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  • triumph (card game)

    Triumph, 16th-century card game ancestral to whist. In triomphe, the French variety known to English contemporaries as French ruff, each player received five cards, a trump was turned, and the aim was to win three or more tricks. From this derived écarté and five-card loo. In the English game

  • triumph (ancient Roman honour)

    Triumph, a ritual procession that was the highest honour bestowed upon a victorious general in the ancient Roman Republic; it was the summit of a Roman aristocrat’s career. Triumphs were granted and paid for by the Senate and enacted in the city of Rome. The word probably came from the Greek

  • triumph ceremony (pair bonding)

    anseriform: Behaviour: …pair bond by a “triumph ceremony,” with mutual head waving and calling, typically when the male has driven off an intruder. Male sheldgeese have a puffing, strutting display. Their females incite them to attack other birds by sideways jabbing movements of the bill. Female incitement behaviour is found throughout…

  • Triumph des Willens (film by Riefenstahl [1935])

    Albert Speer: …filmed by Leni Riefenstahl in Triumph of the Will.

  • Triumph Motor Co. Ltd. (British company)

    British Leyland Motor Corporation, Ltd.: …until 1961, when it acquired Triumph Motor Co. Ltd. (Triumph had begun in 1903 as a motorcycle manufacturer and began making cars in 1923.) In 1966 Leyland merged with another car manufacturer, The Rover Co. Ltd. (founded 1904), and the combined companies became Leyland Motor Corp. Ltd. The first chairman…

  • Triumph of Achilles, The (poetry by Glück)

    Louise Glück: The poems in The Triumph of Achilles (1985), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for poetry, address archetypal subjects of classic myth, fairy tales, and the Bible. These concerns are also evident in Ararat (1990), which has been acclaimed for searing honesty in its examination of…

  • Triumph of Bacchus, The (painting by Velázquez)

    Diego Velázquez: Court painter in Madrid: …also known as Los borrachos ), seems to have been inspired by Titian and Rubens, but his realistic approach to the subject is characteristically Spanish and one that Velázquez was to preserve throughout his life.

  • Triumph of Caesar (works by Mantegna)

    Andrea Mantegna: Years as court painter in Mantua: …a Roman triumphal procession, the Triumph of Caesar, begun about 1486 and worked on for several years, still exist. In these paintings, reflecting the classical tastes of his new patron, Francesco, Mantegna reached the peak of his late style. Perhaps it was this new imaginative synthesis of the colour, splendour,…

  • Triumph of Christ, The (tapestry)

    tapestry: 15th century: …Christ, popularly known as the Mazarin Tapestry (c. 1500), are characterized by their richness of effect.

  • Triumph of Death (work by Valdés Leal)

    Juan de Nisa Valdés Leal: …Finis Gloriae Mundi and the Triumph of Death (1660 and 1672), and Jesus Disputing with the Doctors (1686), all characterized by their macabre subject matter, dynamic energy, and theatrical violence. The violence of his subjects has often distracted attention from the inventiveness of his execution.

  • Triumph of Death, The (novel by D’Annunzio)

    Gabriele D'Annunzio: …Il trionfo della morte (1894; The Triumph of Death), appeared. It and his next major novel, Le vergini delle rocce (1896; The Maidens of the Rocks), featured viciously self-seeking and wholly amoral Nietzschean heroes.

  • Triumph of Galatea (fresco by Raphael)

    Raphael: Last years in Rome: …a more secular subject, the Triumph of Galatea, in the Villa Farnesina in Rome; this work was perhaps the High Renaissance’s most successful evocation of the living spirit of Classical antiquity. Meanwhile, Raphael’s decoration of the papal apartments continued after the death of Julius in 1513 and into the succeeding…

  • Triumph of Love, The (ballet)

    Western dance: Varieties of the ballet: …Le Triomphe de l’amour (The Triumph of Love; 1681), choreographed by Charles-Louis Beauchamp (1636–c. 1719) to Lully’s music. Originally a ballet de cour, it was revived for the stage with a professional cast. Its star, Mlle Lafontaine, became ballet’s first première danseuse exactly 100 years after the Ballet comique…

  • Triumph of Love, The (film by Peploe [2001])

    Mira Sorvino: …in such minor films as The Triumph of Love (2001), Between Strangers (2002), and The Final Cut (2004). She costarred with Donald Sutherland in the TV miniseries Human Trafficking (2005) and was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for her performance. Her later movies included Union Square (2011), Space Warriors

  • Triumph of Marat, The (painting by Boilly)

    Louis-Léopold Boilly: …republican regime with his painting The Triumph of Marat (1794), a flattering view of the revolutionary leader Jean-Paul Marat. Over the next 40 years, Boilly painted a large number of works depicting the most varied aspects of everyday life in Paris. Such paintings as Gathering of Artists in the Studio…

  • Triumph of Peace, The (work by Shirley)

    James Shirley: His elaborate masque The Triumph of Peace (1634) was performed at the Inns of Court, with scenery by Inigo Jones and music by William Lawes.

