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  • Tres Galliae (Roman territory, Europe)

    Gallia Comata, (Latin: Long-haired Gaul, ) (Three Gauls), in Roman antiquity, the land of Gaul that included the three provinces of (1) Aquitania, bordered by the Bay of Biscay on the west and the Pyrenees on the south; (2) Celtica (or Gallia Lugdunensis), with Lugdunum (Lyon) as its capital, on

  • Três Lagoas (Brazil)

    Três Lagoas, city, east-central Mato Grosso do Sul estado (state), south-central Brazil, at the confluence of the Sucuriú and Paraná rivers, at 1,030 feet (313 metres) above sea level. The city is a hub of economic activity, serving as a cattle-shipping and meat-packing centre. Três Lagoas, which

  • três Marias, As (work by Queiroz)

    Brazilian literature: Modernismo and regionalism: …in As três Marias (1939; The Three Marias) she evoked the claustrophobic condition of women victimized by a rigid patriarchal system. Jorge Amado, a socialist and a best-selling novelist, focused on the oppressed proletariat and Afro-Brazilian communities in novels such as Cacáu (1933; “Cacao”) and Jubiabá (1935; Eng. trans. Jubiabá).…

  • Tres Reis Magos (Brazil)

    Natal, city and port, capital of Rio Grande do Norte estado (state), northeastern Brazil. It is situated near the mouth of the Potengi River on the Atlantic coast. Founded by the Portuguese in 1597 near the site of a fort (Três Reis Magos [“The Three Magi”]), Natal was given town status in 1611;

  • Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry (work by Limbourg brothers and Colombe)

    book of hours: …the most splendid examples, the Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry (c. 1409–16), was created in northern France during the 14th and 15th centuries. Now held in Chantilly at the Musée Condé, it is an excellent pictorial record of the duke’s spectacular residences, with magnificent calendar pages illuminated by…

  • Tres tristes tigres (film by Ruiz [1968])

    Third Cinema: …Ruiz’s Tres tristes tigres (1968; Three Sad Tigers), which provided a variety of options for social change in its examination of the Santiago underworld through a single handheld camera, emphasizing the city’s atmosphere of entrapment. The Third Cinema approach spread worldwide through international exposure, especially in Europe, overcoming the obstacles…

  • Tres tristes tigres (work by Cabrera Infante)

    Guillermo Cabrera Infante: …he acquired international renown with Tres tristes tigres (1964; Three Trapped Tigers), winner of the Bibliotheca Breve Prize given by the Spanish publisher Seix Barral. In the manner of James Joyce’s Ulysses, this highly successful novel chronicles the adventures of several young characters in Havana’s prerevolutionary nightlife. It is a…

  • Tres Zapotes (archaeological site, Mexico)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Veracruz and Chiapas: …strong Olmec tradition, however, was Tres Zapotes, near the Tuxtla Mountains in the old Olmec “heartland.” Its most famous monument, the fragmentary Stela C, is clearly epi-Olmec on the basis of a jaguar-monster mask carved in relief on its obverse. On the reverse is a column of numerals in the…

  • ?Trés! (album by Green Day)

    Green Day: ?Uno!, ?Dos!, and ?Tré!—that found the band returning to the high-energy immediacy of its punk roots while also drawing inspiration from its classic-rock forebears. Green Day’s next release, Revolution Radio (2016), was a more-focused return to basics.

  • Trésaguet, Pierre-Marie-Jér?me (French engineer)

    Pierre-Marie-Jér?me Trésaguet, French engineer known for his introduction of modern road-building ideas. Youngest son of a family of engineers, Trésaguet served many years in the Corps des Ponts et Chaussées (Bridges and Highways Corps), first in Paris as a subinspector and later in Limoges as

  • Tresca criterion (mechanics)

    mechanics of solids: Continuum plasticity theory: Tresca proposed a yield criterion for macroscopically isotropic metal polycrystals based on the maximum shear stress in the material, and that was used by Saint-Venant to solve an early elastic-plastic problem, that of the partly plastic cylinder in torsion, and also to solve for the…

