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  • ?ubayq, Mount Al- (mountain, Arabian Desert, Arabian Peninsula)

    Arabian Desert: Physiography: To the southeast, Mount Al-?ubayq rises higher, standing as a mass of sandstone deeply cut by numerous wadis (ephemeral watercourses). Farther southeast the plateaus of Tabūk, Taymā?, ?awīl, Al-?ufrah, and Al-Hūj reach to the western edge of Al-Nafūd (or Great Nafud), a large sand desert in the north.…

  • Tubb, Ernest (American musician)

    Ernest Tubb, American country music singer and songwriter. His first musical influence was the yodeling of Jimmie Rodgers. He became one of the earliest exponents of honky-tonk with hits such as “I’m Walking the Floor over You” (1941). He joined the Grand Ole Opry in 1942, and he became one of the

  • Tubb, Ernest Dale (American musician)

    Ernest Tubb, American country music singer and songwriter. His first musical influence was the yodeling of Jimmie Rodgers. He became one of the earliest exponents of honky-tonk with hits such as “I’m Walking the Floor over You” (1941). He joined the Grand Ole Opry in 1942, and he became one of the

  • Tubbat (autonomous region, China)

    Tibet, historic region and autonomous region of China that is often called “the roof of the world.” It occupies a vast area of plateaus and mountains in Central Asia, including Mount Everest (Qomolangma [or Zhumulangma] Feng; Tibetan: Chomolungma). It is bordered by the Chinese provinces of Qinghai

  • Tubbataha Reefs (reefs, Pacific Ocean)

    Sulu Sea: …Mapun (Cagayan Sulu) island, the Tubbataha Reefs, and the volcanic Mapun island group itself. The Tubbataha Reefs were designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1993 in recognition of their abundance and diversity of marine life; in 2009 the boundaries of the site were extended to triple its original size.

  • Tubba? (?imyarite rulers)

    history of Arabia: The Tubba? kings: A major break with the past was made in the 4th century ce, when the polytheistic religion of the earlier cultures was replaced by a monotheistic cult of “The Merciful (Ra?mān), Lord of heaven and earth.” There was also an increasing interest, both…

  • tube (metallurgy)

    steel: Tubes: With the development of the gas industry at the beginning of the 19th century, an increased demand developed for tubes to transmit gas. In 1824 a method for pressure butt-welding of heated, curved strip was developed in Britain, and in 1832 a plant for…

  • tube (wind instrument)

    sound: In air columns: Tubes are classified by whether both ends of the tube are open (an open tube) or whether one end is open and one end closed (a closed tube). The basic acoustic difference is that the open end of a tube allows motion of the air;…

  • tube

    Subway, underground railway system used to transport large numbers of passengers within urban and suburban areas. Subways are usually built under city streets for ease of construction, but they may take shortcuts and sometimes must pass under rivers. Outlying sections of the system usually emerge

  • tube (glass)

    industrial glass: Tubes and rods: Tubes and rods are made in three processes: the Danner process, the downdraw process, and the Vello process. In the Danner process, a continuous stream of glass flows over a hollow, rotating mandrel that is mounted on an incline inside a surrounding…

  • tube (polychaete organ)

    annelid: Polychaetes: Tubes may consist of calcium carbonate, parchment, or mucus, to which sediment adheres. The anus is at the posterior tip. Tube dwellers generally have an external fecal groove along which fecal material passes forward. Eyes are occasionally present on gills, along the sides of the…

  • tube anemone (invertebrate)

    Tube anemone, (genus Cerianthus), any of a group of invertebrate marine animals of the class Anthozoa (phylum Cnidaria) characterized by an elongated polyp (i.e., a hollow stalklike structure with a mouth and tentacles at the upper end); the polyp lives in a tube of slime on the ocean bottom. The

  • tube foot (zoology)

    circulatory system: Echinodermata: …sac (or ampulla) and a tube foot (podium), which commonly has a flattened tip that can act as a sucker. Contraction of the sac results in a valve in the lateral canal closing as the contained fluid is forced into the podium, which elongates. On contact with the substratum, the…

  • tube mill (device)

    mineral processing: Grinding: …be further disintegrated in a cylinder mill, which is a cylindrical container built to varying length-to-diameter ratios, mounted with the axis substantially horizontal, and partially filled with grinding bodies (e.g., flint stones, iron or steel balls) that are caused to tumble, under the influence of gravity, by revolving the container.

