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi and Hunan province. According to most linguists the Dong speak a Kam-Sui language that is closely related to the Tai languages, and they call themselves Kam. The Dong

  • Tung Ch’i-ch’ang (Chinese artist)

    Dong Qichang, Chinese painter, calligrapher, and theoretician who was one of the finest artists of the late Ming period. The most distinguished connoisseur of his day, Dong Qichang set forward ideas that have continued to influence Chinese aesthetic theory. Dong Qichang was born to a poor but

  • Tung Chee Hwa (Chinese businessman and politician)

    Tung Chee-hwa, Chinese businessman and politician and first chief executive (1997–2005) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (S.A.R.) of China. Tung was the son of C.Y. Tung, founder of Orient Overseas—now part of Orient Overseas (International) Limited (OOIL), one of the world’s largest

  • Tung Chee-hwa (Chinese businessman and politician)

    Tung Chee-hwa, Chinese businessman and politician and first chief executive (1997–2005) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (S.A.R.) of China. Tung was the son of C.Y. Tung, founder of Orient Overseas—now part of Orient Overseas (International) Limited (OOIL), one of the world’s largest

  • Tung Chien-hua (Chinese businessman and politician)

    Tung Chee-hwa, Chinese businessman and politician and first chief executive (1997–2005) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (S.A.R.) of China. Tung was the son of C.Y. Tung, founder of Orient Overseas—now part of Orient Overseas (International) Limited (OOIL), one of the world’s largest

  • Tung Chin dynasty (Chinese history)

    Dong Jin, second phase of the Jin dynasty (265–420 ce), ruling China from 317 to 420 ce and forming one of the Six

  • Tung Cho (Chinese general)

    Dong Zhuo, general whose seizure of power and tyrannical rule ended the Han dynasty (206 bce–220 ce) and divided the Chinese empire. In 190 ce Dong Zhuo burned Luoyang, the capital, and removed himself and the emperor to the ancient capital of Chang’an (now Xi’an). At his fief he built the walled

  • Tung Chung-shu (Chinese scholar)

    Dong Zhongshu, scholar instrumental in establishing Confucianism in 136 bce as the state cult of China and as the basis of official political philosophy—a position it was to hold for 2,000 years. As a philosopher, Dong merged the Confucian and Yinyang schools of thought. As a chief minister to the

  • Tung Hai (sea, Pacific Ocean)

    East China Sea, arm of the Pacific Ocean bordering the East Asian mainland and extending northeastward from the South China Sea, to which it is connected by the shallow Taiwan Strait between Taiwan and mainland China. The East China Sea and the South China Sea together form the China Sea. The East

  • Tung Han dynasty (Chinese history [25-220])

    China: Dong (Eastern) Han: The Han house was restored by Liu Xiu, better known as Guangwudi, who reigned from 25 to 57 ce. His claim had been contested by another member of the Liu house—Liu Xuan, better known as Liu Gengshi—who had been actually enthroned for…

  • tung oil (plant substance)

    Tung oil, pale-yellow, pungent drying oil obtained from the seeds of the tung tree. On long standing or on heating, tung oil polymerizes to a hard, waterproof gel that is highly resistant to acids and alkalies. It is used in quick-drying varnishes and paints, as a waterproofing agent, and in making

  • tung oil tree (plant)

    Tung tree, (Aleurites fordii), small Asian tree of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), commercially valuable for tung oil (q.v.), which is extracted from its nutlike seeds. In the Orient tung oil was traditionally used for lighting, but it also has important modern industrial uses. The tung tree

  • tung tree (plant)

    Tung tree, (Aleurites fordii), small Asian tree of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), commercially valuable for tung oil (q.v.), which is extracted from its nutlike seeds. In the Orient tung oil was traditionally used for lighting, but it also has important modern industrial uses. The tung tree

  • Tung-chia (people)

    Dong, an ethnic minority of China found in southeastern Guizhou province and in neighbouring Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi and Hunan province. According to most linguists the Dong speak a Kam-Sui language that is closely related to the Tai languages, and they call themselves Kam. The Dong