  • Tresca, Henri Edouard (French scientist)

    mechanics of solids: Continuum plasticity theory: …for metallic materials begins with Henri Edouard Tresca in 1864. His experiments on the compression and indentation of metals led him to propose that this type of plasticity, in contrast to that in soils, was essentially independent of the average normal stress in the material and dependent only on shear…

  • trescientas, Las (poem by Mena)

    Juan de Mena: …best known for his poem El laberinto de Fortuna (1444; “The Labyrinth of Fortune”), also called Las trescientas (“The Three Hundreds”) for its length; it is a complex work that owes much to Lucan, Virgil, and Dante. Writing in arte mayor, lines of 12 syllables that lend themselves to stately…

  • Tresckow, Henning von (German general)

    July Plot: …the general staff), Major General Henning von Tresckow, Colonel General Friedrich Olbricht, and several other top officers. Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, one of Germany’s most prestigious commanders, agreed with the conspirators that Hitler should be removed from power, but he looked on assassination with distaste and took no active part…

  • Tresguerras, Francisco Eduardo (Mexican architect)

    Latin American art: State-sponsored art and Neoclassicism: …the 19th century, the architect Francisco Eduardo Tresguerras, born in Mexico and self-educated from architectural books, proved to be also a painter of considerable talent. His self-portrait recalls that of his Spanish contemporary Francisco de Goya in its severe coloration, absence of background, and unflattering realism. In addition to designing…

  • tresillo (card game)

    Ombre, Anglicized version of the classic Spanish card game originally called hombre (meaning “man”) and now known as tresillo in Spain and South America. Three players each receive 10 cards from the Spanish suited 40-card deck lacking 10-9-8 in each suit; the remaining cards go facedown as a stock.

  • Trésor de l’épargne (French government)

    France: Military and financial organization: …a new central treasury, the Trésor de l’épargne, into which all his revenues, ordinary and extraordinary, were to be deposited. In 1542 he set up 16 financial and administrative divisions, the généralités, appointing in each a collector general responsible for the collection of all royal revenues within his area. In…

  • Tresor de la langue fran?aise (French dictionary)

    Tresor de la langue fran?aise, (French: “Treasury of the French Language”) comprehensive etymological and historical dictionary of the French language originally published in 16 volumes (1971–94). In the 1960s more than 250,000,000 word examples were collected for use in the dictionary. Publication

  • Tresor de la langue fran?aise: dictionnaire de la langue de XIXe et du XXe siècle (1789–1960) (French dictionary)

    Tresor de la langue fran?aise, (French: “Treasury of the French Language”) comprehensive etymological and historical dictionary of the French language originally published in 16 volumes (1971–94). In the 1960s more than 250,000,000 word examples were collected for use in the dictionary. Publication

  • Trésor des chartes (work by Dupuy)

    Pierre Dupuy: …catalog the royal archives (Trésor des chartes) and, with his brother Jacques, the king’s library.

  • Tresor, The (work by Latini)

    encyclopaedia: The level of writing: …and mercantile classes with his Li livres dou trésor (c. 1264; “Treasure Books”) and therefore used a concise and accurate style that evoked an immediate and general welcome. Gregor Reisch managed to cover the whole university course of the day in his brief Margarita philosophica, which correctly interpreted the taste…

  • trespass (law)

    Trespass, in law, the unauthorized entry upon land. Initially, trespass was wrongful conduct directly causing injury or loss and thus was the origin of the law of torts in common-law countries. Trespass now, however, is generally confined to issues involving real property. Neither malice nor

  • Trespass (film by Schumacher [2011])

    Nicole Kidman: Roles from the early 2010s: In the thriller Trespass (2011), Kidman and Nicolas Cage played a married couple whose home is invaded by thieves. In 2012 she starred as the writer Martha Gellhorn, who was briefly married to Ernest Hemingway, in the HBO movie Hemingway & Gellhorn, and she vamped as the fiancée…

  • Trespasser, The (film by Goulding [1929])

