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  • triad (religion)

    ancient Egyptian religion: Groupings of deities: …Kingdom and later, was the triad. The archetypal triad of Osiris, Isis, and Horus exhibits the normal pattern of a god and a goddess with a youthful deity, usually male. Most local centres came to have triads, the second and third members of which might be devised for the sake…

  • Triadic Ballet, The (ballet by Schlemmer)

    Oskar Schlemmer: …Das triadisches Ballett (1922; “The Triadic Ballet”)—a ballet that he choreographed and for which he designed costumes. He named it “Triadic” to reflect the three acts, three dancers, and three colours (one for each act). The costumes he designed—based on cylinder, sphere, cone, and spiral shapes—were revolutionary. That ballet…

  • triadisches Ballett, Das (ballet by Schlemmer)

    Oskar Schlemmer: …Das triadisches Ballett (1922; “The Triadic Ballet”)—a ballet that he choreographed and for which he designed costumes. He named it “Triadic” to reflect the three acts, three dancers, and three colours (one for each act). The costumes he designed—based on cylinder, sphere, cone, and spiral shapes—were revolutionary. That ballet…

  • Triadobatrachus (fossil amphibian genus)

    amphibian: Evolution and classification: …few amphibian fossils, although one—Triadobatrachus massinoti, from the Early Triassic—is especially important. Though this amphibian has many froglike traits, it is not a true frog. It has the long legs, shortened trunk, and broad head of the typical frog body form. Caudal vertebrae were unfused, not yet forming the…

  • Triaenodes bicolor (insect)

    caddisfly: Life cycle: Larvae of one species (Triaenodes bicolor) swim by means of long, slender, hair-fringed posterior legs, dragging their cases through the water.

  • triage (medical treatment)

    Triage, Division of patients for priority of care, usually into three categories: those who will not survive even with treatment; those who will survive without treatment; and those whose survival depends on treatment. If triage is applied, the treatment of patients requiring it is not delayed by

  • Triakis semifasciata (fish)

    Leopard shark, (Triakis semifasciata), small shark of the family Triakidae found in shallow water along the Pacific coast of the United States. A slim, narrow-headed shark with small, three-cusped teeth, it grows about 90 to 150 centimetres (3 to 5 feet) long. It is gray, distinctively marked with

  • Triakontameron (work by Godowsky)

    Leopold Godowsky: Most notable is his Triakontameron (1920), a cycle of 30 pieces. Rarely played since his death, his compositions are said to have influenced Maurice Ravel and the Russian composer Sergey Prokofiev.

  • Trial (film by Robson [1955])

    Mark Robson: Films of the 1950s: …more socially conscious fare with Trial (1955), a courtroom drama about a Mexican teenager who is accused of raping and killing a white girl; it starred Glenn Ford as a defense attorney and Katy Jurado as the boy’s mother. The caustic The Harder They Fall (1956) was Robson’s acclaimed adaptation…

  • trial (ship building)

    ship construction: Trials: As the vessel nears completion a number of tests are made. The naval architect makes a careful assessment of the weight of the finished ship and checks its stability and loading particulars by reference to data for the ship’s lightweight and centre of gravity,…

  • trial (law)

    Trial, In law, a judicial examination of issues of fact or law for the purpose of determining the rights of the parties involved. Attorneys for the plaintiff and the defendant make opening statements to a judge or jury, then the attorney for the plaintiff makes his case by calling witnesses, whom

  • trial (sport)

    Field trial, any of the competitions among individual sporting dogs, under conditions that approximate or simulate those found in the hunting field. Competing dogs need not necessarily be of the same breed. In the United States many of the field trials in the bird-dog (pointing dog) category are

  • Trial Begins, The (novel by Sinyavsky)

    Andrey Donatovich Sinyavsky: …the novel Sud idyot (1960; The Trial Begins), which deals with the Doctors’ Plot of 1953, during which nine Soviet doctors were unjustly accused of treason. An anthology of short stories, Fantastic Stories (1963), explores the themes of tyranny, dissipation, and spiritual loneliness. In the novel The Makepeace Experiment (1965),…

  • trial by battle (trial process)

    ordeal: In ordeal by combat, or ritual combat, the victor is said to win not by his own strength but because supernatural powers have intervened on the side of the right, as in the duel in the European Middle Ages in which the “judgment of God” was…

