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  • Truth About the Russian Dancers, The (ballet by Bax)

    Sir Arnold Bax: His ballet, The Truth About the Russian Dancers, on a scenario by the playwright J.M. Barrie, was produced by Serge Diaghilev in 1920. Between 1921 and 1939 he wrote seven symphonies dedicated to the musicians he admired, among them John Ireland and Jean Sibelius. He also wrote…

  • Truth and Beauty (memoir by Patchett)

    Ann Patchett: …full-length volume of nonfiction writing, Truth and Beauty, a memoir recounting her friendship with the writer Lucy Grealy, who died of a drug overdose in 2002. Patchett returned to fiction with her next book, Run (2007), which explores the relationship between an ambitious father and his two sons. Issues of…

  • Truth and Consequences (novel by Lurie)

    Alison Lurie: Truth and Consequences (2005), which follows two couples courting divorce, revisits Lurie’s invented Corinth University.

  • Truth and Method (work by Gadamer)

    Hans-Georg Gadamer: …work, Wahrheit und Methode (1960; Truth and Method), is considered by some to be the major 20th-century philosophical statement on hermeneutical theory. His other works include Kleine Schriften, 4 vol. (1967–77; Philosophical Hermeneutics, selected essays from vol. 1–3); Dialogue and Dialectic (1980), comprising eight essays on Plato; and Reason in…

  • Truth and Reconciliation Commission (Honduran history)

    Manuel Zelaya: In July the Honduras Truth and Reconciliation Commission established by the Organization of American States to investigate the circumstances of Zelaya’s ouster determined that his removal from power was indeed an illegal coup and not a constitutional succession, as some had argued. At the same time, the commission found…

  • Truth and Reconciliation Commission (Liberian history)

    Leymah Gbowee: …as a commissioner on Liberia’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2004–05). In 2006 she was one of the founders of the Women Peace and Security Network–Africa (WISPEN-Africa), an organization active in several western African countries that encouraged the involvement of women in peace, security, and governance issues. She was named executive…

  • Truth and Reconciliation Commission, South Africa (South African history)

    Truth and Reconciliation Commission, South Africa (TRC), courtlike body established by the new South African government in 1995 to help heal the country and bring about a reconciliation of its people by uncovering the truth about human rights violations that had occurred during the period of

  • Truth and Reconciliation Committee (Liberian history)

    Leymah Gbowee: …as a commissioner on Liberia’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2004–05). In 2006 she was one of the founders of the Women Peace and Security Network–Africa (WISPEN-Africa), an organization active in several western African countries that encouraged the involvement of women in peace, security, and governance issues. She was named executive…

  • Truth and Reconciliation Committee (South African history)

    Truth and Reconciliation Commission, South Africa (TRC), courtlike body established by the new South African government in 1995 to help heal the country and bring about a reconciliation of its people by uncovering the truth about human rights violations that had occurred during the period of

  • truth cinema (French film movement)

    Cinéma vérité , (French: “truth cinema”), French film movement of the 1960s that showed people in everyday situations with authentic dialogue and naturalness of action. Rather than following the usual technique of shooting sound and pictures together, the film maker first tapes actual

  • truth commission (sociology)

    Truth commission, an official body established to investigate a series of human rights violations, war crimes, or other serious abuses that took place over many years. Truth commissions aim to identify the causes and consequences of abuses, which may have been committed by repressive regimes or by

  • truth condition (logic)

    semantics: Truth-conditional semantics: Confronted with the skepticism of Quine, his student Donald Davidson made a significant effort in the 1960s and ’70s to resuscitate meaning. Davidson attempted to account for meaning not in terms of behaviour but on the basis of truth, which by then had…

  • Truth Exalted (tract by Penn)

    William Penn: Quaker leadership and political activism: …his first publication, the pamphlet Truth Exalted (1668), he upheld Quaker doctrines while attacking in turn those of the Roman Catholics, the Anglicans, and the Dissenting churches. It was followed by The Sandy Foundation Shaken (1668), in which he boldly questioned the Trinity and other Protestant doctrines. Though Penn subsequently…

  • truth function (logic)

    formal logic: Basic features of PC: …an operator is called a truth function of the operator’s argument(s). The truth functionality of the PC operators is clearly brought out by summarizing the above account of them in Table 1. In it,

  • Truth Lifting Up Its Head Above Scandals (work by Winstanley)

    anarchism: English anarchist thought: In his pamphlet of 1649, Truth Lifting Up Its Head Above Scandals, Winstanley laid down what later became basic principles among anarchists: that power corrupts; that property is incompatible with freedom; that authority and property are between them the begetters of crime; and that only in a society without rulers,…

  • Truth of the Christian Religion, The (work by Grotius)

    Hugo Grotius: Early life: …theological and politico-theological works, including De Veritate Religionis Christianae (1627; The Truth of the Christian Religion), the book that in his lifetime probably enjoyed the highest popularity among his works.