  • Tung-hsiang language

    Mongolian languages: …Monguor (Tu), Bao’an (Bonan), and Santa (Dongxiang) in the south—were isolated from the main body of Mongolian languages when the tide of Mongol conquest receded. These languages diverged from the main group of Mongolian dialects and to this day retain archaic features characteristic of Middle Mongolian that have been lost…

  • Tung-hui (people)

    Manchu, people who lived for many centuries mainly in Manchuria (now Northeast) and adjacent areas of China and who in the 17th century conquered China and ruled for more than 250 years. The term Manchu dates from the 16th century, but it is certain that the Manchu are descended from a group of

  • Tung-jen (people)

    Dong, an ethnic minority of China found in southeastern Guizhou province and in neighbouring Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi and Hunan province. According to most linguists the Dong speak a Kam-Sui language that is closely related to the Tai languages, and they call themselves Kam. The Dong

  • Tung-lin (Chinese history)

    Donglin, party of Chinese scholars and officials who attempted to combat the moral laxity and intellectual weakness they felt was undermining public life during the last years of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). The party was founded by Gu Xiancheng, a government official forced out of office because

  • Tung-pei (historical region, China)

    Manchuria, historical region of northeastern China. Strictly speaking, it consists of the modern provinces (sheng) of Liaoning (south), Jilin (central), and Heilongjiang (north). Often, however, the northeastern portion of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region also is included. Manchuria is bounded

  • Tung-pei P’ing-yüan (plain, China)

    Northeast Plain, heart of the central lowland of northeastern China (Manchuria). It has a surface area of about 135,000 square miles (350,000 square km), all of which lies below 1,000 feet (300 metres) above sea level. The plain, largely the product of erosion from the surrounding highlands, is

  • Tung-shu (work by Zhou Dunyi)

    Zhou Dunyi: In the longer treatise entitled Tongshu (“Explanatory Text”), Zhou’s restatement and reinterpretation of Confucian doctrines laid the basis for the ethics of later Neo-Confucianism. According to Zhou, the sage, or superior man, reacts to external phenomena according to the principles of propriety, humanity, righteousness, wisdom, faithfulness, and tranquillity. Zhou viewed…

  • Tung-t’ing Hu (lake, China)

    Dongting Lake, large lake in northern Hunan province, south-central China. It lies in a basin to the south of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) and is connected to the Yangtze by four channels. Typically, some two-fifths of the river’s waters flow into the lake, the amount increasing during flood

  • Tung-yüan (Chinese philosopher)

    Dai Zhen, Chinese empirical philosopher, considered by many to have been the greatest thinker of the Qing period (1644–1911/12). Born to poor parents, Dai educated himself by reading borrowed books. Although he passed his preliminary civil service examinations, he never passed the highly stylized

  • Tunga penetrans (insect)

    mamey apple: …used locally for destroying skin-infesting chigoe fleas, and the bitter resinous seeds are used as an antiworming agent.

  • Tungabhadra (river, India)

    Krishna River: …the Bhima (north) and the Tungabhadra (south). The latter has a dam at Hospet, completed in 1957, forming a reservoir and supplying hydroelectric power. Other hydroelectric installations along the river include those along the Telangana–Andhra Pradesh border at Srisailam and Nagarjuna Sagar.

  • Tungabhadra-Krishna Doab (region, India)

    India: Bahmanī consolidation of the Deccan: …concerned with control over the Tungabhadra-Krishna Doab. The doab had been an area of contention long before the foundation of either the Bahmanī kingdom or Vijayanagar. Claims and counterclaims of victory show that neither side gained effective and lasting control over the doab, and the struggle extended eventually into the…

  • tungara frog (amphibian)

    Tungara frog, (Physalaemus pustulosus), terrestrial, toadlike frog common in moist, lowland sites from Mexico to northern South America. The frog is cryptically coloured, its rough brown skin matching the leaf litter in which it lives. Although a mere 25–35 mm (1–1.4 inches) in length, this small

  • Tungna (river, Iceland)

    Thjórs River: …and its largest tributary, the Tungna (80 miles [129 km] long), carry away meltwater from Hofsj?kull, Vatnaj?kull (Vatna Glacier), and several smaller glaciers while draining a basin of 2,907 square miles (7,530 square km), the lower third of which is part of the island’s most extensive farming region. Because of…

  • Tungri (people)

    history of the Low Countries: The Roman period: …the Xanten district, and the Tungri to part of the area originally inhabited by the Eburones.

