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  • Tucker, C. DeLores (American political activist)

    C. DeLores Tucker, (Cynthia DeLores Nottage), American political activist (born Oct. 4, 1927, Philadelphia, Pa.—died Oct. 12, 2005, Philadelphia), in the 1990s spearheaded a campaign against the foul language and misogyny found in the lyrics of gangsta-rap music. Tucker became politically active a

  • Tucker, Corin (American musician)

    Sleater-Kinney: …as a collaboration between friends Corin Tucker (b. November 9, 1972, State College, Pennsylvania, U.S.) and Carrie Brownstein (b. September 27, 1974, Seattle, Washington), of the early 1990s riot grrrl bands Heavens to Betsy and Excuse 17, respectively. (Sleater-Kinney was named after a street in Olympia.) The two singer-guitarists recruited…

  • Tucker, Forrest (American actor)

    The Abominable Snowman: …crass American, Tom Friend (Forrest Tucker). The expedition’s purpose is to find the legendary Abominable Snowman. Against the advice of his wife and the high lama, Rollason joins Friend’s team of trackers. Tragedy strikes the group at every turn, and a fight breaks out between Rollason and Friend when…

  • Tucker, Ira B. (American singer)

    Ira B. Tucker, American gospel singer (born May 17, 1925, Spartanburg, S.C.—died June 24, 2008, Philadelphia, Pa.), was for seven decades the arresting lead singer of the a cappella soul-gospel group the Dixie Hummingbirds, who enjoyed a flourishing career and influenced such performers as James

  • Tucker, James (Australian author)

    Australian literature: The century after settlement: James Tucker’s Ralph Rashleigh; or, The Life of an Exile (written in 1844; published in an edited version in 1929 and in its original text in 1952), on the other hand, makes use of all the sensational opportunities at hand. It begins as a picaresque…

  • Tucker, Jim Guy (American politician)

    Mike Huckabee: …seat after the previous tenant, Jim Guy Tucker, became governor following Bill Clinton’s ascent to the presidency. Tucker’s resignation in 1996 made Huckabee only the third Republican governor of Arkansas since Reconstruction (1865–77). He was reelected to full terms in 1998 and 2002.

  • Tucker, Josiah (British philosopher)

    international trade: The United States: …of a contemporary liberal philosopher, Josiah Tucker, Dean of Gloucester (England):

  • Tucker, Maureen (American musician)

    the Velvet Underground: …30, 1995, Poughkeepsie, New York), Maureen (“Moe”) Tucker (b. August 26, 1944, Levittown, Long Island, New York), Nico (original name Christa P?ffgen; b. October 16, 1938, Cologne, Germany—d. July 18, 1988, Ibiza, Spain), Angus MacLise, and Doug Yule.

  • Tucker, Moe (American musician)

    the Velvet Underground: …30, 1995, Poughkeepsie, New York), Maureen (“Moe”) Tucker (b. August 26, 1944, Levittown, Long Island, New York), Nico (original name Christa P?ffgen; b. October 16, 1938, Cologne, Germany—d. July 18, 1988, Ibiza, Spain), Angus MacLise, and Doug Yule.

  • Tucker, Richard (American opera singer)

    Richard Tucker, American operatic tenor and cantor who sang roles in more than 30 operas. As a youth, Tucker first sang as a member of a synagogue choir and on radio. He studied voice with Paul Althouse and made his Metropolitan Opera debut in 1945 as Enzo in Amilcare Ponchielli’s La gioconda. His

  • Tucker, Sophie (American singer)

    Sophie Tucker, American singer whose 62-year stage career included American burlesque, vaudeville, and nightclub and English music hall appearances. Born somewhere in Russia as her mother was on her way to join her father in the United States, Sophie Kalish grew up in Boston and then in Hartford,

  • Tucker, St. George (American jurist and educator)

    Second Amendment: District Court judge St. George Tucker in 1803 in his great work Blackstone’s Commentaries: With Notes of Reference to the Constitution and Laws of the Federal Government of the United States and of the Commonwealth of Virginia, as the “true palladium of liberty.” In addition to checking federal…