  • tube nucleus (plant anatomy)

    plant reproductive system: Angiosperms: …small generative cell and a tube cell. The generative cell may divide to form two sperm cells before the pollen grain (developing male gametophyte) is shed or while the pollen tube is growing during germination. The pollen grains of angiosperms have variously, and often elaborately, ornamented walls characteristic of the…

  • tube snout (fish)

    Tubesnout, either of the two species of fishes in the family Aulorhynchidae (order Gasterosteiformes). Both species—Aulorhynchus flavidus and Aulichthys japonicus—are marine and restricted to coastal regions of the northern Pacific Ocean. Taxonomically, they are sometimes placed in the stickleback

  • tube wave (seismology)

    Earth exploration: Seismic refraction methods: …surface of a borehole (tube waves). Under certain circumstances (e.g., oblique incidence on an interface), waves can change from one mode to another.

  • tube worm (annelid)

    Tube worm, any of a number of tube-dwelling marine worms belonging to the annelid class Polychaeta (see polychaete; feather-duster worm; tentacle worm). Other tube-dwelling worms include the horseshoe worm (phylum Phoronida) and the beardworm (phylum

  • tube zither (musical instrument)

    stringed instrument: Zithers: …seem to derive ultimately from tube zithers made directly from lengths of bamboo. The bamboo prototypes are said to be idiochordic because their strings, part of the bamboo itself, are worked loose from the tough surface of the tube, to which they remain attached at either end. The maker then…

  • Tube, the (subway, London, England, United Kingdom)

    London Underground, underground railway system that services the London metropolitan area. The London Underground was proposed by Charles Pearson, a city solicitor, as part of a city improvement plan shortly after the opening of the Thames Tunnel in 1843. After 10 years of discussion, Parliament

  • tube-dwelling polychaete (invertebrate)

    annelid: …are divided into free-moving and sedentary, or tube-dwelling, forms; the earthworms (Oligochaeta); and the leeches (Hirudinea).

  • tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided missile

    rocket and missile system: Antitank and guided assault: …pending the development of the TOW (for tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided) missile. Because it was designed for greater range and hitting power, TOW was mounted primarily on vehicles and, particularly, on attack helicopters. Helicopter-fired antitank missiles were first used in combat when the U.S. Army deployed several TOW-equipped UH-1 “Hueys”…

  • tubeless tire (wheel)

    tire: Pneumatic tires: In the 1950s, however, tubeless tires reinforced by alternating plies, or layers, of cord became standard equipment on new automobiles. In that decade Michelin introduced the radial-ply tire, which is now standard for all automobiles in developed countries.

  • Tuber (fungus)

    Truffle, edible subterranean fungus, prized as a food delicacy from Classical times. Truffles are in the genus Tuber, order Pezizales (phylum Ascomycota, kingdom Fungi). They are native mainly to temperate regions. The different species range in size from that of a pea to that of an orange. A

  • tuber (machine)

    rubber: Shaping: Extruders are used to produce long continuous products such as tubing, tire treads, and wire coverings. They are also used to produce various profiles that can later be cut to length. Multiroll calenders are used to make wide sheeting. In transfer and injection molds, the…

  • tuber (plant anatomy)

    Tuber, specialized storage stem of certain seed plants. Tubers are usually short and thickened and typically grow below the soil. Largely composed of starch-storing parenchyma tissue, they constitute the resting stage of various plants and enable overwintering in many species. As modified stems,

  • Tuber aestivum (fungus)

    truffle: The English truffle, T. aestivum, is found principally in beech woods. It is bluish black, rounded, and covered with coarse polygonal warts; the gleba is white when immature, then yellowish, and finally brown with white branched markings.

