You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • troika (vehicle)

    Troika, (Russian: “three”), any vehicle drawn by three horses abreast, usually a sleigh with runners but also a wheeled carriage. The three-horse team is also known as a unicorn team. In Hungary and in Russia the troika, drawn by three horses and driven by an elegantly clad coachman, was once the

  • troilite (mineral)

    Troilite, variety of the iron sulfide mineral pyrrhotite (q.v.) present in

  • Troillet, Jean (Swiss mountaineer)

    Mount Everest: Further exploration from Tibet: …ascent by the Swiss climbers Jean Troillet and Erhard Loretan. Like Messner, they snatched a clear-weather window toward the end of the monsoon for a lightning dash up and down the mountain. Unlike Messner, they did not even carry a tent and sleeping bags. Climbing by night, resting during the…

  • Troilus (Greek mythology)

    Troilus, Trojan prince in Greek mythology, son of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy. It had been prophesied that Troy would never fall if Troilus reached the age of 20. When Troilus was a boy, Achilles ambushed him as he was drinking from a fountain and killed him. His sister, Polyxena,

  • Troilus (fictional character)

    Troilus and Cressida: …Greeks, pledges her love to Troilus, one of King Priam’s sons. However, when her father demands her presence in the Greek camp, she reluctantly accepts the attentions of Diomedes, the Greek officer who has been sent to escort her to the Greek side. Given her situation in an enemy camp…

  • Troilus and Cressida (work by Shakespeare)

    Troilus and Cressida, drama in five acts by William Shakespeare, written about 1601–02 and printed in a quarto edition in two different “states” in 1609, probably from the author’s working draft. The editors of the First Folio of 1623 may have had copyright difficulties in obtaining permission to

  • Troilus and Criseyde (verse romance by Chaucer)

    Troilus and Criseyde, tragic verse romance by Geoffrey Chaucer, composed in the 1380s and considered by some critics to be his finest work. The plot of this 8,239-line poem was taken largely from Giovanni Boccaccio’s Il filostrato. It recounts the love story of Troilus, son of the Trojan king

  • Trois contes (work by Flaubert)

    Gustave Flaubert: Later years: …Pécuchet, in order to write Trois Contes, containing the three short stories “Un Coeur simple,” a tale about the drab and simple life of a faithful servant; “La Légende de Saint Julien l’Hospitalier”; and “Hérodias.” This book, through the diversity of the stories’ themes, shows Flaubert’s talent in all its…

  • Trois femmes (work by Charrière)

    Isabelle de Charrière: …aristocratic privilege, moral conventions (Trois femmes, 1797; “Three Women”), religious orthodoxy, and poverty, though she was opposed to revolutionary radicalism (Lettres trouvées sous la neige, 1794; “Letters Found on the Snow”). Her novels, of which the most important were Caliste; ou, lettres écrites de Lausanne (1786; “Caliste; or, Letters…

  • Trois Frères (cave, Ariège, France)

    Trois Frères, cave in Ariège, France, containing an important group of Late Paleolithic paintings and engravings. The cave was discovered in 1914, and most of the pictures of animals, together with a couple of therianthropes (half-human, half-animal figures), are located on the walls of a deep

  • Trois Glorieuses, les (French history)

    France: The revolution of 1830: …days known to Frenchmen as les Trois Glorieuses (July 27–29), protest was rapidly transmuted into insurrection; barricades went up in the streets, manned by workers, students, and petty bourgeois citizens (some of them former members of the National Guard, which Charles, in pique, had disbanded in 1827). On July 29…

  • Trois gymnopédies (work by Satie)

    Trois gymnopédies, three pieces for solo piano by French composer Erik Satie, written in 1888. The word gymnopédies was derived from a festival of ancient Sparta at which young men danced and competed against each other unencumbered by clothing, and the name was a (presumably) droll reference to

  • Trois Mousquetaires, Les (novel by Dumas, père)

    The Three Musketeers, novel by Alexandre Dumas père, published in French as Les Trois Mousquetaires in 1844. SUMMARY: A historical romance, it relates the adventures of four fictional swashbuckling heroes who lived under the French kings Louis XIII and Louis XIV, who reigned during the 17th and

  • Trois Pitons, Mount (mountain, Dominica)

    Dominica: Relief, drainage, and soils: …(4,747 feet [1,447 metres]) and Mount Trois Pitons (4,670 feet [1,424 metres]).