  • trial by combat (trial process)

    ordeal: In ordeal by combat, or ritual combat, the victor is said to win not by his own strength but because supernatural powers have intervened on the side of the right, as in the duel in the European Middle Ages in which the “judgment of God” was…

  • trial by jury (law)

    personal-liberty laws: …which did not provide for trial by jury, Indiana (1824) and Connecticut (1828) enacted laws making jury trials for escaped slaves possible upon appeal. In 1840 Vermont and New York granted fugitives the right of jury trial and provided them with attorneys. After 1842, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled…

  • Trial by Jury (work by Gilbert and Sullivan)

    Arthur Sullivan: …in 1875; the result was Trial by Jury, which was originally put on as an afterpiece to an Offenbach operetta; it won instant popularity and ran for more than a year.

  • trial by ordeal (trial method)

    Ordeal, a trial or judgment of the truth of some claim or accusation by various means based on the belief that the outcome will reflect the judgment of supernatural powers and that these powers will ensure the triumph of right. Although fatal consequences often attend an ordeal, its purpose is not

  • trial jury (law)

    Petit jury, a group chosen from the citizens of a district to try a question of fact. Distinct from the grand jury, which formulates accusations, the petit jury tests the accuracy of such accusations by standards of proof. Generally, the petit jury’s function is to deliberate questions of fact,

  • Trial of Dedan Kimathi, The? (play by Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Mugo)

    Ngugi wa Thiong'o: …of several plays, of which The Trial of Dedan Kimathi (1976; produced 1974), cowritten with Micere Githae Mugo, is considered by some critics to be his best. He was also coauthor, with Ngugi wa Mirii, of a play first written in Kikuyu, Ngaahika Ndeenda (1977; I Will Marry When I…

  • Trial of Dr. Spock, The (work by Mitford)

    Jessica Mitford: …found expression in the book The Trial of Dr. Spock (1969), an account of the famous pediatrician’s trial on conspiracy charges for antiwar activities during the Vietnam War. Kind and Usual Punishment: The Prison Business (1973) is Mitford’s critical examination of the American prison system. In 1992 she published The…

  • Trial of Joan of Arc, The (film by Bresson)

    Robert Bresson: …Procès de Jeanne d’Arc (1962; The Trial of Joan of Arc), abruptly concluded with the leading character quietly and stoically accepting the inevitability of fate.

  • Trial of Moses (work by Giorgione)

    Giorgione: Works: The panels representing the Trial of Moses and the Judgment of Solomon are generally agreed to number among the artist’s first works (c. 1495–1500). Although the figures look slightly archaic, the beauty of the landscape setting, with its soft melting distances, unmistakably reveals the hand of the painter of…

  • Trial, The (novel by Kafka)

    The Trial, novel by visionary German-language writer Franz Kafka, originally published posthumously in 1925. One of Kafka’s major works, and perhaps his most pessimistic, this surreal story of a young man who finds himself caught up in the mindless bureaucracy of the law has become synonymous with

  • Trial, The (opera by Einem)

    Gottfried von Einem: The opera Der Prozess (The Trial), a work inspired by Einem’s 1938 arrest and by Franz Kafka’s novel, was first performed in 1953. Einem composed several symphonic works for American orchestras, including the Philadelphia Symphony (1960). His opera Der Besuch der alten Dame (1970; The Visit of the Old…

  • Trial, The (film by Welles [1962])

    Orson Welles: Later films: Chimes at Midnight, The Other Side of the Wind, and F for Fake: He made The Trial (1962) in Europe. Franz Kafka’s novel of existential dread was a good match for Welles’s baroque pessimism, and, indeed, Welles considered it one of his best. Anthony Perkins (convincingly anguished as Joseph K.), Welles (formidable as Hastler, the advocate), Jeanne Moreau, and Romy

  • trial-and-error learning

    animal behaviour: Ontogeny: …the egg, conditioning, or by trial-and-error learning. For example, chicks might “learn” to peck before hatching as a result of the rhythmic beating of their heart, or they might have a pecking reflex and simply learn to associate a food reward with pecking at the parent’s bill. Moreover, a chick’s…

  • Trialeurodes vaporariorum (insect)

    whitefly: The greenhouse whitefly (Trialeurodes vaporariorum) is one of the most abundant and destructive members of the family. It damages plants by reducing vigour and causing them to wilt, turn yellow, and die. Sprays that kill both adult and larval stages are necessary to control this pest.

