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  • troponin (protein)

    muscle: Thin filament proteins: Troponin is a complex of three different protein subunits. One troponin complex is bound to every tropomyosin molecule. A troponin molecule is located approximately every 40 nm along the filament. Troponin and tropomyosin are both involved in the regulation of the contraction and relaxation of…

  • tropopause (atmospheric region)

    weather forecasting: Meteorological measurements from satellites and aircraft: One such layer is the tropopause, the boundary between the relatively dry stratosphere and the more meteorologically active layer below. This is often the region of the jet streams. Important information about these kinds of high-speed air currents is obtained with sensors mounted on high-flying commercial aircraft and is routinely…

  • troposphere (atmospheric region)

    Troposphere, lowest region of the atmosphere, bounded by the Earth beneath and the stratosphere above, with its upper boundary being the tropopause, about 10–18 km (6–11 miles) above the Earth’s surface. The troposphere is characterized by decreasing temperature with height and is distinguished

  • tropotaxis (animal behaviour)

    stereotyped response: Taxes: In tropotaxis, attainment of orientation is direct, resulting from turning toward the less stimulated (negative) or more stimulated (positive) side as simultaneous, automatic comparisons of intensities on two sides of the body are made. No deviations (trial movements) are required. Tropotaxis is shown by animals with…

  • Troppau (Czech Republic)

    Opava, city, northeastern Czech Republic. It lies along the Opava River near the Polish border and is northwest of Ostrava, from which it is separated by part of the wooded Oder Hills. First recorded as Oppavia in 1195, it was a principate and fief of the Bohemian crown in the early 14th century

  • Troppau, Congress of (Europe [1820])

    Congress of Troppau, (October–December 1820), meeting of the Holy Alliance powers, held at Troppau in Silesia (modern Opava, Czech Republic), at which the Troppau protocol, a declaration of intention to take collective action against revolution, was signed (Nov. 19, 1820). Attended by Francis I of

  • Troqueurs, Les (French operetta)

    theatre music: Classical developments: …Paris production in 1753 of Les Troqueurs (“The Barterers”), based on a fable by Jean de La Fontaine and having original music by a court violinist, Antoine Dauvergne.

  • Trossachs, the (region, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    The Trossachs, tourist area in the Highlands of the Stirling council area, historic county of Perthshire, Scotland. In popular usage the name is applied to the rugged country extending west of Callander to Loch Katrine, but strictly it refers to that part of the glen between Loch Achray and the

  • Tr?st Einsamkeit (German journal)

    Joseph von G?rres: With them he edited the Zeitung für Einsiedler (“Journal for Hermits,” renamed Tr?st Einsamkeit; “Consolation Solitude”), which became the organ for the Heidelberg Romantics. His study of German folk literature, which had been awakened by this contact with the Romantic movement, produced Die teutschen Volksbücher (1807; “The German Chapbooks”), a…

  • Trost, Barry (American chemist)

    green chemistry: Atom economy: …originally suggested by American chemist Barry Trost in 1973, became a central concept among green chemistry researchers. Atom economy was designed to overcome the limitations of the traditional concept of “yield,” the amount of final products, which was used for calculating the efficiency of chemical reactions. To calculate the yield,…

  • Trostan (mountain, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Antrim: Prominent peaks in Antrim included Trostan (1,817 feet), Knocklayd (1,695 feet), and Slieveanorra (1,676 feet); Divis (1,574 feet) is the highest of the Belfast hills. The basalt reaches the north coast as steep cliffs and, at the Giant’s Causeway, forms perpendicular hexagonal columns.

  • trot (animal locomotion)

    Trot, two-beat gait of a horse in which the feet are lifted and strike the ground in diagonal pairs—the right hind and left fore almost simultaneously; then the left hind and right fore. As the horse springs from one pair of legs to the other, twice in each stride all of its legs are off the

  • Troteras y danzaderas (work by Pérez de Ayala)

    Ramón Pérez de Ayala: … (1912; The Fox’s Paw); and Troteras y danzaderas (1913; “Trotters and Dancers”), a novel about literary and Bohemian life in Madrid.

  • Trotha, Lothar von (German military officer)

    German-Herero conflict of 1904–07: Conflict: Lothar von Trotha as the new commander in chief. He was a colonial veteran of the wars in German East Africa and of the Boxer Rebellion in China.