  • Truth of Two and Other Poems (work by Salinas)

    Spanish literature: The Generation of 1927: Truth of Two and Other Poems), profoundly personal love experiences inspire subtle observations on the solidity of external reality and the fleeting world of subjective perception. Guillén’s lifelong poetic effort, Cántico (Cántico: A Selection), first published in 1928 and repeatedly enlarged in successive editions, constitutes…

  • Truth or Consequences (New Mexico, United States)

    Truth or Consequences, city, seat (1937) of Sierra county, southwestern New Mexico, U.S. It lies along the Rio Grande, east of the Black Range in Gila National Forest, 60 miles (97 km) north-northwest of Las Cruces. The locality was first settled in the mid-19th century near the Palomas Springs,

  • Truth or Consequences (American game show)

    Bob Barker: …Ralph Edwards, the creator of Truth or Consequences, a popular television game show in which contestants who failed to correctly answer trivia questions had to perform stunts. Barker began hosting the program in 1956, and his affable manner quickly connected with audiences. He remained with the show until 1975. While…

  • truth predicate (philosophy and logic)

    truth: Deflationism: …common? What purpose does the truth predicate serve? The answer, according to most deflationists, is that true is a highly useful device for making generalizations over large numbers of sayings or assertions. For example, suppose that Winston Churchill said many things (S1, S2, S3,…Sn). One could express total agreement with…

  • truth quark (physics)

    Carlo Rubbia: …for the sixth quark, called top, had been found. The discovery of this quark confirmed an earlier prediction that three pairs of these particles should exist.

  • truth table (logic)

    Truth table, in logic, chart that shows the truth-value of one or more compound propositions for every possible combination of truth-values of the propositions making up the compound ones. It can be used to test the validity of arguments. Every proposition is assumed to be either true or false and

  • Truth unto Godliness (work by Pontoppidan)

    Church of Norway: …work with a Pietistic emphasis, Truth Unto Godliness, an explanation of Martin Luther’s Small Catechism published in 1737 by Erik Pontoppidan, a Danish-Norwegian Lutheran professor and bishop, extensively influenced Norwegian religious life for about 200 years. A Pietistic revival from 1797 to 1804 was led by Hans Hauge, a peasant’s…

  • Truth Unveiling Falsehood (work by Spencer)

    Lilly Martin Spencer: …worked on her monumental painting, Truth Unveiling Falsehood, which was acclaimed as a masterwork upon its completion in 1869. She refused as much as $20,000 for the canvas, which was later lost. Her popularity declined in later years, although she continued to work.

  • Truth Will Not Help Us, The (novel by Bowen)

    John Bowen: …experience inspired his first novel, The Truth Will Not Help Us (1956), about an unjust trial of three Englishmen in Scotland in 1705 for piracy.

  • Truth, Gospel of (Gnostic literature)

    patristic literature: The gnostic writers: …Christ to the Apostles; the Gospel of Truth, perhaps to be identified with the work of this name attributed by Irenaeus to Valentinus; the Epistle to Rheginos, a Valentinian work, possibly by Valentinus himself, on the Resurrection; and a Tripartite Treatise, probably written by Heracleon, of the school of Valentinianism.…

  • Truth, Sojourner (American evangelist and social reformer)

    Sojourner Truth, African American evangelist and reformer who applied her religious fervour to the abolitionist and women’s rights movements. Isabella was the daughter of slaves and spent her childhood as an abused chattel of several masters. Her first language was Dutch. Between 1810 and 1827 she

  • Truth, The (film by Kore-eda [2019])

    Catherine Deneuve: …Seeds) and La vérité (2019; The Truth).

