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  • Trinamool Congress Party (political party, India)

    West Bengal: History: …the All India Trinamool (or Trinamul) Congress (AITC), had been an ally in what was then the Congress Party’s national ruling coalition government. The AITC’s founder and leader, Mamata Banerjee, became the state’s first female chief minister (head of government).

  • Trinamul Congress Party (political party, India)

    West Bengal: History: …the All India Trinamool (or Trinamul) Congress (AITC), had been an ally in what was then the Congress Party’s national ruling coalition government. The AITC’s founder and leader, Mamata Banerjee, became the state’s first female chief minister (head of government).

  • Trinchera de los Paraguayos (Argentina)

    Posadas, city, capital of Misiones provincia (province), northeastern Argentina. Situated in the western corner of the province, it is bordered (north and east) by the Paraná River, which separates it from Encarnación, Paraguay. The settlement originated as a Paraguayan trading post and river port,

  • Trinchera de San José (Argentina)

    Posadas, city, capital of Misiones provincia (province), northeastern Argentina. Situated in the western corner of the province, it is bordered (north and east) by the Paraná River, which separates it from Encarnación, Paraguay. The settlement originated as a Paraguayan trading post and river port,

  • trincherazo

    bullfighting: Act three: Other maneuvers include the trincherazo, typically done with one knee on the ground and at the beginning of the faena, and the pase de la firma, in which the muleta is moved in front of the bull’s nose while the bullfighter remains motionless. Especially noteworthy is the left-handed natural,…

  • Trincomalee (Sri Lanka)

    Trincomalee, town and port, Sri Lanka, on the island’s northeastern coast. It is situated on a peninsula in Trincomalee Bay—formerly called Koddiyar (meaning “Fort by the River”) Bay—one of the world’s finest natural harbours. Trincomalee was in early times a major settlement of Indo-Aryan

  • Trincomalee Bay (bay, Sri Lanka)

    Trincomalee: …situated on a peninsula in Trincomalee Bay—formerly called Koddiyar (meaning “Fort by the River”) Bay—one of the world’s finest natural harbours.

  • Trincomalee, Battle of (Anglo-French War [1782])

    Battle of Trincomalee, (3 September 1782), savage naval battle of the Anglo-French War (1778–83) fought off the coast of Trincomalee, northeastern Sri Lanka, famous throughout history as one of the finest ports in the world. The battle was one of several French efforts to counter British expansion

  • Trindade Coelho, José Francisco (Portuguese writer)

    José Trindade Coelho, Portuguese writer who is best known for his regional short stories, most of which are set in remote, rural northern Portugal. Trindade Coelho graduated in 1885 from the University of Coimbra and subsequently entered the government legal service. He was a magistrate in Lisbon

  • Trinectes maculatus (fish)

    Hogchoker, North American fish, a species of sole

  • Tringa (bird genus)

    Tringa, genus of shorebirds in the family Scolopacidae (order Charadriiformes). Its members include the birds known as greenshank, redshank, sandpiper, and yellowlegs

  • Tringa erythropus (bird)

    redshank: The slightly larger spotted redshank (T. erythropus), also called dusky or black redshank, has reddish brown legs and a straight red bill with a brown tip. In breeding season, its plumage is black; in winter, gray. It breeds across sub-Arctic Eurasia and winters from the Mediterranean region into…

  • Tringa flavipes (bird)

    yellowlegs: The lesser yellowlegs (T. flavipes), about 25 cm (10 inches) long, appears in sizable flocks on mud flats during migration between its breeding grounds across Canada and Alaska and its wintering ground from the Gulf of Mexico to southern Chile and Argentina. The greater yellowlegs (T.…

  • Tringa hypoleucos (bird)

    sandpiper: The common sandpiper (Actitis, or sometimes Tringa, hypoleucos) is an abundant breeder on grassy shores of lakes and rivers throughout Eurasia, and it winters from Africa to Australia and Polynesia. This species is notable for a nervous mannerism of wagging its tail. The closely related spotted…