  • Triumph of St. Hermengild (painting by Herrera the Younger)

    Francisco Herrera, the Younger: The Triumph of St. Hermengild (c. 1660–70) and The Ecstasy of St. Francis (1657), painted for Sevilla Cathedral on his return from Italy, both reflect the violent movement and theatrical effect of the Roman Baroque style, which he probably introduced into Sevilla.

  • Triumph of the Egg (work by Anderson)

    American literature: Fiction: His Winesburg, Ohio (1919) and The Triumph of the Egg (1921) were collections of short stories that showed villagers suffering from all sorts of phobias and suppressions. Anderson in time wrote several novels, the best being Poor White (1920).

  • Triumph of the Egg (work by Flannagan)

    John Bernard Flannagan: , Triumph of the Egg (1937 and 1941) and perhaps even the tumid Dragon Motif (1933). The spirit of the inert material seems to emerge from those works and mingle with the impressions made by the carver. Shortly before he committed suicide, Flannagan had begun to…

  • Triumph of the Eucharist (work by Villalpando)

    Cristóbal de Villalpando: Villalpando’s Triumph of the Eucharist, for example, is based on Rubens’s Triumph of the Eucharist. Villalpando made this painting for the sacristy of the Cathedral of Mexico, for which he produced other works, including The Virgin of the Apocalypse and An Allegory of the Church, all…

  • Triumph of the Name of Jesus (ceiling fresco by Baciccio)

    Gesù: …nave ceiling is a fresco—The Triumph of the Name of Jesus, executed in 1678–79 by Giovanni Battista Gaulli, also known as Baciccio—that is one of the masterpieces of Baroque decorative painting.

  • Triumph of the Republic (sculpture by Dalou)

    Jules Dalou: …Parisian monuments include the bronze Triumph of the Republic (1879–99) at the Place de la Nation and the memorial to painter Eugène Delacroix in the Luxembourg Gardens (1890). Two bronze gisants—Auguste Blanqui (1885) and Victor Noir (1890), both in Père-Lachaise Cemetery, Paris—became popular pilgrimage and rallying sites for political liberals.…

  • Triumph of the Seasons (work by Caron)

    Antoine Caron: …of the Valois court, include Triumph of the Seasons, with its depiction of parties, picnics, and orchestras; the Artemisia series; and History of the Kings of France. (2) Paintings on the theme of massacre, such as Massacre Under the Triumvirate, recall the bloodshed of the Wars of Religion. (3) Fantasy…

  • Triumph of the Will (film by Riefenstahl [1935])

    Albert Speer: …filmed by Leni Riefenstahl in Triumph of the Will.

  • Triumphal Arch (memorial arch, Cinquantenaire Park, Etterbeek, Belgium)

    Etterbeek: …the park’s dramatic centrepiece, the Triumphal Arch, was not completed until 1905. The park also houses several important museums. Pop. (2007 est.) mun., 42,342.

  • triumphal arch

    Triumphal arch, a monumental structure pierced by at least one arched passageway and erected to honour an important person or to commemorate a significant event. It was sometimes architecturally isolated but usually was built to span either a street or a roadway, preferably one used for triumphal

  • Triumphal Way (thoroughfare, Paris, France)

    Paris: The Triumphal Way: Northwest from the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel (Carrousel Triumphal Arch), located in the courtyard between the open arms of the Louvre, extends one of the most remarkable perspectives to be seen in any modern city. It is sometimes called la Voie Triomphale…

  • Triumphes of Oriana, The (work by Morley)

    Thomas Morley: Morley edited The Triumphes of Oriana (published 1603), a collection of 25 madrigals by various composers. His last volume of original compositions was The First Booke of Ayres (1600). Morley’s body of work also includes services (primary music of the Anglican liturgy), anthems, motets, and psalms. The…

  • Triumphs (poem by Petrarch)

    Petrarch: Break with his past (1346–53): …began work on his poem Trionfi, a more generalized version of the story of the human soul in its progress from earthly passion toward fulfillment in God.