  • truth-functional connective (logic)

    Connective, in logic, a word or group of words that joins two or more propositions together to form a connective proposition. Commonly used connectives include “but,” “and,” “or,” “if . . . then,” and “if and only if.” The various types of logical connectives include conjunction (“and”),

  • truth-functional operator (logic)

    Connective, in logic, a word or group of words that joins two or more propositions together to form a connective proposition. Commonly used connectives include “but,” “and,” “or,” “if . . . then,” and “if and only if.” The various types of logical connectives include conjunction (“and”),

  • Truth-in-Lending Act (United States)

    consumer credit: In the United States the Truth in Lending Act (part of the Consumer Credit Protection Act of 1968) requires lenders to state finance charges in ways that allow borrowers to compare the terms being offered by the lending companies.

  • truth-in-sentencing (law)

    parole: …retained parole passed so-called “truth-in-sentencing” laws, which generally required that a prisoner serve more than 85 percent of his maximum sentence before becoming eligible for parole (the percentage enabled states to qualify for federal funds to build or expand correctional facilities). Partially as a result of such restrictions on…

  • truth-value (logic)

    Truth-value, in logic, truth (T or 1) or falsity (F or 0) of a given proposition or statement. Logical connectives, such as disjunction (symbolized ∨, for “or”) and negation (symbolized ~), can be thought of as truth-functions, because the truth-value of a compound proposition is a function of, or

  • truthiness (neologism)

    Stephen Colbert: …show Colbert coined the word truthiness to express a kind of unchanging “truth” derived from a gut feeling rather than from any known facts. (Truthiness was named the Word of the Year in 2005 by the American Dialect Society.) The neologism became the organizing principle for the show, where Colbert’s…

  • Trutkul (Uzbekistan)

    Nukus: …1932 and in 1939 replaced Trutkul (which was being eroded by the Amu Darya) as capital of the Kara-Kalpak A.S.S.R. (now Qoragalpoghiston). The present city has a number of food-processing and other light industries, the Qoragalpoghiston branch of the Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Nukus State University (1979), a museum, and…

  • trutruca (musical instrument)

    Trutruka, wind instrument used by the Mapuche (Araucanian) peoples of Chile and Argentina. Technically a trumpet, the trutruka is typically constructed from a long (roughly 8 to 18 feet [2.5 to 6 metres]) straight bamboo tube that is covered with horse intestine and affixed with a cow-horn

  • trutruka (musical instrument)

    Trutruka, wind instrument used by the Mapuche (Araucanian) peoples of Chile and Argentina. Technically a trumpet, the trutruka is typically constructed from a long (roughly 8 to 18 feet [2.5 to 6 metres]) straight bamboo tube that is covered with horse intestine and affixed with a cow-horn

  • Truvada (drug)

    AIDS: Condoms, vaccines, gels, and other prevention methods: Truvada had been approved in 2004 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a combination therapy (used with other drugs) for HIV infection; in 2012, following further clinical investigation of its effectiveness for PrEP, it became the first drug to be approved by…

  • Truyen Kieu (poem by Nguyen Du)

    Nguyen Du: …translation by Huynh Sanh Thong, The Tale of Kieu: The Classic Vietnamese Verse Novel; 1973). As an exploration of the Buddhist doctrine of karmic retribution for individual sins, his poem expresses his personal suffering and deep humanism. He also wrote “Words of a Young Hat Seller,” a shorter poem in…

  • TRW Inc. (American corporation)

    TRW Inc., major American industrial corporation providing advanced-technology products and services primarily in the automotive, defense, and aerospace sectors. The company was formed in 1958 as Thompson Ramo Wooldridge Inc. from the merger of Thompson Products, Inc., and Ramo-Wooldridge

  • try (American and Canadian football)

    gridiron football: The play of the game: …is allowed to attempt a conversion: a placekick through the goal posts for one point or a run or completed pass across the goal line for two points. (In the NFL the ball is placed at the 15-yard line for a kick attempt and at the 2-yard line for a…

  • try (rugby)

    rugby: Scoring: …at goal, called a “try,” and goals, called “conversions,” that could be kicked after a try. Scoring changed by 1890 to the pattern favoured at Cheltenham School, whereby points were scored for a try, and penalty kicks were introduced, allowing teams disadvantaged by illegal play to kick for goal…

  • Try! Try! (play by O’Hara)

    Frank O'Hara: …his experimental one-act plays, including Try! Try! (1960), about a soldier’s return to his wife and her new lover.