  • tungstate mineral

    molybdate and tungstate minerals: tungstate minerals, naturally occurring inorganic compounds that are salts of molybdic acid, H2MoO4, and tungstic acid, H2WO4. Minerals in these groups often are valuable ores.

  • tungsten (chemical element)

    Tungsten (W), chemical element, an exceptionally strong refractory metal of Group 6 (VIb) of the periodic table, used in steels to increase hardness and strength and in lamp filaments. Tungsten metal was first isolated (1783) by the Spanish chemists and mineralogists Juan José and Fausto Elhuyar by

  • Tungsten (novel by Vallejo)

    César Vallejo: …proletarian novel El tungsteno (1931; Tungsten), showing the brutal exploitation and degradation of Indian workers at a Peruvian tungsten mine. He returned to Paris in 1932, and he then spent two years in Spain during that nation’s civil war (1936–39). The Spanish Civil War inspired most of his last important…

  • tungsten carbide (chemical compound)

    Tungsten carbide, an important member of the class of inorganic compounds of carbon, used alone or with 6 to 20 percent of other metals to impart hardness to cast iron, cutting edges of saws and drills, and penetrating cores of armour-piercing projectiles. Tungsten carbide is a dense, metallike

  • tungsten processing

    Tungsten processing, preparation of the ore for use in various products. Tungsten exhibits a body-centred cubic (bcc) crystal lattice. It has the highest melting point of all metals, 3,410° C (6,170° F), and it has high conductivity for electricity. Owing to this unique combination of properties,

  • tungsten-halogen lamp

    Halogen lamp, Incandescent lamp with a quartz bulb and a gas filling that includes a halogen. It gives brilliant light from a compact unit. The halogen combines with the tungsten evaporated from the hot filament to form a compound that is attracted back to the filament, thus extending the

  • tungstenite (mineral)

    molybdenite: …hexagonal symmetry as those of tungstenite (tungsten disulfide). Both have layered structures and similar physical properties; the chief difference is the higher specific gravity of tungstenite. For detailed physical properties, see sulfide mineral (table).

  • tungsteno, El (novel by Vallejo)

    César Vallejo: …proletarian novel El tungsteno (1931; Tungsten), showing the brutal exploitation and degradation of Indian workers at a Peruvian tungsten mine. He returned to Paris in 1932, and he then spent two years in Spain during that nation’s civil war (1936–39). The Spanish Civil War inspired most of his last important…

  • tungunlungu (African figurine)

    African art: Lower Congo (Kongo) cultural area: One type of figure, called tungunlungu, representing the female ancestry of the tribe, is placed in front of the chief’s house.

  • Tungurahua (volcano, Ecuador)

    Puruhá: …two local volcanoes, Chimborazo and Tungurahua, were their divine ancestors, and they offered human sacrifices to Chimborazo.

  • Tungus (people)

    Evenk, the most numerous and widely scattered of the many small ethnic groups of northern Siberia (Asian Russia). The Evenk numbered about 70,000 in the early 21st century. A few thousand live in Mongolia, and the remainder are almost equally divided between Russia and China. They are separable

  • Tungus language

    Evenk language, one of the largest members of the Manchu-Tungus language family (a subfamily of the Altaic languages). The language, which has more than 20 dialects, is spoken in China, Mongolia, and Russia. A literary form of the language, using the Latin alphabet, was created in the late 1920s,

  • Tungus languages

    Arctic: Linguistic affiliations: …Yenisey River, languages of the Tungusic type predominate. These languages, each with several dialect divisions, are spoken by the Evenk and the Even. They represent the northern branch of the so-called Manchu-Tungus language group. Languages of this group share a common agglutinative structure with the Mongolian languages (which include Mongol,…