  • Trials of Apollo, The (book series by Riordan)

    Rick Riordan: A sequel series, The Trials of Apollo, began with The Hidden Oracle (2016) and continued with The Dark Prophecy (2017), The Burning Maze (2018), and The Tyrant’s Tomb (2019).

  • Trials of Brother Jero, The (play by Soyinka)

    Wole Soyinka: …credulity of their parishioners in The Trials of Brother Jero (performed 1960; published 1963) and Jero’s Metamorphosis (1973). But his more serious plays, such as The Strong Breed (1963), Kongi’s Harvest (opened the first Festival of Negro Arts in Dakar, 1966; published 1967), The Road (1965), From Zia, with Love…

  • triaminotriazine (chemical compound)

    Melamine, a colourless crystalline substance belonging to the family of heterocyclic organic compounds, which are used principally as a starting material for the manufacture of synthetic resins. Melamine is rich in nitrogen, a property that is similar to protein. Melamine can be manufactured from

  • Triangle (constellation)

    Triangulum, (Latin: “Triangle”) constellation in the northern sky at about 2 hours right ascension and 30° north in declination. Its brightest star is Beta Trianguli, with a magnitude of 3.0. The brightest stars in the constellation form an obvious triangle. This constellation contains M33, one of

  • triangle (musical instrument)

    Triangle, percussion instrument consisting of a steel rod bent into a triangle with one corner left open. It is suspended by a gut or nylon loop and struck with a steel rod. It is theoretically an instrument of indefinite pitch, for its fundamental pitch is obscured by its nonharmonic overtones.

  • triangle (mathematics)

    mathematics: Archimedes: …equals the area of a triangle whose height equals the radius of the circle and whose base equals its circumference. He established analogous results for the sphere showing that the volume of a sphere is equal to that of a cone whose height equals the radius of the sphere and…

  • triangle (drawing instrument)

    drafting: Equipment: …known are the T square, triangle, protractor, and compass; the parallel straightedge is an alternative to the T square. The drafting machine, introduced about 1930, allows a straightedge to be moved while maintaining any desired angle between it and the edge of the drawing board. Combining the functions of the…

  • triangle inequality (mathematics)

    Triangle inequality, in Euclidean geometry, theorem that the sum of any two sides of a triangle is greater than or equal to the third side; in symbols, a + b ≥ c. In essence, the theorem states that the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. The triangle inequality has

  • triangle offense (basketball)

    Chicago Bulls: …Tex Winter installed the “triangle offense,” an offensive scheme predicated on the precise spacing of players and movement without the ball, which discouraged opposing defensive players from double-teaming Jordan. With the new offense in place, Jordan, Pippen, and a roster of key role players—including gritty forward Horace Grant, veteran…

  • Triangle Publications, Inc. (American company)

    Walter H. Annenberg: …inherited the debt- and scandal-ridden Triangle Publications, Inc. He successfully took the company in new directions—founding the magazine Seventeen (1944), acquiring several television and radio stations, and developing TV Guide (1953), which became one of the most popular magazines in the United States. In 1988 Annenberg sold his interests in…

  • Triangle shirtwaist factory fire (conflagration, New York City, New York, United States [1911])

    Triangle shirtwaist factory fire, fatal conflagration that occurred on the evening of March 25, 1911, in a New York City sweatshop, touching off a national movement in the United States for safer working conditions. The fire—likely sparked by a discarded cigarette—started on the eighth floor of the

  • triangle spider (arachnid)

    spider: Spider webs: …group within this family (genus Hyptiotes) weaves only a partial orb. The spider, attached by a thread to vegetation, holds one thread from the tip of the hub until an insect brushes the web. The spider then alternately relaxes and tightens the thread, and the struggling victim becomes completely entangled.…

  • Triangle Trade (economics)

    Bordeaux: …again prospered from the “triangular” trade: slaves from Africa to the West Indies, sugar and coffee back to Bordeaux, then arms and wines back to Africa. The marquis de Tourny, intendant of Guyenne, made the city pleasing with squares and fine buildings. The Girondist Party of the French Revolution…

  • triangle water fern (plant)

    water fern: pteridoides); triangle water fern (C. richardii); and water sprite (C. thalictroides). The plants are widespread in tropical and warm temperate regions around the world, and several are cultivated as aquarium plants. Although water ferns sometimes root in mud, more frequently they float on the surface of…

  • triangular ferrimagnetism (physics)

    ferrite: …aligned in opposite directions; in triangular ferrimagnetism the field orientations may be at various angles to each other. Ferrites can have several different types of crystalline structures, including spinel, garnet, perovskite, and hexagonal.