  • Trotman, Alexander James (British business executive)

    Alexander James Trotman, Baron Trotman of Osmotherly, British business executive (born July 22, 1933, Isleworth, Middlesex, Eng.—died April 25, 2005, Yorkshire, Eng.), rose through the corporate ranks at Ford Motor Co. from his start as a management trainee in London in 1955 to become (1993) the g

  • Trotsky, Leon (Russian revolutionary)

    Leon Trotsky, communist theorist and agitator, a leader in Russia’s October Revolution in 1917, and later commissar of foreign affairs and of war in the Soviet Union (1917–24). In the struggle for power following Vladimir Ilich Lenin’s death, however, Joseph Stalin emerged as victor, while Trotsky

  • Trotskyism

    Trotskyism, a Marxist ideology based on the theory of permanent revolution first expounded by Leon Trotsky (1879–1940), one of the leading theoreticians of the Russian Bolshevik Party and a leader in the Russian Revolution. Trotskyism was to become the primary theoretical target of Stalinism

  • trotter (harness racing)

    Trotting, horse racing event in which Standardbred horses drawing sulkies compete. See harness

  • Trotter, Charles (American chef and restaurateur)

    Charlie Trotter, (Charles Trotter), American chef and restaurateur (born Sept. 8, 1959, Wilmette, Ill.—died Nov. 5, 2013, Chicago, Ill.), achieved national celebrity-chef status as the proprietor (1987–2012) of his eponymous 60-seat Chicago restaurant, which became a mecca for fine dining and

  • Trotter, Charlie (American chef and restaurateur)

    Charlie Trotter, (Charles Trotter), American chef and restaurateur (born Sept. 8, 1959, Wilmette, Ill.—died Nov. 5, 2013, Chicago, Ill.), achieved national celebrity-chef status as the proprietor (1987–2012) of his eponymous 60-seat Chicago restaurant, which became a mecca for fine dining and

  • Trotter, Tariq (American music artist)

    the Roots: …was created in 1987 by Black Thought and Questlove—the only members who remained part of the band throughout its history—when they met as students at the Philadelphia High School for the Creative and Performing Arts. Originally calling themselves the Square Roots, they began performing on Philadelphia street corners. With the…

  • Trotter, Wilfred Batten Lewis (British surgeon and sociologist)

    Wilfred Trotter, surgeon and sociologist whose writings on the behaviour of man in the mass popularized the phrase herd instinct. A surgeon at University College Hospital, London, from 1906, and professor of surgery there from 1935, Trotter held the office of honorary surgeon to King George V from

  • Trotter, William Monroe (American journalist and civil rights activist)

    William Monroe Trotter, African American journalist and vocal advocate of racial equality in the early 20th century. From the pages of his weekly newspaper, The Guardian, he criticized the pragmatism of Booker T. Washington, agitating for civil rights among blacks. Along with W.E.B. Du Bois and

  • Trotti, Jacques-Joachim (French diplomat)

    Jacques-Joachim Trotti, marquis de La Chétardie, French officer and diplomat who helped raise the princess Elizabeth to the throne of Russia. La Chétardie entered French military service at an early age and rose through the ranks, becoming lieutenant (1721), major (1730), and colonel (1734). He

  • Trotti, Lamar (American writer and producer)
  • Trottier, Bryan (Canadian hockey player)

    New York Islanders: …right wing Mike Bossy, centre Bryan Trottier, and left wing Clark Gillies. That young group (all but Smith were no older than age 25 at the start of the 1979–80 season) played with postseason poise that belied their youth, losing just three games over the course of their first four…

  • trotting (harness racing)

    Trotting, horse racing event in which Standardbred horses drawing sulkies compete. See harness

  • Trotwood, Betsey (fictional character)

    Betsey Trotwood, fictional character, the eccentric aunt of the protagonist of Charles Dickens’s novel David Copperfield

  • Trotzig, Birgitta (Swedish author)

    Birgitta Trotzig, Swedish novelist and essayist in the existential tradition of France in the 1940s. (She lived in Paris from 1955 to 1972.) In her novels Trotzig probed from different perspectives the same basic human dilemma: man as a prisoner of his own ego and his own patterns of action. Her

  • Trou aux Cerfs (extinct crater, Mauritius)

    Curepipe: The Trou aux Cerfs, an extinct crater that is 280 feet (85 metres) deep and 200 feet (60 metres) wide, overlooks the town. Pop. (2005 est.) 82,660.