  • Tucker, William Ellis (American pottery manufacturer)

    Tucker porcelain: …factory founded in Philadelphia by William Ellis Tucker, who had found porcelain ingredients at sites near Wilmington, Del., and in New Jersey. At first, transfer-printed landscapes and floral patterns were executed on porcelain; from about 1831 ornate pieces, such as vases decorated with overglaze painting in the style of Sèvres…

  • Tucker: The Man and His Dream (film by Coppola [1988])

    Francis Ford Coppola: The 1980s: Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988) did no better commercially, but this handsome biographical film was arguably Coppola’s best film in years. Jeff Bridges played visionary car designer Preston Tucker, whose superior product (the “Tucker Torpedo”) is squelched through the collusion of Detroit’s giant…

  • Tuckey, James Kingston (British naval officer and explorer)

    James Kingston Tuckey, British naval officer and explorer who investigated the course of the Congo River and the kingdoms of the interior of West Africa. After service in the Caribbean, India, and the Far East, Tuckey was sent to Australia in 1802 to help found the British colony of New South

  • tuckpointing (building construction)

    Tuckpointing, in building construction, technique of finishing masonry joints with a fine, pointed ridge of mortar, for decorative purposes, instead of the usual slightly convex finish in ordinary masonwork. The term is sometimes used for pointing (q.v.) as in masonry

  • tuco-tuco (rodent)

    Tuco-tuco, (genus Ctenomys), South American burrowing rodents similar to the North American pocket gopher in both appearance and ecology. There are 48 species, although different authorities recognize from 39 to 56. More continue to be found, reflecting the variability in size, colour, and number

  • Tucson (Arizona, United States)

    Tucson, city, seat (1864) of Pima county, southeastern Arizona, U.S. Tucson lies along the Santa Cruz River on a hilly plain of the Sonoran Desert that is rimmed by the Santa Catalina and other mountains. The city lies at an elevation of 2,410 feet (735 metres) and is situated about 115 miles (185

  • Tucumán (province, Argentina)

    Tucumán, provincia (province), northwestern Argentina. It is the second smallest of the country’s provinces. The city of San Miguel de Tucumán, in central Tucumán, is the provincial capital. The western fringe of the province is occupied by the Sierra del Aconquija, which consists of

  • Tucumán (Argentina)

    San Miguel de Tucumán, city, capital of Tucumán provincia (province), northwestern Argentina. It lies along the Salí River, at the foot of the scenic Aconquija Mountains. It was founded in 1565 by the Spanish colonial governor Diego de Villarroel at Ibatín on the Tejar River (now Pueblo Viejo on

  • Tucumán, Congress of (Argentina [1816])

    Congress of Tucumán, assembly that met in the city of Tucumán (now San Miguel de Tucumán) and declared the independence of Argentina from Spain on July 9, 1816. Napoleon’s intervention in Spain in 1808 had plunged that country into civil war and released its American colonies from the control of

  • Tucumcari (New Mexico, United States)

    Tucumcari, city, seat (1903) of Quay county, eastern New Mexico, U.S., in the Canadian River valley. Lying along the important Goodnight-Loving cattle trail, it was established as a construction base for the El Paso and Rock Island Railroad in 1901. Tucumcari is named for a mountain (1,000 feet

  • Tucuna (people)

    Tucuna, a South American Indian people living in Brazil, Peru, and Colombia, around the Amazon-Solim?es and Putomayo-I?á rivers. They numbered about 25,000 in the late 1980s. The Tucunan language does not appear to be related to any of the other languages spoken in the region. The Tucuna live in

  • Tucupita (Venezuela)

    Tucupita, city, capital of Delta Amacuro estado (state), northeastern Venezuela. It lies along the Mánamo River, which is a main distributary of the Orinoco River. Founded about 1885, Tucupita served as a trading centre for the corn (maize), bananas, cacao, sugarcane, and tobacco grown in the

  • Tucuruí Dam (dam, Brazil)

    Amazon River: Mining and energy: …are met by the giant Tucuruí hydroelectric plant on the Tocantins River, one of the largest hydroelectric power stations in the world. A more modest hydroelectric facility on a small river north of Manaus supplies that city with power. A growing sensitivity to the harmful consequences for both human beings…