  • triangular number (mathematics)

    number game: Polygonal and other figurate numbers: ” Thus, the triangular numbers, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, etc., were visualized as points or dots arranged in the shape of a triangle.

  • triangular point (astronomy)

    celestial mechanics: The restricted three-body problem: …two stationary points, called the triangular points, are located equidistant from the two finite masses at a distance equal to the finite mass separation. The two masses and the triangular stationary points are thus located at the vertices of equilateral triangles in the plane of the circular orbit.

  • Triangular Road (memoir by Marshall)

    Paule Marshall: Her memoir Triangular Road (2009), adapted in part from lectures delivered at Harvard University in 2005, documents her early years as a writer and meditates on the slave trade.

  • triangular trade (economics)

    Bordeaux: …again prospered from the “triangular” trade: slaves from Africa to the West Indies, sugar and coffee back to Bordeaux, then arms and wines back to Africa. The marquis de Tourny, intendant of Guyenne, made the city pleasing with squares and fine buildings. The Girondist Party of the French Revolution…

  • triangular wave voltammetry (chemistry)

    chemical analysis: Triangular wave voltammetry: Triangular wave voltammetry (TWV) is a method in which the potential is linearly scanned to a value past the potential at which an electrochemical reaction occurs and is then immediately scanned back to its original potential. A triangular wave voltammogram usually has…

  • triangulation (trigonometry)

    Triangulation, in navigation, surveying, and civil engineering, a technique for precise determination of a ship’s or aircraft’s position, and the direction of roads, tunnels, or other structures under construction. It is based on the laws of plane trigonometry, which state that, if one side and two

  • triangulation (navigation)

    GPS: Triangulation: The principle behind the unprecedented navigational capabilities of GPS is triangulation. To triangulate, a GPS receiver precisely measures the time it takes for a satellite signal to make its brief journey to Earth—less than a tenth of a second. Then it multiplies that time…

  • Triangulo Mineiro (region, Brazil)

    Minas Triangle, western regi?o (region) of Minas Gerais estado (state), southeastern Brazil. Roughly triangular in shape, the region is defined by the Paranaíba River to the west and north and the Grande River to the south. This 20,371-square-mile (52,760-square-km) area of undulating grasslands

  • Triangulum (constellation)

    Triangulum, (Latin: “Triangle”) constellation in the northern sky at about 2 hours right ascension and 30° north in declination. Its brightest star is Beta Trianguli, with a magnitude of 3.0. The brightest stars in the constellation form an obvious triangle. This constellation contains M33, one of

  • Triangulum Australe (astronomy)

    Triangulum Australe, (Latin: “Southern Triangle”) constellation in the southern sky at about 16 hours right ascension and 65° south in declination. Its brightest star is Alpha Trianguli Australis (sometimes abbreviated as Atria), with a magnitude of 1.9. The brightest stars in the constellation

  • Trianon de porcelaine (building, Versailles, France)

    art market: European trade with East Asia: …the fashion was the so-called Trianon de porcelaine, built by Louis XIV for his mistress Mme de Montespan on the site now occupied by the Grand Trianon (see Palace of Versailles). It was faced with faience tiles of a blue-and-white chinoiserie pattern.

  • Trianon Syndrome (European history)

    Hungary: …suffered from the so-called “Trianon Syndrome.” The syndrome was widespread prior to 1945; it was suppressed during Soviet domination (1945–90); and it reemerged during independence in 1990, when it took on a different form. The modern country appears to be split into two irreconcilable factions: those who are still…

  • Trianon, Treaty of (World War I [1920])

    Treaty of Trianon, (1920), treaty concluding World War I and signed by representatives of Hungary on one side and the Allied Powers on the other. It was signed on June 4, 1920, at the Trianon Palace at Versailles, France. The Allies’ presentation of their terms for peace with Hungary was delayed

  • triarchic theory (psychology)

    human intelligence: Cognitive-contextual theories: …cultural context was Sternberg’s “triarchic” theory, which he proposed in Beyond IQ: A Triarchic Theory of Human Intelligence (1985). Both Gardner and Sternberg believed that conventional notions of intelligence were too narrow; Sternberg, however, questioned how far psychologists should go beyond traditional concepts, suggesting that musical and bodily-kinesthetic abilities…

  • Trías Monge, José (Puerto Rican government official)