  • Trois Vérités, Les (work by Charron)

    Pierre Charron: …in his two major works, Les Trois Vérités (1593; “The Three Truths”) and De la sagesse (1601; On Wisdom). In the first of these, which was intended as a Counter-Reformation tract against the reformed theology of John Calvin, Charron claimed that the nature and existence of God are unknowable because…

  • Trois versions de la vie (play by Reza)

    Yasmina Reza: Reza’s next play, Trois versions de la vie, showed an awkward situation—a couple arriving a day early for a dinner party—working itself out in three different outcomes. After premiering in Vienna in October 2000, it opened the following month in Paris, with the author in the cast, and…

  • Trois Villes, Les (work by Zola)

    émile Zola: Life: …novels, Les Trois Villes (1894–98; The Three Cities) and Les Quatre évangiles (1899–1903; The Four Gospels), are generally conceded to be far less forceful than his earlier work. However, the titles of the novels in the latter series reveal the values that underlay his entire life and work: Fécondité (1899;…

  • Trois volontés de Malic, Les (book by Diagne)

    African literature: French: In his novel Les Trois volontés de Malic (1920; “The Three Wishes of Malic”), the Senegalese writer Ahmadou Mapaté Diagne anticipates such later writers as Sheikh Hamidou Kane, also of Senegal. In Diagne’s novel, Malic, a Wolof boy, is embroiled in a struggle between Muslim tradition and the…

  • Trois-évêchés (historical territory, France)

    Verdun: … to form the Trois-évêchés (Three Bishoprics) territory. In 1552 the French king Henry II took over the three bishoprics, and France’s ownership was confirmed in 1648 by the Peace of Westphalia. In 1792 Verdun was besieged by the Prussians and yielded only a few weeks before the French victory…

  • Trois-Rivières (Quebec, Canada)

    Trois-Rivières, city, Mauricie–Bois-Francs region, southern Quebec province, Canada. It lies on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River, at the mouth of the Saint-Maurice River. Trois-Rivières was founded in 1634 by the French explorer Samuel de Champlain and named for the three channels at the

  • Troisgros, Jean (French chef)
  • Troisgros, Pierre (French chef)
  • Troitsa (holiday)

    Russia: Daily life and social customs: …popular traditional holiday is the Troitsa (Pentecost), during which homes are adorned with fresh green branches. Girls often make garlands of birch branches and flowers to put into water for fortune-telling. In the last month of summer, there is a cluster of three folk holidays—known collectively as the Spas—that celebrate…

  • Troitsk (Russia)

    Troitsk, city, Chelyabinsk oblast (region), western Russia. Troitsk lies along the Uy River at the inflow of the Uvelka River. Founded in 1743 as a fortress, it was chartered in 1784. An agricultural centre for the adjacent steppes, Troitsk also has transport and industrial functions, and a

  • Troitskaya Tower (tower, Moscow, Russia)

    Moscow: The Kremlin: …two other principal gate towers—the Trinity (Troitskaya) Tower, with a bridge and outer barbican (the Kutafya Tower), and the Borovitskaya Tower—rise from the western wall.

  • Troitskosavsk (Russia)

    Kyakhta, town, Buryatia, south-central Siberia, Russia. It lies in the basin of the Selenga River, on the frontier with Mongolia. The town is on the railway and motor road from Ulan-Ude to Ulaanbaatar; both routes follow an ancient caravan track that was the only recognized link between Russia and

  • Troja (ancient city, Turkey)

    Troy, ancient city in northwestern Anatolia that holds an enduring place in both literature and archaeology. The legend of the Trojan War is the most notable theme from ancient Greek literature and forms the basis of Homer’s Iliad. Although the actual nature and size of the historical settlement

  • Troja und seine Ruinen (work by Schliemann)

    Heinrich Schliemann: Discovery of Troy: During the delay he published Troja und seine Ruinen (1875; “Troy and Its Ruins”) and began excavation at Mycenae. In August 1876 he began work in the tholoi, digging by the Lion Gate and then inside the citadel walls, where he found a double ring of slabs and, within that…

  • trojan (computing)

