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  • Tremblay, Michel (Canadian playwright)

    Canadian literature: The Quiet Revolution: In 1968 the young playwright Michel Tremblay revolutionized Quebec theatre with Les Belles-Soeurs (“The Sisters-in-Law”; Eng. trans. Les Belles-Soeurs), which was first read at the Centre d’Essai des Auteurs Dramatiques (Centre for Dramatic Authors), established in 1965 to give a forum to Quebec playwrights. The “new Quebec theatre” ushered in…

  • Trembley, Abraham (Swiss naturalist)

    Abraham Trembley, Swiss naturalist, best known for his studies of the freshwater hydra, mainly Chlorohydra viridissima. His extensive systematic experiments foreshadowed modern research on tissue regeneration and grafting. Trembley’s experiments demonstrated the hydra’s ability, when cut in two, to

  • trembling aspen (plant)

    aspen: tremula) and the American quaking, or trembling, aspen (P. tremuloides) are similar, reaching a height of 27 metres (90 feet). P. tremuloides is distinguished by its leaves, which have more pointed tips, and it grows by root suckers. Individual clones of the plants persist for thousands of years even…

  • Treme (American television program)

    John Goodman: Other TV work, including The Conners: …appeared on the HBO series Treme, a drama set in New Orleans shortly after Hurricane Katrina, and he joined the cast of the legal drama Damages for its 2011 season. Goodman also had a featured role in the HBO television movie You Don’t Know Jack (2010), which centred on Dr.…

  • Tremella (fungus genus)

    Basidiomycota: …including those of the genus Tremella (40 species), so called because they have jellylike fruiting bodies. Frequently brightly coloured (especially yellow and orange) or white, the fungi occur on decaying wood after heavy rains in late summer.

  • Tremellales (order of fungus)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Tremellales Parasitic on mosses, vascular plants, or insects, although most are saprotrophic; basidiocarps well-formed, appearing as inconspicuous horny crusts when dry but usually bright-coloured to black gelatinous masses after a rain; example genera include Tremella, Trichosporon, and Christiansenia. Class Dacrymycetes

  • Tremellomycetes (class of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Class Tremellomycetes Parasitic or saprotrophic; if present, parenthesome separated into cup-shaped sections; gelatinous fruiting bodies may be absent; includes 3 orders. Order Cystofilobasidiales Parasitic and pathogenic on plants (causing black canker of parsnips), may be saprotrophic; dolipores present; may lack parenthesomes;

  • tremendismo (literary style)

    Camilo José Cela: …the narrative style known as tremendismo, a tendency to emphasize violence and grotesque imagery.

  • Tremex columba (wasp)

    horntail: …North American species is the pigeon tremex (Tremex columba). The adult is about 3.75 cm (1.5 inches) long and has a black and brown body with yellow stripes and yellow legs. The most common British species is Urocerus gigas, which feeds on the wood of pine trees.

  • Tremfya (drug)

    psoriasis: (Remicade), etanercept (Enbrel), and guselkumab (Tremfya).

  • Tremoctopus (mollusk)

    cephalopod: Reproduction and life cycles: In the argonaut and the blanket octopus (Tremoctopus) the males differ in appearance and size from the females.

  • Tremoille, Charlotte de la (English countess)

    William Christian: …whereupon the Countess of Derby, Charlotte de la Tremoille, initiated a fruitless attempt to ransom her husband’s life through the surrender of the island to Parliament. Christian headed a revolt against the countess, but at the same time he negotiated independently with the Parliamentarians. In October of 1651, Christian cooperated…

  • Trémoille, Claude de La (French noble)

    La Trémoille Family: Louis III’s son Claude (1566–1604) at first fought in the campaigns against the Huguenots under Henry III but then changed sides, joining the Protestant king of Navarre, Henry III, in 1586. After Henry de Navarre became King Henry IV, of France, Claude was made a peer (1595).

