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  • Trichomycteridae (fish family)

    ostariophysan: Annotated classification: Family Trichomycteridae (candirus and other parasitic catfishes) Operculum (gill cover) usually with spines. Many parasitic. Size to 10 cm (4 inches). The similar family Cetopsidae lacks opercular spines. Costa Rica, Panama, and South America. About 41 genera, 201 species. Family Nematogenyidae (mountain catfishes)

  • Trichonotidae (fish)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Trichonotidae (sand divers) Resemble Percophiidae but body extremely elongated and dorsal fin unusually high; snout pointed; lips fringed; dive headfirst into sand. 8 species; tropical and subtropical Indo-Pacific oceans. Family Creediidae Elongate little fishes resembling Percophiidae; 16 species; coasts of Australia, Marshall and Mariana islands.

  • Trichonympha (protozoan genus)

    hypermastigote: In the genus Trichonympha encystment and sexual reproduction are initiated by the molting of the host woodroach.

  • Trichophaga tapetzella (insect species, Trichophaga tapetzella)

    tineid moth: …moth (Tinea pellionella), and the carpet, tapestry, or white-tip clothes moth (Trichophaga tapetzella). The larvae of the casemaking clothes moth use silk and fragments of food to construct a small, flat, oval case in which the larvae live and pupate. Clothes-moth larvae also attack synthetic or plant-fibre fabrics soiled with…

  • Trichophyton (genus of fungi)

    Trichophyton, a genus of fungi in order Onygenales (phylum Ascomycota, kingdom Fungi) that infects the skin, hair, and nails of humans and other animals. It is one of several causes of athlete’s foot, jockstrap itch, and other ringworm (q.v.) infections in people. T. verrucosum causes ringworm in

  • Trichophyton rubrum (fungus)

    athlete's foot: Causes: T. rubrum is the dermatophyte most commonly associated with athlete’s foot. Although other dermatophytes can also cause the condition, they are less frequently isolated from humans. Fungal spores from T. rubrum can live in human scales for 12 months and are therefore easily transmitted from…

  • Trichophyton schoenleini (fungi)

    Trichophyton: T. schoenleini, for example, is the cause of a human skin infection in the Mediterranean, and T. rubrum causes a similar disease in the tropics.

  • Trichophyton verrucosum (fungi)

    Trichophyton: T. verrucosum causes ringworm in cattle. Although worldwide in distribution, some species apparently are more abundant in some areas than in others. T. schoenleini, for example, is the cause of a human skin infection in the Mediterranean, and T. rubrum causes a similar disease in…

  • Trichoptera (insect)

    Caddisfly, (order Trichoptera), any of a group of mothlike insects that are attracted to lights at night and live near lakes or rivers. Because fish feed on the immature, aquatic stages and trout take flying adults, caddisflies are often used as models for the artificial flies used in fishing.

  • Trichosanthes cucumerina (plant)

    Snake gourd, (Trichosanthes cucumerina), rapid-growing vine of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), cultivated for its oddly shaped edible fruits. The snake gourd is native to southeastern Asia and Australia and is also grown in parts of tropical Africa. The whole fruit is eaten as a vegetable when

  • Trichosphaeriales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Trichosphaeriales (incertae sedis; not placed in any subclass) Pathogenic on plants, saprotrophic on wood; ascomata globose, dark, and superficial; cylindrical, stalked asci; some produce muriform (brick-shaped) spores; example genus is Trichosphaeria. Pezizomycotina (incertae sedis; not placed in any class) Order

  • Trichostomatida (protozoan)

    Trichostome, any ciliate protozoan of the holotrichous order Trichostomatida. Free-living forms are found in freshwater (e.g., Tillina), salt water (e.g., Woodruffia), and decaying vegetation; parasitic forms also occur. Trichostomes usually have a heavily ciliated vestibule (outer cavity) that

  • trichostome (protozoan)

    Trichostome, any ciliate protozoan of the holotrichous order Trichostomatida. Free-living forms are found in freshwater (e.g., Tillina), salt water (e.g., Woodruffia), and decaying vegetation; parasitic forms also occur. Trichostomes usually have a heavily ciliated vestibule (outer cavity) that

  • Trichosurus caninus (marsupial)

    phalanger: arnhemensis) and the mountain brush-tailed possum (T. caninus), are also relatively common.