  • tuber calcanei (anatomy)

    heel: Posteriorly, a roughened area, the tuber calcanei, takes much of the weight in standing. On one side of this is a small protuberance, the lateral process, developed only in humans, related to balance in the upright position. The Achilles tendon (tendo calcaneus) attaches to the posterior border of the calcaneus.…

  • Tuber melanosporum (fungus)

    truffle: …in French cuisine is the Périgord (Tuber melanosporum), which is said to have first gained favour toward the end of the 15th century. It is brown or black, rounded, and covered with polygonal wartlike protrusions, having a depression at their summit; the flesh (gleba) is first white, then brown or…

  • tubercle (pathology)

    inflammation: Chronic inflammation: …the granulomas formed are called tubercles. Granulomas also typically arise from fungal infections, and they are present in schistosomiasis, syphilis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

  • tubercle bacillus (bacterium)

    pasteurization: …be necessary to destroy the Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other more heat-resistant of the non-spore-forming, disease-causing microorganisms found in milk. The treatment also destroys most of the microorganisms that cause spoilage and so prolongs the storage time of food.

  • tuberculin test (medicine)

    Tuberculin test, procedure for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection by the introduction into the skin, usually by injection on the front surface of the forearm, of a minute amount of purified protein derivative (PPD) tuberculin. Tuberculin is a protein substance from the tuberculosis-causing

  • tuberculoid leprosy (pathology)

    leprosy: Course of the disease: …form of leprosy known as tuberculoid leprosy because of the hard nodules, or tubercles, that form in the skin. The intense cellular reaction involves all of the thicknesses of the skin and the tissues under it, the sweat glands, the hair follicles, and the nerve fibres that end in the…

  • tuberculosis (pathology)

    Tuberculosis (TB), infectious disease that is caused by the tubercle bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In most forms of the disease, the bacillus spreads slowly and widely in the lungs, causing the formation of hard nodules (tubercles) or large cheeselike masses that break down the respiratory

  • tuberculous laryngitis

    laryngitis: Tuberculous laryngitis is a secondary infection spread from the initial site in the lungs. Tubercular nodule-like growths are formed in the larynx tissue. The bacteria die after infecting the tissue, leaving ulcers on the surface. There may be eventual destruction of the epiglottis and laryngeal…

  • tuberculous meningitis (pathology)

    meningitis: Other bacterial causes of meningitis: In many developing countries, tuberculous meningitis is common.

  • tuberculous spondylitis

    Pott disease, disease caused by infection of the spinal column, or vertebral column, by the tuberculosis bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Pott disease is characterized by softening and collapse of the vertebrae, often resulting in a hunchback curvature of the spine. The condition is named

  • Tubero, Orosius (French philosopher)

    Fran?ois de La Mothe Le Vayer, independent French thinker and writer who developed a philosophy of Skepticism more radical than that of Michel de Montaigne but less absolute than that of Pierre Bayle. La Mothe Le Vayer became an avocat in the Parlement of Paris, taking over his father’s seat, but

  • tuberose (plant)

    Tuberose, (Polianthes tuberosa), perennial garden plant of the asparagus family (Asparagaceae), cultivated for its fragrant flowers. The tuberose is native to Mexico, and the flowers are used in the manufacture of perfumes. The tuberose has long bright green leaves clustered at the base and smaller

  • tuberous root (plant)

    angiosperm: Root systems: …common being the formation of tuberous (fleshy) roots for food storage. For example, carrots and beets are tuberous roots that are modified from taproots, and cassava (manioc) is a tuberous root that is modified from an adventitious root. (Tubers, on the other hand, are modified, fleshy, underground

  • tuberous sclerosis (pathology)

    Tuberous sclerosis, autosomal dominant disorder marked by the formation of widespread benign tumors throughout the body. This disease has a well-established molecular link, which stems from defects or mutations in either of two genes—TSC1 or TSC2—that cause uncontrolled cell growth. Eighty percent

  • tuberous sclerosis complex (pathology)

    Tuberous sclerosis, autosomal dominant disorder marked by the formation of widespread benign tumors throughout the body. This disease has a well-established molecular link, which stems from defects or mutations in either of two genes—TSC1 or TSC2—that cause uncontrolled cell growth. Eighty percent

  • tuberous-rooted begonia (plant)

    begonia: Tuberous-rooted begonias include the Tuberhybrida group, grown outdoors for their large and colourful flowers from early summer to first frost, and the greenhouse begonias that bloom during the winter. The latter are subdivided into the Cheimantha group, derived from crosses between B. socotrana and B.…

  • tubesnout (fish)