  • Tringa melanoleuca (bird)

    yellowlegs: The greater yellowlegs (T. melanoleuca), about 35 cm (14 inches) long, with a proportionately longer and stouter (and slightly upturned) bill, has similar breeding and wintering ranges but is everywhere less common and more wary than the lesser yellowlegs. Individuals of the two species may be…

  • Tringa nebularia (bird)

    Greenshank, (species Tringa nebularia), Old World shorebird of the family Scolopacidae (order Charadriiformes). Greenshanks are gray birds with greenish legs and a white rump. Rather slender, about 30 cm (12 inches) long, they are deep waders and have a long, slightly upturned bill. Greenshanks

  • Tringa ochropus (bird)

    sandpiper: The closely related green sandpiper (T. ochropus) is its slightly larger counterpart in boreal and mountainous regions of Eurasia.

  • Tringa solitaria (bird)

    sandpiper: The solitary sandpiper (Tringa solitaria), which breeds in North America and winters in South America, is unusual in nesting not on the ground but in the old tree nests of other birds. The closely related green sandpiper (T. ochropus) is its slightly larger counterpart in boreal…

  • Tringa totanus (bird)

    redshank: In the common redshank (Tringa totanus), about 30 cm (12 inches) long, the legs are orange-red, the upper parts are brownish or gray, the rump and hind edge of the wing are white, and the upturned bill is reddish with a black tip. The common redshank nests…

  • Tringinae (bird)

    Tattler, any shorebird that is easily alarmed and calls loudly when it senses danger. Broadly, tattlers are birds of the subfamily Tringinae of the family Scolopacidae. Examples are the redshank, greenshank, willet, and yellowlegs. More narrowly, the name is given to the wandering tattler

  • Trinh Cong Son (Vietnamese singer and songwriter)

    Trinh Cong Son, Vietnamese singer and songwriter (born 1939, Dac Lac province, Vietnam, French Indochina—died April 1, 2001, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam), composed more than 600 songs, but he was dubbed the “Bob Dylan of Vietnam” in the West for his poignant antiwar songs during the 1960s and ’7

  • Trinh family (Vietnamese nobility)

    Trinh Family, noble family that dominated northern Vietnam during much of the Later Le dynasty (1428–1788); it gained control of the position of regent to the Le rulers in the middle of the 16th century. Thereafter, the successive Le monarchs were rulers in name only. From about 1600 onward, Trinh

  • Trinidad (Bolivia)

    Trinidad, city, northeastern Bolivia. It lies in the Moxos (Mojos) Plains, an ancient lake bed stretching eastward from the foothills of the Andean eastern cordillera. In 1686 Jesuits led by Father Cipriano Barrace founded a mission at the present site of the city, naming it Trinidad (“Trinity”)

  • Trinidad (Uruguay)

    Trinidad, city, south-central Uruguay. It lies in the Porongos Hills, a northern outlier of the Grande Inferior Range. The city is the area’s principal trade and manufacturing centre. Wheat, corn (maize), linseed, oats, and fruit grown in the hinterland are processed in Trinidad. Dairying,

  • Trinidad (Cuba)

    Trinidad, city, central Cuba. It lies on the southern slopes of the Sierra de Trinidad, north of its Caribbean Sea port, Casilda. Trinidad was founded in 1514 by Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar. It prospered during the colonial era and for some time was Cuba’s wealthiest city. To preserve the colonial

  • Trinidad (Colorado, United States)

    Trinidad, city, seat (1866) of Las Animas county, south-central Colorado, U.S., situated on the Purgatoire River in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains at an elevation of 6,025 feet (1,836 metres), south of Pueblo. Near the foot of Raton Pass (12 miles [19 km] south on the Colorado–New