    Gloria Swanson: …unfinished), and her first talkie, The Trespasser (1929). She was nominated for the first-ever Academy Award for best actress for Sadie Thompson and received another nomination for The Trespasser. After several lighter vehicles, she tired of the poor scripts available, stopped making films, and started several business ventures outside the…

  • trestle (construction)

    scaffold: Trestle supports are used for work on a large area if little or no adjustment of height is required (e.g., for plastering the ceiling of a room). The trestles may be of special design or simply wooden sawhorses of the type used by carpenters. Specially…

  • Tresus capax (mollusk)

    Gaper clam, (Tresus nuttallii and Tresus capax), either of two species of bivalve mollusks of the family Mactridae. These clams live in sand and mud flats along the coast of western North America from Alaska to Baja California. The shells of both species reach about 200 millimetres (8 inches) in l

  • Tresus nuttallii (mollusk)

    Gaper clam, (Tresus nuttallii and Tresus capax), either of two species of bivalve mollusks of the family Mactridae. These clams live in sand and mud flats along the coast of western North America from Alaska to Baja California. The shells of both species reach about 200 millimetres (8 inches) in l

  • tresviri (ancient Roman office)

    Triumvirate, in ancient Rome, a board of three officials. There were several types: Tresviri capitales, or tresviri nocturni, first instituted about 289 bc, assisted higher magistrates in their judicial functions, especially those relating to crime and the civil status of citizens. Tresviri

  • Tretā Yuga (Hindu chronology)

    chronology: Eras based on astronomical speculation: …in the three others, the Tretā, Dvāpara, and Kali yugas. The respective durations of these four yugas were 1,728,000, 1,296,000, 864,000, and 432,000 years. According to the astronomer Aryabhata, however, the duration of each of the four yugas was the same—i.e., 1,080,000 years. The basic figures in these calculations were…

  • Tretchikoff, Vladimir (South African artist)

    Vladimir Tretchikoff, Russian-born South African artist, a popular self-taught painter who was known as “the king of kitsch”—although his many fans compared his often garishly coloured art to Andy Warhol’s. Tretchikoff escaped with his family from Russia in the wake of the Revolution of 1917, and

  • Tretchikov, Vladimir Grigoryevich (South African artist)

    Vladimir Tretchikoff, Russian-born South African artist, a popular self-taught painter who was known as “the king of kitsch”—although his many fans compared his often garishly coloured art to Andy Warhol’s. Tretchikoff escaped with his family from Russia in the wake of the Revolution of 1917, and

  • Trethewey, Natasha (American poet and teacher)

    Natasha Trethewey, American poet and teacher who served as poet laureate consultant in poetry (2012–14). Her subjects were chiefly history (both her family’s and that of the American South), race, and memory. Trethewey was born in the Deep South to an African American mother and a white father on

  • Tretiak, Vladislav (Soviet hockey player)

    Vladislav Tretiak, Soviet ice hockey player who was considered one of the greatest goaltenders in the history of the sport. As a member of the Central Red Army team and Soviet national squad, he won 10 world championships (1970–71, 1973–75, 1978–79, and 1981–83) and 3 Olympic gold medals (1972,

  • Tretiak, Vladislav Aleksandrovich (Soviet hockey player)

    Vladislav Tretiak, Soviet ice hockey player who was considered one of the greatest goaltenders in the history of the sport. As a member of the Central Red Army team and Soviet national squad, he won 10 world championships (1970–71, 1973–75, 1978–79, and 1981–83) and 3 Olympic gold medals (1972,

  • Tretick, Aaron Stanley (American photographer)

    Aaron Stanley Tretick, American photographer noted for his candid images of the family of Pres. John F. Kennedy; while working for Look magazine in 1963, he was invited to take behind-the-scenes photos at the Kennedy White House and he produced some memorable shots, including one of young John F.

  • Tretis of the tua mariit Wemen and the Wedo (poem by Dunbar)

    William Dunbar: …shocking satire is the alliterative Tretis of the tua mariit Wemen and the Wedo (“Treatise of the Two Married Women and the Widow”).