    Trojan, a type of malicious computer software (malware) disguised within legitimate or beneficial programs or files. Once installed on a user’s computer system, the trojan allows the malware developer remote access to the host computer, subjecting the host computer to a variety of destructive or

  • Trojan (people)

    Aeneid: The Trojans, in Book V, journey to Sicily, where they engage in a series of competitions to commemorate the anniversary of the death of Aeneas’s father, Anchises. They then set sail again. Book VI is the account of Aeneas’s journey to the underworld and Elysium, where…

  • Trojan asteroid (astronomy)

    Trojan asteroid, any one of a number of asteroids that occupy a stable Lagrangian point in a planet’s orbit around the Sun. In 1772 the French mathematician and astronomer Joseph-Louis Lagrange predicted the existence and location of two groups of small bodies located near a pair of gravitationally

  • Trojan horse (Greek mythology)

    Trojan horse, huge hollow wooden horse constructed by the Greeks to gain entrance into Troy during the Trojan War. The horse was built by Epeius, a master carpenter and pugilist. The Greeks, pretending to desert the war, sailed to the nearby island of Tenedos, leaving behind Sinon, who persuaded

  • Trojan Horse of America, The (work by Dies)

    Martin Dies, Jr.: In his 1940 book, The Trojan Horse of America, Dies claimed to have surpassed the FBI in uncovering communist subversives in America.

  • Trojan horse virus (computing)

    Trojan, a type of malicious computer software (malware) disguised within legitimate or beneficial programs or files. Once installed on a user’s computer system, the trojan allows the malware developer remote access to the host computer, subjecting the host computer to a variety of destructive or

  • Trojan Horse, The (work by Morley)

    Christopher Morley: …other novels include the innovative The Trojan Horse (1937), a combination of prose, verse, and dramatic dialogue that satirized human devotion to luxury, and the sentimental best-seller Kitty Foyle (1939), about an office girl and a socialite youth. The Old Mandarin (1947) is a collection of witty free verse. Morley…

  • Trojan planet (astronomy)

    Trojan asteroid, any one of a number of asteroids that occupy a stable Lagrangian point in a planet’s orbit around the Sun. In 1772 the French mathematician and astronomer Joseph-Louis Lagrange predicted the existence and location of two groups of small bodies located near a pair of gravitationally

  • Trojan War (Greek mythology)

    Trojan War, legendary conflict between the early Greeks and the people of Troy in western Anatolia, dated by later Greek authors to the 12th or 13th century bce. The war stirred the imagination of the ancient Greeks more than any other event in their history and was celebrated in the Iliad and the

  • Trojan Women (play by Euripides)

    Trojan Women, drama by Euripides, produced in 415 bce. The play is a famous and powerful indictment of the barbarous cruelties of war. It was first produced only months after the Athenians captured the city-state of Melos, butchering its men and reducing its women to slavery, and the mood of the

  • Trojan Women, The (film by Cacoyannis [1971])

    Vanessa Redgrave: Oscar contender: roles from the 1960s and ’70s: …the role of Andromache in The Trojan Women and received another Oscar nomination for her work as the title character in Mary, Queen of Scots, playing opposite Glenda Jackson’s Queen Elizabeth I. Redgrave also appeared in such popular mainstream vehicles as Murder on the Orient Express (1974) and The Seven-Per-Cent…

  • Trojanerkrieg, Der (poem by Konrad von Würzburg)

    Konrad von Würzburg: …on the fairy-lover theme, and Der Trojanerkrieg (The Trojan War), an account of the Trojan War. He is at his best in his shorter narrative poems, the secular romances Engelhart, Dasz Herzmaere (The Heart’s Tidings), and Keiser Otte mit dem Barte (Kaiser Otte with the Beard) and the religious legends…

  • Trójumanna saga (Icelandic literature)

    Icelandic literature: Translations from Latin: …this was preceded by the Trójumanna saga (“Story of the Trojans”), translated from a supposed eyewitness account of the Trojan War attributed to the Trojan priest Dares Phrygius. A Norwegian translation of the Bible was begun in the reign (1299–1319) of Haakon V Magnusson.

  • Troldhaugen (building, Bergen, Norway)

    Fana: …mast) church in Fantoft, and Troldhaugen, the home of the composer Edvard Grieg.