  • Trou d’Eau Mountains (mountains, Hispaniola)

    Dominican Republic: Relief, drainage, and soils: …to the south is the Sierra de Neiba, which corresponds to the Matheux and Trou d’Eau mountains of Haiti; its high peaks reach approximately 7,200 feet (2,200 metres). Water flowing off the Neiba range drains partly to the Caribbean, via the Yaque del Sur system, and partly inland, to saline…

  • troubadour (medieval lyric poet)

    Troubadour, lyric poet of southern France, northern Spain, and northern Italy, writing in the langue d’oc of Provence; the troubadours, flourished from the late 11th to the late 13th century. Their social influence was unprecedented in the history of medieval poetry. Favoured at the courts, they

  • Troubadour (album by K’naan)

    K'Naan: …K’Naan expanded his audience with Troubadour (2009). The album, recorded in Jamaica at studios that once belonged to Bob Marley, was another globally inspired concoction, featuring elements of reggae and Ethiopian jazz beneath K’Naan’s ebullient rhymes. Though some critics felt that the record was unfocused because of a surfeit of…

  • Troubadour, The (opera by Verdi)

    Il trovatore, (Italian: “The Troubadour”) opera in four acts by Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi (Italian libretto by Salvatore Cammarano, with additions by Leone Emanuele Bardare) that premiered at the Teatro Apollo in Rome on January 19, 1853. Verdi prepared a revised version in French, Le

  • Trouble Along the Way (film by Curtiz [1953])

    Donna Reed: … (1947), Saturday’s Hero (1951), and Trouble Along the Way (1953; with John Wayne). She finally had a chance to play against type when she was cast as a hardheaded prostitute who is surprised by her own vulnerability in the acclaimed epic From Here to Eternity (1953); her emotionally charged performance…

  • Trouble in Paradise (film by Lubitsch [1932])

    Ernst Lubitsch: Transition to sound: Lubitsch’s next project, Trouble in Paradise (1932), is considered by many to be his masterpiece. Hopkins and Herbert Marshall played romantically involved French jewel thieves who gain employment with a wealthy woman (Kay Francis) so that they can bilk her out of her fortune. As in many of…

  • Trouble in Paradise (album by Newman)

    Randy Newman: ” from Trouble in Paradise (1983), was lost on many listeners. Land of Dreams (1988) was Newman’s most personal album; in 1995 he released Faust, a concept album based on Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s Faust. The boxed set Guilty: 30 Years of Randy Newman appeared in 1998…

  • Trouble on the Hoof: Disease Breaks Out in Europe

    Farmers rarely celebrate good fortune in the modern world, but British Agriculture seemed to be emerging from a period of darkness as 2001 began. The scourge of “mad cow” disease was in retreat. After mad cow disease (bovine spongiform encephalopathy [BSE]) had first been causally related to a

  • Trouble with Angels, The (film by Lupino [1966])

    Ida Lupino: Later work: …the innocuous but pleasant comedy The Trouble with Angels; it centres on a rebellious teen (Hayley Mills) who makes life difficult for the mother superior (Rosalind Russell) at a convent school in Pennsylvania. Lupino then helmed several television shows before retiring from directing in 1968.

  • Trouble with Harry, The (film by Hitchcock [1955])

    Alfred Hitchcock: The Paramount years: Rear Window to North by Northwest: If Thief was lightweight, The Trouble with Harry (1955) was downright irreverent. A black comedy about a Vermont town’s problems with a corpse that just will not stay buried, it had the virtues of amusing performances by Edmund Gwenn and (in her screen debut) Shirley MacLaine, but the film…

  • Trouble with Principle, The (work by Fish)

    Stanley Fish: …Studies and Political Change (1995), The Trouble with Principle (1999), and How Milton Works (2001). How to Write a Sentence: And How to Read One and Winning Arguments: What Works and Doesn’t Work in Politics, the Bedroom, the Courtroom, and the Classroom were published in 2011 and 2016, respectively.

  • Trouble with the Curve (film by Lorenz [2012])

    Amy Adams: …of a baseball scout in Trouble with the Curve (2012) and a character based on William S. Burroughs’s wife Joan Vollmer in a screen adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road (2012). Also in 2012 Adams made her New York City stage debut in a Shakespeare in the Park production…

  • Trouble with You, The (film by Salvadori [2018])

    Audrey Tautou: ) and En liberte! (2018; The Trouble with You), in which she played the wife of a man wrongfully imprisoned.