  • Tretyakov Gallery (museum, Moscow, Russia)

    Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow art museum founded by Pavel M. Tretyakov in 1856. It contains the world’s finest collection of 17th- and 18th-century Russian icons, having more than 40,000 of them. There are also 18th-century portraits, 19th-century historical paintings, and works of the Soviet period. T

  • Tretyakov, Sergey Olegovich (Russian intelligence officer)

    Sergey Olegovich Tretyakov, Russian intelligence officer (born Oct. 5, 1956, Moscow, Russia, U.S.S.R.—died June 13, 2010, Osprey, Fla.), left his position as a colonel in the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR)—a successor agency of the Soviet KGB—in 2000 to defect to the U.S., where he gave

  • Tretye Otdeleniye (Russian political office)

    Third Department, office created by Emperor Nicholas I (July 15 [July 3, old style], 1826) to conduct secret police operations. Designed by Count A.Kh. Benckendorff, who was also its first chief administrator (1826–44), the department was responsible for political security. It conducted s

  • Treubiales (plant order)

    bryophyte: Annotated classification: …genera) into the segregate order Treubiales on the basis of several unusual morphological features of the gametophytes. Order Jungermanniales Leaves flattened, in 2 or 3 rows, usually broadened to attachment, often lobed; shoots reclining, erect, or pendent; rhizoids smooth-walled; archegonia terminating shoot, surrounded by a chlorophyllose sheath (perianth); sporophyte with…

  • Treuhaft, Robert Edward (American lawyer)

    Robert Edward Treuhaft, American lawyer (born Aug. 8, 1912, New York, N.Y.—died Nov. 11, 2001, New York City), crusaded for civil rights and numerous other liberal causes and dedicated himself to fighting social injustice. He was especially noted for having urged his wife, Jessica Mitford, to w

  • Treuhandanstalt (German economic organization)

    Germany: Economic unification and beyond: …the Berlin office of the Treuhandanstalt (a government-owned but independent trust agency for the privatization of eastern German industry with wide powers of disposal) was firebombed, and in April 1991 its head was murdered by the West German Red Army Faction.

  • Treurnicht, Andries (South African politician)

    Andries Treurnicht, South African politician. A preacher in the Dutch Reformed Church (1946–60), he later achieved high office in the National Party as a strong supporter of apartheid. In 1976 his insistence that black children be taught Afrikaans lead to the Soweto uprising. In 1982 he left the

  • Treurnicht, Andries Petrus (South African politician)

    Andries Treurnicht, South African politician. A preacher in the Dutch Reformed Church (1946–60), he later achieved high office in the National Party as a strong supporter of apartheid. In 1976 his insistence that black children be taught Afrikaans lead to the Soweto uprising. In 1982 he left the

  • Trevelyan, G. M. (British historian)

    G. M. Trevelyan, English historian whose work, written for the general reader as much as for the history student, shows an appreciation of the Whig tradition in English thought and reflects a keen interest in the Anglo-Saxon element in the English constitution. The third son of Sir George Otto

  • Trevelyan, George Macaulay (British historian)

    G. M. Trevelyan, English historian whose work, written for the general reader as much as for the history student, shows an appreciation of the Whig tradition in English thought and reflects a keen interest in the Anglo-Saxon element in the English constitution. The third son of Sir George Otto

  • Trevelyan, Julian (British artist)

    Julian Trevelyan, British artist who was a founding member of the British Surrealist group in the 1930s. He often infused his work with a sense of humour and fantasy. Trevelyan was the nephew of the historian G.M. Trevelyan. While attending the University of Cambridge (1928–30), Trevelyan became so

  • Trevelyan, Julian Otto (British artist)

    Julian Trevelyan, British artist who was a founding member of the British Surrealist group in the 1930s. He often infused his work with a sense of humour and fantasy. Trevelyan was the nephew of the historian G.M. Trevelyan. While attending the University of Cambridge (1928–30), Trevelyan became so

  • Trevelyan, Sir Charles (British government official)

    public administration: The British Empire: Its principal author, Sir Charles Trevelyan, had acquired a reputation for searching out corruption in the Indian Civil Service during 14 years of service there. The report of 1854 recommended the abolition of patronage and recruitment by open competitive examination. It further recommended (1) the establishment of an…