    José Trías Monge, Puerto Rican government official and judge (born May 5, 1920, San Juan, P.R.—died June 24, 2003, Boston, Mass.), was heavily involved with drafting the Puerto Rican constitution, which took effect in 1952. Under its terms, Puerto Rico bound itself to the U.S. and acquired a

  • Triasacarus fedelei (extinct mite species)

    mite: …two extinct mite species (Triasacarus fedelei and Ampezzoa triassica) dated to approximately 230 million years ago (during the Triassic Period) are among the oldest arthropod fossils preserved in amber. The mites are thought to have fed on extinct species of conifers, ultimately becoming encased and preserved in the trees’…

  • Triassic Period (geochronology)

    Triassic Period, in geologic time, the first period of the Mesozoic Era. It began 252 million years ago, at the close of the Permian Period, and ended 201 million years ago, when it was succeeded by the Jurassic Period. The Triassic Period marked the beginning of major changes that were to take

  • Triassic-Jurassic extinction (mass extinction)

    End-Triassic extinction, global extinction event occurring at the end of the Triassic Period (252 million to 201 million years ago) that resulted in the demise of some 76 percent of all marine and terrestrial species and about 20 percent of all taxonomic families. It is thought that the

  • Triassomachilis uralensis (extinct insect species)

    apterygote: Evolution and paleontology: …family Triassomachilidae (order Archaeognatha) includes Triassomachilis uralensis of the Triassic (252 million to 201 million years ago) deposits of Russia. Other extinct species occur in the genera Machilis, Praemachilis, and Parastylus. One Zygentoma family (Lepidotrichidae), thought to be extinct, was later found in California.

  • Triat, Hippolyte (French gymnast)

    physical culture: Humanism and national revivals: …physical culture pioneer and strongman Hippolyte Triat established a huge gymnasium in Paris where aristocrats joined spirited youth in pursuit of fitness. In the 1870s physical education became a principal focus in French schools, where battalions of healthy young men were trained to avenge the loss of Alsace-Lorraine to the…

  • triathlon (race)

    Triathlon, an endurance contest involving swimming, cycling, and running. The sport evolved out of a 1970s American craze for long-distance running and fitness and was introduced as an Olympic sport at the 2000 Games in Sydney, Australia. The sport debuted in San Diego, California, on September 25,

  • Triatoma (insect)

    heteropteran: Harmful aspects: …the American tropics, occurs through cone nose bugs (Reduviidae), so-called because of the shape of their head. The insect receives trypanosomes when it feeds on the blood of an infected person. The trypanosome passes part of its life cycle in the insect and again becomes infective to humans. Instead of…

  • Triatominae (insect, subfamily Triatominae)

    assassin bug: Predatory behaviour: …known as triatomine bugs or kissing bugs. Some species of triatomine bugs—particularly members of the genera Panstrongylus, Rhodnius, and Triatoma—are carriers of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas disease. Triatomines can survive in a variety of habitats, including underneath rocks and bark, inside the nests of other animals,…

  • triatomine bug (insect, subfamily Triatominae)

    assassin bug: Predatory behaviour: …known as triatomine bugs or kissing bugs. Some species of triatomine bugs—particularly members of the genera Panstrongylus, Rhodnius, and Triatoma—are carriers of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas disease. Triatomines can survive in a variety of habitats, including underneath rocks and bark, inside the nests of other animals,…

  • Triaxonia (invertebrate)

    Glass sponge, any of a class (Hexactinellida, also called Hyalospongiae, or Triaxonia) of sponges characterized by a skeleton that consists of silica spicules (needlelike structures) often united into a delicate geometric network—e.g., that of Venus’s flower basket (q.v.). Glass sponges occur

  • triazolam (drug)

    sedative-hypnotic drug: triazolam (Halcion). They are, however, intended only for short- or medium-term use, since the body does develop a tolerance to them and withdrawal symptoms (anxiety, restlessness, and so on) develop even in those who have used the drugs for only four to six weeks. The…

  • triazole (chemical compound)

    antifungal drug: The azoles: …divided into the imidazoles and triazoles, according to the number of nitrogen molecules in their organic ring structure, exert their effects by binding to fungal membranes and blocking the synthesis of fungal lipids, especially ergosterol. The azoles have broad antifungal activity and are active against fungi that infect the skin…