  • Trichosurus vulpecula (marsupial)

    marsupial: Paleontology and recent history: In Australia the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is an example of a marsupial that has readily adapted to changing conditions brought about by people and is even plentiful in some urban centres. Its adaptability to different locales is attributed to its tolerance for a variety of food, including…

  • trichotomy law (arithmetic)

    arithmetic: Addition and multiplication: … or a < b (the trichotomy law).

  • trichroism (optics)

    pleochroism: …a single optic axis), and trichroism, found in biaxial crystals (two optic axes). It can be observed only in coloured, doubly refracting crystals. When ordinary light is incident on a crystal exhibiting double refraction, the light is split into two polarized components, an ordinary ray and an extraordinary ray, vibrating…

  • trichromacy (physiology)

    colour blindness: …functioning correctly, is known as trichromacy (or trichromatism).

  • trichromatic printing (technology)

    photoengraving: Colourplate production: …colour printing, done with either three or four plates, each using a different colour of ink and overprinting the others, is based on a subtractive system of colours in which intermediate hues are obtained by some combination of two or more of the subtractive, or secondary, colours. The best colour…

  • trichromatic theory (physiology)

    colour: Colour vision: …theories of colour vision, the trichromatic theory, was first proposed around 1801 by Thomas Young, an English physician, and refined about 50 years later by the German scientist Hermann von Helmholtz. Based on experiments in colour matching, this theory postulates three types of colour receptors in the eye. The actual…

  • trichromatism (physiology)

    colour blindness: …functioning correctly, is known as trichromacy (or trichromatism).

  • trichrome process (photography)

    Louis Ducos du Hauron: …in 1869 developed the so-called trichrome process of colour photography, a key 19th-century contribution to photography.

  • Trichur (India)

    Thrissur, city, central Kerala state, southwestern India. The city is located 12 miles (19 km) inland from the Arabian Sea coast on an extensive lagoon system. Thrissur, a commercial and cultural centre, is considered to be the oldest city on the west coast of India. Its name means “small sacred

  • Trichuris (nematode)

    Whipworm, any of certain worms of the genus Trichuris, phylum Nematoda, especially T. trichiura, that are parasitic in the large intestine of man and other mammals. They are so named because of the whiplike shape of the body. Infestation in humans, particularly in children, occurs through the

  • Trichy (India)

    Tiruchchirappalli, city, east-central Tamil Nadu state, southeastern India. It lies at the head of the Kaveri (Cauvery) River delta, about 30 miles (50 km) west of Thanjavur. The city also includes administratively the pilgrimage centre of Srirangam. Tiruchchirappalli was an important regional

  • Trichys fasciculata (rodent)

    porcupine: Old World porcupines (family Hystricidae): …are primarily terrestrial, although the long-tailed porcupine of Southeast Asia (Trichys fasciculata) also climbs in trees and shrubs for food. It is the smallest member of the family, weighing less than 4 kg, and is somewhat ratlike in appearance; it is about a half metre long, not including the tail,…

  • trick (cards)

    bridge: Trick play: The object of play is to win tricks. A trick consists of four cards, one played from the hand of each player in rotation. The first card played to a trick is the lead.

  • trick (human behaviour)

    gaslighting: …elaborate and insidious technique of deception and psychological manipulation, usually practiced by a single deceiver, or “gaslighter,” on a single victim over an extended period. Its effect is to gradually undermine the victim’s confidence in his own ability to distinguish truth from falsehood, right from wrong, or reality from appearance,…

  • trick riding (circus)

    circus: Philip Astley and the first circuses: …him a small company of trick riders and taught horsemanship at the court. Hughes is therefore sometimes credited with having introduced the circus to Russia, but his exhibitions encompassed only trick riding. (The first Russian circus to incorporate a full complement of acts was that of the Frenchman Jacques Tourniaire,…

  • Trick to Catch the Old-One, A (play by Middleton)

    Thomas Middleton: In A Trick to Catch the Old One (1606?, published 1608) two rival usurers are so eager to score over each other that both are taken in by a clever nephew. A Trick was entered for licensing with an unattributed play entitled The Revenger’s Tragedy (1607).…