  • Tuda (people)

    Teda, people of the eastern and central Sahara (Chad, Niger, and Libya). Their language, also called Teda (or Tedaga), is closely related to the Kanuri and Zaghawa languages, and it belongs to the Saharan group of the Nilo-Saharan language family. Teda has northern and southern groups; the term

  • Tudaga (people)

    Teda, people of the eastern and central Sahara (Chad, Niger, and Libya). Their language, also called Teda (or Tedaga), is closely related to the Kanuri and Zaghawa languages, and it belongs to the Saharan group of the Nilo-Saharan language family. Teda has northern and southern groups; the term

  • tudansi (African mask)

    African art: Lower Congo (Kongo) cultural area: Tudansi masks, worn by the young men at their initiation into manhood and decorated with polychrome and raffia collars, are topped with animal figures. The dramatically painted kakungu mask worn by the leader of the initiation rite represents a gaunt face with exaggerated nose and…

  • Tudeh Party (political party, Iran)

    Iran: The growth of social discontent: …while others, such as the Tūdeh Party, were outlawed and forced to operate covertly. Protest all too often took the form of subversive and violent activity by groups such as the Mojāhedīn-e Khalq and Fedā?īyān-e Khalq, organizations with both Marxist and religious tendencies. All forms of social and political protest,…

  • Tudela, Benjamin of (Spanish rabbi)

    Benjamin of Tudela, rabbi who was the first known European traveler to approach the frontiers of China and whose account of his journey, Massa?ot (The Itinerary of Benjamin of Tudela, 1907), illuminates the situation of Jews in Europe and Asia in the 12th century. Motivated by commercial interests

  • Tuder (Italy)

    Todi, town and episcopal see, Umbria regione, central Italy, south of Perugia. The town, on a hill overlooking the Tiber River, is of ancient Umbrian origin and served as an Etruscan fortress before becoming the Roman Tuder. Its extensive remains include an Etruscan necropolis, a Roman

  • Tudhaliyas I (Hittite king)

    Anatolia: The Hittite empire to c. 1180 bce: …the reigns of their predecessors Tudhaliyas II (or I) and Arnuwandas I in the late 15th and early 14th centuries bce. Tudhaliyas II conquered Arzawa and Assuwa (later Asia) in the west and in the southeast captured and destroyed Aleppo, defeated Mitanni, and entered into an alliance with Kizzuwadna, which…

  • Tudhaliyas II (Hittite king)

    Anatolia: The Hittite empire to c. 1180 bce: …the reigns of their predecessors Tudhaliyas II (or I) and Arnuwandas I in the late 15th and early 14th centuries bce. Tudhaliyas II conquered Arzawa and Assuwa (later Asia) in the west and in the southeast captured and destroyed Aleppo, defeated Mitanni, and entered into an alliance with Kizzuwadna, which…

  • Tudhaliyas III (Hittite king)

    Anatolia: The Hittite empire to c. 1180 bce: Arnuwandas’ son Tudhaliyas III seems to have spent most of his reign campaigning to regain the lost territories.

  • Tudhaliyas IV (Hittite king)

    Ahhiyawā: …empire during the reign of Tudhaliyas IV (c. 1250–20 bce). With the fall of the Hittite empire, lack of textual evidence has left unknown the fate of the Ahhiyawāns after the 13th century bce.

  • Tudi Gong (Chinese deity)

    Tudi Gong, (Chinese: “Lord of the Place,” “Earth Lord,” or “Earth God”) in Chinese religion, a god whose deification and functions are determined by local residents. The chief characteristic of a Tudi Gong is the limitation of his jurisdiction to a single place—e.g., a bridge, a street, a temple, a

  • Tudjman, Franjo (president of Croatia)

    Franjo Tudjman, Croat politician who led the country to independence from Yugoslavia in 1991 and who was president until his death. Having joined the Partisans in 1941, Tudjman launched a military career in the Yugoslav army, rose quickly in rank, and in 1960 became one of its youngest generals.