  • tribal assembly (ancient Roman assembly)

    democracy: The Roman Republic: …plebeians (common people); and the Comitia Tributa, like the Athenian Assembly, was open to all citizens. In all the assemblies, votes were counted by units (centuries or tribes) rather than by individuals; thus, insofar as a majority prevailed in voting, it would have been a majority of units, not of…

  • tribal council (government)

    Native American: Reorganization: …had for many years sponsored tribal councils. These councils had functioned without federal sanction, although their members had represented tribal interests in various ways, such as leading delegations to Washington, D.C., to protest allotment. Reorganization gave tribes the opportunity to formalize these and other indigenous institutions. Tribal governments soon initiated…

  • tribal dance

    dance: Tribal dance: A tribal society is essentially a self-contained system. While it may possess sophisticated cultural and social structures, its technological and economic structures are generally primitive. Consequently, by the late 20th century such societies had become increasingly rare, and many tribal dances had either…

  • Tribal Nomenclature: American Indian, Native American, and First Nation

    The past 500 years have seen a myriad of terms used as referents to indigenous Americans, including American Indian, Native American, First Nation, Eskimo, Inuit, and Native Alaskan. Some of these terms are used almost interchangeably, while others indicate relatively specific entities. The term

  • tribal religion

    creation myth: Nature and significance: …expression in archaic or “primitive” societies, often related to ritual presentation, is modelled on the structure of the cosmogonic myth. The masks, dances, and gestures are, in one way or another, aspects of the structure of the cosmogonic myth. This meaning may also extend to the tools that people…

  • tribal self (philosophy)

    William Kingdon Clifford: …consciousness is composed) and “the tribal self.” The latter gives the key to his ethical view, which explains conscience and moral law by the development in each individual of a “self” that prescribes conduct conducive to the welfare of the “tribe.” He recognized the serious difficulties created for certain features…

  • tribal system (anthropology)

    Tribe, in anthropology, a notional form of human social organization based on a set of smaller groups (known as bands), having temporary or permanent political integration, and defined by traditions of common descent, language, culture, and ideology. The term originated in ancient Rome, where the

  • Triballi (people)

    Triballi, a Thracian people whose earliest known home was the “Triballian plain” (probably the Plain of Kosovo), near the junction of the Angrus and Brongus rivers (the western and southern Morava) in the north-central Balkans. Sometime after 424 bc they were overcome by the Autariatae, an Illyrian

  • tribe (ancient Roman government)

    Tribe, in Roman history, a unit of the Roman state. The first Roman tribes were probably ethnic in origin and consisted of the Titienses (Tities), Ramnenses (Ramnes), and Luceres. They were superseded by the creation of new local tribes (date uncertain) consisting of 4 urban tribes and 16 rural, o

  • tribe (anthropology)

    Tribe, in anthropology, a notional form of human social organization based on a set of smaller groups (known as bands), having temporary or permanent political integration, and defined by traditions of common descent, language, culture, and ideology. The term originated in ancient Rome, where the

  • tribelet (territorial and political unit)

    Native American: The Southwest and the southern Pacific Coast: …political organization known as the tribelet: moderately sized sedentary groups characterized by hierarchical but highly independent relationships both within and between polities.

  • Tribes of Galway (Irish history)

    Galway: …of English lineage—the so-called “Tribes of Galway”—leading Galway to be called the “City of the Tribes.” The charter of incorporation given by Richard II (reigned 1377–99) was extended in 1545 to give the port jurisdiction over the Aran Islands, located 20 miles (30 km) southwest; it permitted export of…

  • Tribhuvan (king of Nepal)

    Nepal: External relations, 1750–1950: …royal family, led by King Tribhuvan (reigned 1911–55), and launched a revolution in November 1950. With strong diplomatic support from New Delhi, the rebels accepted a settlement with the Ranas under which the sovereignty of the crown was restored and the revolutionary forces, led by the Nepali Congress (NC) party,…

  • Tribhuvan University (university, Kāthmāndu, Nepal)

    Nepal: Health and education: …was established in 1918, and Tribhuvan University in Kāthmāndu, with faculties of arts, sciences, commerce, and education, was chartered in 1959. The University Senate has sole legal responsibility for higher education and the authority to grant academic recognition to colleges but is largely dependent upon the Ministry of Education for…

  • Tribhuvana (queen of Indonesia)

    Gajah Mada: …had no son, his daughter Tribhuvana became ruler.