  • Trémoille, Fran?ois de La (French noble)

    La Trémoille Family: …Marignan in 1515, his grandson Fran?ois (1502–41) succeeded to the family estates. Through his marriage to Anne de Laval, granddaughter of Frederick of Aragon, deposed king of Naples, the family derived its pretension to the kingdom of Naples and the claim to recognition at the French court as foreign princes.…

  • Trémoille, Georges de La (French noble)

    Georges de La Trémoille, powerful lord who exercised considerable influence over Charles VII of France. At first allied with the duke of Burgundy in the power struggle that continued for many years during Charles VI’s madness, La Trémoille switched his loyalty when the rival faction, the Armagnacs,

  • Trémoille, Gui de La (French noble)

    La Trémoille Family: A Pierre de La Trémoille is recorded as early as the 11th century, but the family’s ascendance dates from the 15th century. Early family members fought in several crusades. Gui (d. 1397) went with John the Fearless, duke of Burgundy, on the crusade to Hungary, was taken prisoner…

  • Trémoille, Marie-Anne de la (French noble)

    Marie-Anne de la Trémoille, princess des Ursins, French noblewoman who exercised great influence in the government of Spain between 1701 and 1714, during the period of the War of the Spanish Succession. Ursins moved to Italy with her first husband, and after his death she married an Italian duke,

  • tremolite (mineral)

    amphibole: Chemical composition: Complete substitution extends from tremolite [Ca2Mg5Si8O22(OH)2] to ferro-actinolite [Ca2Fe5Si8O22(OH)2]. Actinolite is the intermediate member of the tremolite-ferro-actinolite series. The compositional range from about 0.9 Mg7Si8O22(OH)2 to about Fe2

  • tremolite-actinolite series (mineralogy)

    amphibole: Chemical composition: …exist between anthophyllite and the tremolite-actinolite series. Compositional gaps also exist between the cummingtonite-grunerite series and other calcic amphiboles. Consequently, coexisting pairs of anthophyllite-tremolite and grunerite-ferroactinolite are found together in some rocks. Sodium-bearing amphiboles are represented by the glaucophane [Na2Mg3Al2Si8O22(OH)2]–riebeckite [Na2Fe2+3

  • tremolite-ferroactinolite series (mineralogy)

    amphibole: Chemical composition: …the intermediate member of the tremolite-ferro-actinolite series. The compositional range from about 0.9 Mg7Si8O22(OH)2 to about Fe2Mg5Si8O22(OH)2 is represented by the orthorhombic amphibole known as anthophyllite. The monoclinic cummingtonite-grunerite series exists from about Fe2Mg2Si

  • tremolo (music)

    sound: Other effects on tone: …slow change in pitch) and tremolo (a periodic slow change in amplitude) also aid the analysis of steady-state sounds.

  • tremor (geology)

    Earthquake, any sudden shaking of the ground caused by the passage of seismic waves through Earth’s rocks. Seismic waves are produced when some form of energy stored in Earth’s crust is suddenly released, usually when masses of rock straining against one another suddenly fracture and “slip.”

  • Trémouille, Madame (Russian adventuress)

    Yelizaveta Alekseyevna Tarakanova, adventuress and pretender to the Russian throne who claimed to be the daughter of the unmarried empress Elizabeth (reigned 1741–62) and Count Aleksey G. Razumovsky. She claimed to have been reared in St. Petersburg, but she was probably not Russian, and her

  • Trenance (England, United Kingdom)

    Saint Austell, town (parish), Cornwall unitary authority, southwestern England. It lies just inland of St. Austell Bay on the English Channel. St. Austell was originally called Trenance and takes its present name from a hermit named St. Austol. England’s most important kaolin (china clay) deposits

  • trench (geomorphology)

    coal mining: Area strip mining: …is flat, commences with a trench or “box cut” made through the overburden to expose a portion of the coal seam. This trench is extended to the limits of the property in the strike direction. After coal removal, a second cut is made parallel to the first one, and the…

  • trench (geology)

    Deep-sea trench, any long, narrow, steep-sided depression in the ocean bottom in which occur the maximum oceanic depths, approximately 7,300 to more than 11,000 metres (24,000 to 36,000 feet). They typically form in locations where one tectonic plate subducts under another. The deepest known

  • Trench Fever (American Red Cross report)

    Homer Fordyce Swift: …one of many contributors to Trench Fever, a report written in 1918 for the American Red Cross Commission. Between 1914 and 1948 he also contributed articles to books on internal medicine and infectious diseases.