  • Triumphs, the (American musical group)

    The O’Jays, American vocal group that rose to the forefront of the Philadelphia soul movement of the 1970s. The O’Jays’ origins date to the late 1950s, when childhood friends Eddie Levert (b. June 16, 1942, Canton, Ohio, U.S.) and Walter Williams (b. Aug. 25, 1942, Canton) began performing gospel

  • triumvirate (ancient Roman office)

    Triumvirate, in ancient Rome, a board of three officials. There were several types: Tresviri capitales, or tresviri nocturni, first instituted about 289 bc, assisted higher magistrates in their judicial functions, especially those relating to crime and the civil status of citizens. Tresviri

  • triumviri (ancient Roman office)

    Triumvirate, in ancient Rome, a board of three officials. There were several types: Tresviri capitales, or tresviri nocturni, first instituted about 289 bc, assisted higher magistrates in their judicial functions, especially those relating to crime and the civil status of citizens. Tresviri

  • triunfalismo (Spanish history)

    Spanish literature: The novel: …by a brief spate of triunfalismo (“triumphalism”) that lasted through the 1940s, when the victorious Falange, the Spanish fascist party, engaged in propagandistic self-glorification. Triunfalismo’s literary expression produced works that were monothematic and repetitive and that insulted the vanquished, showing them as animals. Psychologically perceptive despite its violence, La familia…

  • Triuridaceae (plant family)

    Pandanales: Triuridaceae: The American botanist Arthur Cronquist suggested in the early 1980s that Triuridaceae may eventually become established as a separate subclass, but DNA analysis at the close of the 20th century recognized members of this family as being closely related to the Pandanaceae and Cyclanthaceae…

  • trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (medicine)

    polio: Treatment and vaccination: …are three types of OPV: trivalent (tOPV), which contains all three serotypes of live attenuated polioviruses; bivalent (bOPV), which contains two of the three serotypes; and monovalent (mOPV), which contains one of the three serotypes. Thus, trivalent vaccine is effective against all three serotypes (PV1, PV2, and PV3), bivalent vaccine…

  • Trivandrum (India)

    Thiruvananthapuram, city, capital of Kerala state, southwestern India. It is situated along the Arabian Sea with isolated hills on a coastal plain. The community became prominent under Raja Martanda Varma, who made it the capital of his kingdom of Travancore in 1745. The city’s former name,

  • trivet (metalwork)

    Trivet, stand or support for utensils before or on the fire. Usually made of wrought iron, the most common variety, from the 17th century, stands on three legs and has a circular plate with perforated decoration, often in the form of a date. Another early type, short-legged, stood in the fire to

  • Trivia; or, The Art of Walking the Streets of London (poem by Gay)

    John Gay: His finest poem, Trivia: or, The Art of Walking the Streets of London (1716), displays an assured and precise craftsmanship in which rhythm and diction underline whatever facet of experience he is describing. A sophisticated lady crossing the street, for example:

  • trivium (education)

    mathematics: European mathematics during the Middle Ages and Renaissance: Together with the trivium (grammar, logic, rhetoric), these subjects formed the seven liberal arts, which were taught in the monasteries, cathedral schools, and, from the 12th century on, universities and which constituted the principal university instruction until modern times.

  • Trivulzio, Gian Giacomo (Italian marshal)

    Leonardo da Vinci: Second Milanese period (1508–13): Gian Giacomo Trivulzio had returned victoriously to Milan as marshal of the French army and as a bitter foe of Ludovico Sforza. He commissioned Leonardo to sculpt his tomb, which was to take the form of an equestrian statue and be placed in the mortuary…

  • trizone (historical division, Germany)

    Berlin: Berlin divided: …a single economic unit (trizone). In protest, the Soviet representative withdrew from the Allied Control Council. In June 1948 a currency reform was introduced in the trizone, including West Berlin. The Soviet Union responded by launching a land blockade of West Berlin.

  • Trizonia (historical division, Germany)

    Berlin: Berlin divided: …a single economic unit (trizone). In protest, the Soviet representative withdrew from the Allied Control Council. In June 1948 a currency reform was introduced in the trizone, including West Berlin. The Soviet Union responded by launching a land blockade of West Berlin.