  • trick-and-meld game

    card game: Classification: Games based on principles other than trick taking include:

  • trick-avoidance game

    card game: Classification: Trick-avoidance games. To avoid winning penalty cards contained in tricks (hearts) or winning any tricks at all (misère). Trick-and-meld games. To make melds (card combinations) in addition to winning tricks or card-points contained in tricks (piquet, bezique,

  • Tricke to Catch the Old-One, A (play by Middleton)

    Thomas Middleton: In A Trick to Catch the Old One (1606?, published 1608) two rival usurers are so eager to score over each other that both are taken in by a clever nephew. A Trick was entered for licensing with an unattributed play entitled The Revenger’s Tragedy (1607).…

  • trickery (human behaviour)

    gaslighting: …elaborate and insidious technique of deception and psychological manipulation, usually practiced by a single deceiver, or “gaslighter,” on a single victim over an extended period. Its effect is to gradually undermine the victim’s confidence in his own ability to distinguish truth from falsehood, right from wrong, or reality from appearance,…

  • Trickett, Libby (Australian swimmer)

    Libby Trickett, Australian swimmer who set several world records in the 100-metre freestyle. She also won seven Olympic medals, four of which were gold. Trickett came to prominence in both Australian and world swimming in 2003, winning her first national title in the 50-metre freestyle and making

  • Trickett, Lisbeth (Australian swimmer)

    Libby Trickett, Australian swimmer who set several world records in the 100-metre freestyle. She also won seven Olympic medals, four of which were gold. Trickett came to prominence in both Australian and world swimming in 2003, winning her first national title in the 50-metre freestyle and making

  • trickle irrigation

    horticulture: Water management: Trickle irrigation involves the slow release of water to each plant through small plastic tubes. This technique is adapted both to field and to greenhouse conditions.

  • trickling filter (wastewater treatment)

    Trickling filter, in wastewater treatment, a bed of crushed rock or other coarse media roughly 2 metres (6 feet) deep and up to 60 metres (200 feet) in diameter. Settled sewage is sprayed over the bed surface and is further purified as it trickles downward, coming in contact with filmy layers of

  • Tricks of the Trade (work by Becker)

    Howard S. Becker: Those concepts were broadened in Tricks of the Trade (1998), which discussed effective and meaningful research methods in the social sciences. Becker’s later books included What About Mozart? What About Murder? (2013) and Evidence (2017).

  • trickster tale (folklore)

    Trickster tale, in oral traditions worldwide, a story featuring a protagonist (often an anthropomorphized animal) who has magical powers and who is characterized as a compendium of opposites. Simultaneously an omniscient creator and an innocent fool, a malicious destroyer and a childlike prankster,

  • Tricky (British musician)

    trip-hop: …Bristolians, former Massive Attack rapper Tricky (byname of Adrian Thaws; b. Jan. 27, 1968, Bristol) and Portishead, a group formed by Massive protégé Geoff Barrow (b. Dec. 9, 1971, Southmead, Eng). Featuring the forlorn vocals of Martina Topley-Bird alongside Tricky’s croaky, mumbled rhymes, Tricky’s debut album, Maxinquaye (1995), is a…

  • Tricky Sam Nanton (American musician)

    Duke Ellington: Ellington’s ensemble: …sonorities of the distinctive trombonist Joe (“Tricky Sam”) Nanton (who played muted “growl” sounds) all influenced Ellington’s early “jungle style,” as seen in such masterpieces as “East St. Louis Toodle-oo” (1926) and “Black and Tan Fantasy” (1927).

  • triclinic system (crystallography)

    Triclinic system, one of the structural categories to which crystalline solids can be assigned. Crystals in this system are referred to three axes of unequal lengths that are inclined at nonorthogonal (nonperpendicular) angles relative to each other. If the atoms or atom groups in the solid are

  • triclinium (Roman art)

    Western painting: Pagan Roman paintings: …a bride, in the so-called triclinium of the Villa of the Mysteries (or Villa Item) outside the Herculaneum gate of Pompeii, also belongs to the Second style. There the walls are denied by the device of substituting for them a narrow stage on which the figures carry out the ritual…

  • Triclinius, Demetrius (Byzantine scholar)