  • Tungus-Manchu languages

    Manchu-Tungus languages, smallest of three subfamilies of the Altaic language family. The Manchu-Tungus languages are a group of 10 to 17 languages spoken by fewer than 70,000 people scattered across a vast region that stretches from northern China across Mongolia to the northern boundary of

  • Tungusic languages

    Arctic: Linguistic affiliations: …Yenisey River, languages of the Tungusic type predominate. These languages, each with several dialect divisions, are spoken by the Evenk and the Even. They represent the northern branch of the so-called Manchu-Tungus language group. Languages of this group share a common agglutinative structure with the Mongolian languages (which include Mongol,…

  • Tunguska event (astronomy and geology)

    Tunguska event, enormous explosion that is estimated to have occurred at 7:14 am plus or minus one minute on June 30, 1908, at an altitude of 5–10 km (15,000–30,000 feet), flattening some 2,000 square km (500,000 acres) and charring more than 100 square km of pine forest near the Podkamennaya

  • Tunguska River (river, Russia)

    Tunguska River, either of two roughly parallel rivers of western Siberia, Russia, both tributaries of the Yenisey. Both rivers flow generally northwest, but the Podkamennaya Tunguska River turns west at about 62° N to join the Yenisey, whereas the Nizhnyaya Tunguska River continues its

  • Tunhisgala (mountain, Sri Lanka)

    Knuckles: …6,112 ft (1,863 m) at Knuckles Peak, about 10 mi northeast of Wattegama. The region receives an average rainfall of 100–200 in. (2,500–5,000 mm). Tea, rubber, rice, vegetables, and cardamom are grown in the area. Of irregular shape, the mountain range extends for 25 mi in length and reaches 15…

  • Tunhuang manuscript

    astronomical map: Relationship of the bright stars and their constellations: …any civilization is the Chinese Tunhuang manuscript in the British Museum, dating from about 940 ce. A Latin document of about the same age, also in the British Museum, shows a planisphere to illustrate the Phainomena of Aratus, without, however, indicating individual stars. The oldest illuminated Islamic astronomical manuscript, a…

  • tunic (clothing)

    Tunic, basic garment worn by men and women in the ancient Mediterranean world. It was fashioned from two pieces of linen sewn up the sides and across the top, with holes left for the head and arms. It reached to the knees or lower, was with or without sleeves, belted at the waist, and held at the s

  • tunic (botany)

    corm: …fibrous covering known as a tunic, and the roots emerge from a smooth area at the base known as the basal plate. Corms store starches to fuel growth and to help plants survive unfavourable conditions, and many produce offshoots known as daughter corms or cormels that are used for vegetative…

  • tunic (tunicate integument)

    tunicate: …embedded in a tough secreted tunic containing cellulose (a glucose polysaccharide not normally found in animals). The less modified forms are benthic (bottom-dwelling and sessile), while the more advanced forms are pelagic (floating and swimming in open water). A characteristic tadpole larva develops in the life cycle, and in one…

  • tunica (clothing)

    Tunic, basic garment worn by men and women in the ancient Mediterranean world. It was fashioned from two pieces of linen sewn up the sides and across the top, with holes left for the head and arms. It reached to the knees or lower, was with or without sleeves, belted at the waist, and held at the s

  • tunica (botany)

    plant development: The shoot tip: …three layers, which constitute the tunica. Enclosed by the tunica lies a core of cells that exhibits no distinct layering; this zone is the corpus. The layers of the tunica normally contribute to the surface layers of the plant, and the corpus provides the deeper lying tissues.

  • tunica adventitia (anatomy)

    artery: The outermost coat, or tunica adventitia, is a tough layer consisting mainly of collagen fibres that act as a supportive element. The large arteries differ structurally from the medium-sized arteries in that they have a much thicker tunica media and a somewhat thicker tunica adventitia. See also cardiovascular system.