  • troll (legendary creature)

    Troll, in early Scandinavian folklore, giant, monstrous being, sometimes possessing magic powers. Hostile to men, trolls lived in castles and haunted the surrounding districts after dark. If exposed to sunlight they burst or turned to stone. In later tales trolls often are man-sized or smaller

  • Troll Circle, The (novel by Hoel)

    Sigurd Hoel: …the late novel Trollringen (1958; The Troll Circle), about a rural community’s scapegoat who is wrongly convicted of his wife’s death partly as a result of his trying to introduce new agricultural methods. Trollringen, as one critic remarked, combines a “masterly use of image and symbol” with caustic social analysis…

  • Troll field (gas field, North Sea)

    Norway: Oil and gas: …toward the development of the Troll field just west of Bergen, one of the largest offshore gas fields ever found. Its development ranked as one of the world’s largest energy projects. With a water displacement of one million tons and a height of nearly 1,550 feet (475 metres), the Troll…

  • Troll Garden, The (short stories by Cather)

    The Troll Garden, first short-story collection by Willa Cather, published in 1905. Publication of the collection, which contains some of her best-known work, led to Cather’s appointment as managing editor of McClure’s Magazine, a New York monthly. The stories are linked thematically by their

  • Troll, Carl (German geographer)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Agricultural adaptation: …1930s by the German geographer Carl Troll. His solution took into account a unique aspect of Andean ecology: the greatest population concentration (more than 1,000,000 people) and the highest agricultural productivity occurred around Lake Titicaca, which is some 12,500 feet above sea level. Nowhere else in the world—not even in…

  • Trolle, Erik (Swedish regent)

    Sweden: Political conflict: …Denmark under the regency of Erik Trolle, whose family supported the union. Svante’s son, Sten Sture the Younger, led a coup, however, and was elected regent. Peace with Denmark was concluded in 1513.

  • Trolle, Gustav Eriksson (Swedish archbishop)

    Gustav Trolle, Swedish archbishop who instigated the Stockholm Bloodbath of 1520—the mass execution of 82 Swedish nobles and bishops who had fought against union with Denmark-Norway. Trolle became archbishop of Sweden in 1514. As head of the council of state, he led the party favouring the election

  • trolley bus (vehicle)

    Trolleybus, vehicle operated on the streets on rubber tires and powered by electricity drawn from two overhead wires by trolley poles. It is distinct from a trolley car, which runs on rails rather than on tires and is thus a form of streetcar. In the late 1880s a number of small transit systems

  • trolley car

    Streetcar, vehicle that runs on track laid in the streets, operated usually in single units and usually driven by electric motor. Early streetcars were either horse-drawn or depended for power on storage batteries that were expensive and inefficient. In 1834 Thomas Davenport, a blacksmith from

  • trolley conveyor (mechanical device)

    conveyor: In trolley conveyors an overhead rail carries a series of load-bearing containers (trolleys) that are coupled together on an endless propelling medium such as cable, chain, or other linkage. The trolleys may be hooks, magnets, or various carriers designed for the particular load to be handled.…

  • Trolley Song (song)

    Meet Me in St. Louis: …songs, from the upbeat “Trolley Song” to the beautiful but sombre “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.”

  • trolleybus (vehicle)

    Trolleybus, vehicle operated on the streets on rubber tires and powered by electricity drawn from two overhead wires by trolley poles. It is distinct from a trolley car, which runs on rails rather than on tires and is thus a form of streetcar. In the late 1880s a number of small transit systems

  • trolleycar

    Streetcar, vehicle that runs on track laid in the streets, operated usually in single units and usually driven by electric motor. Early streetcars were either horse-drawn or depended for power on storage batteries that were expensive and inefficient. In 1834 Thomas Davenport, a blacksmith from

  • Trollfl?jten (film by Bergman)

    Drottningholm Theatre: …setting in Ingmar Bergman’s film Trollfl?jten (1975; “The Magic Flute”).