  • trench fever (disease)

    Trench fever, infectious disease characterized by sudden onset with fever; headache; sore muscles, bones, and joints; and outbreaks of skin lesions on the chest and back. It is transmitted from one person to another by a body louse harbouring the causative organism, the rickettsial bacterium

  • trench foot (disorder)

    Immersion foot, a painful disorder of the foot involving damage to the skin, nerves, and muscle that is caused by prolonged exposure to cold dampness or by prolonged immersion in cold water. See

  • trench method (landfill)

    solid-waste management: Constructing the landfill: …be made below grade, the trench method of construction may be followed. Where this is not feasible because of topography or groundwater conditions, the area method may be practiced, resulting in a mound or hill rising above the original ground. Since no ground is excavated in the area method, soil…

  • trench mouth (pathology)

    Vincent gingivitis, acute and painful infection of the tooth margins and gums that is caused by the symbiotic microorganisms Bacillus fusiformis and Borrelia vincentii. The chief symptoms are painful, swollen, bleeding gums; small, painful ulcers covering the gums and tooth margins; and

  • trench roll back (marine geology)

    back-arc basin: …be forced oceanward, causing the trench to “roll back” over the subducting plate, or it may serve as a “sea anchor” by remaining fixed in place relative to the top of the subducting plate. In the latter case, the enlargement of the basin forces the trailing part of the overlying…

  • trench silo (agriculture)

    farm building: Crop storage: …cut into the ground (trench silo) or built aboveground (bunker silo). The floor is natural earth or concrete. The walls can be concrete, timber or plywood, or sheet steel. The capacity varies but can be large. The tower silo is an above ground cylinder, with 20- to 30-foot (six-…

  • trench warfare

    Trench warfare, warfare in which opposing armed forces attack, counterattack, and defend from relatively permanent systems of trenches dug into the ground. The opposing systems of trenches are usually close to one another. Trench warfare is resorted to when the superior firepower of the defense

  • Trench, battle of the (Islamic history)

    Battle of the Ditch, an early Muslim victory that ultimately forced the Meccans to recognize the political and religious strength of the Muslim community in Medina. A Meccan army of 3,000 men had defeated the undisciplined Muslim forces at U?ud near Medina in 625, wounding Muhammad himself. In

  • Trench, Richard Chenevix (grammarian)

    English language: 19th and 20th centuries: In 1857 Richard Chenevix Trench, dean of St. Paul’s, lectured to the Philological Society on the theme, “On some Deficiencies in our English Dictionaries.” His proposals for a new dictionary were implemented in 1859, when Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s grandnephew, Herbert Coleridge, set to work as first editor.…

  • Trenchard of Wolfeton, Hugh Montague Trenchard, 1st Viscount, Baron Trenchard of Wolfeton (British military officer)

    Hugh Montague Trenchard, 1st Viscount Trenchard, British officer and air marshal who helped lay the foundations of the Royal Air Force (RAF). Trenchard entered the army in 1893 and served in the South African War and later in Nigeria. After being invalided home in 1912, he learned to fly and in

  • Trenchard, Hugh Montague Trenchard, 1st Viscount (British military officer)

    Hugh Montague Trenchard, 1st Viscount Trenchard, British officer and air marshal who helped lay the foundations of the Royal Air Force (RAF). Trenchard entered the army in 1893 and served in the South African War and later in Nigeria. After being invalided home in 1912, he learned to fly and in

  • Trenchard, John (English writer)