  • TRL (American television program)

    MTV: Total Request Live (TRL), an hour-long interview and music video show, debuted in 1998 and anchored the weekday lineup. By the early 21st century, however, MTV increasingly sought to position itself as a destination for music on the Internet. Its Web site offered streaming video…

  • TRM (physics)

    oceanic crust: Marine magnetic anomalies: …of permanent magnetization is the thermoremanent magnetization (or TRM) of iron-titanium oxide minerals. These minerals lock in a TRM as they cool below 200–300 °C (392–572 °F) in the presence of Earth’s magnetic field. Although several processes are capable of altering the TRM, including reheating and oxidation at the seafloor,…

  • tRNA (chemical compound)

    Transfer RNA (tRNA), small molecule in cells that carries amino acids to organelles called ribosomes, where they are linked into proteins. In addition to tRNA there are two other major types of RNA: messenger RNA (mRNA) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA). By 1960 the involvement of tRNAs in the assembly of

  • Trnava (Slovakia)

    Trnava, town, southwestern Slovakia, on the Trnava River and the main Bratislava-?ilina railway. Founded in the 7th century, Trnava received civic privileges in 1238. Its position north of the limit of Ottoman conquest in the 16th century was important to both Hungarian and Slovak cultural

  • Trnka, Ji?í (Czech filmmaker)

    Ji?í Trnka, preeminent filmmaker of the Czech puppet animation tradition who was also a painter, designer, cartoonist, and book illustrator. Trnka, who was trained as a painter in art school, won a design competition organized by the Czech puppeteer Josef Skupa in 1921. He worked with Skupa at his

  • Trnova (Bulgaria)

    Veliko T?rnovo, majestic old town in northern Bulgaria. Veliko T?rnovo (“Great T?rnovo”) occupies near-vertical slopes above the 800-foot (240-metre) meandering gorge of the Yantra (Jantra) River. The houses, built in terraces, appear to be stacked one atop the other. The river divides the town

  • Tro-Cortesianus, Codex (Mayan literature)

    Madrid Codex, together with the Paris, Dresden, and Grolier codices, a richly illustrated glyphic text of the pre-Conquest Mayan period and one of few known survivors of the mass book-burnings by the Spanish clergy during the 16th century. The variant name Tro-Cortesianus is a result of the early

  • Troad (ancient district, Turkey)

    Troas, the land of Troy (q.v.), ancient district formed mainly by the northwestern projection of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) into the Aegean Sea. It extended from the Gulf of Edremit (ancient Adramyttion) on the south to the Sea of Marmara and the Dardanelles on the north and from the Ida mountain r

  • Trōades (play by Euripides)

    Trojan Women, drama by Euripides, produced in 415 bce. The play is a famous and powerful indictment of the barbarous cruelties of war. It was first produced only months after the Athenians captured the city-state of Melos, butchering its men and reducing its women to slavery, and the mood of the

  • Troas (ancient district, Turkey)

    Troas, the land of Troy (q.v.), ancient district formed mainly by the northwestern projection of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) into the Aegean Sea. It extended from the Gulf of Edremit (ancient Adramyttion) on the south to the Sea of Marmara and the Dardanelles on the north and from the Ida mountain r

  • trobar clus (medieval poetic style)

    Marcabru: …the earliest exponent of the trobar clus, an allusive and deliberately obscure poetic style in Proven?al.

  • Trobriand (island, Papua New Guinea)

    Oceanic art and architecture: The Massim area: …Kiriwina, the largest of the Trobriand Islands.

  • Trobriand Islands (islands, Papua New Guinea)

    Trobriand Islands, coral formations in the Solomon Sea of the southwestern Pacific, Papua New Guinea, 90 miles (145 km) north of the southeasternmost extension of the island of New Guinea. The low-lying group of 28 islands, all of coralline limestone and many fringed by coral reefs, comprises four

  • Trobriander (people)

    Trobriander, any of the Melanesian people of the Kiriwina (Trobriand) Islands, lying off eastern New Guinea. Subsistence is based on yams and other vegetables, domesticated pigs, and fish. Storage houses for yams and the chief’s house stand in the middle of the village, surrounded by dwellings

  • trocar (instrument)

    embalming: Modern procedures: …long hollow needle called a trocar and replaced with preservative. This fluid is also based on Formalin mixed with alcohols, emulsifiers, and other substances (like embalming fluid) to keep the body temporarily from shriveling and turning brown. Arterial embalming is not permanent; even such carefully prepared corpses as that of…

  • Trochacea (gastropod superfamily)

    gastropod: Classification: Superfamily Trochacea Small to large spiral shells in shallow to deep ocean waters, often brightly coloured, with or without heavy shell ornamentation; Trochidae (top shells), Turbinidae (turban shells), and Phasianellidae (pheasant shells). Superfamily Neritacea Small,

  • trochanteric bursitis (pathology)

    joint disease: Bursitis: …side of the hip joint—trochanteric bursitis—has a similar course.