  • Trollh?tte Canal (canal, Sweden)

    Trollh?tte Canal, waterway in Sweden, first begun in 1718 and finally opened in 1800, that is now part of the G?ta

  • trolling (fishing)

    Trolling, method of fishing in which a lure or a bait is pulled behind a boat at varying speeds and depths according to the nature, habitat, and size of the fish being sought. Trolling is practiced in both freshwater and salt water and with all kinds of craft; power boats that carry varied tackle

  • Trollius (plant)

    Globeflower, any of about 20 species of perennial herbaceous plants constituting the genus Trollius of the buttercup family, Ranunculaceae, native mostly to North Temperate Zone wetlands. The common European globeflower (T. europaeus), up to 60 cm (about 2 feet) tall, is often cultivated in moist

  • Trollius europaeus (plant)

    globeflower: The common European globeflower (T. europaeus), up to 60 cm (about 2 feet) tall, is often cultivated in moist gardens and along pond edges; most of its horticultural varieties have yellow to orange ball-shaped flowers 2.5 to 5 cm (1 to 2 inches) across. Typically the dark…

  • Trollius laxus (plant)

    globeflower: The American spreading globeflower (T. laxus), with greenish-yellow flowers, is native to the swamps of the eastern United States; T. laxus albiflorus is a white-flowered variety found in the northwestern United States.

  • Trollius laxus albiflorus (plant)

    globeflower: …of the eastern United States; T. laxus albiflorus is a white-flowered variety found in the northwestern United States.

  • Trollope, Anthony (British author)

    Anthony Trollope, English novelist whose popular success concealed until long after his death the nature and extent of his literary merit. A series of books set in the imaginary English county of Barsetshire remains his best loved and most famous work, but he also wrote convincing novels of

  • Trollringen (novel by Hoel)

    Sigurd Hoel: …the late novel Trollringen (1958; The Troll Circle), about a rural community’s scapegoat who is wrongly convicted of his wife’s death partly as a result of his trying to introduce new agricultural methods. Trollringen, as one critic remarked, combines a “masterly use of image and symbol” with caustic social analysis…

  • Trolls (film by Mitchell [2016])

    Justin Timberlake: For the animated film Trolls (2016), he provided the voice of one of the title characters and cowrote the Oscar-nominated song “Can’t Stop the Feeling!” In Woody Allen’s Wonder Wheel (2017), Timberlake portrayed a lifeguard on Coney Island during the 1950s who wants to become a playwright. He gained…

  • Trolltunga (iceberg)

    iceberg: Iceberg distribution and drift trajectories: …instance, a large iceberg called Trolltunga calved from the Fimbul Ice Shelf near the Greenwich meridian in 1967, and it became grounded in the southern Weddell Sea for five years before continuing its drift. If a berg can break away from the coastal current (as Trolltunga had done by late…

  • Trol?sa (film by Ullmann [1999])

    Liv Ullmann: Kristin Lavransdatter (1995); Trol?sa (1999; Faithless), for which Bergman wrote the screenplay; and Miss Julie (2014), which she adapted from August Strindberg’s play of the same name.

  • tromba marina (musical instrument)

    Trumpet marine, stringed musical instrument of medieval and Renaissance Europe, highly popular in the 15th century and surviving into the 18th century. It had a long narrow body and one or two strings, which the player’s left thumb touched lightly to produce the notes of the harmonic series, as on

  • Trombetas Formation (geological region, Brazil)

    Silurian Period: Tillites: Similarly, the widespread Lower Silurian Nhamunda Formation in the Amazon region of Brazil includes diamictite (a non-sorted conglomerate made up clastic material) beds consisting of highly diverse clastics related to tillites.

  • Trombetas River (river, Brazil)

    Trombetas River, river in northwestern Pará state, northern Brazil. Formed by the Poana, Anamu, and other headstreams flowing from the southern slope of the Serra Acaraí on the Guyana border, the Trombetas meanders generally southward for 470 mi (760 km). It forms several lakes, including Jamari a

  • Trombicula (arachnid genus)

    chigger: …East Asia certain species of Leptotrombidium carry the disease known as scrub typhus.

  • Trombicula alfreddugesi (arachnid)

    chigger: …is Eutrombicula alfreddugèsi (also called Trombicula irritans). This species occurs from the Atlantic coast to the Midwest and southward to Mexico. The tiny larvae easily penetrate clothing. Once on the skin surface, they attach themselves and inject a fluid that digests tissue and causes severe itching. The surrounding tissue hardens,…

  • Trombicula irritans (arachnid)

    chigger: …is Eutrombicula alfreddugèsi (also called Trombicula irritans). This species occurs from the Atlantic coast to the Midwest and southward to Mexico. The tiny larvae easily penetrate clothing. Once on the skin surface, they attach themselves and inject a fluid that digests tissue and causes severe itching. The surrounding tissue hardens,…

  • Tromboncino, Bartolomeo (Italian composer)

    frottola: …important composers of frottola were Bartolomeo Tromboncino (d. c. 1535) and Marchetto Cara (d. c. 1530). At times the same person wrote both text and music.