  • Tudkhaliash IV (Hittite king)

    Ahhiyawā: …empire during the reign of Tudhaliyas IV (c. 1250–20 bce). With the fall of the Hittite empire, lack of textual evidence has left unknown the fate of the Ahhiyawāns after the 13th century bce.

  • Tudmur (Syria)

    Palmyra, ancient city in south-central Syria, 130 miles (210 km) northeast of Damascus. The name Palmyra, meaning “city of palm trees,” was conferred upon the city by its Roman rulers in the 1st century ce; Tadmur, Tadmor, or Tudmur, the pre-Semitic name of the site, is also still in use. The city

  • Tudományos Gy?jtemény (Hungarian magazine)

    Mihály V?r?smarty: …of a well-known magazine, the Tudományos Gy?jtemény, and he was the first Hungarian man of letters to make a living—a modest one—from literature. In 1830 he became the first member of the newly founded Hungarian Academy and produced a truly great work, Csongor és Tünde, a symbolic fairy-tale play that…

  • Tudor Church Music (English music collection)

    John Taverner: …music, which is printed in Tudor Church Music, volumes 1 and 3 (1923–24), shows a variety, skill, range, and power that represent the climax of pre-Reformation English music. It includes 8 masses (e.g., The Western Wind), a few mass movements, 3 Magnificats, a Te Deum, and 28 motets. Taverner’s adaptation…

  • Tudor dynasty (English dynasty)

    House of Tudor, an English royal dynasty of Welsh origin, which gave five sovereigns to England: Henry VII (reigned 1485–1509); his son, Henry VIII (1509–47); followed by Henry VIII’s three children, Edward VI (1547–53), Mary I (1553–58), and Elizabeth I (1558–1603). The origins of the Tudors can

  • Tudor style (art and architecture)

    Tudor style, type of British architecture, mainly domestic, that grafted Renaissance decorative elements onto the Perpendicular Gothic style between 1485 and 1558. The Tudor style in architecture coincides with the first part of the reign of the Tudor monarchs, which commenced in 1485 with the

  • Tudor, Antony (American dancer)

    Antony Tudor, British-born American dancer, teacher, and choreographer who developed the so-called psychological ballet. He began his dance studies at 19 years of age with Marie Rambert and for her company choreographed his first ballet, Cross-Gartered (1931), based on an incident in Shakespeare’s

  • Tudor, David Eugene (American composer and musician)

    David Eugene Tudor, U.S. avant-garde composer and pianist who gained prominence after 1950 as an interpreter of the works of such composers as Pierre Boulez, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and, most notably, John Cage, with whom he collaborated often and whom he succeeded in 1992 as music director of the

  • Tudor, Henry, earl of Richmond (king of England)

    Henry VII, king of England (1485–1509), who succeeded in ending the Wars of the Roses between the houses of Lancaster and York and founded the Tudor dynasty. Henry, son of Edmund Tudor, earl of Richmond, and Margaret Beaufort, was born nearly three months after his father’s death. His father was

  • Tudor, House of (English dynasty)

    House of Tudor, an English royal dynasty of Welsh origin, which gave five sovereigns to England: Henry VII (reigned 1485–1509); his son, Henry VIII (1509–47); followed by Henry VIII’s three children, Edward VI (1547–53), Mary I (1553–58), and Elizabeth I (1558–1603). The origins of the Tudors can

  • Tudor, Jasper (Welsh noble)

    Jasper Tudor, duke of Bedford, leader of the Lancastrians in Wales, uncle and guardian of Henry, earl of Richmond, afterward Henry VII of England. The second son of Owen Tudor, founder of the family’s fortunes, he was knighted in 1449 and created earl of Pembroke about 1452. Between 1456 and 1459

  • Tudor, Margaret (queen of Scotland)

    Margaret Tudor, wife of King James IV of Scotland, mother of James V, and elder daughter of King Henry VII of England. During her son’s minority, she played a key role in the conflict between the pro-French and pro-English factions in Scotland, constantly shifting her allegiances to suit her

  • Tudor, Mary (queen of England)