  • troche (pharmacology)

    pharmaceutical industry: Other solid dosage forms: Lozenges usually consist of a mixture of sugar and either gum or gelatin, which are compressed to form a solid mass. Lozenges are designed to release drug while slowly dissolving in the mouth. Suppositories are solid dosage forms designed for introduction into the rectum or…

  • trochee (poetry)

    Trochee, metrical foot consisting of one long syllable (as in classical verse) or stressed syllable (as in English verse) followed by one short or unstressed syllable, as in the word hap′|?py. Trochaic metres were extensively used in ancient Greek and Latin tragedy and comedy in a form,

  • Trochidae (gastropod family)

    Top shell, any marine snail of the family Trochidae (subclass Prosobranchia, class Gastropoda), characterized by a spiral, conical shell. Although top shells are found from the intertidal zone to the deep open seas, they occur with greatest diversity in the shallow waters along rocky shores from

  • Trochili (bird suborder)

    apodiform: Classification: Suborder Trochili Bill slender, usually long, gape not deeply cleft; tongue long, tubular, and extensible; crop present in nestling; nostrils with opercula; 6–7 secondaries; 8 pairs of ribs. Family Trochilidae (hummingbirds) Over 109 genera and more than 320 species.

  • Trochilidae (bird)

    Hummingbird, any of about 320 species of small, often brightly coloured birds of the family Trochilidae, usually placed with the swifts in the order Apodiformes but sometimes separated in their own order, Trochiliformes. The brilliant, glittering colours and elaborately specialized feathers of many

  • trochlea (anatomy)

    humerus: …smooth articular surfaces (capitulum and trochlea), two depressions (fossae) that form part of the elbow joint, and two projections (epicondyles). The capitulum laterally articulates with the radius; the trochlea, a spool-shaped surface, articulates with the ulna. The two depressions—the olecranon fossa, behind and above the trochlea, and the coronoid fossa,…

  • trochlear nerve (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Trochlear nerve (CN IV or 4): The fourth cranial nerve is unique for three reasons. First, it is the only cranial nerve to exit the dorsal side of the brainstem. Second, fibres from the trochlear nucleus cross in the midbrain before they exit, so that…

  • trochlear notch (anatomy)

    ulna: …large C-shaped notch—the semilunar, or trochlear, notch—which articulates with the trochlea of the humerus (upper arm bone) to form the elbow joint. The projection that forms the upper border of this notch is called the olecranon process; it articulates behind the humerus in the olecranon fossa and may be felt…

  • trochlear nucleus (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Midbrain: …nerve as well as the trochlear nucleus; these cranial nerves innervate muscles that move the eye and control the shape of the lens and the diameter of the pupil. In addition, between the midbrain reticular formation (known here as the tegmentum) and the crus cerebri is a large pigmented nucleus…

  • Trochodendraceae (plant family)

    magnoliid clade: Vegetative structures: The exceptions, Trochodendron (Trochodendraceae) and Tetracentron (Tetracentraceae), show definite links with the magnoliids but are classified in the Eudicot clade. Of the magnoliids, all Winteraceae (Canellales) and Amborellaceae (Laurales) lack vessels.