  • Trevelyan, Sir George Otto, 2nd Baronet (British historian)

    Sir George Otto Trevelyan, 2nd Baronet, English historian and statesman remembered for his biography of his uncle Lord Macaulay and for his part in the political events surrounding Prime Minister William Gladstone’s introduction of Irish Home Rule (1886), which Trevelyan first opposed and then

  • Treveri (people)

    history of the Low Countries: The Roman period: …what is now Luxembourg, the Treveri. North of the Rhine, the Frisii (Frisians) were the principal inhabitants, although the arrival of the Romans brought about a number of movements: the Batavi came to the area of the lower reaches of the Rhine, the Canninefates to the western coastal area of…

  • Trèves (Germany)

    Trier, city, Rhineland-Palatinate Land (state), southwestern Germany. It lies on the right bank of the Moselle (Mosel) River, surrounded by the foothills of the Eifel, Hunsrück, and Mosel mountains, just east of the border with Luxembourg. A shrine of the Treveri, a Germanic tribe, existed at the

  • Treves, Claudio (Italian reformist)

    Italy: Conduct of the war: The reformist Claudio Treves voiced the pacifist opinions of the movement in parliament in 1917, when he made a plea that the troops should not spend another winter in the trenches. Other Socialists took a more active role against the war and distributed antiwar propaganda or organized…

  • Trevi Fountain (fountain, Rome, Italy)

    Trevi Fountain, fountain in Rome that is considered a late Baroque masterpiece and is arguably the best known of the city’s numerous fountains. It was designed by Nicola Salvi and completed by Giuseppe Pannini in 1762. According to legend, those who toss coins into its waters will return to Rome.

  • Trevino, Lee (American golfer)

    Lee Trevino, American professional golfer who became an immediate success when he joined the Professional Golfers’ Association of America (PGA) tour in 1967 and soon was recognized as one of the finest players in the world. Of Mexican-American descent, Trevino received a grade-school education,

  • Trevino, Lee Buck (American golfer)

    Lee Trevino, American professional golfer who became an immediate success when he joined the Professional Golfers’ Association of America (PGA) tour in 1967 and soon was recognized as one of the finest players in the world. Of Mexican-American descent, Trevino received a grade-school education,

  • Trevisan, Dalton (Brazilian author)

    Brazilian literature: The short story: Beginning in the 1950s, Dalton Trevisan, Brazil’s prolific short-story writer par excellence, immortalized lurid scenes of sex and death among the lower middle classes in O vampiro de Curitiba (1965; The Vampire of Curitiba, and Other Stories) and in numerous other collections. He also experimented with the short-story genre…

  • Trevisani, Francesco (Italian artist)

    Western painting: Late Baroque and Rococo: …his pupil Benedetto Luti, while Francesco Trevisani abandoned the dramatic lighting of his early paintings in favour of a glossy Rococo classicism. In the early 18th century, Neapolitan painting under Francesco Solimena developed from the brilliant synthesis of Pietro da Cortona’s grand manner and Venetian colour that Giordano had evolved…

  • Trévise, édouard-Adolphe-Casimir-Joseph Mortier, duc de (French general)

    édouard-Adolphe-Casimir-Joseph Mortier, duke de Trevise, French general, one of Napoleon’s marshals, who also served as prime minister and minister of war during the reign of King Louis-Philippe. Mortier fought in the wars of the French Revolution, serving in the Army of the North, the Army of the

  • Treviso (Italy)

    Treviso, city, Veneto regione, northeastern Italy, situated north of Venice in a fertile plain at the confluence of the Sile and Botteniga rivers and intersected by canals. Originating as the Celtic Tarvisium, it was a Roman municipality and had an important mint at the time of Charlemagne. As

  • Trevithick, Richard (English engineer)

    Richard Trevithick, British mechanical engineer and inventor who successfully harnessed high-pressure steam and constructed the world’s first steam railway locomotive (1803). In 1805 he adapted his high-pressure engine to driving an iron-rolling mill and to propelling a barge with the aid of paddle

  • Trevor, Claire (American actress)