  • Troubled 2014 Everest Climbing Season, The

    Something happened on Mt. Everest in 2014 that had not occurred there for some four decades: with one notable exception, not one climbing expedition reached—or even attempted to reach—the summit of the mountain from the southern (Nepalese) side during the spring climbing season. Cancellation of the

  • Troubled Asset Relief Program (United States government)

    Kenneth Chenault: …receive emergency financing through the Troubled Assets Relief Program (TARP)—a program created under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 that allowed the Treasury secretary to purchase troubled assets from banks in order to restore stability and liquidity to U.S. credit markets.

  • Troubled Assets Relief Program (United States government)

    Kenneth Chenault: …receive emergency financing through the Troubled Assets Relief Program (TARP)—a program created under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 that allowed the Treasury secretary to purchase troubled assets from banks in order to restore stability and liquidity to U.S. credit markets.

  • troubled world economy

    As 1998 drew to a close, the world was caught in the grips of the most serious financial crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Starting in Thailand in July 1997, the crisis spread spasmodically to much of the rest of Asia, parts of Latin America, and Russia over the next 18 months. By the

  • Troublemaker (novel by Hansen)

    Dave Brandstetter: …of a gay bar in Troublemaker (1975). In Early Graves (1987) he comes out of retirement to trace a serial killer who murders victims of AIDS. The detective also appears in the novels The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of (1978), Skinflick (1980), Gravedigger (1982), Nightwork (1984), The Little Dog Laughed…

  • Troubles (work by Farrell)

    J.G. Farrell: The first, Troubles (1970), focuses on the struggle for Irish independence in the years following World War I, with its principal setting—the sprawling, run-down Majestic Hotel—serving as a metaphor for the dying empire. Though a rule change made the novel (and all others published in 1970) ineligible…

  • Troubles, Council of (Netherlands history)

    Council of Troubles, (1567–74), special court in the Low Countries organized by the Spanish governor, the Duke of Alba, which initiated a reign of terror against all elements suspected of heresy or rebellion. Alba’s dispatch to the Netherlands at the head of a large army in the summer of 1567 had

  • Troubles, the (Northern Ireland history)

    The Troubles, violent sectarian conflict from about 1968 to 1998 in Northern Ireland between the overwhelmingly Protestant unionists (loyalists), who desired the province to remain part of the United Kingdom, and the overwhelmingly Roman Catholic nationalists (republicans), who wanted Northern

  • Troubles, Time of (Russian history)

    Time of Troubles, period of political crisis in Russia that followed the demise of the Rurik dynasty (1598) and ended with the establishment of the Romanov dynasty (1613). During this period foreign intervention, peasant uprisings, and the attempts of pretenders to seize the throne threatened to

  • Troublesome Raigne and Lamentable Death of Edward the Second, King of England, The (play by Marlowe)

    Christopher Marlowe: Works.: …in the younger Mortimer of Edward II Marlowe shows a man developing an appetite for power and increasingly corrupted as power comes to him. In each instance the dramatist shares in the excitement of the pursuit of glory, but all three plays present such figures within a social framework: the…

  • Troublesome Raigne of John King of England, The (English play)

    King John: …two-part drama generally known as The Troublesome Raigne of John King of England. This earlier play, first printed in 1591, was based on the chronicles of Raphael Holinshed and Edward Hall; Shakespeare also consulted some chronicle materials, as well as John Foxe’s Acts and Monuments (1563), known as

  • trough (wave)

    wave: Types and features of waves: …low point is called the trough. For longitudinal waves, the compressions and rarefactions are analogous to the crests and troughs of transverse waves. The distance between successive crests or troughs is called the wavelength. The height of a wave is the amplitude. How many crests or troughs pass a specific…

  • trough withering

    tea: Withering: In trough withering, air is forced through a thick layer of leaf on a mesh in a trough. In drum withering, rotating, perforated drums are used instead of troughs, and in tunnel withering, leaf is spread on tats carried by mobile trolleys and is subjected to…

  • Troughs of the Coastal Margin (region, United States)

    United States: The Western Cordillera: …these Pacific Coast Ranges the Troughs of the Coastal Margin contain the only extensive lowland plains of the Pacific margin—California’s Central Valley, Oregon’s Willamette River valley, and the half-drowned basin of Puget Sound in Washington. Parts of an inland trench that extends for great distances along the east coast of…