  • Trinidad All Steel Percussion Orchestra (musical ensemble)

    steel band: …formation in 1950 of the Trinidad All Steel Percussion Orchestra (TASPO), a government-sponsored ensemble that brought together prominent players from different neighbourhood bands. Most of the musicians were well-known pan tuners, including Ellie Mannette of the band Invaders, Anthony Williams of North Stars, and others. The TASPO members enjoyed productive…

  • Trinidad and Tobago

    Trinidad and Tobago, island country of the southeastern West Indies. It consists of two main islands—Trinidad and Tobago—and several smaller islands. Forming the two southernmost links in the Caribbean chain, Trinidad and Tobago lie close to the continent of South America, northeast of Venezuela

  • Trinidad and Tobago, flag of

    national flag consisting of a red field (background) incorporating a diagonal black stripe with white fimbriations (narrow borders). The flag has a width-to-length ratio of 3 to 5.As a British colony, Trinidad and Tobago displayed both the Union Jack and the British Blue Ensign with a special

  • Trinidad and Tobago, Republic of

    Trinidad and Tobago, island country of the southeastern West Indies. It consists of two main islands—Trinidad and Tobago—and several smaller islands. Forming the two southernmost links in the Caribbean chain, Trinidad and Tobago lie close to the continent of South America, northeast of Venezuela

  • Trinidad, Félix (Puerto Rican boxer)

    Bernard Hopkins: …Hopkins stopped the previously undefeated Félix Trinidad in the 12th round in a major upset to retain the IBF and WBC belts and win the World Boxing Association (WBA) title. Hopkins thus became the first unified middleweight champion since Marvin Hagler lost the title in 1987. This achievement earned Hopkins…

  • Trinil (Indonesia)

    Java: History: The site of Trinil on Java is famous for the discovery in 1891 of fossilized remains of Homo erectus, or “Java man,” which indicates that the island was the site of human activity perhaps as early as 1.5 million years ago. The colonization of Java apparently took place…

  • Trinil faunal zone (paleontology)

    Homo erectus: The earliest finds: …well-preserved skullcap was unearthed at Trinil on the Solo River. Considering its prominent browridges, retreating forehead, and angled rear skull, Dubois concluded that the Trinil cranium showed anatomic features intermediate between those of humans (as they were then understood) and those of apes. Several years later, near where the skull…

  • Trinità dei Monti (church, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: Piazza di Spagna: …French-built church and convent of Trinità dei Monti, begun in 1495 with a gift from the visiting French king Charles VIII and restored by Louis XVIII.

  • Trinitaria, La (secret society of Dominican Republic)

    flag of the Dominican Republic: …Dominican revolutionary group known as La Trinitaria emphasized its Christian heritage by placing a white cross on the background of the blue-red flag. The revolution led by La Trinitaria broke out on February 27, 1844, and the flag, designed by Juan Pablo Duarte, was hoisted the next day. The success…

  • Trinitarians (religious order)

    Trinitarian, a Roman Catholic order of men founded in France in 1198 by St. John of Matha to free Christian slaves from captivity under the Muslims in the Middle East, North Africa, and Spain. St. Felix of Valois has been traditionally considered as cofounder, but recent critics have questioned his

  • trinitate, De (work by Augustine)

    Christianity: Conflict between order and charismatic freedom: ” In his work De Trinitate (“On the Trinity”), Augustine undertook to render the essence of the Trinity understandable in terms of the Trinitarian structure of the human person: the Holy Spirit appears as the Spirit of love, which joins Father and Son and draws people into this communion…

  • Trinité, La (church, Caen, France)

    Caen: …churches of Saint-étienne (the Abbaye-aux-Hommes) La Trinité (the Abbaye-aux-Dames) escaped war damage; both date from the 1060s and are fine specimens of Norman Romanesque. William the Conqueror’s tomb is in front of Saint-étienne’s high altar, and the tomb of his wife, Matilda, stands in La Trinité’s choir. William’s remains were…

  • trinitrate (chemical compound)

    nitrocellulose: Composition, properties, and manufacture of nitrocellulose: …be replaced, resulting in cellulose trinitrate, which contains more than 14 percent nitrogen. In practice, however, most nitrocellulose compounds are dinitrates, averaging 1.8 to 2.8 nitro groups per molecule and containing from 10.5 to 13.5 percent nitrogen. The degree of nitration determines the solubility and flammability of the final product.