    Commonwealthmen: …century included critics such as John Trenchard and Thomas Gordon, who coauthored Cato’s Letters, a widely reprinted set of essays named after the Roman aristocrat who opposed Julius Caesar’s rule. The most-notable Commonwealthmen later in the century included radical philosophers such as Richard Price and Joseph Priestley, the political reformer…

  • trencher (plate)

    Trencher, originally a thick slice of bread, used as a primitive form of plate for eating and for slicing meat (hence its derivation from “trancher”—to cut, or carve), but by the 14th century a square or circular wooden plate of rough workmanship. There was usually a small cavity for salt in the

  • trenching machine (engineering)

    Trenching machine, excavation machine employing a wheel fitted with rim buckets, or with a boom or ladder on which an endless chain of buckets or scrapers revolves. The machine is self-propelled on rubber tires or crawlers (continuous metal treads driven by wheels). As the machine moves forward,

  • trend (geology)

    aseismic ridge: …Hawaiian-Emperor chain has two main trends: (1) from the Hawaiian Islands west to the Kammu and Yūryaku seamounts (near 32° N, 168° W), the trend of the Hawaiian portion is just west of northwest; and (2) from this point to the Aleutian Trench, the trend of the Emperor segment is…

  • Trendall, A. F. (Australian geologist)

    mineral deposit: Iron deposits: During the 1980s, A.F. Trendall, working for the Geological Survey of Western Australia, studied deposits in the Hamersley Basin and found that individual thin layers could be traced for more than 100 kilometres. Such continuity suggests that evaporation played a major role in precipitating both the iron minerals…

  • Trendelenburg, Friedrich Adolf (German philosopher)

    Friedrich Adolf Trendelenburg, German philologist, educator, prolific writer, and controversial philosopher who is remembered for his criticisms based on the thought of Aristotle and aimed against adherents of Immanuel Kant and G.W.F. Hegel. Attracted to the study of Plato and Aristotle as a

  • Trendle, George W. (American producer)

    Green Hornet: …Hornet was conceived by producer George W. Trendle to build on the success of The Lone Ranger, which was also produced at WXYZ. Trendle had the idea of using a modern-day character who was related to the Lone Ranger, and writer Fran Striker was given the job of fleshing out…

  • Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (education)

    STEM: Development of STEM in the United States: …studies such as TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study), a periodic international comparison of mathematics and science knowledge of fourth and eighth graders, and PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment), a triennial assessment of knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds, reinforced concerns in the United States. PISA 2006…

  • Trenet, Charles (French singer and songwriter)

    Charles Trenet, (Louis Charles Augustin Claude Trenet), French singer and songwriter (born May 18, 1913, Narbonne, France—died Feb. 19, 2001, Créteil, France), was for more than 60 years one of the most celebrated practitioners of the French chanson, a form of cabaret ballad distinguished by c

  • Trenet, Louis Charles Augustin Claude (French singer and songwriter)

    Charles Trenet, (Louis Charles Augustin Claude Trenet), French singer and songwriter (born May 18, 1913, Narbonne, France—died Feb. 19, 2001, Créteil, France), was for more than 60 years one of the most celebrated practitioners of the French chanson, a form of cabaret ballad distinguished by c

  • Trengganu (region, Malaysia)

    Terengganu, traditional region of northeastern West Malaysia (Malaya), bounded by those of Kelantan (north and northwest) and Pahang (south and southwest). It has a 200-mile- (320-kilometre-) long coastline along the South China Sea (east). Terengganu is mentioned in 1365 as a vassal of the

  • Trennungsorthodoxie (Jewish religious movement)

    Judaism: Modern Jewish mysticism: “Neo-Orthodoxy,” the theological system founded in Germany by Samson Raphael Hirsch (1808–88), was indifferent to mysticism at the outset, but it too came to be influenced by it, especially after the rediscovery of living Judaism in Poland during World War I by Western Jewish thinkers.…

  • Trent (Italy)

    Trento, city, Trentino–Alto Adige/Südtirol regione (region), northern Italy. It lies along the Adige River, south of Bolzano. Trento was founded, according to the classical savant Pliny the Elder and the geographer Strabo of Amaseia, by the Raetians, and it became a Roman colony and military base