  • Tryambakeshvar (India)

    Nashik: Tryambakeshvar, a village 14 miles (22 km) from Nashik, is the site of a Shaivite Jyotirlinga temple, the most important of the pilgrim sites.

  • Tryblidia (mollusk class)

    Monoplacophoran, (class Tryblidia), any of a group of primitive marine mollusks characterized by a single, cap-shaped shell and bilateral symmetry. The term Tryblidia is preferred over Monoplacophoran and Galeroconcha, because both latter terms are taken to include several fossil groups of

  • Tryckt och otryckt (work by Andersson)

    Dan Andersson: …Eftersk?rd (1929; “Late Harvest”) and Tryckt och otryckt (1942; “Printed and Unprinted”).

  • trying plane (tool)

    hand tool: Plane: …long, a long-bodied trying, or jointing, plane having a length of about 76 cm (30 inches) was needed to remove large curves in the wood. Short planes—a common length was about 23 cm (9 inches)—were called smoothing planes for the final finish they produced.

  • Tryon, William (British general)

    Danbury: …the British under Major General William Tryon. Danbury is now a manufacturing city. Its products include optical equipment, ball bearings, pharmaceuticals, and machinery, and it is the location of the corporate headquarters of Union Carbide Corporation, a major manufacturer of petrochemicals. Danbury once was known for its hat industry, begun…

  • Trypaflavine (antiseptic and dye)

    Acriflavine, dye obtained from coal tar, introduced as an antiseptic in 1912 by the German medical-research worker Paul Ehrlich and used extensively in World War I to kill the parasites that cause sleeping sickness. The hydrochloride and the less irritating base, neutral acriflavine, both are

  • trypan red (dye)

    chemotherapy: …1903 Ehrlich invented a dye, trypan red, which was the first drug to show activity against trypanosomal infections in mice. Ehrlich’s greatest triumph, however, was the discovery (1910) of the organic arsenical drug Salvarsan, which proved to be effective in the treatment of syphilis. The discovery of other chemotherapeutic agents…

  • Trypanorhyncha (tapeworm order)

    flatworm: Annotated classification: Order Trypanorhyncha Scolex with 2 or 4 bothridia; vitellaria in continuous sleevelike distribution; parasites of elasmobranchs; about 115 species. Order Pseudophyllidea Scolex with 2 elongated, shallow bothria, 1 dorsal and 1 ventral; genital pore lateral or median. Vitellaria lateral or extending across proglottid and encircling other…

  • Trypanosoma (protozoan)

    Trypanosome, any member of a genus (Trypanosoma) of parasitic zooflagellate protozoans belonging to the order Kinetoplastida. Adult trypanosomes are mainly blood parasites of vertebrates, especially fishes, birds, and mammals. Most species require an intermediate host (often an insect or a leech)

  • Trypanosoma brucei (protozoan)

    protozoan: Protozoans and disease: …produced by two subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei—namely, T. brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense. The life cycle of T. brucei has two hosts: a human (or other mammal) and the bloodsucking tsetse fly, which transmits the parasite between humans.

  • Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (protozoan)

    sleeping sickness: …infection with the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or the closely related subspecies T. brucei rhodesiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly (genus Glossina). Sleeping sickness is characterized by two stages of illness. In the first stage, infected persons typically experience fever, headache, muscle and joint

  • Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (protozoan)

    sleeping sickness: … or the closely related subspecies T. brucei rhodesiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly (genus Glossina). Sleeping sickness is characterized by two stages of illness. In the first stage, infected persons typically experience fever, headache, muscle and joint pain, and inflammation of the lymph nodes

  • Trypanosoma cruzi (protozoan)

    antiprotozoal drug: Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease, is treated with nifurtimox, a nitrofuran derivative. It is given orally and results in the production of activated forms of oxygen, which are lethal to the parasite. Other forms of trypanosomiasis (African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness) are…

  • Trypanosoma gambiense (protozoan)

    sleeping sickness: …infection with the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or the closely related subspecies T. brucei rhodesiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly (genus Glossina). Sleeping sickness is characterized by two stages of illness. In the first stage, infected persons typically experience fever, headache, muscle and joint

  • Trypanosoma rhodesiense (protozoan)

    sleeping sickness: … or the closely related subspecies T. brucei rhodesiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly (genus Glossina). Sleeping sickness is characterized by two stages of illness. In the first stage, infected persons typically experience fever, headache, muscle and joint pain, and inflammation of the lymph nodes