  • Trochodendrales (plant order)

    Trochodendrales, a small order of dicotyledonous flowering plants comprising just one family (Trochodendraceae) with two genera of evergreen trees (Trochodendron and Tetracentron), each with a single tree species. Along with Buxales, Proteales, Ranunculales, and the family Sabiaceae,

  • Trochodendron (plant genus)

    Trochodendrales: …genera of evergreen trees (Trochodendron and Tetracentron), each with a single tree species. Along with Buxales, Proteales, Ranunculales, and the family Sabiaceae, Trochodendrales is part of a group known as the peripheral eudicots. These are plants with the basic eudicot characters of triaperturate pollen and a lack of the…

  • Trochodendron aralioides (plant)

    Trochodendrales: Trochodendron aralioides, of South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan, is a small broadleaf evergreen tree up to 12 metres (about 40 feet) in height with pinnately veined leaves (i.e., the leaves have a midrib from which comblike lateral veins arise) and flowers in clusters at the…

  • trochoid joint (skeleton)

    Pivot joint, in vertebrate anatomy, a freely moveable joint (diarthrosis) that allows only rotary movement around a single axis. The moving bone rotates within a ring that is formed from a second bone and adjoining ligament. The pivot joint is exemplified by the joint between the atlas and the axis

  • Trochonema (fossil gastropod genus)

    Trochonema, genus of extinct gastropods (snails) found as fossils in rocks dating from the Ordovician Period to the Devonian Period (505 to 360 million years ago). The shell of Trochonema consists of a series of turretlike whorls, each ornamented by slight lines. The aperture is large,

  • trochophore (larva)

    Trochophore, small, translucent, free-swimming larva characteristic of marine annelids and most groups of mollusks. Trochophores are spherical or pear-shaped and are girdled by a ring of cilia (minute hairlike structures), the prototroch, that enables them to swim. Above the prototroch is a sensory

  • trochosphere (larva)

    Trochophore, small, translucent, free-swimming larva characteristic of marine annelids and most groups of mollusks. Trochophores are spherical or pear-shaped and are girdled by a ring of cilia (minute hairlike structures), the prototroch, that enables them to swim. Above the prototroch is a sensory

  • Trochus (snail genus)

    top shell: Tropical top shells such as Trochus, Tectus, and Cittarium tend to be larger and more colourful than the genera from other regions. All species are herbivorous, feeding on algae or films of spores on rock surfaces. Male and female organs occur in separate individuals, and fertilization is external, with most…

  • Trochus niloticus (snail)

    top shell: The largest species, Trochus niloticus, from the Indo-Pacific region, was, in fact, once extensively fished for its lustrous mother-of-pearl layer, which was used in the manufacture of pearl buttons.

  • troctolite (rock)

    Troctolite, coarse-grained, intrusive igneous rock that is composed almost entirely of olivine (often iron-rich) and plagioclase feldspar (labradorite or bytownite). The olivine may be wholly altered to serpentine, which gives the rock a stippled appearance of red, green, brown, yellow, and black

  • Troell, Jan (Swedish director)

    Liv Ullmann: …Emigrants), which was directed by Jan Troell.

  • Troelstra, Pieter Jelles (Dutch statesman)

    Pieter Jelles Troelstra, Dutch socialist statesman and poet, who founded the Social Democratic Labour Party and headed the Dutch labour movement from 1894 to 1924. An attorney and newspaper editor, Troelstra joined the Social Democratic League in 1890. When a split developed in the Socialist ranks

  • Troeltsch, Ernst (German theologian)

    Ernst Troeltsch, German scholar of considerable influence on younger theologians of his time for his insistence that the Christian church reexamine its claims to absolute truth. Many of Troeltsch’s publications, which span the disciplines of theology, social history and theory, philosophy of

  • Trofimov, Yevgeny (athletic trainer)

    Yelena Isinbayeva: Pole-vault coach Yevgeny Trofimov invited her to try that sport, and the next season, in July 1998, she vaulted 4 metres (13 feet 1.5 inches). She won the 1999 world youth title and the 2000 world junior title, and in 2001 she broke both indoor and outdoor…

  • Troggs, the (British musical group)

    British Invasion: …Get No] Satisfaction” and others), the Troggs (“Wild Thing”), and Donovan (“Sunshine Superman”) all topped Billboard’s singles chart. These charming invaders had borrowed (often literally) American rock music and returned it—restyled and refreshed—to a generation largely ignorant of its historical and racial origins. In April 1966 Time magazine effectively raised…

  • Trogidae (insect)

    Skin beetle, (family Trogidae), any of approximately 300 widely distributed species of beetles in the superfamily Scarabaeoida (insect order Coleoptera) that are also classified by some authorities in the subfamily Troginae in the scarab family Scarabaediae. Skin beetles have a rough body surface,

  • Trogir (Croatia)

    Trogir, port in Dalmatia in southern Croatia. It is located on an island in the Adriatic Sea and is connected by a bridge to the mainland and to the island of ?iovo. It was colonized as Tragurion by Syracusan Greeks c. 385 bce and became a part of the Eastern, or Byzantine, Empire in the 6th