  • trombone (musical instrument)

    Trombone, brass wind musical instrument sounded by lip vibration against a cup mouthpiece. It has an extendable slide that can increase the length of the instrument’s tubing. The slide thus performs the function of the valves on other brass instruments. From the 19th century, some trombones have

  • Trommeln in der Nacht (play by Brecht)

    Bertolt Brecht: …der Nacht (Kleist Preis, 1922; Drums in the Night); the poems and songs collected as Die Hauspostille (1927; A Manual of Piety, 1966), his first professional production (Edward II, 1924); and his admiration for Wedekind, Rimbaud, Villon, and Kipling.

  • Tromostovje (bridge, Ljubljana, Slovenia)

    Ljubljana: …stone bridges, such as the Tromostovje (Triple Bridge), were constructed across the river.

  • Tromp, Cornelis Maartenszoon (Dutch admiral)

    Cornelis Tromp, Dutch admiral, second son of Maarten Tromp. He commanded a series of actions against England, France, and Sweden. After serving as a lieutenant of his father’s ship in 1645, Cornelis became a captain in 1649. He fought the North African pirates in the Mediterranean (1650) and the

  • Tromp, Maarten Harpertszoon (Dutch admiral)

    Maarten Tromp, Dutch admiral, the highest ranking sea commander (from 1636) under the stadholder during the Dutch wars with Spain and England during the first half of the 17th century. His victory over the Spanish in the Battle of the Downs (1639) signalled the passing of Spain’s power at sea. At

  • trompe de chasse (musical instrument)

    horn: The large circular French hunting horn, the trompe (or cor) de chasse, appeared in about 1650; the modern orchestral, or French, horn derives from it. Still played in modern France and Belgium by huntsmen, brass bands, and horn-playing clubs, it varies in diameter and number of coils but…

  • trompe l’oeil (painting)

    Trompe l’oeil, (French: “deceive the eye”) in painting, the representation of an object with such verisimilitude as to deceive the viewer concerning the material reality of the object. This idea appealed to the ancient Greeks who were newly emancipated from the conventional stylizations of earlier

  • Trompe le Monde (album by Pixies)

    Pixies: …time of the release of Trompe le Monde (1991), which is generally considered the Pixies’ weakest effort.

  • trompete (musical instrument)

    Trumpet, brass wind musical instrument sounded by lip vibration against a cup mouthpiece. Ethnologists and ethnomusicologists use the word trumpet for any lip-vibrated instrument, whether of horn, conch, reed, or wood, with a horn or gourd bell, as well as for the Western brass instrument. The

  • Trompeter von S?kkingen, Der (work by Scheffel)

    Joseph Victor von Scheffel: …popular humorous epic poem Der Trompeter von S?ckingen (1854; “The Trumpeter of S?ckingen”) and historical novel Ekkehard (1855) appealed to sentimental popular taste and made him one of the most widely read German authors of his time.

  • trompette (musical instrument)

    Trumpet, brass wind musical instrument sounded by lip vibration against a cup mouthpiece. Ethnologists and ethnomusicologists use the word trumpet for any lip-vibrated instrument, whether of horn, conch, reed, or wood, with a horn or gourd bell, as well as for the Western brass instrument. The

  • Troms? (Norway)

    Troms?, town, northern Norway. It is located on two islands, Troms (Troms?y) and Kval (Kval?y), just west of the mainland. Because Troms? is located well north of the Arctic Circle, the sun is visible continuously from late May to late July. The town was established about 1250 and received its

  • Troms?, University of (university, Troms?, Norway)

    Norway: Education: …Technology, founded 1910), and the University of Troms? (1968)—along with the University of Stavanger, the Norwegian University of Life Sciences in ?s, and the University of Agder. There are also six university-level specialized institutions (including the Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration in Bergen and the Norwegian Academy of…

  • Tromyegan (river, Russia)