  • Tribhuvanadityavarman (ruler of Cambodia)

    Jayavarman VII: Early life: …the accession of the rebel Tribhuvanadityavarman (ruled 1166–77), he decided to remain in his homeland and to await an opportunity to assert his own claim to the throne.

  • tribi (ancient Roman government)

    Tribe, in Roman history, a unit of the Roman state. The first Roman tribes were probably ethnic in origin and consisted of the Titienses (Tities), Ramnenses (Ramnes), and Luceres. They were superseded by the creation of new local tribes (date uncertain) consisting of 4 urban tribes and 16 rural, o

  • Triblidiales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Triblidiales Saprotrophic; ascomata solitary or clustered; example genera include Huangshania, Pseudographis, and Triblidium. Phylum Basidiomycota Parasitic or saprotrophic on plants or insects; filamentous; hyphae septate, with septa typically inflated

  • Tribolium (insect)

    life: Temperature and desiccation: …kangaroo rat (a mammal) and Tribolium (the flour beetle) imbibe no water at all in the liquid state. They rely entirely on metabolic water—that is, on water released from chemical bonds through the metabolism of food. A variety of plants, including Spanish moss, live without contact with groundwater. They extract…

  • Tribolium confusum (insect)

    darkling beetle: …the smaller flour beetle (Tribolium confusum) are pests in dried foods. Remains of Tribolium have been found in a grain jar in an Egyptian tomb dating back to about 2500 bce. The flour beetle is also used in laboratory studies of population ecology, heredity, and behaviour because large numbers…

  • Tribolo (Italian architect)

    Boboli Gardens: …di Raffaello de’ Pericoli detto Tribolo, who had been commissioned by Eleonora de Toledo, wife of Cosimo I, to create a setting that would be appropriate for vast pageants and Medici court entertainments.

  • tribological ceramics

    Tribological ceramics, ceramic materials that are resistant to friction and wear. They are employed in a variety of industrial and domestic applications, including mineral processing and metallurgy. This article surveys the principal tribological ceramic materials and their areas of application.

  • tribology (physics)

    Tribology, the study of the interaction of sliding surfaces. It includes three subjects: friction, wear, and lubrication (qq.v.). There is a difficulty in that friction is generally characterized as a branch of physics or mechanical engineering, wear is part of the material science of metallurgy,

  • triboluminescence (physics)

    luminescence: Triboluminescence: When crystals of certain substances—e.g., sugar—are crushed, luminescent sparkles are visible. Similar observations have been made with numerous organic and inorganic substances. Closely related are the faint blue luminescence observable when adhesive tapes are stripped from a roll, and the luminescence exhibited when strontium…

  • Tribonema (genus of yellow-green algae)

    algae: Annotated classification: includes Botrydium, Bumilleriopsis, Tribonema, and Vaucheria. Division Cryptophyta Unicellular flagellates. Class Cryptophyceae Chlorophyll a, chlorophyllide c2, and phycobiliproteins; starch stored outside

  • Tribonian (Byzantine legal scholar)

    Tribonian, legal authority and public official in the Byzantine Empire (eastern Roman Empire), who was the chief compiler and perhaps the initiator of the Code of Justinian, the comprehensive codification of Roman law sponsored by and named for the emperor Justinian I (reigned ad 527–565). From 530

  • Tribonianus (Byzantine legal scholar)

    Tribonian, legal authority and public official in the Byzantine Empire (eastern Roman Empire), who was the chief compiler and perhaps the initiator of the Code of Justinian, the comprehensive codification of Roman law sponsored by and named for the emperor Justinian I (reigned ad 527–565). From 530

  • Triborough Bridge (bridge, New York City, New York, United States)

    Othmar Herman Ammann: …Triborough Bridge (later renamed the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge), New York City. He also sat on the Board of Engineers in charge of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, which opened in 1937.

  • Tribschener Idyll (work by Wagner)

    Siegfried Idyll, symphonic poem for chamber orchestra by Richard Wagner that reflects a gentle, tender side of the composer. It premiered on Christmas Day 1870. After the wife of the pianist and conductor Hans von Bülow had three children—Isolde (1865), Eva (1867), and Siegfried (1869)—with Wagner,

  • tribulum (farm implement)

    origins of agriculture: Harvesting and processing: …an implement known as a tribulum, a wooden framework with bits of flint or metal fixed to the underside, hauled over the grain by an animal. Winnowing was still done by tossing in the air from a winnowing basket when there was a favourable wind to blow away the chaff.

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