  • Troglodytidae (bird)

    Wren, (family Troglodytidae), any of approximately 85 species of small, chunky, brownish birds (order Passeriformes). The family originated in the Western Hemisphere, and only one species, Troglodytes troglodytes, which breeds circumpolarly in temperate regions, has spread to the Old World. This

  • Troglotayosicidae (scorpion family)

    scorpion: Annotated classification: Family Troglotayosicidae 2 species found only in caves of France, Spain, and Ecuador. Family Urodacidae (cave scorpions) 2 species found only in caves of France, Spain, and Ecuador. Family Pseudochactidae 1 species of Central Asia; first described in 1998.

  • Trogoderma granarium (insect)

    dermestid beetle: The khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium), a small beetle native to the Indian subcontinent, is a serious pest in most parts of the world. It is unique among dermestids because the larvae feed on stored grain.

  • trogon (bird family)

    Trogon, (family Trogonidae), any of about 35 bird species common to warm regions. They constitute the family of Trogonidae in the order Trogoniformes. Trogons have a bright red to yellow belly in contrast to a dark chest and upperparts. In Africa and America males are iridescent above. Those of

  • Trogon temnurus (bird)

    Cuba: Plant and animal life: The endemic forest-dwelling tocororo (Trogon temnurus, or Priotelus temnurus), which is similar in appearance to the Guatemalan quetzal, was designated the national bird of Cuba because its bright plumes of red, white, and blue correspond to the colours of the Cuban flag; the tocororo is reputed to survive…

  • Trogonidae (bird family)

    Trogon, (family Trogonidae), any of about 35 bird species common to warm regions. They constitute the family of Trogonidae in the order Trogoniformes. Trogons have a bright red to yellow belly in contrast to a dark chest and upperparts. In Africa and America males are iridescent above. Those of

  • Trogoniformes (bird order)

    bird: Annotated classification: Order Trogoniformes (trogons) 37 species in 1 family; tropical, except Australasia; extremely soft-plumaged arboreal birds that feed on insects and small fruit; feet weak; 1st and 2nd toes directed backward; length 23–40 cm (9.1–16 inches). Order Podicipediformes (

  • Trogonophidae (reptile)

    lizard: Annotated classification: Family Trogonophidae (short-headed worm lizards) Limbless worm lizards with spade-shaped heads. They occur in North Africa, the eastern Arabian Peninsula, and the Horn of Africa. 4 genera with 6 species are recognized. Advances in gene sequencing (especially the use of nuclear genes) and analytical techniques…

  • Trogontherium (extinct mammal)

    Castoroides: …similar form of giant beaver, Trogontherium, paralleled the development of Castoroides.

  • Trogossitidae (insect family)

    Bark-gnawing beetle, (family Trogossitidae), any of some 500 species of beetles (order Coleoptera) that are found under bark, in woody fungi, and in dry plant material, mostly in the tropics. Bark-gnawing beetles range from 5 to 20 mm (0.2 to 0.8 inch) and are dark-coloured. The species

  • Trogus, Pompeius (Roman historian)

    Pompeius Trogus, Roman historian whose work, though not completely preserved, is important for Hellenistic studies. Trogus was a Vocontian Gaul from Gallia Narbonensis whose grandfather gained Roman citizenship (and the name Pompeius) from Pompey and whose father was secretary to Julius Caesar.

  • Troia (ancient city, Turkey)

    Troy, ancient city in northwestern Anatolia that holds an enduring place in both literature and archaeology. The legend of the Trojan War is the most notable theme from ancient Greek literature and forms the basis of Homer’s Iliad. Although the actual nature and size of the historical settlement

  • Troias (ancient district, Turkey)

    Troas, the land of Troy (q.v.), ancient district formed mainly by the northwestern projection of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) into the Aegean Sea. It extended from the Gulf of Edremit (ancient Adramyttion) on the south to the Sea of Marmara and the Dardanelles on the north and from the Ida mountain r

  • Troick (Russia)

    Troitsk, city, Chelyabinsk oblast (region), western Russia. Troitsk lies along the Uy River at the inflow of the Uvelka River. Founded in 1743 as a fortress, it was chartered in 1784. An agricultural centre for the adjacent steppes, Troitsk also has transport and industrial functions, and a

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