  • Troughton, Edward (English inventor)

    Edward Troughton, English maker of scientific instruments. At age 17 Troughton joined his brother’s mechanician’s shop in London, where he applied himself singlemindedly to inventing. His new mode of graduating arcs of circles (1778) would later be called “the greatest improvement ever made in the

  • troupial (bird)

    passeriform: Nesting: …nests are often appropriated by troupials (Icterus icterus), which evict the owners, even destroying the eggs and young in the process. a few other species also take over nests for their own use, notably the piratic flycatcher (Legatus leucophaius, a tyrannid) and the bay-winged cowbird (Molothrus badius).

  • Troupsville (Georgia, United States)

    Carrollton, city, seat (1829) of Carroll county, western Georgia, U.S. It is situated near the Little Tallapoosa River, about 45 miles (70 km) southwest of Atlanta. Formerly called Troupsville, it was renamed (1829) for the Maryland plantation of patriot Charles Carroll. It developed as a trade and

  • trousers (clothing)

    Trousers, an outer garment covering the lower half of the body from the waist to the ankles and divided into sections to cover each leg separately. In attempting to define trousers, historians often explain that if any portion of a garment passed between the legs, it was an ancestor of this

  • trout (fish)

    Trout, any of several prized game and food fishes of the family Salmonidae (order Salmoniformes) that are usually restricted to freshwater, though a few types migrate to the sea between spawnings. Trout are closely related to salmon. They are important sport fishes and are often raised in

  • Trout Fishing in America (work by Brautigan)

    Richard Brautigan: Trout Fishing in America (1967), his second novel, became his best-known work. Rife with allusions to acknowledged American literary masters such as Henry David Thoreau and Ernest Hemingway and rich with references to early American history, Trout Fishing in America is a subversive commentary on…

  • Trout Mask Replica (album by Captain Beefheart)

    Captain Beefheart: Beefheart’s most famous recording, Trout Mask Replica (1969), produced by Zappa, proved an astonishing departure from previous rock conventions, combining eerie slide guitars, unpredictable rhythms, and surrealistic lyrics that Beefheart (who possessed a five-octave range) wailed with fierce intensity. His songs conveyed a deep distrust of modern civilization, a…

  • Trout Quintet (work by Schubert)

    Trout Quintet, five-movement quintet for piano and stringed instruments by Austrian composer Franz Schubert that is characterized by distinctive instrumentation and form. In the summer of 1819 Schubert visited the Austrian town of Steyr, about halfway between Vienna and Salzburg, with his friend

  • Trout, Bobbi (American aviator)

    Evelyn Trout, (“Bobbi”), American aviator (born Jan. 7, 1906, Greenup, Ill.—died Jan. 24, 2003, La Jolla, Calif.), counted having been the first woman to fly an all-night route among her many women’s flight endurance and altitude records. She was the last survivor of the pilots who in 1929 took p

  • Trout, Evelyn (American aviator)

    Evelyn Trout, (“Bobbi”), American aviator (born Jan. 7, 1906, Greenup, Ill.—died Jan. 24, 2003, La Jolla, Calif.), counted having been the first woman to fly an all-night route among her many women’s flight endurance and altitude records. She was the last survivor of the pilots who in 1929 took p

  • Trout, Michael Nelson (American baseball player)

    Mike Trout, American baseball centre fielder who was one of the sport’s best all-around players of the early 21st century. Trout was a baseball star at Millville (New Jersey) High School, and his already-apparent skills prompted the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim to choose him as the 25th overall

  • Trout, Mike (American baseball player)

    Mike Trout, American baseball centre fielder who was one of the sport’s best all-around players of the early 21st century. Trout was a baseball star at Millville (New Jersey) High School, and his already-apparent skills prompted the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim to choose him as the 25th overall

  • Trout, Robert (American journalist)

    Robert Trout, (Robert Albert Blondheim), American broadcast journalist (born Oct. 15, 1909, Washington, D.C.—died Nov. 14, 2000, New York, N.Y.), helped create the role of news anchor. Trout got his start in journalism as a news announcer for radio station WJSV in Alexandria, Va. When Columbia B

  • trout-perch (fish)

    Trout-perch, either of two species of small, dark-spotted fishes of the genus Percopsis (family Percopsidae), found in freshwaters of North America. The larger species, P. omiscomaycus, grows about 15 cm (6 inches) long and is found in central North America. The second, P. transmontana, is about