  • trypanosome (protozoan)

    Trypanosome, any member of a genus (Trypanosoma) of parasitic zooflagellate protozoans belonging to the order Kinetoplastida. Adult trypanosomes are mainly blood parasites of vertebrates, especially fishes, birds, and mammals. Most species require an intermediate host (often an insect or a leech)

  • trypanosomiasis (pathology)

    Trypanosomiasis, infectious disease in both humans and animals caused by certain members of the flagellate protozoa genus Trypanosoma and spread by certain bloodsucking insects. The genus Trypanosoma belongs to the family Trypanosomatidae, which is in the order Kinetoplastida. The life cycle of

  • Trypetheliales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Trypetheliales (incertae sedis; not placed in any subclass) Forms lichen; most have hyaline ascospores. Class Eurotiomycetes Parasitic on animals, saprotrophic in soil; small, evanescent asci, found at various levels within spherical ascocarp; includes subclasses Chaetothyriomycetidae, Eurotiomycetidae, and

  • Trypetidae (insect family)

    fruit fly: Insects of the family Trypetidae are often referred to as large fruit flies, and those of the Drosophilidae as small fruit flies or vinegar flies. (See vinegar fly.)

  • Trypetidae (insect)

    Fruit fly, any two-winged insect of either the family Trypetidae or the family Drosophilidae (order Diptera) whose larvae feed on fruit or other vegetative matter. Insects of the family Trypetidae are often referred to as large fruit flies, and those of the Drosophilidae as small fruit flies or

  • Tryphon (Greek scholar)

    classical scholarship: Grammar and language study: Under Augustus, Tryphon studied the language of prose and made the first study of syntax, the first vocabulary of the written language, and a classification of the so-called figures of speech. About the same time Didymus, known as Chalkenteros (“Brazen-Gutted”), incorporated into huge variorum editions much of…

  • Trypillia culture (anthropology)

    Trypillya culture, Neolithic European culture that arose in Ukraine between the Seret and Bug rivers, with extensions south into modern-day Romania and Moldova and east to the Dnieper River, in the 5th millennium bc. The culture’s characteristic pottery was red or orange and was decorated with

  • Trypillya culture (anthropology)

    Trypillya culture, Neolithic European culture that arose in Ukraine between the Seret and Bug rivers, with extensions south into modern-day Romania and Moldova and east to the Dnieper River, in the 5th millennium bc. The culture’s characteristic pottery was red or orange and was decorated with

  • trypsin (enzyme)

    biochemistry: Digestion: Pepsin and trypsin, the proteolytic enzymes of gastric and pancreatic juice, respectively, continue to be intensively investigated.

  • trypsinogen (chemical compound)

    enterokinase: …changes the inactive pancreatic secretion trypsinogen into trypsin, one of the enzymes that digest proteins. Enterokinase is believed to be produced by the glands of Brunner in the membrane lining of the duodenum. It resists destruction from the various enzymes in the small intestine but is destroyed by bacteria in…

  • tryptophan (chemical compound)

    Tryptophan, an amino acid that is nutritionally important and occurs in small amounts in proteins. It is an essential amino acid, meaning that humans and certain other animals cannot synthesize it and must obtain it from their diets. Infants require greater amounts of tryptophan than adults to

  • tryptophan malabsorption syndrome (pathology)

    iminoglycinuria: …specific amino acids include the tryptophan malabsorption syndrome (or “blue diaper syndrome”), and the methionine malabsorption syndrome (or “oasthouse urine disease”). They are characterized by poor absorption of the amino acids tryptophan and methionine, respectively, from the small intestine. For other hereditary disorders of amino acid transport, see also cystinuria;…

  • Trysil River (river, Sweden)

    Sweden: Drainage: The longest, however, is the Klar-G?ta River, which rises in Norway and flows 447 miles (719 km), reaching Lake V?ner (V?nern) and continuing southward out of the lake’s southern end to the North Sea; along its southernmost course are the famous falls of Trollh?ttan. The Muonio and Torne rivers form…

  • Trzmiel, Jacek (American business executive)

    Jack Tramiel, (Jacek Trzmiel), American business executive (born Dec. 13, 1928, Lodz, Pol.—died April 8, 2012, Palo Alto, Calif.), was the hard-driving founding president in 1955 of Commodore International, which was at the forefront of the personal computer (PC) revolution in the 1970s with its

  • Trzy po trzy (work by Fredro)

    Aleksander Fredro: His memoir, Trzy po trzy (1880; “Topsy Turvy Talk”), is written in the picaresque manner of Laurence Sterne. Rendering scenes from the Napoleonic Wars matter-of-factly and often humorously, it is considered to be one of the most brilliant Polish prose works.