    Demetrius Triclinius, Byzantine scholar of the Palaeologan era, who edited the works of the ancient Greek poets, mainly the tragedians, with metrical and exegetical scholia (annotations). Triclinius’s editions incorporated notes by other scholars as well as scholia from earlier traditions. He was

  • Triclino, Demetrio (Byzantine scholar)

    Demetrius Triclinius, Byzantine scholar of the Palaeologan era, who edited the works of the ancient Greek poets, mainly the tragedians, with metrical and exegetical scholia (annotations). Triclinius’s editions incorporated notes by other scholars as well as scholia from earlier traditions. He was

  • tricobalt tetroxide (chemical compound)

    cobalt: Compounds: …CoO, and tricobalt textroxide, or cobalto-cobaltic oxide, Co3O4. The latter contains cobalt in both +2 and +3 oxidation states and constitutes up to 40 percent of the commercial cobalt oxide used in the manufacture of ceramics, glass, and enamel and in the preparation of catalysts and cobalt metal powder.

  • tricolour nun (bird)

    munia: The black-headed munia, or chestnut mannikin (Lonchura malacca, including atricapilla and ferruginosa), is a pest in rice fields from India to Java and the Philippines; as a cage bird it is often called tricolour nun. Others kept as pets include the white-headed munia (L. maja) of…

  • tricoloured heron (bird)

    heron: …Egretta (egrets), such as the tricoloured heron (E. tricolor), of the southeastern United States and Central and South America, and the little blue heron (E. caerulea). The green heron (Butorides virescens), a small green and brown bird widespread in North America, is notable for its habit of dropping bait on…

  • Tricon Global Restaurants, Inc. (American company)

    PepsiCo, Inc.: …a new, separate company called Tricon Global Restaurants, Inc. Looking to add more products that were considered healthier, PepsiCo acquired the Tropicana and Dole juice brands from the Seagram Company in 1998, and in 2001 it merged with the Quaker Oats company to form a new division, Quaker Foods and…

  • Triconodon (fossil mammal genus)

    Triconodon, genus of extinct mammals found in European deposits of the late Jurassic Period (about 161 million–146 million years ago). Triconodon is representative of the triconodonts, known from fossils throughout North America, Europe, Africa, and China. Triconodon, being about the size of a

  • Tricorno (mountain, Slovenia)

    Triglav, mountain peak, the highest (9,396 feet [2,864 m]) of Slovenia and of the Julian Alps, situated 40 miles (64 km) northwest of the city of Ljubljana. The north wall of the peak forms an enormous limestone face nearly 2 miles (3 km) wide. From the time of its first ascent in 1778, the summit

  • tricot (textile)

    knitting: Tricot is characterized by fine, vertical wales on the surface and crosswise ribs on the back. It has good draping qualities and is frequently used for lingerie and as backing for laminated fabric. Raschel knits have a lacelike, open construction, with a heavy, textured yarn…

  • tricot machine (knitting)

    textile: Tricot: Tricot, a warp knit made with two sets of threads, is characterized by fine ribs running vertically on the fabric face and horizontally on its back. The tricot knitting machine makes light fabrics, weighing less than four ounces per square yard. Its development was…

  • Tricotism (American jazz trio)

    Lucky Thompson: …his unique saxophone-guitar-bass trio in Tricotism [1956]) and with Milt Jackson, Jo Jones, and Miles Davis.

  • tricresol (chemical compound)

    cresol: …is also called tricresol, or cresylic acid. All three isomers are very toxic, and in high concentrations they can be absorbed in fatal amounts through the skin. The cresols are strong germicides, and in low concentrations they are effective disinfectants and antiseptics. They are also used in low concentrations in…

  • Trictenotomidae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Trictenotomidae About 12 species in forests of Oriental region. Family Ulodidae Found mainly in New Zealand and Australia; example genera Meryx, Brouniphylax, and Syrphetodes. Family Zopheridae Few species, mostly in

  • tricuspid valve (anatomy)

    valve: …of the heart is the tricuspid valve, composed of three flaps of tissue; on the left is the two-piece mitral valve. Once blood has left the heart and entered the aorta, its return is prevented by the semilunar valves, which consist of membranous saclike flaps that open away from the…