  • Trent (American Civil War)

    Trent Affair, (1861), incident during the American Civil War involving the doctrine of freedom of the seas, which nearly precipitated war between Great Britain and the United States. On Nov. 8, 1861, Captain Charles Wilkes, commanding the Union frigate San Jacinto, seized from the neutral British

  • Trent Affair (American Civil War)

    Trent Affair, (1861), incident during the American Civil War involving the doctrine of freedom of the seas, which nearly precipitated war between Great Britain and the United States. On Nov. 8, 1861, Captain Charles Wilkes, commanding the Union frigate San Jacinto, seized from the neutral British

  • Trent Bridge cricket ground (stadium, England, United Kingdom)

    West Bridgford: Trent Bridge cricket ground (one of England’s most famous) and Nottinghamshire’s county hall lie within the boundaries of the community. Pop. (2001) 43,395.

  • Trent Canal (canal, Ontario, Canada)

    Trent Canal, canal, southeastern Ontario, Canada, linking Georgian Bay of Lake Huron with Lake Ontario. It extends from the southeastern shore of Georgian Bay near Port Severn, up the Severn River to Lake Simcoe, eastward, connecting several lakes of the Kawartha Lake region to Rice Lake, and down

  • Trent University (university, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada)

    Peterborough: …city is the site of Trent University (founded 1963) and of Fleming College. Inc. 1905. Pop. (2011) 78,698; (2016) 81,032.

  • Trent’s Last Case (work by Bentley)

    E.C. Bentley: …and as the author of Trent’s Last Case (1913), a classic detective story that remains a best seller.

  • Trent, Council of (Roman Catholicism)

    Council of Trent, 19th ecumenical council of the Roman Catholic Church, held in three parts from 1545 to 1563. Prompted by the Reformation, the Council of Trent was highly important for its sweeping decrees on self-reform and for its dogmatic definitions that clarified virtually every doctrine

  • Trent, Jackie (British singer-songwriter)

    Jackie Trent, (Yvonne Ann Burgess), British singer-songwriter (born Sept. 6, 1940, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, Eng.—died March 21, 2015, Ciutadella, Minorca, Spain), pursued a moderately successful career as a pop singer in the 1960s, but she had her greatest successes writing lyrics in

  • Trent, River (river, England, United Kingdom)

    River Trent, river in the English Midlands. It rises in the county of Staffordshire and, after flowing southeastward, northeastward, and then northward for 168 miles (270 km), enters the Humber estuary 40 miles (65 km) from the North Sea. Its drainage basin covers more than 4,000 square miles

  • Trent-Severn Waterway (canal, Ontario, Canada)

    Trent Canal, canal, southeastern Ontario, Canada, linking Georgian Bay of Lake Huron with Lake Ontario. It extends from the southeastern shore of Georgian Bay near Port Severn, up the Severn River to Lake Simcoe, eastward, connecting several lakes of the Kawartha Lake region to Rice Lake, and down

  • Trente ans d’amour fou (novel by Rolin)

    Dominique Rolin: Trente ans d’amour fou (1988; “Thirty Years of Passionate Love”) recalls her annual visits to Venice. Her later works include Train de rêves (1994; “Train of Dreams”); Les Géraniums (1993), a collection of short stories that had been published separately between 1934 and 1980; Le…

  • Trente arpents (novel by Panneton)

    Ringuet: His next effort, Trente arpents, was first published in Paris. Skillfully styled and presenting an unsentimental view of rural versus urban life, the book was an immediate success and was rapidly translated into several languages. Also noteworthy is Le Poids du jour (1948; “The Heaviness of the Day”),…

  • Trente et Quarante (card game)

    Trente et Quarante, (French: “Thirty and Forty”, ) (“Red and Black”), French card game played at Monte- Carlo and French and Italian gambling casinos. It is not popular in North America. The name Trente et Quarante is derived from the fact that the winning point always lies between thirty and