  • Trinitron (television)

    television: Shadow masks and aperture grilles: …introduced in the Sony Corporation’s Trinitron tube. In Trinitron-type tubes the shadow-mask is replaced by a metal grille having short vertical slots extending from the top to the bottom of the screen (see the figure). The three electron beams pass through the slots to the coloured phosphors, which are in…

  • trinitrotoluene (chemical compound)

    Trinitrotoluene (TNT), a pale yellow, solid organic nitrogen compound used chiefly as an explosive, prepared by stepwise nitration of toluene. Because TNT melts at 82° C (178° F) and does not explode below 240° C (464° F), it can be melted in steam-heated vessels and poured into casings. It is

  • trinitroxylene (explosive)

    explosive: TNT: …a mixture of 40 percent trinitroxylene (TNX) and 60 percent TNT. This mixture not only casts perfectly but can be detonated with a smaller tetryl booster. There is no indication that any TNX was used in World War II; it is believed to have been replaced by PETN and RDX.

  • Trinity (painting by El Greco)

    El Greco: Middle years: …in the painting of the Trinity, in the upper part of the high altar, where the powerful sculpturesque body of the nude Christ leaves no doubt of the ultimate source of inspiration. In the lateral altar painting of the Resurrection, the poses of the standing soldiers and the contrapposto (a…

  • Trinity (work by Uris)

    Leon Uris: …dealing with Nazi war crimes; Trinity (1976), a chronicle of a Northern Irish farm family from the 1840s to 1916; The Haj (1984), depicting the lives of Palestinian Arabs from World War I to the Suez war of 1956; and A God in Ruins (1999), a novel about a U.S.…

  • Trinity (Christianity)

    Trinity, in Christian doctrine, the unity of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit as three persons in one Godhead. The doctrine of the Trinity is considered to be one of the central Christian affirmations about God. It is rooted in the fact that God came to meet Christians in a threefold figure: (1) as

  • Trinity (painting by Titian)

    Titian: Religious paintings: The Trinity (or La Gloria), painted for Charles V’s personal devotion, reflects central Italian art to a lesser degree than the earlier Christ Crowned with Thorns. The glowing richness of colour predominates in this adoration of the Trinity in which Charles V and his family appear…

  • Trinity (atomic bomb test)

    Hanford Site: …on July 16, 1945 (the Trinity test), and the bomb (called Fat Man) that effectively ended the war when it was detonated over Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9. (The Hiroshima bomb was fueled by uranium-235 from the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, nuclear facility.)

  • Trinity Church (church, Boston, Massachusetts, United States)

    H.H. Richardson: …the Brattle Square (1870–72) and Trinity (1872–77) churches in Boston. Designed for the renowned preacher Phillips Brooks, Trinity was one of the most important Episcopal churches in America. Richardson’s Romanesque revival design won him a national reputation, many imitators, and so many New England commissions that it became desirable to…

  • Trinity Church (church, New York City, New York, United States)

    Western architecture: United States: …Gothic church; but it was Trinity Church (1839–46) at New York City, in a flat, harsh Gothic style, that established his reputation. This was built for the Episcopalians and was rigidly “correct” in the ecclesiological sense. During the next 30 years he designed no fewer than 40 Gothic churches, mostly…

  • Trinity College (university, Dublin, Ireland)

    University of Dublin, oldest university in Ireland, founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland and endowed by the city of Dublin. When founded, it was intended that Trinity College would be the first of many constituent colleges of the University of Dublin. No other colleges were

  • Trinity College (college, Hartford, Connecticut, United States)

    Trinity College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Hartford, Conn., U.S. It is a nonsectarian liberal arts college that has a historical affiliation with the Episcopal church. It offers B.A. and B.S. degrees in about 35 majors and M.A. and M.S. degrees in five departments.