  • tunica albuginea (anatomy)

    animal reproductive system: Testes: …surrounded by a capsule, the tunica albuginea. Seminiferous tubules may constitute up to 90 percent of the testis. The tubule walls consist of a multilayered germinal epithelium containing spermatogenic cells and Sertoli cells, nutritive cells that have the heads of maturing sperm embedded in them. Seminiferous tubules may begin blindly…

  • tunica intima (anatomy)

    artery: The innermost layer, or tunica intima, consists of a lining, a fine network of connective tissue, and a layer of elastic fibres bound together in a membrane pierced with many openings. The tunica media, or middle coat, is made up principally of smooth (involuntary) muscle cells and elastic fibres…

  • Tunica language

    Mary R. Haas: …where her dissertation was on Tunica, a moribund American Indian language. She continued her fieldwork on, and comparative studies of, American Indian languages, especially of the southeastern U.S., including the Natchez and Muskogean languages, for the rest of her life. She directed the Survey of California Indian Languages while on…

  • tunica media (anatomy)

    artery: The tunica media, or middle coat, is made up principally of smooth (involuntary) muscle cells and elastic fibres arranged in roughly spiral layers. The outermost coat, or tunica adventitia, is a tough layer consisting mainly of collagen fibres that act as a supportive element. The large…

  • Tunicata (chordate subphylum)

    Tunicate, any member of the subphylum Tunicata (Urochordata) of the phylum Chordata. Small marine animals, they are found in great numbers throughout the seas of the world. Adult members are commonly embedded in a tough secreted tunic containing cellulose (a glucose polysaccharide not normally

  • tunicate (chordate subphylum)

    Tunicate, any member of the subphylum Tunicata (Urochordata) of the phylum Chordata. Small marine animals, they are found in great numbers throughout the seas of the world. Adult members are commonly embedded in a tough secreted tunic containing cellulose (a glucose polysaccharide not normally

  • Tunick, Jonathon (American composer)
  • tunicle (vestment)

    dalmatic: A shorter dalmatic, called the tunicle, is worn by subdeacons. Both the dalmatic and tunicle were worn under the chasuble by Roman Catholic bishops, but since 1960 these vestments have not been obligatory for bishops.

  • tuning (music)

    Tuning and temperament, in music, the adjustment of one sound source, such as a voice or string, to produce a desired pitch in relation to a given pitch, and the modification of that tuning to lessen dissonance. The determination of pitch, the quality of sound that is described as ‘high” or “low,”

  • tuning and temperament (music)

    Tuning and temperament, in music, the adjustment of one sound source, such as a voice or string, to produce a desired pitch in relation to a given pitch, and the modification of that tuning to lessen dissonance. The determination of pitch, the quality of sound that is described as ‘high” or “low,”

  • tuning fork (mechanical device)

    Tuning fork, narrow, two-pronged steel bar that when tuned to a specific musical pitch retains its tuning almost indefinitely. It was apparently invented by George Frideric Handel’s trumpeter John Shore shortly before Shore’s death in 1752. Because it produces a nearly pure tone (without

  • tuning peg (musical instrument part)

    stringed instrument: Morphology: The pegbox carries the four tuning pegs, two on each side. It is slotted to the front to receive the strings. The pegs are tapered and pass through two holes in the cheeks of the head. At the top of the head is the scroll, again a typical embellishment of…

  • tuning wire (organ pipe)

    keyboard instrument: Reed pipes: …are tuned by moving the tuning wire, thus shortening or lengthening the tongue. As in flue pipes, the scale and shape of the resonator largely determine the quality of tone to be produced; but the wind pressure, the shape and size of the shallot, and the thickness and curvature of…

  • tuning-fork piano (musical instrument)

    percussion instrument: The 19th century: …experiments with graduated sets of tuning forks struck by hammers from a keyboard produced the 19th-century “tuning-fork pianos,” the most noteworthy of which were different models of Victor Mustel of Paris from 1865 on. Graduated steel bars struck from a keyboard by piano hammers form the celesta, patented in 1886…

  • Tunip (ancient city, Syria)