    Tubesnout, either of the two species of fishes in the family Aulorhynchidae (order Gasterosteiformes). Both species—Aulorhynchus flavidus and Aulichthys japonicus—are marine and restricted to coastal regions of the northern Pacific Ocean. Taxonomically, they are sometimes placed in the stickleback

  • tubeworm (annelid)

    Tube worm, any of a number of tube-dwelling marine worms belonging to the annelid class Polychaeta (see polychaete; feather-duster worm; tentacle worm). Other tube-dwelling worms include the horseshoe worm (phylum Phoronida) and the beardworm (phylum

  • Tubifera (insect)

    hover fly: The rat-tailed maggots (larvae) of the drone fly (Eristalis tenax), which live in drains and polluted waters, have a telescopic breathing tube at the rear that gives them their common name.

  • Tubifex (annelid)

    annelid: Annotated classification: …of genera: Nais, Tubifex (sludge worm). Class Hirudinea (leeches) Primarily freshwater, but also terrestrial and marine forms; small sucker at anterior end, large sucker at posterior end; fixed number of body segments at 34; body cavity filled with connective tissue; hermaphroditic, with fertilized eggs laid in a cocoon secreted…

  • tubinare (bird)

    Procellariiform, (order Procellariiformes), any of the group of seabirds that includes the albatrosses (family Diomedeidae); shearwaters, fulmars, prions, and large petrels (Procellariidae); storm petrels (Hydrobatidae); and diving petrels (Pelecanoididae). There are approximately 117 living

  • Tubinares (bird)

    Procellariiform, (order Procellariiformes), any of the group of seabirds that includes the albatrosses (family Diomedeidae); shearwaters, fulmars, prions, and large petrels (Procellariidae); storm petrels (Hydrobatidae); and diving petrels (Pelecanoididae). There are approximately 117 living

  • Tübingen (Germany)

    Tübingen, city, Baden-Württemberg Land (state), southwestern Germany. The city lies along the Neckar River at its junction with the Ammer and Steinlach rivers, south of Stuttgart. Originating as Castra Alamannorum around the castle of the counts palatine of Tübingen (first mentioned in 1078) and

  • Tübingen theory (biblical analysis)

    Protestantism: Biblical criticism: This theory, known as the Tübingen theory, soon receded in influence; but Baur’s commentary on New Testament texts remained a landmark in the study of the Bible. A number of excellent biblical scholars appeared after Baur, including Joseph Barber Lightfoot (1828–89) of Cambridge who demolished the Tübingen theory by showing…

  • Tübingen, Eberhard-Karl University of (university, Tübingen, Germany)

    University of Tübingen, state-supported university at Tübingen, Ger. It was founded in 1477 by Count Eberhard VI (1445–96), later the first duke of Württemberg, a civic and ecclesiastic reformer who established the school after becoming absorbed in the Renaissance revival of learning during his

  • Tübingen, Treaty of (German history)

    Ulrich: …forced him to conclude the Treaty of Tübingen, whereby, in return for their assuming liability for his debts, he granted them important rights. Subsequent breaches of the treaty by Ulrich led to his being expelled by the Swabian League in 1519; and in 1520 the Swabian League sold Württemberg to…

  • Tübingen, University of (university, Tübingen, Germany)

    University of Tübingen, state-supported university at Tübingen, Ger. It was founded in 1477 by Count Eberhard VI (1445–96), later the first duke of Württemberg, a civic and ecclesiastic reformer who established the school after becoming absorbed in the Renaissance revival of learning during his

  • Tubipora (coral)

    Organ-pipe coral, (genus Tubipora), any of a genus of marine animals of the class Anthozoa (phylum Cnidaria). The single known species, Tubipora musica, occurs on reefs in shallow waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans and is characterized by long, parallel upright polyps, or stalks, supported by

  • Tubipora musica (coral)

    organ-pipe coral: The single known species, Tubipora musica, occurs on reefs in shallow waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans and is characterized by long, parallel upright polyps, or stalks, supported by a skeleton of rigid tubes of calcium carbonate. The tentacles of the polyps are sometimes green, and the skeleton…

  • tubism (art)

    Fernand Léger: …style was aptly nicknamed “tubism.”