  • Trente melodies populaires de Basse Bretagne (work by Bourgault-Ducoudray)

    Louis Bourgault-Ducoudray: …from Greece and the Orient”), Trente mélodies populaires de Basse Bretagne (1885; “Thirty Popular Melodies from Lower Brittany”), and Quatorze mélodies celtiques (1909; “Fourteen Celtic Melodies”), which fostered a new approach to folk music in France through their use of the original modal scales. He thus anticipated 20th-century music, being…

  • Trentes, Combat des (French history [1351])

    Battle of the Thirty, French Combat Des Trentes, (March 27, 1351), episode in the struggle for the succession to the duchy of Brittany between Charles of Blois, supported by the King of France, and John of Montfort, supported by the King of England. Battles are usually fought by many thousands of

  • Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol (region, Italy)

    Trentino–Alto Adige/Südtirol, autonomous regione (region), northern Italy, comprising the province (provinces) of Bolzano-Bozen (north) and Trento (south). Historically, the region includes the area of the medieval ecclesiastical principalities of Trento (Trent) and Bressanone (Brixen), which were

  • Trento (Italy)

    Trento, city, Trentino–Alto Adige/Südtirol regione (region), northern Italy. It lies along the Adige River, south of Bolzano. Trento was founded, according to the classical savant Pliny the Elder and the geographer Strabo of Amaseia, by the Raetians, and it became a Roman colony and military base

  • Trento (province, Italy)

    Trentino–Alto Adige/Südtirol: … (provinces) of Bolzano-Bozen (north) and Trento (south). Historically, the region includes the area of the medieval ecclesiastical principalities of Trento (Trent) and Bressanone (Brixen), which were later contested between the counts of Tirol and Venice. Passing to Italy after World War I, the area was known as Venetia Tridentina until…

  • Trenton (New Jersey, United States)

    Trenton, city and capital of New Jersey, U.S., seat (1837) of Mercer county, and industrial metropolis at the head of navigation on the Delaware River. It lies 28 miles (45 km) northeast of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and about 55 miles (89 km) southwest of New York City. The original settlement

  • Trenton (Ontario, Canada)

    Trenton, former city, Hastings county, southeastern Ontario, Canada, since 1998 incorporated into the city of Quinte West. It is a port of entry on the Bay of Quinte, on the northern shore of Lake Ontario, and lies at the mouth of the Trent River and at the southern end of the Trent Canal system.

  • Trenton (Michigan, United States)

    Trenton, city, southwestern suburb of Detroit, Wayne county, southeastern Michigan, U.S. It lies along the Detroit River, opposite Grosse Ile. The site of the Battle of Monguagon during the War of 1812, it was settled by Maj. Abram Caleb Truax in 1816. It was laid out as Truaxton in 1834 and was

  • Trenton and Princeton, Battles of (United States history)

    Battles of Trenton and Princeton, (1776–77), in the American Revolution, a series of engagements won by the Continental Army against Hessian and British forces in New Jersey. The battles occurred over a span of nine days (December 26, 1776–January 3, 1777) and are notable as the first successes won

  • Trenton Battle Monument (monument, New Jersey, United States)

    Washington Crossing State Park: Other features are the Trenton Battle Monument, a 155-foot (47-metre) granite shaft marking the spot where the colonial artillery opened fire on Trenton, and McKonkey Ferry Museum, in a building that supposedly sheltered Washington and some of his men after the historic crossing.