  • Trinity College (college, University of Cambridge, England, United Kingdom)

    Bloomsbury group: …the group had been at Trinity or King’s College, Cambridge, with Leslie Stephen’s son Thoby, who had introduced them to his sisters Vanessa and Virginia. Most of them had been “Apostles”; i.e., members of the “society,” a select, semisecret university club for the discussion of serious questions, founded at Cambridge…

  • Trinity College (university, Durham, North Carolina, United States)

    Duke University, private coeducational institution of higher learning in Durham, North Carolina, U.S., affiliated with but not controlled by the United Methodist Church. In 1838 a regular program of education was initiated at a schoolhouse in Randolph county, to the west of Durham, and a year later

  • Trinity House, Corporation of (British organization)

    lighthouse: The beginning of the modern era: Douglass, engineer-in-chief of Trinity House. In order to reduce the tendency of waves to break over the lantern during severe storms (a problem often encountered with Smeaton’s tower), Douglass had the new tower built on a massive cylindrical base that absorbed some of the energy of incoming seas.…

  • Trinity Repertory Company (Providence, Rhode Island, United States)

    Rhode Island: Cultural institutions: The Trinity Repertory Company (1964), with its own home in Providence, is renowned for producing works by new playwrights as well as for staging novel productions of classic works.

  • Trinity Sunday (Christianity)

    Feast of the Holy Trinity, Christian feast in honour of the Trinity, celebrated in Western liturgical churches on the Sunday following Pentecost (the 50th day after Easter). It is known that the feast was celebrated on this day from as early as the 10th century. Celebration of the feast gradually

  • Trinity Tower (tower, Moscow, Russia)

    Moscow: The Kremlin: …two other principal gate towers—the Trinity (Troitskaya) Tower, with a bridge and outer barbican (the Kutafya Tower), and the Borovitskaya Tower—rise from the western wall.

  • Trinity with Saints, The (fresco by Castagno)
  • Trinity, abbey of the (abbey, Fécamp, France)

    Fécamp: The abbey of the Trinity, which was destroyed by lightning, was rebuilt between the 12th and 13th centuries and was restored in the 15th and 18th centuries. It is an impressive building with a lantern tower 275 feet (84 metres) high. There is also a distillery…

  • Trinity, The (work by Augustine)

    Christianity: Conflict between order and charismatic freedom: ” In his work De Trinitate (“On the Trinity”), Augustine undertook to render the essence of the Trinity understandable in terms of the Trinitarian structure of the human person: the Holy Spirit appears as the Spirit of love, which joins Father and Son and draws people into this communion…

  • Trinity, The (painting by Masaccio)

    Masaccio: The Trinity: The Trinity, a fresco in the Church of Santa Maria Novella, also presents important pictorial innovations that embody contemporary concerns and influences. Painted about 1427, it was probably Masaccio’s last work in Florence. It represents the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit) set…

  • Trinity–St. Sergius monastery (monastery, Sergiyev Posad, Russia)

    Russian Orthodox Church: …foremost religious centre by the Trinity–St. Sergius monastery, which was founded in the mid-14th century by St. Sergius of Radonezh (in what is now the city of Sergiyev Posad). Sergius, as well as the metropolitans St. Peter (1308–26) and St. Alexius (1354–78), supported the rising power of the principality of…

  • trinklied (music)

    Drinking song, song on a convivial theme composed usually for singing in accompaniment to drinking. The form became a standard element in certain types of 19th-century opera and operetta, frequently involving not only a soloist but also a chorus joining in with choral repeats or refrains. In Italy

  • Trinobantes (ancient people)