    Claire Trevor, (Claire Wemlinger), American actress (born March 8, 1909?, Bensonhurst, Long Island, N.Y.—died April 8, 2000, Newport Beach, Calif.), appeared in dozens of motion pictures during her half-century-long career, often as a tough-talking though vulnerable and kindhearted floozy. Films o

  • Trevor, Elleston (British author)

    Elleston Trevor, (TREVOR DUDLEY SMITH), British novelist who published dozens of mysteries, thrillers, and adventure books under several pseudonyms; his best-known novels were The Flight of the Phoenix and The Quiller Memorandum (b. Feb. 17, 1920--d. July 21,

  • Trevor, William (Irish writer)

    William Trevor, Irish writer who was noted for his wry and often macabre short stories and novels. In 1950 Trevor graduated from Trinity College Dublin, and he subsequently began teaching in Northern Ireland and working as a sculptor. In 1954 he moved to England, where he initially taught art. He

  • Trevor-Roper, H. R., Baron Dacre of Glanton (British historian)

    Hugh Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton, British historian and scholar noted for his works on aspects of World War II and on Elizabethan history. He is probably best known as a historian of Adolf Hitler. Trevor-Roper graduated from Christ Church College, Oxford, in 1936, and in 1939, as a

  • Trevor-Roper, Hugh Redwald (British historian)

    Hugh Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton, British historian and scholar noted for his works on aspects of World War II and on Elizabethan history. He is probably best known as a historian of Adolf Hitler. Trevor-Roper graduated from Christ Church College, Oxford, in 1936, and in 1939, as a

  • Trevor-Roper, Hugh, Baron Dacre of Glanton (British historian)

    Hugh Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton, British historian and scholar noted for his works on aspects of World War II and on Elizabethan history. He is probably best known as a historian of Adolf Hitler. Trevor-Roper graduated from Christ Church College, Oxford, in 1936, and in 1939, as a

  • trevorite (mineral)

    Trevorite, the mineral nickel iron oxide, NiFe3+2O4, a member of the magnetite (q.v.) series of

  • trew encountre, The (pamphlet by Fawkes)

    history of publishing: Medieval Europe: Titled The Trew Encountre, this four-leaved pamphlet gave an eyewitness account of the battle together with a list of the English heroes involved. By the final decade of the 15th century, publication of newsbooks was running at more than 20 per year in England alone, matching…

  • Trew Law of a Free Monarchy, The (treatise by James I)

    United Kingdom: James I (1603–25): …wrote political treatises such as The Trew Law of a Free Monarchy (1598), debated theology with learned divines, and reflected continually on the art of statecraft. He governed his poor by balancing its factions of clans and by restraining the enthusiastic leaders of its Presbyterian church. In Scotland, James was…

  • Treyens, James (American psychologist)

    schema: …American researchers William Brewer and James Treyens studied the effects of schemata in human memory. In their study, 30 subjects were brought into the office of the principal investigator and were told to wait. After 35 seconds, the subjects were asked to leave the room and to list everything that…

  • Trézel, Camille Alphonse (French general)

    Jean-Baptiste Drouet, count d'Erlon: Trézel, but on Trézel’s being posted to Oran he fell under the influence of a scheming emissary of Abdelkadar (?Abd al-Qādir). He disavowed Trézel after the latter’s defeat by Abdelkadar at La Macta. Drouet was recalled to France in July 1835. After some years at…

  • Trezzini, Domenico (Swiss architect)

    St. Petersburg: Petrograd Side: …was built in 1712–33 by Trezzini, and the tsars and tsarinas of Russia from the time of Peter (except for Peter II and Nicholas II) are buried in it. Trezzini also designed St. Peter’s (Petrovsky) Gate (1718) as the eastern entrance to the fortress. The Neva Gate, designed by Nikolay…

  • TRF

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, simplest of the hypothalamic neurohormones, consisting of three amino acids in the sequence glutamic acid–histidine–proline. The structural simplicity of thyrotropin-releasing hormone is deceiving because this hormone actually has many functions. It stimulates the

  • TRG (American company)