    Ramses II: Military exploits: …defenses and conquered Katna and Tunip—where, in a surprise attack by the Hittites, he went into battle without his armour—and held them long enough for a statue of himself as overlord to be erected in Tunip. In a further advance he invaded Kode, perhaps the region between Alexandretta and Carchemish.…

  • Tunis (national capital, Tunisia)

    Tunis, capital and largest city of Tunisia, on the northern African coast, between the western and eastern basins of the Mediterranean Sea. Tunis was built at the end of the shallow Lake of Tunis, an inlet of the Gulf of Tunis, and is linked with its port, ?alq al-Wādī, 6 miles (10 km) to the

  • Tunis, Bourse de (stock exchange, Tunisia)

    Tunisia: Finance: The Tunisian stock exchange, Bourse de Tunis, was founded in 1969 and has become a central pillar of economic policy, as it has facilitated privatization and encouraged both domestic savings and foreign investment.

  • Tunisia

    Tunisia, country of North Africa. Tunisia’s accessible Mediterranean Sea coastline and strategic location have attracted conquerors and visitors throughout the ages, and its ready access to the Sahara has brought its people into contact with the inhabitants of the African interior. According to

  • Tunisia, flag of

    national flag consisting of a red field (background) with a central white disk incorporating a red star and redcrescent. The flag’s width-to-length ratio is 2 to 3.The Turkish national flag colour for centuries has been red, and ships from Tunisia, like private vessels throughout the Ottoman

  • Tunisia, history of

    Tunisia: History: The following discussion offers a brief summary of Tunisia’s early history but mainly focuses on Tunisia since about 1800. For a more detailed treatment of earlier periods and of the country in its regional context, see North Africa.

  • Tunisia, Republic of

    Tunisia, country of North Africa. Tunisia’s accessible Mediterranean Sea coastline and strategic location have attracted conquerors and visitors throughout the ages, and its ready access to the Sahara has brought its people into contact with the inhabitants of the African interior. According to

  • Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts (Tunisian organization)

    National Dialogue Quartet: …des Avocats de Tunisie), the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts (Union Tunisienne de l’Industrie, du Commerce et de l’Artisinat; UTICA), and the Tunisian Human Rights League (La Ligue Tunisienne pour la Défense des Droits de l’Homme; LTDH)—that was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2015 for its efforts…

  • Tunisian Dorsale (mountains, Tunisia)

    Tunisia: Relief: The Tunisian Dorsale, or High Tell, a southwest-northeast–trending mountain range that is an extension of the Saharan Atlas (Atlas Saharien) of Algeria, tapers off in the direction of the Sharīk (Cape Bon) Peninsula in the northeast, south of the Gulf of Tunis. The highest mountain, Mount Chambi (Al-Sha?nabī), located…

  • Tunisian General Labour Union (Tunisian labour organization)

    National Dialogue Quartet: …of Tunisian civil society organizations—the Tunisian General Labour Union (Union Générale Tunisienne du Travail; UGTT), the Tunisian Order of Lawyers (Ordre National des Avocats de Tunisie), the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts (Union Tunisienne de l’Industrie, du Commerce et de l’Artisinat; UTICA), and the Tunisian Human Rights League…

  • Tunisian Human Rights League (Tunisian organization)

    National Dialogue Quartet: …de l’Artisinat; UTICA), and the Tunisian Human Rights League (La Ligue Tunisienne pour la Défense des Droits de l’Homme; LTDH)—that was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2015 for its efforts to broker peaceful political compromise in Tunisia in the wake of the Tunisian Revolution of 2010–11 (also called the…

  • Tunisian Liberal Constitutional Party (political party, Tunisia)

    Destour, Tunisian political party, especially active in the 1920s and ’30s in arousing Tunisian national consciousness and opposition to the French protectorate. The forerunner of the Destour, the Young Tunisians, had engaged the Tunisian intellectual elite but lacked widespread support. Forced