    Trinovantes, ancient British tribe that inhabited the region that became Essex. In the mid-50s bc their prince, Mandubracius, was driven into exile by Cassivellaunus, king of the aggressive Catuvellauni. Caesar’s second invasion of Britain was going poorly in 54 bc, when the Trinovantes joined him

  • Trinovantes (ancient people)

    Trinovantes, ancient British tribe that inhabited the region that became Essex. In the mid-50s bc their prince, Mandubracius, was driven into exile by Cassivellaunus, king of the aggressive Catuvellauni. Caesar’s second invasion of Britain was going poorly in 54 bc, when the Trinovantes joined him

  • Trintignant, Jean-Louis (French actor)

    Jean-Louis Trintignant, French motion-picture actor who achieved a wide range of characterizations with great economy. Trintignant initially studied law but began acting on the stage in 1951. His first film appearance was in Si tous les gars du monde (1955; If All the Guys in the World), and he

  • Trintignant, Marie (French actress)

    Marie Trintignant, French actress (born Jan. 21, 1962, Boulogne-Billancourt, France—died Aug. 1, 2003, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France), specialized in portraying damaged women in a career that included more than 50 films as well as television movies and stage plays. Trintignant appeared in Mon amour, m

  • trinucleotide (genetics)

    cell: RNA: replicated from DNA: …each nucleotide triplet (called a codon) specifies a particular amino acid. Thus, a nucleotide sequence in the DNA specifies a protein provided that a messenger RNA molecule is produced from that DNA sequence. Each region of the DNA sequence specifying a protein in this way is called a gene.

  • trio (music)

    Trio, a musical composition for three instruments or voices, or a group of three performers. The term trio came to be identified with the middle section of a dance movement in ternary form (the b section of an aba form such as a minuet or a scherzo). The designation arose because many such trio

  • Trio A (dance by Rainier)

    Yvonne Rainer: Her best-known dance, “Trio A,” (1966) a section of a larger work called The Mind Is a Muscle (1966–68), consisted of a simultaneous performance by three dancers that included a difficult series of circular and spiral movements. It was widely adapted and interpreted by other choreographers. Rainer choreographed…

  • trio sonata (music)

    Trio sonata, major chamber-music genre in the Baroque era (c. 1600–c. 1750), written in three parts: two top parts played by violins or other high melody instruments, and a basso continuo part played by a cello. The trio sonata was actually performed by four instruments, since the cello was

  • trioctahedral structure (chemistry)

    clay mineral: General features: …of octahedral sheet is called trioctahedral, and the latter dioctahedral. If all the anion groups are hydroxyl ions in the compositions of octahedral sheets, the resulting sheets may be expressed by M2+(OH)2 and M3+(OH)3, respectively. Such sheets, called hydroxide sheets, occur singly, alternating with silicate layers in some clay minerals.…

  • triode (electronics)

    Triode, electron tube consisting of three electrodes—cathode filament, anode plate, and control grid—mounted in an evacuated metal or glass container. It has been used as an amplifier for both audio and radio signals, as an oscillator, and in electronic circuits. Currently, small glass triodes are

  • triode tube (electronics)

    Triode, electron tube consisting of three electrodes—cathode filament, anode plate, and control grid—mounted in an evacuated metal or glass container. It has been used as an amplifier for both audio and radio signals, as an oscillator, and in electronic circuits. Currently, small glass triodes are

  • Triodia (plant genus)

    grassland: Biota: …the spinifex grasses, Plectrachne and Triodia, which form characteristic hummocks by trapping windblown sand at the bases of their tussocks. Heteropogon and Sorghum dominate grasslands in moister, northern areas, and Astrebla (Mitchell grass) is prevalent in seasonally arid areas, especially on cracking clay soils in the east. Other grass species…

  • Triodion (liturgical book)

    church year: Eastern churches: …before Easter, contained in the Triōdion (pre-Easter liturgical service book)—the first four of these Sundays prepare for the Great Fast, or Lent (i.e., the Sunday of the Pharisee and Publican; the Sunday of the Prodigal Son; Meat-Fast Sunday, after which abstinence from meat is enjoined; and Cheese-Fast Sunday, after which…