  • Ts (chemical element)

    Tennessine (Ts), artificially produced transuranium element of atomic number 117. In 2010 Russian and American scientists announced the production of six atoms of tennessine, which were formed when 22 milligrams of berkelium-249 were bombarded with atoms of calcium-48, at the cyclotron at the Joint

  • Ts’ai Lun (Chinese inventor)

    Cai Lun, Chinese court official who is traditionally credited with the invention of paper. Cai Lun was a eunuch who entered the service of the imperial palace in 75 ce and was made chief eunuch under the emperor Hedi (reigned 88–105/106) of the Dong (Eastern) Han dynasty in the year 89. About the

  • Ts’ai O (Chinese general)

    China: Yuan’s attempts to become emperor: Cai E (Ts’ai O; a disciple of Liang Qichao) and by the governor of Yunnan, Tang Jiyao (T’ang Chi-yao). Joined by Li Liejun (Li Lieh-chün) and other revolutionary generals, they established the National Protection Army (Huguojun) and demanded that Yuan cancel his plan. When he would not,…

  • Ts’ai Shen (Chinese deity)

    Caishen, in Chinese religion, the popular god (or gods) of wealth, widely believed to bestow on his devotees the riches carried about by his attendants. During the two-week New Year celebration, incense is burned in Caishen’s temple (especially on the fifth day of the first lunar month), and

  • Ts’ang Chieh (Chinese calligrapher)

    Chinese calligraphy: It was said that Cangjie, the legendary inventor of Chinese writing, got his ideas from observing animals’ footprints and birds’ claw marks on the sand as well as other natural phenomena. He then started to work out simple images from what he conceived as representing different objects such as…

  • Ts’ang-chou (China)

    Cangzhou, city, eastern Hebei sheng (province), northeastern China. It is situated on the low-lying coastal plain about 60 miles (100 km) south of Tianjin on the Grand Canal and on the Beijing-Shanghai railway. The coastal plain there is very low, and in historical times the coastline was much

  • Ts’ao Chan (Chinese author)

    Cao Zhan, author of Hongloumeng (Dream of the Red Chamber), generally considered China’s greatest novel. A partly autobiographical work, it is written in the vernacular and describes in lingering detail the decline of the powerful Jia family and the ill-fated love between Baoyu and his cousin Lin

  • Ts’ao Chih (Chinese poet)

    Cao Zhi, one of China’s greatest lyric poets and the son of the famous general Cao Cao. Cao Zhi was born at the time his father was assuming command over the northern third of China, later known as the Wei kingdom. In a family of poets—the verses of Cao Cao and Cao Pi (Cao Zhi’s older brother and

  • Ts’ao Kuo-chiu (Chinese mythology)

    Cao Guojiu, in Chinese mythology, one of the Baxian, the Eight Immortals of Daoism. Cao is sometimes depicted in official robes and hat and carrying a tablet indicative of his rank and of his right to palace audiences. He was a man of exemplary character who often reminded a dissolute brother that

  • Ts’ao P’i (emperor of Wei dynasty)

    Cao Pi, founder of the short-lived Wei dynasty (ad 220–265/266) during the Sanguo (Three Kingdoms) period of Chinese history. The son of the great general and warlord Cao Cao of the Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 220), Cao Pi succeeded his father as king of Wei upon the latter’s death in 220. At the same

  • Ts’ao Ts’ao (Chinese general)

    Cao Cao, one of the greatest of the generals at the end of the Han dynasty (206 bce–220 ce) of China. Cao’s father was the adopted son of the chief eunuch of the imperial court. Cao was initially a minor garrison commander and rose to prominence as a general when he suppressed the Yellow Turban

  • Ts’ao Yü (Chinese author)

    Cao Yu, Chinese playwright who was a pioneer in huaju (“word drama”), a genre influenced by Western theatre rather than traditional Chinese drama (which is usually sung). Wan Jiabao was educated at Nankai University in Tianjin and Qinghua University in Beijing, where he studied contemporary Chinese

  • ts’ao-shu (Chinese calligraphy)