    Mary I, the first queen to rule England (1553–58) in her own right. She was known as Bloody Mary for her persecution of Protestants in a vain attempt to restore Roman Catholicism in England. The daughter of King Henry VIII and the Spanish princess Catherine of Aragon, Mary as a child was a pawn in

  • Tudor, Owen (Welsh noble)

    House of Tudor: …dynastic fortunes were established by Owen Tudor (c. 1400–61), a Welsh adventurer who took service with Kings Henry V and Henry VI and fought on the Lancastrian side in the Wars of the Roses; he was beheaded after the Yorkist victory at Mortimer’s Cross (1461). Owen had married Henry V’s…

  • Tudor, Tasha (American illustrator and author)

    Tasha Tudor, (Starling Burgess), American children’s book illustrator and author (born Aug. 28, 1915, Boston, Mass.—died June 18, 2008, Marlboro, Vt.), illustrated nearly 100 books, many of which she also wrote; her artwork frequently shows children in old-fashioned clothing enjoying simple

  • Tueni, Ghassan (Lebanese journalist, politician, and diplomat)

    Ghassan Tueni, Lebanese journalist, politician, and diplomat (born Jan. 5, 1926, Beirut, Leb.—died June 8, 2012, Beirut), pursued his vision of a peaceful, nonsectarian Lebanon in his role as the editor and publisher (1948–99; 2005–12) of the independent newspaper An Nahar (“The Day”), which his

  • Tuércele el cuello al cisne de enga?oso plumaje (poem by González Martínez)

    Enrique González Martínez: …famous for his sonnet “Tuércele el cuello al cisne de enga?oso plumaje” (“Wring the neck of the swan with the deceiving plumage”), an attack on the excesses of poetic modernism, published in Los senderos ocultos (1911; “The Hidden Ways”). His other poetic works include La palabra del viento (1921;…

  • Tuesday (day)

    Tuesday, third day of the week

  • tufa (mineral)

    sinter: Calcareous sinter, sometimes called tufa, calcareous tufa, or calc-tufa, is a deposit of calcium carbonate, exemplified by travertine. So-called petrifying springs, not uncommon in limestone districts, yield calcareous waters that deposit a sintery incrustation on objects exposed to their action. The cavities in calcareous sinter…

  • tufa cave (geological formation)

    Tufa cave, umbrella-like canopy formed as a calcium-carbonate-saturated stream plunges over a cliff. As the water is aerated, carbon dioxide is released, causing the calcium carbonate to be deposited. Tufa caves may completely bridge a river, forming a natural tunnel. One of the largest such c

  • Tufan (autonomous region, China)

    Tibet, historic region and autonomous region of China that is often called “the roof of the world.” It occupies a vast area of plateaus and mountains in Central Asia, including Mount Everest (Qomolangma [or Zhumulangma] Feng; Tibetan: Chomolungma). It is bordered by the Chinese provinces of Qinghai

  • tuff (geology)

    Tuff, a relatively soft, porous rock that is usually formed by the compaction and cementation of volcanic ash or dust. (The Italian term tufa is sometimes restricted to the soft, porous, sedimentary rock formed by the chemical deposition of calcite, or calcium carbonate, or silica from water as

  • tuff cone (geology)

    volcano: Pyroclastic cones: …groundwater; and tuff rings and tuff cones, which are landforms built of compacted pyroclastic deposits. Tuff rings and cones resemble maars, but they have higher rims and are not filled with water. Tuff rings are only about 5 metres (16 feet) high, with craters roughly at ground level. Tuff cones…

  • tuff ring (geology)

    volcano: Pyroclastic cones: …of magma and groundwater; and tuff rings and tuff cones, which are landforms built of compacted pyroclastic deposits. Tuff rings and cones resemble maars, but they have higher rims and are not filled with water. Tuff rings are only about 5 metres (16 feet) high, with craters roughly at ground…

  • Tuffier, Théodore (French surgeon)

    history of medicine: Anesthesia and thoracic surgery: Indeed, when Théodore Tuffier, in 1891, successfully removed the apex of a lung for tuberculosis, this was the technique that he used; he even added an inflatable cuff around the tube inserted in the trachea to ensure a gas-tight fit. Tuffier was ahead of his time, however,…

  • tuft tree (plant)

    ti: Ti, or ti tree (Cordyline australis), is a common ornamental. In the wild it is a tree up to about 12 metres (40 feet) tall with a crown of long leaves, but it is much shorter when grown as a houseplant. It has green or white flowers…

  • tufted carpet

    floor covering: The pile of tufted carpets is formed by tufts inserted into a backing with needles. In knitted carpets, the backing, locking, and pile yarns are all looped together. Flocked types are produced by systems in which adhesives are used to bind fibres or yarns to the backing fabric.