  • Triodontidae (fish)

    tetraodontiform: Annotated classification: Family Triodontidae (threetooth puffers) Most primitive member of the superfamily, the only species to retain even the pelvic bone of the pelvic fin apparatus (completely lost by all other members of suborder). Body somewhat elongate; 3 fused teeth in jaws. 1 living species (Triodon bursarius); deep…

  • triolet (literature)

    Triolet, (Middle French: “clover leaf”) medieval French verse form that consists of eight short lines rhyming ABaAabAB (the capital letters indicate lines that are repeated). The name triolet is taken from the three repetitions of the first line. The great art of the triolet consists in using the

  • Triomf (book by van Niekerk)

    African literature: Afrikaans: Marlene van Niekerk wrote Triomf (1994; “Triumph”; Eng. trans. Triomf), a novel based on Sophiatown, a black settlement near Johannesburg that was replaced by the South African government in the 1950s and ’60s by a white working-class suburb dubbed Triomf. In Lettie Viljoen’s Klaaglied vir Koos (1984; “Lament for…

  • Triomphe de l’amour, Le (ballet)

    Western dance: Varieties of the ballet: …Le Triomphe de l’amour (The Triumph of Love; 1681), choreographed by Charles-Louis Beauchamp (1636–c. 1719) to Lully’s music. Originally a ballet de cour, it was revived for the stage with a professional cast. Its star, Mlle Lafontaine, became ballet’s first première danseuse exactly 100 years after the Ballet comique…

  • Triomphe du Carrousel, Arc de (arch, Paris, France)

    Paris: The Triumphal Way: Northwest from the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel (Carrousel Triumphal Arch), located in the courtyard between the open arms of the Louvre, extends one of the most remarkable perspectives to be seen in any modern city. It is sometimes called la Voie Triomphale (“the Triumphal Way”). From the…

  • Triomphe, Arc de (arch, Paris, France)

    Arc de Triomphe, massive triumphal arch in Paris, France, one of the world’s best-known commemorative monuments. It stands at the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle (formerly called the Place de l’étoile), the western terminus of the avenue des Champs-élysées; just over 1.2 miles (2 km) away, at

  • Trionfi (poem by Petrarch)

    Petrarch: Break with his past (1346–53): …began work on his poem Trionfi, a more generalized version of the story of the human soul in its progress from earthly passion toward fulfillment in God.

  • trionfi (theatre)

    stagecraft: Renaissance costume: …England, entrées in France, and trionfi in Italy were based on the triumphal processions of the ancient world. The monarch or emperor was glorified as the hero, and the monarch’s entourage and vassals appeared in semiclassical grandeur. There were floats of allegorical figures and legions of splendour such as Caesar…

  • trionfo (theatre)

    stagecraft: Renaissance costume: …England, entrées in France, and trionfi in Italy were based on the triumphal processions of the ancient world. The monarch or emperor was glorified as the hero, and the monarch’s entourage and vassals appeared in semiclassical grandeur. There were floats of allegorical figures and legions of splendour such as Caesar…

  • trionfo della libertà, Il (poem by Manzoni)

    Alessandro Manzoni: His anticlerical poem “Il trionfo della libertà” demonstrates his independence of thought. When his mother’s lover and his father died, the former left him a comfortable income, through his mother.

  • trionfo della morte, Il (novel by D’Annunzio)

    Gabriele D'Annunzio: …Il trionfo della morte (1894; The Triumph of Death), appeared. It and his next major novel, Le vergini delle rocce (1896; The Maidens of the Rocks), featured viciously self-seeking and wholly amoral Nietzschean heroes.