  • Tubman, Harriet (American abolitionist)

    Harriet Tubman, American bondwoman who escaped from slavery in the South to become a leading abolitionist before the American Civil War. She led hundreds of bondmen to freedom in the North along the route of the Underground Railroad—an elaborate secret network of safe houses organized for that

  • Tubman, William V. S. (president of Liberia)

    William V. S. Tubman, statesman whose 27 years as Liberia’s 17th president constituted the longest tenure in that office in the history of Africa’s first republic (proclaimed in 1847). He was responsible for numerous reforms and social policies, including enactment of suffrage and property rights

  • Tubman, William Vacanarat Shadrach (president of Liberia)

    William V. S. Tubman, statesman whose 27 years as Liberia’s 17th president constituted the longest tenure in that office in the history of Africa’s first republic (proclaimed in 1847). He was responsible for numerous reforms and social policies, including enactment of suffrage and property rights

  • Tubman, Winston (Liberian politician)

    Liberia: Return to peace: Johnson Sirleaf and Winston Tubman, who was running with Weah as his vice presidential candidate on the CDC ticket, emerged as the two top candidates, winning almost 44 percent and 33 percent of the vote, respectively. As neither candidate was able to garner more than 50 percent of…

  • Tubmanburg (Liberia)

    Tubmanburg, city, western Liberia, western Africa. Located in the Bomi Hills, a former iron-mining district, it was long associated with the Liberian Mining Company (LMC; a subsidiary of Republic Steel Corporation), which closed down mining operations in the late 1970s. The firm, the first in

  • tubocurarine (chemical compound)

    drug: Drugs that affect skeletal muscle: …important competitive blocking drug is tubocurarine, which is the active constituent of curare, a drug with a long history and one of the first drugs whose action was analyzed in physiological terms. Claude Bernard, a 19th-century French physiologist, showed that curare causes paralysis by blocking transmission between nerve and muscle,…

  • Tubou (village, Lakeba Island, Fiji)

    Lau Group: The village of Tubou, the main settlement of the Lau Group, is on Lakeba. Because of the Lau Group’s proximity and historical connections to Tonga, the people and their culture combine Polynesian and Melanesian characteristics to a greater extent than is found in Fiji’s more westerly groups.

  • ?ubruq (Libya)

    Tobruk, port, northeastern Libya. It was the site of Antipyrgos, an ancient Greek agricultural colony, and thereafter of a Roman fortress guarding the Cyrenaican frontier. The town later became a way station on the coastal caravan route. Because it is Libya’s only natural harbour, Tobruk was

  • Tubu (people)

    Teda, people of the eastern and central Sahara (Chad, Niger, and Libya). Their language, also called Teda (or Tedaga), is closely related to the Kanuri and Zaghawa languages, and it belongs to the Saharan group of the Nilo-Saharan language family. Teda has northern and southern groups; the term

  • Tubuai (island, French Polynesia)

    Tubuai Islands: …miles [29 square km]), and Tubuai (18 square miles [47 square km])—as well as the tiny, uninhabited Marotiri Islands at the southern end of the chain, and Maria Atoll in the north.

  • Tubuai Islands (archipelago, French Polynesia)

    Tubuai Islands, southernmost archipelago of French Polynesia in the central South Pacific Ocean. Volcanic in origin, the islands are part of a vast submerged mountain chain, probably a southeasterly extension of the Cook Islands (New Zealand). Scattered over an area some 800 miles (1,300 km) long,

  • tubuan (mask)

    Oceanic art and architecture: New Britain: …male (dukduk) and female (tubuan) masks. Both types are cone-shaped and were constructed of cane and fibre. The dukduk is taller than the tubuan and is faceless. The tubuan has circular eyes and a crescent-shaped mouth painted on a dark background. Both masks have short, bushy capes of leaves.

  • tubular bells (musical instrument)

    Tubular bells, series of tuned brass (originally bronze) tubes of graded length, struck with wooden hammers to produce a sound. They first appeared in England in an 1886 performance of Arthur Sullivan’s Golden Legend in Coventry. Large tubular bells were at first used as a substitute for church

  • tubular bridge (engineering)

    Robert Stephenson: …which led to several other tubular bridges built by Stephenson in England and other countries. (Following a fire in 1970, the Britannia Bridge underwent extensive repairs, and the tubes were replaced by concrete decks supported by steel arches.)