  • tufted cell (anatomy)

    chemoreception: Smell: Tufted cells, which are similar to but smaller than mitral cells, and periglomerular cells, another type of interneuron cell, also contribute to the formation of glomeruli. The axons of all the receptor cells that exhibit a response to a specific chemical or a range of…

  • tufted puffin (bird)

    puffin: …southerly Pacific distribution is the tufted puffin (Lunda cirrhata), which is black with red legs and bill, a white face, and straw-coloured plumes curving backward from behind the eyes.

  • tufted titmouse (bird)

    titmouse: …10 North American species, the tufted titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor, formerly Parus bicolor) is the best known, ranging widely over the eastern United States, where its cheery whistled “peter-peter-peter” rings through deciduous woodlands, orchards, and suburbs. Often attracted to bird feeders, this handsome crested little bird relishes sunflowers, although insects make…

  • tufting (textiles)

    dress: Mesopotamia: …the wool combed into decorative tufts. These wraparound skirts were pinned in place and extended from the waist to the knees or, for more important persons, to the ankles. The upper part of the torso was bare or clothed by another sheepskin cloaking the shoulders. From about 2500 bce a…

  • Tufts College (university, Medford, Massachusetts, United States)

    Tufts University, private, nonsectarian, coeducational institution of higher education, located in Medford where it meets Somerville, Massachusetts, U.S. Tufts grants undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees. Its largest academic division, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, is made up of

  • Tufts University (university, Medford, Massachusetts, United States)

    Tufts University, private, nonsectarian, coeducational institution of higher education, located in Medford where it meets Somerville, Massachusetts, U.S. Tufts grants undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees. Its largest academic division, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, is made up of

  • Tufts, Sonny (American actor)

    Mark Sandrich: …cast included Colbert, Veronica Lake, Sonny Tufts, and Paulette Goddard, who was nominated for an Academy Award. Here Come the Waves (1944) was a return to the more familiar territory of musical comedy; it featured Crosby and Betty Hutton. Sandrich’s other 1944 film was I Love a Soldier, a wartime…

  • tuftybell (plant)

    Tuftybell, any of about 260 species of annual and perennial herbs of the genus Wahlenbergia, of the bellflower family (Campanulaceae), mostly native to south temperate regions of the Old World. Ten species of the genus Edraianthus often are included in Wahlenbergia. The ivy-leaved bellflower (W.

  • Tug Hill Upland (region, North America)

    New York: Relief: …of Oneida Lake lies the Tug Hill Upland, which is one of the least-settled parts of the state because of its poor soil and drainage and its excessive winter snow conditions.

  • tug-of-war (athletic contest)

    Tug-of-war, athletic contest between two teams at opposite ends of a rope, each team trying to drag the other across a centre line. In some forms of the game a tape or handkerchief is tied around the centre of the rope, and two others are tied six feet (1.8 metres) on either side. Three

  • Tugaloo River (river, United States)

    Tugaloo River, river formed southeast of Tallulah Falls, Ga., U.S., at the confluence of the Chattooga and Tallulah rivers (which are there dammed to form Tugaloo and Yonah lakes). The river then flows southeast, serving as a portion of the Georgia–South Carolina state boundary. After a course of

  • Tugan-Baranovsky, Mikhayl (Russian economist)

    business cycle: Investment theories: …this phenomenon, the Russian economist Mikhayl Tugan-Baranovsky, published a study of industrial crises in England in which he maintained that the cycle of investment continues until all capital funds have been used up. Bank credit expands as the cycle progresses. Disproportions then begin to develop among the various branches of…