  • Trenton Business College (university, Lawrenceville, New Jersey, United States)

    Rider University, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, U.S. It includes colleges of Business Administration, Liberal Arts, Education, Sciences, and Continuing Studies. It also includes a music school, Westminster Choir College, at nearby Princeton, New

  • Trenton Six (United States law case)

    Civil Rights Congress: …the case of the so-called Trenton Six, a group of six black men in Trenton, New Jersey, accused having murdered an elderly white shopkeeper. Although the men did not fit the descriptions of the killers given by witnesses, they were convicted and sentenced to death by an all-white jury. The…

  • Trenton State College (college, Ewing, New Jersey, United States)

    College of New Jersey, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Ewing township, near Trenton, New Jersey, U.S. It comprises schools of Arts and Sciences, Business, Education, Nursing, and Engineering. More than 20 graduate programs leading to master’s degrees are offered through the

  • Treny (work by Kochanowski)

    Jan Kochanowski: …is the cycle Treny (1580; Laments), 19 poems inspired by the death of his beloved daughter, Urszula. Kochanowski was also the author of the first Polish Renaissance tragedy, Odprawa pos?ów greckich (1578; The Dismissal of the Grecian Envoys). With a plot from Homer’s Iliad and written in blank verse, it…

  • trepang (seafood)

    Bêche-de-mer, boiled, dried, and smoked flesh of sea cucumbers (phylum Echinodermata) used to make soups. Most bêche-de-mer comes from the southwestern Pacific, where the animals (any of a dozen species of the genera Holothuria, Stichopus, and Thelonota) are obtained on coral reefs. Bêche-de-mer is

  • trepanning

    history of medicine: Early medicine and folklore: …of the victim—the practice of trepanning, or trephining. Trepanned skulls of prehistoric date have been found in Britain, France, and other parts of Europe and in Peru. Many of them show evidence of healing and, presumably, of the patient’s survival. The practice still exists among some tribal people in parts…

  • trepha (Judaism)

    Terefah, any food, food product, or utensil that, according to the Jewish dietary laws (kashruth, q.v.), is not ritually clean or prepared according to law and is thus prohibited as unfit for Jewish use. Terefah is thus the antithesis of kosher (“fit”). The broad connotation of terefah derives from

  • trephining

    history of medicine: Early medicine and folklore: …of the victim—the practice of trepanning, or trephining. Trepanned skulls of prehistoric date have been found in Britain, France, and other parts of Europe and in Peru. Many of them show evidence of healing and, presumably, of the patient’s survival. The practice still exists among some tribal people in parts…

  • Treponema (bacteria genus)

    spirochete: Treponema includes the agents of syphilis (T. pallidum pallidum) and yaws (T. pallidum pertenue). Borrelia includes several species transmitted by lice and ticks and causing relapsing fever (B. recurrentis and others) and Lyme disease (

  • Treponema carateum (bacteria)

    pinta: …is caused by infection with Treponema carateum, an organism that is indistinguishable from that of syphilis. There is some evidence of a degree of cross-immunity between the two diseases, and the treatment of both is the same. Unlike syphilis, however, pinta has little effect on the general health of the…

  • Treponema pallidum (bacterium)

    bacteria: Diversity of structure of bacteria: …in length; and the corkscrew-shaped Treponema pallidum, which is the causative agent of syphilis, averaging only 0.1 to 0.2 μm in diameter but 6 to 15 μm in length. The cyanobacterium Synechococcus averages about 0.5 to 1.6 μm in diameter. Some bacteria are relatively large, such as Azotobacter, which has…

  • Treponema pallidum endemicum (bacterium)

    bejel: …is caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum endemicum, which is closely related to T. pallidum pallidum, the cause of sporadic (venereal) syphilis. Bejel occurs primarily in the hot dry regions of the Middle East and in the southern Sahara of western Africa; it is rare beyond those areas.

  • Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (medicine)

    syphilis test: Treponemal tests include the Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA; or T. pallidum particle agglutination assay, TPPA); the enzyme immunoassay (EIA); and the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) test. Treponemal tests are based on the detection of treponemal antibody—the antibody that attacks T. pallidum, the spirochete that causes syphilis—in the…

  • Treponema pallidum pallidum (bacterium)

    spirochete: …the agents of syphilis (T. pallidum pallidum) and yaws (T. pallidum pertenue). Borrelia includes several species transmitted by lice and ticks and causing relapsing fever (B. recurrentis and others) and Lyme disease (B. burgdorferi) in humans. Spirochaeta

  • Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (medicine)

    syphilis test: Treponemal tests include the Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA; or T. pallidum particle agglutination assay, TPPA); the enzyme immunoassay (EIA); and the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) test. Treponemal tests are based on the detection of treponemal antibody—the antibody that attacks T. pallidum, the spirochete that causes syphilis—in the…

  • Treponema pallidum pertenue (bacteria)

    spirochete: pallidum pallidum) and yaws (T. pallidum pertenue). Borrelia includes several species transmitted by lice and ticks and causing relapsing fever (B. recurrentis and others) and Lyme disease (B. burgdorferi) in humans. Spirochaeta are free-living nonpathogenic inhabitants of mud and water,

  • treponematosis (disease)

    syphilis: …of infections, collectively known as treponematosis or nonvenereal syphilis, is not spread by sexual contact and is localized in warm parts of the world where crowded conditions and poor health care favour its development.

  • Trepospira (fossil gastropod genus)

    Trepospira, extinct genus of gastropods (snails) found as fossils in rocks of Devonian to Late Carboniferous age (between 286 and 408 million years old). Its shell has a low spire, and the length of the coiling axis is short relative to the shell’s width. The shell is smooth but is ornamented by

  • Trepostomata (fossil bryozoan order)

    Trepostomata, extinct order of bryozoans (moss animals) found as fossils in marine rocks of Ordovician to Triassic age (200 million to 488 million years old). The trepostomes are characterized by colonies in long, curved calcareous tubes, the interiors of which are intersected by partitions. The

  • Treppen (geology)

    continental landform: The geomorphic concepts of Penck and King: …the resulting stair-stepped landscapes (Treppen, the German word for “steps”) of scarps and flats were presumed to reflect tectonics and to be correlatable, the term Tectonic Geomorphic School has been applied to its advocates.

  • Treppenbühne (theatrical device)

    theatre: Production aspects of Expressionist theatre: …earned his stage the name Treppenbühne (“stepped stage”). He utilized screens in the manner advocated by Craig, and his productions illustrated a plastic concept of stage setting, which allowed the action to flow freely with minimum hindrance. Some of Jessner’s productions relied heavily on steps and levels for this plasticity,…

  • Treres (people)

    Anatolia: The Cimmerians, Lydia, and Cilicia, c. 700–547 bce: …time, that time by the Treres, a Thracian tribe that operated in close connection with the Cimmerians. According to Assyrian sources, Ardys restored Lydia’s diplomatic relations with Assyria. The Cimmerian forces were finally beaten by the Assyrians in Cilicia between 637 and 626. At that time the Cimmerian leader was…

  • Treroninae (bird)

    pigeon: The Treroninae, or the fruit pigeons, consists of about 115 species in about 10 genera, found primarily in Africa, southern Asia, Australia, and the Pacific islands. These fruit-eating birds are soft-billed, short-legged, and arboreal in habit. Their plumage is usually greenish, often with yellow, red, or other brightly coloured…

  • Tres aproximaciones a la literatura de nuestro tiempo (work by Sábato)

    Ernesto Sábato: Tres aproximaciones a la literatura de nuestro tiempo (1968; “Three Approximations to the Literature of Our Time”) are critical literary essays that deal specifically with the works of Alain Robbe-Grillet, Jorge Luis Borges, and Jean-Paul Sartre. The novel Abaddón el exterminador (1974, corrected and revised,…

  • Tres Cruces (mountain, South America)

    Andes Mountains: Physiography of the Central Andes: The peak of Tres Cruces (22,156 feet) at 27° S latitude marks the culmination of this part of the cordillera. To the north is found a transverse depression and the southern limit of the high plateau region called the Atacama Plateau in Argentina and Chile and the Altiplano…

  • Tres de Febrero (county, Argentina)

    Tres de Febrero, partido (county), central Gran (Greater) Buenos Aires, eastern Argentina, immediately west of the city of Buenos Aires, in Buenos Aires provincia (province). The county is named for the Battle of Caseros on February 3, 1852, in which the Argentine military ruler Juan Manuel de

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