  • Tunisian literature

    Tunisia: The arts: Modern Tunisian literature grew from a cultural renaissance in the early 20th century. Social essayist Tahar Haddad, satirist Ali Douagi, poet Aboul Kacem Chabbi, and others have paved the way for a new realist trend in Tunisian literature by combining modern European styles with contemporary Tunisian…

  • Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet (Tunisian organization)

    National Dialogue Quartet, coalition of Tunisian civil society organizations—the Tunisian General Labour Union (Union Générale Tunisienne du Travail; UGTT), the Tunisian Order of Lawyers (Ordre National des Avocats de Tunisie), the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts (Union

  • Tunisian Order of Lawyers (Tunisian organization)

    National Dialogue Quartet: …Tunisienne du Travail; UGTT), the Tunisian Order of Lawyers (Ordre National des Avocats de Tunisie), the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts (Union Tunisienne de l’Industrie, du Commerce et de l’Artisinat; UTICA), and the Tunisian Human Rights League (La Ligue Tunisienne pour la Défense des Droits de l’Homme; LTDH)—that…

  • Tunisie Télécom (communications organization, Tunisia)

    Tunisia: Transportation and telecommunications: …telecommunication services are controlled by Tunisie Télécom (founded in 1996), a state-owned entity that is responsible for maintaining and developing the country’s communications infrastructure. Tunisia signed the World Trade Organization Basic Telecommunications Services Agreement of 1997, which opened the country’s market, and its telecommunications infrastructure has expanded markedly since that…

  • Tunisien, Le (Tunisian newspaper)

    Tunisia: The protectorate (1881–1956): …major weapon became the newspaper Le Tunisien, a French-language publication founded in 1907. With the printing of an Arabic edition in 1909, the Young Tunisians simultaneously educated their compatriots and persuaded the more liberal French to help move Tunisia toward modernity.

  • Tunja (Colombia)

    Tunja, city and capital of Boyacá departamento, north-central Colombia. It lies in the high valley of the Teatinos, or Boyacá, River. Founded in 1539 by Captain Gonzalo Suárez Rendón, the settlement was originally called Hunza by the local Chibcha Indians. In 1819 it served as Simón Bolívar’s

  • Tunjur (people)

    Chad: Ethnic groups: …associated with the Kanembu and Tunjur, who are of Arabic origin. All of these groups are sedentary and coexist with Daza, Kreda, and Arab nomads. The Hadjeray (of the Guera Massif) and Abou Telfan are composed of refugee populations who, living on their mountainous terrain, have resisted various invasions. On…

  • Tunkin, Grigory Ivanovich (Russian scholar and diplomat)

    Grigory Ivanovich Tunkin, Soviet legal scholar and diplomat who played a major role in formulating Soviet foreign policy as a key adviser to Soviet leaders Nikita Khrushchev and Mikhail Gorbachev. Tunkin graduated from the Moscow Law Institute in 1935 and received a doctorate from Moscow State

  • Tunku, Dan (Fulani warrior)

    Kazaure: It was founded by Dan Tunku, a Fulani warrior who was one of the 14 flag bearers for the Fulani jihad (holy war) leader Usman dan Fodio. Dan Tunku arrived from the nearby town of Dambatta (Dambarta) at a stockaded village that he named Kazaure and established an emirate…

  • tunnel (engineering)

    Tunnels and underground excavations, horizontal underground passageway produced by excavation or occasionally by nature’s action in dissolving a soluble rock, such as limestone. A vertical opening is usually called a shaft. Tunnels have many uses: for mining ores, for transportation—including road

  • tunnel diode (electronics)

    Leo Esaki: …which became known as the Esaki diode. It also opened new possibilities for solid-state developments that his corecipients of the 1973 prize exploited separately. In 1960 Esaki was awarded an IBM (International Business Machines) fellowship for further research in the United States, and he subsequently joined IBM’s research laboratories in…

  • tunnel effect (physics)

    Tunneling, in physics, passage of minute particles through seemingly impassable force barriers. The phenomenon first drew attention in the case of alpha decay, in which alpha particles (nuclei of helium atoms) escape from certain radioactive atomic nuclei. Because nuclear constituents are held

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