  • trout-stream beetle (insect)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Amphizoidae (trout-stream beetles) About 5 species (Amphizoa) in Tibet, North America; feed on drowned insects. Family Aspidytidae (cliff water beetles) 2 species (Aspidytes). Family Carabidae (ground beetles) Usually dark,

  • Troutman, Roger (American musician)

    Roger Troutman, American singer, songwriter, and producer who with his brothers founded (1975) the funk group Zapp, which had a number of hits in the 1980s, including “More Bounce to the Ounce”; he also worked as a solo performer and on recordings by various hip-hop artists (b. Nov. 29, 1951,

  • Trouvelot, étienne L. (French astronomer)

    extraterrestrial life: Martian vegetation and canals: …posed by a French astronomer, étienne L. Trouvelot, in 1884:

  • trouvère (French poet)

    Trouvère, any of a school of poets that flourished in northern France from the 11th to the 14th century. The trouvère was the counterpart in the language of northern France (the langue d’o?l) to the Proven?al troubadour (q.v.), from whom the trouvères derived their highly stylized themes and m

  • trouveur (French poet)

    Trouvère, any of a school of poets that flourished in northern France from the 11th to the 14th century. The trouvère was the counterpart in the language of northern France (the langue d’o?l) to the Proven?al troubadour (q.v.), from whom the trouvères derived their highly stylized themes and m

  • Trouville (France)

    Trouville, seaside resort and port on the English Channel, Calvados département, Normandy région, northwestern France. It is situated where the Normandy Corniche drops to the right bank of the Touques estuary, opposite Deauville-les-Bains, with which community there are ferry and bridge links.

  • Trouville-sur-Mer (France)

    Trouville, seaside resort and port on the English Channel, Calvados département, Normandy région, northwestern France. It is situated where the Normandy Corniche drops to the right bank of the Touques estuary, opposite Deauville-les-Bains, with which community there are ferry and bridge links.

  • Trova, Ernest Tino, Jr. (American sculptor and painter)

    Ernest Tino Trova, Jr., (“Ernie”), American sculptor and painter (born Feb. 19, 1927, St. Louis, Mo.—died March 8, 2009, Richmond Heights, Mo.), was a self-taught artist who drew on his experiences as a window dresser (especially focusing on mannequins as artistic elements) to create Abstract

  • trovador, El (work by García Gutiérrez)

    Il trovatore: Based on the 1836 play El trovador by Antonio García Gutiérrez, the opera is one of three considered to represent the culmination of Verdi’s artistry to that point. (The other two are Rigoletto and La traviata.)

  • trovatore, Il (opera by Verdi)

    Il trovatore, (Italian: “The Troubadour”) opera in four acts by Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi (Italian libretto by Salvatore Cammarano, with additions by Leone Emanuele Bardare) that premiered at the Teatro Apollo in Rome on January 19, 1853. Verdi prepared a revised version in French, Le

  • trover (law)

    Trover, a form of lawsuit in common-law countries (e.g., England, Commonwealth countries, and the United States) for recovery of damages for wrongful taking of personal property. Trover belongs to a series of remedies for such wrongful taking, its distinctive feature being recovery only for the

  • Trovoada, Miguel (president of Sao Tome and Principe)

    Sao Tome and Principe: After independence: …was succeeded in 1991 by Miguel Trovoada, a former prime minister who ran for the presidency unopposed in the first free elections in the country’s history. In August 1995 Trovoada was deposed in a bloodless coup orchestrated by the military. However, coup leaders reconsidered their demands when faced with the…

  • trow (legendary creature)

    Troll, in early Scandinavian folklore, giant, monstrous being, sometimes possessing magic powers. Hostile to men, trolls lived in castles and haunted the surrounding districts after dark. If exposed to sunlight they burst or turned to stone. In later tales trolls often are man-sized or smaller

  • Trow, Ann (American abortionist)

    Madame Restell, infamous British-born abortionist and purveyor of contraceptives. Ann Trow was born into a poor family. In 1831 she moved to New York City with her husband, who died a few years later, and in 1836 she married Charles R. Lohman. Her husband had established himself as a purveyor of

  • Trowbridge (England, United Kingdom)