  • tricycle (vehicle)

    automobile: The age of steam: …was a huge, heavy, steam-powered tricycle, and his model of 1769 was said to have run for 20 minutes at 2.25 miles (3.6 km) per hour while carrying four people and to have recuperated sufficient steam power to move again after standing for 20 minutes. Cugnot was an artillery officer,…

  • tricyclic antidepressant drug

    antidepressant: …in the 1950s the first tricyclic antidepressants were discovered. These agents, so called because they are composed chemically of three carbon rings, inhibit the active reuptake, to varying degrees, of norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain. The tricyclics include imipramine, amitriptyline, desipramine, nortriptyline, and a

  • Tridacna gigas (species of clam)

    Pacific Ocean: Biological resources: …diversification, with the giant clam, Tridacna gigas, a spectacular example. Another example of the Pacific’s richness in species is found among the tunas: six species (one of them endemic) roam the tropical reaches of the Pacific, furnishing more than half of the world’s tuna catch.

  • Tridacnidae (clam family)

    bivalve: Food and feeding: In the Tridacnidae, symbiotic zooxanthellae (minute algal cells) are contained within the mantle tissue. The relationship between clam and algae is probably mutually beneficial, the algae having access to the dissolved waste products of the clam and the clam benefiting from the nutritional value of either culled…

  • Tridactylidae (insect)

    Pygmy sand cricket, any member of the orthopteran family Tridactylidae of about 60 species that often inhabits moist sandy surfaces near a lake or stream. Tridactylidae have forelegs, modified for digging, that resemble those of a mole. Adult pygmy sand crickets are up to 10 mm (about 0.4 inch) l

  • Trident C-4 (missile)

    Trident missile: The first version, the Trident I, or C-4, was 34 feet (10.4 m) long and 6 feet (1.8 metres) in diameter. It could deliver eight independently targetable 100-kiloton nuclear warheads to a range of 4,000 nautical miles (7,400 km). The Trident II, or D-5, is about 46 feet (14…

  • Trident Conference (United Kingdom-United States [1943])

    20th-century international relations: Allied strategy to the fall of Italy: At the Trident Conference in Washington (May 1943) Churchill and Roosevelt finally projected a 29-division invasion of France for May 1944. The long delay was the consequence of the need to build up troop strength, landing craft, and supplies, and to ensure complete command of air and…

  • Trident D-5 (missile)

    Trident missile: The Trident II, or D-5, is about 46 feet (14 metres) long and carries multiple independently targeted warheads. It has a maximum range of about 6,500 nautical miles (12,000 km).

  • Trident I (missile)

    Trident missile: The first version, the Trident I, or C-4, was 34 feet (10.4 m) long and 6 feet (1.8 metres) in diameter. It could deliver eight independently targetable 100-kiloton nuclear warheads to a range of 4,000 nautical miles (7,400 km). The Trident II, or D-5, is about 46 feet (14…

  • Trident II (missile)

    Trident missile: The Trident II, or D-5, is about 46 feet (14 metres) long and carries multiple independently targeted warheads. It has a maximum range of about 6,500 nautical miles (12,000 km).

  • Trident missile

    Trident missile, American-made submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) that succeeded the Poseidon and Polaris missiles in the 1980s and ’90s. It is the sole strategic-range nuclear weapon of the United Kingdom and constitutes the sea-based leg of the United States’ nuclear forces. Under

  • Tridentum (Italy)

    Trento, city, Trentino–Alto Adige/Südtirol regione (region), northern Italy. It lies along the Adige River, south of Bolzano. Trento was founded, according to the classical savant Pliny the Elder and the geographer Strabo of Amaseia, by the Raetians, and it became a Roman colony and military base

  • tridymite (mineral)

    Tridymite, silica mineral, the stable form of silica (silicon dioxide, SiO2) at temperatures between 870° and 1,470° C (1,598° and 2,678° F); at lower temperatures it transforms to high-quartz, at higher to cristobalite. It has three modifications: high-tridymite, middle-tridymite, and

  • Triébert, Charles (instrument maker)

    wind instrument: The Romantic period: Charles Triébert and his son modified the oboe, finally adding some features from the Boehm flute to produce the “conservatory system.” Certain improvements were made in the bassoon in 1825 by Karl Almenr?der, a chamber musician of Biebrich, Germany. Because the improvements were accompanied by…

  • Trielis (wasp genus)

    orchid: Natural history: …are pollinated by the wasps Trielis and Gorytes, and the bee Eucera induce the insects to attempt copulation with the apex of the lip. Those orchids pollinated by Andrena appear, for the most part, to stimulate the bee to reverse its position and copulate with the base of the lip.…

  • Triennial Act (Great Britain [1694])

    United Kingdom: The revolution settlement: A Triennial Act (1694) reestablished the principle of regular parliamentary sessions.