  • Trionfo di Giulio Cesare (works by Mantegna)

    Andrea Mantegna: Years as court painter in Mantua: …a Roman triumphal procession, the Triumph of Caesar, begun about 1486 and worked on for several years, still exist. In these paintings, reflecting the classical tastes of his new patron, Francesco, Mantegna reached the peak of his late style. Perhaps it was this new imaginative synthesis of the colour, splendour,…

  • Trionychidae (reptile)

    Softshell turtle, (family Trionychidae), any of about 30 turtle species characterized by a flattened shell. The shell lacks the epidermal scutes (large scales) characteristic of most turtles, as in the leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), and the bony architecture of the shell is reduced.

  • Trionychinae (turtle subfamily)

    softshell turtle: …sub-Saharan Africa; and the subfamily Trionychinae of southeastern North America, southern Asia, and Africa. The cyclanorbine softshells are made up of two African genera (Cyclanorbis and Cycloderma) and a single genus (Lissemys) of Indian and Burman flap-shelled turtles. The trionychine softshells are more biologically diverse. The three species of North…

  • trionychine (turtle subfamily)

    softshell turtle: …sub-Saharan Africa; and the subfamily Trionychinae of southeastern North America, southern Asia, and Africa. The cyclanorbine softshells are made up of two African genera (Cyclanorbis and Cycloderma) and a single genus (Lissemys) of Indian and Burman flap-shelled turtles. The trionychine softshells are more biologically diverse. The three species of North…

  • Triops (crustacean)

    crustacean: Importance to humans: Tadpole shrimps (Triops) are often numerous in rice fields, where they stir up the fine silt in search of food, killing many of the plants. Land crabs and crayfish may damage tomato and cotton crops.

  • Triops cancriformis (crustacean)

    branchiopod: Evolution and paleontology: …placed in the living species Triops cancriformis, indicating that this species has been in existence for more than 200 million years. The Anomopoda occur as fossils in recent deposits. The families Chydoridae and Bosminidae in particular have been used, in conjunction with pollen and diatoms, to interpret climatic and ecological…

  • triose phosphate (chemical compound)

    metabolism: The aldolase reaction: …glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, are also called triose phosphates. They are readily converted to each other by a process [5] analogous to that in step [2]. The enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion [5] is triose phosphate isomerase, an enzyme different from that catalyzing step [2].

  • triose phosphate isomerase (enzyme)

    metabolism: The aldolase reaction: …catalyzes the interconversion [5] is triose phosphate isomerase, an enzyme different from that catalyzing step [2].

  • Triosteum (plant)

    Feverwort, any of the four North American plant species of the genus Triosteum, all coarse perennials belonging to the family Caprifoliaceae. Several other species of the genus are East Asian. The common names feverwort, wild ipecac, and horse gentian resulted from former medicinal uses of the

  • Trip to Bountiful, The (play by Foote)

    Horton Foote: Foote’s best-known original work, The Trip to Bountiful, was written as a television play and broadcast in 1953; later that year it was staged on Broadway, and in 1985 it was produced as a film, for which Foote also wrote the Academy Award-nominated screenplay. His 1954 play The Travelling…

  • Trip to Bountiful, The (film by Masterson [1985])

    Geraldine Page: …she starred in the film The Trip to Bountiful, for which she won an Academy Award. As an actress, Page was respected for her intuitiveness and creativity in capturing her often vulnerable, eccentric characters. When she died in 1987, she was still acting on Broadway in Blithe Spirit. Her last…

  • Trip to the Moon, A (work by Méliès)

    Georges Méliès: …Voyage dans la lune (1902; A Trip to the Moon), Le Voyage à travers l’impossible (1904; The Voyage Across the Impossible), and Hamlet (1908). He also filmed studio reconstructions of news events as an early kind of newsreel. It never occurred to him to move the camera for close-ups or…

  • Trip, The (film by Corman [1967])

    Jack Nicholson: Early life and career: …credits being Corman’s LSD-hallucination film The Trip (1967) and the surrealistic romp Head (1968), a box-office failure starring the Monkees that has since attracted a cult following.

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