  • tugboat

    Tugboat, small, powerful watercraft designed to perform a variety of functions, especially to tow or push barges and large ships. In 1736 Jonathan Hulls of Gloucestershire, Eng., patented a boat to be powered by a Newcomen steam engine to move large vessels in and out of harbours. The first tugboat

  • Tugdamme (Cimmerian king)

    Anatolia: The Cimmerians, Lydia, and Cilicia, c. 700–547 bce: …time the Cimmerian leader was Tugdamme (Lygdamis), who is identified in Greek tradition as the victor over Sardis in 652 and is also said to have attacked Ephesus. A nonaggression pact signed between Ashurbanipal and Tugdamme, if correctly dated after the mid-650s, confirms the Greek data concerning Tugdamme’s involvement in…

  • Tugela Falls (waterfall, South Africa)

    Tugela Falls, series of cataracts in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. The falls are located near the source of the Tugela River in the Drakensberg mountains and are situated within Royal Natal National Park. Tugela Falls ranks among the world’s highest, with an uninterrupted leap of 1,350 feet

  • Tugela River (river, South Africa)

    Tugela River, principal river of KwaZulu/Natal province, South Africa. It rises as a stream on the 10,000-foot- (3,050-metre-) high Mont-aux-Sources plateau near the merger point of the Lesotho–Free State province borders. Its upper course, which lies within Royal Natal National Park, flows

  • Tugendhat House (building, Brno, Czech Republic)

    Brno: Tugendhat House (1930), designed by architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1992. The old town, with narrow streets, is enclosed by a belt of boulevards, beyond which are several modern housing projects.

  • Tuggeranong (district, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia)

    Australian Capital Territory: Settlement patterns: of Woden–Weston Creek, Belconnen, Tuggeranong, and Gungahlin includes residential suburbs, a major regional centre, and local service centres. These districts were developed according to modern town planning and urban design principles in order to provide services and job opportunities in each urban district close to where people live. This…

  • Tuggle, Jessie (American football player)

    Atlanta Falcons: …Anderson on offense and linebacker Jessie Tuggle on defense. The Falcons upset a 15–1 Minnesota Vikings team in the NFC championship game to earn their first Super Bowl berth, a loss to the Denver Broncos. The season after their Super Bowl appearance, however, the Falcons plummeted to a 5–11 record.

  • Tughlaq (play by Karnad)

    Girish Karnad: Karnad’s next play, Tughlaq (1964), tells the story of the 14th-century sultan Mu?ammad ibn Tughluq and remains among the best known of his works.

  • Tughluq dynasty (Indian dynasty)

    South Asian arts: Islāmic architecture in India: period of the Delhi and provincial sultanates: …Delhi, ushered in by the Tughluq dynasty, is impoverished and austere. The buildings, with a few exceptions, are made of coarse rubble masonry and overlaid with plaster. The tomb of Ghiyās-ud-Dīn Tughluq (c. 1320–25), placed in a little fortress, has sloping walls faced with panels of stone and marble. Also…

  • Tughluq Temür (Chinese ruler)

    Timur: Life: …the khan of nearby Kashgar, Tughluq Temür, who had overrun Transoxania’s chief city, Samarkand, in 1361. Tughluq Temür appointed his son Ilyas Khoja as governor of Transoxania, with Timur as his minister. But shortly afterward Timur fled and rejoined his brother-in-law Amir Husayn, the grandson of Amir Kazgan. They defeated…

  • ?ughrā (calligraphy)

    calligraphy: Arabic calligraphy: …to Turkish calligraphy is the tu?ra (?ughrā), a kind of royal cipher based on the names and titles of the reigning sultan and worked into a very intricate and beautiful design. A distinctive tu?ra was created for each sultan and affixed to imperial decrees by a skilled calligrapher, the neshan?.

  • tughra (coin)

    coin: Ottoman Empire: …notable Ottoman innovation was the tughra, an elaborate monogram formed of the sultan’s name and titles, which occupies one side of the coin. Various European silver dollars also circulated extensively.