  • tubular capacitor (electronics)

    capacitor dielectric and piezoelectric ceramics: Disk, multilayer, and tubular capacitors: …monolithic units are still employed, tubular capacitors are often used in place of disks, because the axial wire lead configuration of tubular capacitors is preferred over the radial configuration of disk capacitors for automatic circuit-board insertion machines.

  • tubular centrifuge (chemistry)

    centrifuge: Tubular centrifuges: The tubular centrifuge is used primarily for the continuous separation of liquids from liquids or of very fine particles from liquids, although in some cases it is employed as a batch-type centrifuge. In general, it is used when higher centrifugal fields are required…

  • tubular drum (musical instrument)

    drum: Tubular drums assume many shapes (goblet, hourglass, barrel, etc.) and are considered shallow if the height is less than the diameter. If the drum is so shallow that the shell cannot act as a resonator for the sound (as in a tambourine), it is considered…

  • tubular heart (biology)

    circulatory system: Hearts: …heart is found in the tubular heart of most arthropods, in which part of the dorsal vessel is expanded to form one or more linearly arranged chambers with muscular walls. The walls are perforated by pairs of lateral openings (ostia) that allow blood to flow into the heart from a…

  • tubular pneumatic action (technology)

    keyboard instrument: Stop and key mechanisms: This system was called tubular pneumatic action. At its best, it was remarkably effective, being reliable, long-lived, reasonably silent in action, and perfectly prompt in operation. At anything but its best, it was none of these things, and its worst fault usually lay in sluggish operation. Tubular pneumatic action…

  • tubular rim (wheel)

    bicycle: Wheels: Tubular rims are used with tubular racing tires, which are glued to the rim.

  • tubular steel (technology)

    furniture: Metal: …genre was soon imitated, and tubular steel furniture became a symbol of functionalism. Since then, thinner tubing and plaited wire, with a resiliency similar to that found in wickerwork chairs have been used. Because of its lightness, aluminum became a furniture material.

  • tubular steel chair

    furniture: Modern: …thinking, resulting, for example, in tubular steel chairs designed by the architects Marcel Breuer, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and others. During World War II, the aircraft industry accelerated the development of laminated wood and molded plastic furniture. The dominant chair forms of this period go back to designs by…

  • Tubulifera (insect suborder)

    thrips: Annotated classification: Suborder Tubulifera The 10th abdominal segment tubelike, never split, major anal setae arising from separate plates adjacent to the tube; females without ovipositor; wings without longitudinal veins or fringe; larvae with antennal segments smooth not ringed; pupae with antennal sheaths hornlike or curved around (not over)…

  • Tubulinea (protist)

    protozoan: Annotated classification: Tubulinea Either naked or testate amoebae. Can produce tubular subcylindrical pseudopodia. Taxa lack centrosomes and flagellated stages. Flabellinea Flat. Lack subcylindrical pseudopodia; lack centrosomes and flagellated stages. Stereomyxida Branched or reticulate networks; trilaminate

  • TUC (British organization)

    Trades Union Congress (TUC), national organization of British trade unions. Although it is the sole national trade union, three other related bodies also exist: the Scottish Trades Union Congress, the Wales Trade Union Council, and the Irish Congress of Trade Unions (including the Northern Ireland

  • TUC (Guyanan organization)

    Guyana: Labour: The Trade Union Congress is an association of major unions. Among them are the Guyana Mine Workers’ Union, which is composed almost exclusively of Afro-Guyanese workers, and the Guyana Agricultural and General Workers’ Union, a predominantly South Asian association.

  • Tucana (astronomy)

    Tucana, (Latin: “Toucan”) constellation in the southern sky at about 0 hour right ascension and 60° south in declination. Its brightest star is Alpha Tucanae, with a magnitude of 2.9. This constellation contains the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite of the Milky Way Galaxy and one of the nearest

  • tucano (bird family)

    Toucan, (family Ramphastidae), the common name given to numerous species of tropical American forest birds known for their large and strikingly coloured bills. The term toucan—derived from tucano, a native Brazilian term for the bird—is used in the common name of about 15 species (Ramphastos and

  • Tucano (people)

    South American forest Indian: Social organization: …numerous populations, mostly Arawak and Tucano, are united in a vast network of interethnic relations. At the headwaters of the Xingu, a complex system of intertribal institutions also exists among formerly autonomous groups.