    Gordon Gould: …joined the defense research firm Technical Research Group (TRG) in 1958 to work on building a laser. Believing that he first needed to have a working prototype, he waited until 1959 to apply for a patent, but by that time Townes and physicist Arthur Schawlow had filed such an application…

  • TRH

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, simplest of the hypothalamic neurohormones, consisting of three amino acids in the sequence glutamic acid–histidine–proline. The structural simplicity of thyrotropin-releasing hormone is deceiving because this hormone actually has many functions. It stimulates the

  • Tri sestry (play by Chekhov)

    Three Sisters, Russian drama in four acts by Anton Chekhov, first performed in Moscow in 1901 and published as Tri sestry in the same year. The Prozorov sisters (Olga, Masha, and Irina) yearn for the excitement of Moscow; their dreary provincial life is enlivened only by the arrival of the Imperial

  • Tri smerti (work by Tolstoy)

    Leo Tolstoy: First publications: “Tri smerti” (1859; “Three Deaths”) describes the deaths of a noblewoman who cannot face the fact that she is dying, of a peasant who accepts death simply, and, at last, of a tree, whose utterly natural end contrasts with human artifice. Only the author’s transcendent consciousness unites these…

  • Tri tolstyaka (novel by Olesha)

    Yury Karlovich Olesha: …popular book, Tri tolstyaka (1928; The Three Fat Men), was written for both children and adults. It is a story set in an unknown land about an uprising led by the gunsmith Prospero. (The name is an allusion to the magician of William Shakespeare’s The Tempest.) The novel has the…

  • Tri Truaighe Scéalaigheachta (ancient Irish literature)

    Deirdre: …Three Sorrows of Storytelling (Tri Truaighe Scéalaigheachta). The older version, preserved in The Book of Leinster (c. 1160), is more starkly tragic, less polished, and less romantic than the later version. It describes a Druid’s foretelling, at Deirdre’s birth, that many men would die on her account. Raised in…

  • Tri-Cities Blackhawks (American basketball team)

    Atlanta Hawks, American professional basketball team based in Atlanta. The Hawks were one of the original franchises of the National Basketball Association (NBA) when the league was established in 1949. The team won its only championship in 1958. Originally founded in Moline and Rock Island,

  • tri-kāya (Buddhism)

    Trikaya, (Sanskrit: “three bodies”), in Mahāyāna Buddhism, the concept of the three bodies, or modes of being, of the Buddha: the dharmakaya (body of essence), the unmanifested mode, and the supreme state of absolute knowledge; the sambhogakaya (body of enjoyment), the heavenly mode; and the

  • tri-loka (Hinduism)

    loka: …of the universe is the tri-loka, or three worlds (heaven, earth, atmosphere; later, heaven, world, netherworld), each of which is divided into seven regions. Sometimes 14 worlds are enumerated: 7 above earth and 7 below. The various divisions illustrate the Hindu concept of innumerable hierarchically ordered worlds. Lokas are often…

  • Tri-Party Agreement (American history)

    Hanford Site: …of a pact called the Tri-Party Agreement, negotiated by the DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the state of Washington. The scheduled work was extensive. It included cocooning (encasing in steel and concrete) eight of the nine reactors, leaving only the B Reactor building to be maintained as a National…

  • tri-ratna (Buddhism and Jainism)

    Triratna, (Sanskrit: “Three Jewels”) in Buddhism the Triratna comprises the Buddha, the dharma (doctrine, or teaching), and the sangha (the monastic order, or community). One becomes a Buddhist by saying the words “I go to the Buddha for refuge, I go to the Doctrine for refuge, I go to the Order

  • Tri-Star Pictures (American company)

    history of the motion picture: The effect of new technologies: In fact, Tri-Star, one of Hollywood’s major producer-distributors, was a joint venture of CBS Inc., Columbia Pictures, and Time-Life’s premium cable service Home Box Office (HBO). HBO and competitor Showtime both functioned as producer-distributors in their own right by directly financing films and entertainment specials for cable…

  • Tri-State Tornado of 1925 (United States history)