  • ?ughril Beg (Muslim ruler)

    Toghr?l Beg, founder of the Seljuq dynasty, which ruled in Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Anatolia during the 11th– 14th centuries. Under his rule the Seljuqs assumed the leadership of the Islāmic world by establishing political mastery over the ?Abbāsid caliphate in Baghdad. The grandson of Seljuq, chief

  • tu?ra (calligraphy)

    calligraphy: Arabic calligraphy: …to Turkish calligraphy is the tu?ra (?ughrā), a kind of royal cipher based on the names and titles of the reigning sultan and worked into a very intricate and beautiful design. A distinctive tu?ra was created for each sultan and affixed to imperial decrees by a skilled calligrapher, the neshan?.

  • tugrik (currency)

    Mongolia: Finance: …regulating the national currency, the tugrik (t?gr?g). The establishment of several private-venture and international banks in Ulaanbaatar was followed by periods of consolidation and relative stability, which opened up opportunities to set up services for commercial and private loans and personal banking and to introduce electronic banking, credit cards, and…

  • Tugwell, Rexford Guy (American economist)

    Rexford Guy Tugwell, American economist, one of the three members of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s so-called Brain (or Brains) Trust. Tugwell attended the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Finance and Commerce, earning his bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees (1915, 1916,

  • Tuhfat al-Kibar fi Asfar il-Bahar (work by Katip ?elebi)

    Katip ?elebi: Tuhfat al-Kibar fi Asfar il-Bahar (Eng. trans. of chapters I-IV, The Maritime Wars of the Turks) is a history of the Ottoman navy; Dustūr al-amal li islah al-khalal (“Instructions for the Reform of Abuses”) is a treatise suggesting remedies for the economic crisis in the…

  • Tuhfat al-Nafis (work by Ali Haji bin Raja Amhad)

    Raja Ali Haji bin Raja Amhad: …rewrote and expanded as the Tuhfat al-Nafis (c. 1866; “Precious Gift”), which remains an invaluable source for the history of the Malay Peninsula, Borneo, and Sumatra.

  • Tu?fat al-nu??ār fī gharā?ib al-am?ār wa?ajā?ib al-asfār (work by Ibn Battuta)

    Travels, classic travel account by Ibn Ba??ū?ah of his journeys through virtually all Muslim countries and many adjacent lands. The full title means “The Gift of the Beholders on the Peculiarities of the Regions and the Marvels of Journeys.” The narrative was dictated in 1353 to Ibn Juzayy, who

  • Tu?fat al-qadīm (work by Ibn al-Abbār)

    Ibn al-Abbār: His Tu?fat al-qadīm, a major study of the Islāmic poets of Muslim Spain, is particularly important. He was also a humorist and a satirist of considerable ability. Ibn al-Abbār’s alleged disrespectful attitude toward al-Mustan?ir angered the ruler. The scholar’s fall from power and subsequent execution may…

  • Tu?fat al-?Irāqayn (work by Khāqānī)

    Khāqānī: …poem in rhyming couplets), the Tu?fat al-?Irāqayn (“Gift of the Two Iraqs”). It consists of five parts and is essentially a description of the poet’s travels.

  • tui (bronze work)

    Dui, type of Chinese bronze vessel produced in the late Zhou dynasty (c. 600–256/255 bc), it was a food container consisting of two bowls—each supported on three legs—that, when placed together, formed a sphere. The dui usually had two loop handles on either side of the rim of each bowl. The

  • Tuibian (work by Cao Yu)

    Cao Yu: …to Jiang’an, where he wrote Tuibian (1940; “Metamorphosis”), a patriotic work in which he expressed the hope that China would throw off the constraints of the old ways and embrace the new. He followed it with Beijingren (1940; rev. ed. 1947; “Beijing Man”; Eng. trans. Peking Man), thought by many…

  • Tuil (deity)

    nature worship: Earthquakes: …of the underworld, such as Tuil, the earthquake god of the inhabitants of the Kamchatka Peninsula, who rides on a sleigh under the earth. The earthquake is driven away by noise, loud shouting, or poking with the pestle of a mortar. Among peoples with eschatological (last times) views, earthquakes announce…

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