    Caoshu, (Chinese: “draft script,” or “grass script”) in Chinese calligraphy, a cursive variant of the standard Chinese scripts lishu and kaishu and their semicursive derivative xingshu. The script developed during the Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 220), and it had its period of greatest growth during the

  • Ts’ao-tung (Buddhist sect)

    Sōtō, largest of the Zen Buddhist sects in Japan. It follows the method of quiet sitting and meditation (zazen) as a means of obtaining enlightenment. The sect was founded in China in the 9th century by Liang-chieh and Pen-chi, where it was known as Ts’ao-tung (after its monastic centres on the

  • Ts’en Chia-chou (Chinese poet)

    Cen Shen, one of the celebrated poets of the Tang dynasty (618–907) of China. Because of the decline of his aristocratic family, Cen had to rely upon his literary skill to secure government appointment through the examination system. During the 750s he held several assignments in the Central Asian

  • Ts’en Shen (Chinese poet)

    Cen Shen, one of the celebrated poets of the Tang dynasty (618–907) of China. Because of the decline of his aristocratic family, Cen had to rely upon his literary skill to secure government appointment through the examination system. During the 750s he held several assignments in the Central Asian

  • Ts’iao-tso (China)

    Jiaozuo, city, northern Henan sheng (province), China. It lies in the foothills at the southern end of the Taihang Mountains, to the west of Xinxiang, in a mining district. Jiaozuo was originally two villages under the administration of Xiuwu county. Exploitation of the villages’ rich coal

  • ts’un (brushstroke)

    Cun, (Chinese: “wrinkles”) in Chinese painting, brushstrokes or dabs that give texture, or surface, to the pictorial elements. The Chinese artist does not strive for illusionistic modeling that is dependent upon the manipulation of light and shade; rather, after the forms are outlined, texture

  • ts’ung (Chinese art)

    Cong, Chinese jade form begun in the late Neolithic Period, it diminished after the Shang (18th–12th century bc) and Zhou (1111–256/255 bc) dynasties. A hollow cylinder or truncated cone enclosed in a rectangular body, the cong varies in proportion from squat to quite tall. The outer flat surfaces

  • TSA (school, New York City, New York, United States)

    Lawrence Rhodes: …at the New York University Tisch School of the Arts, where he eventually became chairman of the dance department. From 1989 to 1999 he was artistic director of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens. In 2002 Rhodes became artistic director of the Juilliard School’s dance division; he held the post until 2017.

  • TSA (United States government)

    Transportation Security Administration (TSA), U.S. agency created following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks that is mandated with developing and implementing policies to ensure the safety of the nation’s transportation systems. It was established by the Aviation and Transportation

  • tsa-chü (Chinese theatre)

    Zaju, (Chinese: “mixed drama or play”) one of the major forms of Chinese drama. The style originated as a short variety play in North China during the Northern Song dynasty (960–1127), and during the Yuan dynasty (1206–1368) it developed into a mature four-act dramatic form, in which songs

  • Tsaatan (people)

    Mongolia: Agriculture, forestry, and fishing: The Tsaatan keep small herds of reindeer in the northern part of the country.

  • Tsáchila (people)

    Tsáchila, Indian people of the Pacific coast of Ecuador. They live in the tropical lowlands of the northwest, where, along with the neighbouring Chachi, they are the last remaining aboriginal group. The Tsáchila are linguistically related to the Chachi, although their Chibchan languages are

  • tsaddik (Judaism)

    Tzaddiq, one who embodies the religious ideals of Judaism. In the Bible, a tzaddiq is a just or righteous man (Genesis 6:9), who, if a ruler, rules justly or righteously (II Samuel 23:3) and who takes joy in justice (Proverbs 21:15). The Talmud (compendium of Jewish law, lore, and commentary)

  • tsaddikim (Judaism)

    Tzaddiq, one who embodies the religious ideals of Judaism. In the Bible, a tzaddiq is a just or righteous man (Genesis 6:9), who, if a ruler, rules justly or righteously (II Samuel 23:3) and who takes joy in justice (Proverbs 21:15). The Talmud (compendium of Jewish law, lore, and commentary)

  • Tsagaan Agui (archaeological site, Gobi Desert, Mongolia)

    Gobi: Geology: …during the 1990s at the Tsagaan Agui (White Cave) in southwest-central Mongolia have produced artifacts up to 35,000 years old.

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