    Tri-State Tornado of 1925, tornado, the deadliest in U.S. history, that traveled from southeastern Missouri through southern Illinois and into southwestern Indiana on March 18, 1925. The storm completely destroyed a number of towns and caused 695 deaths. The tornado materialized about 1:00 pm local

  • triac (electronics)

    semiconductor device: Thyristors: …three-terminal thyristor is called a triac. This device can switch the current in either direction by applying a small current of either polarity between the gate and one of the two main terminals. The triac is fabricated by integrating two thyristors in an inverse parallel connection. It is used in…

  • Triacanthidae (fish family)

    tetraodontiform: Annotated classification: Family Triacanthidae (triple spines) Shallow-water derivatives of the spikefishes; deeply forked caudal fin; slender caudal peduncle; body relatively streamlined for rapid swimming; soft dorsal fin base much longer than anal fin base. 4 genera, 7 species; Indo-Pacific, sometimes found in estuaries. Superfamily Balistoidea

  • Triacanthodidae (fish superfamily)

    tetraodontiform: Annotated classification: Family Triacanthodidae (spikefishes) The most primitive members of the order. Deepwater species with a truncated or rounded tail; deep caudal peduncle (the region between the end of the anal fin and the front of the tail); nonstreamlined body; soft dorsal and anal fins of about same…

  • Triacanthodoidei (fish suborder)

    tetraodontiform: Annotated classification: Suborder Triacanthodoidei 12–18 dorsal fin-rays; 11–16 anal fin-rays. Family Triacanthodidae (spikefishes) The most primitive members of the order. Deepwater species with a truncated or rounded tail; deep caudal peduncle (the region between the end of the anal fin and the front of the tail); nonstreamlined body;…

  • Triacanthoidea (fish superfamily)

    tetraodontiform: Annotated classification: Superfamily Triacanthoidea 1 family. Family Triacanthidae (triple spines) Shallow-water derivatives of the spikefishes; deeply forked caudal fin; slender caudal peduncle; body relatively streamlined for rapid swimming; soft dorsal fin base much longer than anal fin base. 4 genera, 7 species; Indo-Pacific, sometimes found in estuaries.

  • triacetate fibre (textile)

    cellulose acetate: triacetate. It can also be molded into solid plastic parts such as tool handles or cast into film for photography or food wrapping, though its use in these applications has diminished.

  • Triactinomyxon ignotum (biology)

    actinomyxidian: The representative species Triactinomyxon ignotum lives in the marine worm Tubifex and has spore valves that are elongated into three large hooks.

  • triacylglycerol (chemical compound)

    Triglyceride, any one of an important group of naturally occurring lipids (fat-soluble components of living cells). Triglycerides are esters in which three molecules of one or more different fatty acids are linked to the alcohol glycerol; they are named according to the fatty acid components;

  • Triad (Chinese secret society)

    Triad, Term used variously for secret societies in Qing-dynasty China (and sometimes earlier), for modern Chinese crime gangs, and for crime gangs of other Asian nationals operating in their own countries or abroad. A secret society with the name Triad started operating in the early 19th century in

  • Triad (work by Palamas)

    Saint Gregory Palamas: …attack by composing his “Apology for the Holy Hesychasts” (1338), also called the “Triad” because of its division into three parts.

  • triad (music)

    Triad, in music, a chord made up of three tones, called chord factors, of the diatonic scale: root, third, and fifth. The system of diatonic triads is the basis of tonal harmony in music. Triads are classified according to intervals formed above the root. If the factors of the triad are a major

  • triad (chemistry)

    Triad, in chemistry, any of several sets of three chemically similar elements, the atomic weight of one of which is approximately equal to the mean of the atomic weights of the other two. Such triads—including chlorine-bromine-iodine, calcium-strontium-barium, and sulfur-selenium-tellurium—were

  • triad (in muscle)

    muscle: The myofibril: …a three-element complex called a triad. The number of triads per sarcomere depends on the species; for example, in frog muscle there is one per triad, and in mammalian muscle there are two. In fishes and crustaceans, only one cisterna is associated with each transverse tubule, thus forming a dyad.…

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