    Ob River: Physiography: …and receives more tributaries: the Tromyegan (right), the Great (Bolshoy) Yugan (left), the Lyamin (right), the Great Salym (left), the Nazym (right), and finally, at Khanty-Mansiysk, the Irtysh (left). In its course through the taiga, the middle Ob has a minimal gradient, a valley broadening to 18 to 30 miles…

  • TRON (film by Lisberger [1982])

    Jeff Bridges: …the Disney science fiction movie TRON (1982). For his leading role as an alien who takes on the appearance of a woman’s dead husband in Starman (1984), he earned a third Oscar nomination. Bridges also starred as a former athlete searching for a female fugitive in Against All Odds (1984).…

  • Tron Kirk (church, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Edinburgh: The Old Town: …also the site of the Tron Kirk (built 1637–47), Edinburgh’s second post-Reformation church and now a tourist information centre, where the North and South bridges later cut across the crest of the ridge. Almost directly across from the kirk is Anchor Close, where Smellie printed the 1787 edition of the…

  • TRON: Legacy (film by Kosinski [2010])

    Jeff Bridges: …that success with the sequel TRON: Legacy (2010), in which he reprised his original role. His performance as the ornery U.S. marshal Rooster Cogburn in the Coen brothers’ western True Grit (2010) earned him his sixth Oscar nomination.

  • trona (mineral)

    Trona, an evaporite mineral, hydrated sodium bicarbonate [Na3H(CO3)2·2H2O], occasionally encountered as a saline lake deposit or evaporation product and as an efflorescence on arid soil. Usually associated with natron, thermonatrite, halite, and gypsum, it occurs near Memphis, in the Lower Nile

  • Tronador, Mount (mountain, South America)

    Lake Llanquihue: …border towers the great, glaciated Mount Tronador (11,660 feet [3,554 m]). The setting of the lake and good fishing have made the lakeside towns, especially Puerto Varas, Llanquihue, and Puerto Octay, popular resorts. Sawmills and a beet-sugar factory are also on its shores. Its outlet is the Maullín River, which…

  • Tronc (American publishing company)

    Los Angeles Times: …company, which was eventually named Tronc.

  • Tr?ndelag (region, Norway)

    Tr?ndelag, geographical region, central Norway, surrounding Trondheims Fjord. Its area of 15,978 square miles (41,383 square km) embraces the counties of Nord-Tr?ndelag and S?r-Tr?ndelag. The region is very mountainous, with only small strips of lowlands along the coast, fjords, and interior river

  • Trondheim (Norway)

    Trondheim, historic port, central Norway. It lies on a sheltered peninsula on the southern shore of the deeply indented Trondheims Fjord at the mouth of the Nidelva (river), 23 miles (37 km) southeast of the Norwegian Sea. It was founded in 997 by King Olaf I Tryggvason as the village of Kaupangr;

  • Trondheim, University of (university, Trondheim, Norway)

    Henning Larsen: …(unbuilt) and the University of Trondheim in Norway (first stage completed 1978, second stage completed 1994). With the Trondheim project, Larsen established ideas about light and space that he would continue to integrate into his design work throughout his career. The campus was conceived as a small city enclosed in…

  • Trondheims Fjord (fjord, Norway)

    Trondheims Fjord, fjord, in the Norwegian Sea, indenting the coast of west central Norway. Extending some 80 miles (130 km) inland, it serves as a natural boundary between northern and southern Norway. Trondheims Fjord branches into many smaller fjords, the most important being Orkdalsfjorden in

  • Trondheimsfjorden (fjord, Norway)

    Trondheims Fjord, fjord, in the Norwegian Sea, indenting the coast of west central Norway. Extending some 80 miles (130 km) inland, it serves as a natural boundary between northern and southern Norway. Trondheims Fjord branches into many smaller fjords, the most important being Orkdalsfjorden in

  • Trongsa (Bhutan)

    Tongsa, town, fortress, and monastery, central Bhutan. It lies in the Himalayas on the Tongsa (or Mangde) River, about 5,500 feet (1,700 m) above sea level. It was the headquarters of the first hereditary maharaja of Bhutan and the historic seat of power over central and eastern Bhutan. The dzong

Your preference has been recorded
Get a Premium membership for 30% off!
Save 30% with our Memorial Day Sale!
港台一级毛片免费观看