  • Tucanoan languages

    South American Indian languages: Tucanoan: Tucanoan, which is spoken in two compact areas in the western Amazon region (Brazil, Colombia, and Peru), includes about 30 languages with a total of over 30,000 speakers. One of the languages is a lingua franca in the region.

  • Tuchins (French history)

    France: Economic distress: …relatively prosperous ?le-de-France and the Tuchins in Languedoc, both betrayed desperation born of recurrent taxation and were associated with the expression of egalitarian ideas; the Jacquerie coincided with a weakened grain market and may have been hastened by efforts of lords to enforce labour services and payments after the Black…

  • Tuchman, Barbara (American author and historian)

    Barbara Tuchman, author who was one of the foremost American popular historians in the second half of the 20th century. Barbara Wertheim was born a member of a wealthy banking family and was educated at Walden School in New York City. After four years at Radcliffe College (B.A., 1933), she became a

  • Tucholsky, Kurt (German writer)

    Kurt Tucholsky, German satirical essayist, poet, and critic, best-known for his cabaret songs. After studying law and serving in World War I, Tucholsky left Germany in 1924 and lived first in Paris and after 1929 in Sweden. He contributed to Rote Signale (1931; “Red Signals”), a collection of

  • Tuck Everlasting (novel by Babbitt)

    Natalie Babbitt: Babbitt’s 1975 work Tuck Everlasting, about a family that, having found a secret spring of water that confers immortality, discovers that living forever is not a blessing, became a classic of children’s literature that was translated into 27 languages and was twice filmed (in 1981 and 2002). Babbitt…

  • tuck point (building construction)

    Tuckpointing, in building construction, technique of finishing masonry joints with a fine, pointed ridge of mortar, for decorative purposes, instead of the usual slightly convex finish in ordinary masonwork. The term is sometimes used for pointing (q.v.) as in masonry

  • tuck pointing (building construction)

    Tuckpointing, in building construction, technique of finishing masonry joints with a fine, pointed ridge of mortar, for decorative purposes, instead of the usual slightly convex finish in ordinary masonwork. The term is sometimes used for pointing (q.v.) as in masonry

  • tuck position (diving)

    diving: In the tuck position, both hips and knees are flexed and the body resembles a ball. The most complicated dives may be done in free (any) position, a loose but graceful combination of the others.

  • tuck stitch (knitting)

    textile: Weft knitting: To form a tuck stitch, a completed loop is not discharged from some of the needles in each course, and loops accumulating on these needles are later discharged together. The plaited stitch is made by feeding two threads into the same hook, so that one thread shows on…

  • tuckahoe (fungus)

    fungus: Structure of the thallus: …pore fungus also known as tuckahoe, may reach a diameter of 20 to 25 cm (8 to 10 inches).

  • Tuckasegee River (river, North Carolina, United States)

    Tuckasegee River, river, Jackson county, North Carolina, U.S. It rises in the Blue Ridge, in Pisgah National Forest west of Brevard. The Tuckasegee flows some 50 miles (80 km) northwest past Cullowhee, Whittier, and Bryson City, near which it empties into Fontana Lake in the Little Tennessee River.

  • Tucker porcelain

    Tucker porcelain, pottery ware made from 1826 to 1838 at a factory founded in Philadelphia by William Ellis Tucker, who had found porcelain ingredients at sites near Wilmington, Del., and in New Jersey. At first, transfer-printed landscapes and floral patterns were executed on porcelain; from

  • Tucker, Archibald N. (British Africanist)

    Nilo-Saharan languages: History of classification: Stevenson, and Archibald N. Tucker, whose pioneering descriptive and comparative work had resulted in more detailed knowledge of the language map of eastern and central Africa.

  • Tucker, Benjamin (American political philosopher)

    anarchism: Anarchism in the Americas: …Joseph Labadie, and above all Benjamin Tucker. An early advocate of women’s suffrage, religious tolerance, and fair labour legislation, Tucker combined Warren’s ideas on labour egalitarianism with elements of Proudhon’s and Bakunin’s antistatism. The result was the most sophisticated exposition to date of anarchist ideas in the United States. Much…

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