  • Triennial Act (England [1641])

    Charles I: Conflict with Parliament: …conciliatory attitude—he agreed to the Triennial Act that ensured the meeting of Parliament once every three years—but expressed his resolve to save Strafford, to whom he promised protection. He was unsuccessful even in this, however. Strafford was beheaded on May 12, 1641.

  • Triennial Convention (Protestant organization)

    Adoniram Judson: …what is now called the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society. When the British East India Company opposed them in India, the Judsons relocated to Rangoon in 1813; there Judson mastered the Burmese language and literature and learned Pāli, the Buddhist canonical language.

  • Trient (Italy)

    Trento, city, Trentino–Alto Adige/Südtirol regione (region), northern Italy. It lies along the Adige River, south of Bolzano. Trento was founded, according to the classical savant Pliny the Elder and the geographer Strabo of Amaseia, by the Raetians, and it became a Roman colony and military base

  • Trier (Germany)

    Trier, city, Rhineland-Palatinate Land (state), southwestern Germany. It lies on the right bank of the Moselle (Mosel) River, surrounded by the foothills of the Eifel, Hunsrück, and Mosel mountains, just east of the border with Luxembourg. A shrine of the Treveri, a Germanic tribe, existed at the

  • Trier M?rch, Dea (Danish author)

    Danish literature: Postwar literary trends: Dea Trier M?rch, a politically committed author and a member of the R?de Mor (“Red Mother”) artist collective, scored her greatest success with Vinterb?rn (1976; Winter’s Child), a sensitive novel about women from various social circumstances at a maternity hospital. It gave voice to Trier…

  • Trier, Lars (Danish filmmaker)

    Lars von Trier, Danish film director and cofounder of the Dogme 95 movement, whose films were known for their bleak worldview and controversial subject matter. Von Trier attended the National Film School of Denmark, graduating in 1983. He was born Lars Trier, but while in school he added the prefix

  • Triest (Italy)

    Trieste, city and capital of Friuli-Venezia Giulia regione and of Trieste provincia, northeastern Italy, located on the Gulf of Trieste at the northeastern corner of the Adriatic Sea 90 miles (145 km) east of Venice. It was under Roman control by about 177 bc; Julius Caesar made it a colony and

  • Trieste (Italy)

    Trieste, city and capital of Friuli-Venezia Giulia regione and of Trieste provincia, northeastern Italy, located on the Gulf of Trieste at the northeastern corner of the Adriatic Sea 90 miles (145 km) east of Venice. It was under Roman control by about 177 bc; Julius Caesar made it a colony and

  • Trieste (bathyscaphe)

    Trieste, bathyscaphe (q.v.) launched by Auguste Piccard in

  • Trieste agreement (Europe [1954])

    20th-century international relations: Peace treaties and territorial agreements: Trieste was contested by Italy and Yugoslavia and remained under Western occupation until 1954. The major change affected Poland, which was figuratively picked up and moved some 150 miles to the west. This meant that large portions of eastern Germany came under Polish administration, while…

  • Trieste Depth (physical feature, Pacific Ocean)

    Yap Trench: …of the Pacific Ocean, the Trieste Depth (36,201 feet [11,034 m]), occurs near the intersection of the Mariana and Yap trenches.

  • Trieste e Trento, Piazza (marketplace, Naples, Italy)

    Naples: The Castel Nuovo: Immediately south, on Piazza Trieste e Trento, the 17th-century church of San Ferdinando has traditionally given the Stabat Mater of Giovanni Battista Pergolesi—composed in 1736 for this confraternity—during Easter Week.