    Trowbridge, town (parish), administrative and historic county of Wiltshire, southwestern England. Trowbridge is located on the River Biss in western Wiltshire, approximately 12 miles (19 km) southeast of Bath. Its substantial growth in the 18th and 19th centuries and strong transportation links

  • trowsers (clothing)

    Trousers, an outer garment covering the lower half of the body from the waist to the ankles and divided into sections to cover each leg separately. In attempting to define trousers, historians often explain that if any portion of a garment passed between the legs, it was an ancestor of this

  • Troxler phenomenon (physiology)

    human eye: The retinal image: This effect is called the Troxler phenomenon. To study it reproducibly, it is necessary to use an optical device that ensures that the image of any object upon which the gaze is fixed will remain on the same part of the retina however the eyes move. When this is acheived,…

  • Troy (New York, United States)

    Troy, city, seat (1793) of Rensselaer county, eastern New York, U.S. It lies on the east bank of the Hudson River, opposite Watervliet and the junction of the Hudson with the Mohawk River and the New York State Canal System. With Albany and Schenectady, it forms an urban-industrial complex. Its

  • Troy (Alabama, United States)

    Troy, city, seat (1839) of Pike county, southeastern Alabama, U.S., about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of Montgomery. Originally known as Deer Stand Hill (an Indian hunting ground) and first settled about 1824, it was later known as Zebulon and then Centreville before being renamed Troy (1838),

  • Troy (ancient city, Turkey)

    Troy, ancient city in northwestern Anatolia that holds an enduring place in both literature and archaeology. The legend of the Trojan War is the most notable theme from ancient Greek literature and forms the basis of Homer’s Iliad. Although the actual nature and size of the historical settlement

  • Troy and Its Remains (work by Schliemann)

    Heinrich Schliemann: Discovery of Troy: During the delay he published Troja und seine Ruinen (1875; “Troy and Its Ruins”) and began excavation at Mycenae. In August 1876 he began work in the tholoi, digging by the Lion Gate and then inside the citadel walls, where he found a double ring of slabs and, within that…

  • Troy Book, The (work by Lydgate)

    John Lydgate: …from vast narratives such as The Troy Book and The Falle of Princis to occasional poems of a few lines. Of the longer poems, one translated from the French, the allegory Reason and Sensuality (c. 1408) on the theme of chastity, contains fresh and charming descriptions of nature, in well-handled…

  • Troy Female Seminary (school, Troy, New York, United States)

    Troy Female Seminary, American educational institution, established in 1821 by Emma Hart Willard in Troy, New York, the first in the country founded to provide young women with an education comparable to that of college-educated young men. At the time of the seminary’s founding, women were barred

  • Troy Hills (New Jersey, United States)

    Parsippany–Troy Hills, township, Morris county, northeastern New Jersey, U.S. The township extends eastward from the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains to the Passaic River swamps, 23 miles (37 km) west of New York City. Communities within the township include Manor Lakes, Lake Hiawatha, Lake

  • troy weight (measurement system)

    Troy weight, traditional system of weight in the British Isles based on the grain, pennyweight (24 grains), ounce (20 pennyweights), and pound (12 ounces). The troy grain, pennyweight, and ounce have been used since the Middle Ages to weigh gold, silver, and other precious metals and stones. The

  • Troy, Doris (American singer)

    Doris Troy, (Doris Higgensen), American soul singer (born Jan. 6, 1937, New York, N.Y.—died Feb. 16, 2004, Las Vegas, Nev.), found great popularity in Britain, where she resettled in 1969, recording backing vocals with the Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, and George Harrison. She first came to fame in N

  • Troy, Jean-Fran?ois de (French painter)

    Jean-Fran?ois de Troy, French Rococo painter known for his tableaux de mode, or scenes of the life of the French upper class and aristocracy, especially during the period of the regency—e.g., Hunt Breakfast (1737) and Luncheon with Oysters (1735). As a youngster he studied with his father, Fran?ois

  • Troy, Sergeant Francis (fictional character)

    Sergeant Francis Troy, fictional character, a dashing but heartless cad who marries Bathsheba Everdene, the heroine of Thomas Hardy’s novel Far from the Madding Crowd

  • Troy, Siege of (Trojan War)

    Siege of Troy, (1250 bce). No war has had a more tenacious hold over the Western imagination than that of the Siege of Troy (1250 bce), as related in Homer’s Iliad. It was long assumed to be the stuff of legend, yet it has recently been suggested that it might be a part of history as well. When

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