  • Trieste I (bathyscaphe)

    Trieste, bathyscaphe (q.v.) launched by Auguste Piccard in

  • Trieste, Free Territory of (historical region, Europe)

    Free Territory of Trieste, former region, western Istria, southern Europe, surrounding and including the city of Trieste. It was occupied by Yugoslavia in 1945. The United Nations established it as a free territory in 1947. It was divided for administrative purposes into two zones: Zone A in the

  • triethylaluminum (chemical compound)

    coordination compound: Coordination compounds in industry: …titanium trichloride, or TiCl3, and triethylaluminum, or Al(C2H5)3—bring about the polymerizations of organic compounds with carbon-carbon double bonds under mild conditions to form polymers of high molecular weight and highly ordered (stereoregular) structures. Certain of these polymers are of great commercial importance because they are used to make many kinds…

  • Trieu Da (Chinese general)

    Nam Viet: His son Chao T’o (Trieu Da) expanded the new kingdom southward, incorporating the Red River delta and the area as far south as Da Nang.

  • trifecta (gambling)

    horse racing: Wagers: …but not in order), and trifecta (win, place, and show winners in order in one race). Other specialty wagers, sometimes offering extremely high payouts, require the bettor to select multiple trifectas, the winners of several races, or the first four horses in one race.

  • Triffin, Robert (Belgian economist)

    Robert Triffin, Belgian-born economist (born Oct. 5, 1911, Flobecq, Belgium—died Feb. 23, 1993, Ostend, Belgium), warned in 1962 that without a complete overhaul the international system of fixed exchange rates established at the Bretton Woods Conference in 1944 would inevitably collapse under t

  • Trifid Nebula (astronomy)

    Trifid Nebula, (catalog numbers NGC 6514 and M 20), bright, diffuse nebula in the constellation Sagittarius, lying several thousand light-years from the Earth. It was discovered by the French astronomer Legentil de La Galaisière before 1750 and named by the English astronomer Sir John Herschel for

  • trifle (food)

    Trifle, a common English dessert traditionally consisting of sponge cake soaked in brandy, sherry, or white wine that is layered with custard, fruit, or jam and then topped with whipped cream and slivered almonds or glacé cherries. It is typically served in glass dessert cups, revealing its

  • trifoliolate leaf (plant anatomy)

    Fabales: Classification of Fabaceae: …those with three leaflets (trifoliolate) are common—e.g., beans and soybeans. Trifoliolate leaves rarely occur in the other subfamilies. The large genus of Lupinus (lupines) generally has 5 to 11 (occasionally up to 15) palmate leaves. The leaves of clovers are most commonly palmately trifoliolate, as are those of Baptisia.…

  • Trifolium (plant)

    Clover, (genus Trifolium), genus of about 300 annual and perennial species in the pea family (Fabaceae). Clovers occur in most temperate and subtropical regions of the world, except Southeast Asia and Australia; cultivated species have become naturalized in temperate regions worldwide. The plants

  • Trifolium dubium (plant)

    shamrock: including white clover (Trifolium repens), suckling clover (T. dubium), and black medic (Medicago lupulina). According to Irish legend, St. Patrick, patron saint of Ireland, first chose the shamrock as a symbol of the Trinity of the Christian church because of its three leaflets bound by a common stalk. Wood sorrel…

  • Trifolium hybridum (plant)

    clover: repens), and alsike clover (T. hybridum). Red clover, a biennial, or short-lived perennial, bears an oval purplish flower head about 2.5 cm (1 inch) in diameter. White clover, a low creeping perennial, is often used in lawn-grass mixtures and bears a white flower head often tinged with…

  • Trifolium pratense (plant)

    clover: …most important agricultural species are red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (T. repens), and alsike clover (T. hybridum). Red clover, a biennial, or short-lived perennial, bears an oval purplish flower head about 2.5 cm (1 inch) in diameter. White clover, a low creeping perennial, is often used in lawn-grass mixtures…

  • Trifolium repens (plant)

    clover: …are red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (T. repens), and alsike clover (T. hybridum). Red clover, a biennial, or short-lived perennial, bears an oval purplish flower head about 2.5 cm (1 inch) in diameter. White clover, a low creeping perennial, is often used in lawn-grass mixtures and bears a white…

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