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  • tree frog (amphibian group)

    Tree frog, any typically arboreal frog belonging to one of several families of the order Anura. Of these, the hylid, or “true,” tree frogs from the family Hylidae are the most numerous. Hylids are usually slender, less than 10 cm (4 inches) in length, and long-legged, and they possess enlarged

  • tree germander (plant)

    germander: Bush germander (T. fruticans), a shrub growing to 1.5 metres (5 feet), has scattered pale blue to lilac flowers and lance-shaped leaves. It is native on hillsides of coastal Europe.

  • Tree Grows in Brooklyn, A (novel by Smith)

    Elia Kazan: Films of the 1940s: …in Brooklyn, from the best-selling novel by Betty Smith. It was a high-profile project with which to debut, but Kazan acquitted himself impressively, eliciting an especially strong performance from James Dunn, who earned an Academy Award as best supporting actor.

  • Tree Grows in Brooklyn, A (film by Kazan [1945])

    Nicholas Ray: Early life and work: …his assistant on the film A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945).

  • tree heath (plant)

    heath: The white, or tree, heath, or giant heather (E. arborea), found in the Mediterranean region and parts of Africa, is the source of briar root, used for making briarwood pipes. Some southern African species (e.g., E. melanthera, E. verticillata, and E. ventricosa) are cultivated in cool…

  • tree hyrax (mammal)

    hyrax: The tree hyraxes (Dendrohyrax) are arboreal, solitary, and nocturnal. All are primarily vegetarian.

  • tree ivy (plant)

    fatsia: …(Hedera helix) to produce the tree ivy, or aralia ivy (× Fatshedera lizei), an intergeneric cross, a most uncommon botanical occurrence.

  • tree line (tree growth)

    Timberline, upper limit of tree growth in mountainous regions or in high latitudes, as in the Arctic. Its location depends largely on temperature but also on soil, drainage, and other factors. The mountain timberline always would be higher near the Equator than near the poles if it were not for

  • tree lungwort (lichen)

    Tree lungwort, (Lobaria pulmonaria), a lichen that, because of its physical resemblance to the lungs, was once used to treat tuberculosis, pneumonia, and other lung diseases. Its elongated, forked thallus (12 to 18 centimetres), loosely attached at one end, is dark green when wet and greenish

  • tree mallow (plant)

    Tree mallow, (Lavatera arborea), biennial, herbaceous plant, of the hibiscus, or mallow, family (Malvaceae), native to Europe. It grows 1.2–3 metres (4–10 feet) tall and bears downy, lobed leaves 10–25 cm (4–10 inches) long. Purplish-red flowers about 5 cm (2 inches) wide are borne in profuse,

  • tree marriage (rite)

    Tree marriage, symbolic marital union of a person with a tree that is said to be infused with supernatural life. Tree marriage may also be a form of proxy marriage. In one such practice, between a bachelor and a tree, the tree was afterward felled, thereby endowing the man with the widower status

  • tree moss (plant)

    Tree moss, any of the plants of the genus Climacium (order Bryales), which resemble small evergreen trees and are found in damp, shady places throughout the Northern Hemisphere. The most common species are the European tree moss (C. dendroides), which is also found in North America, and the

  • Tree of Commonwealth, The (work by Dudley)

    Edmund Dudley: …author of a political allegory, The Tree of Commonwealth (1509).

  • tree of heaven (plant)

    Tree of heaven, (Ailanthus altissima), rapid-growing tree, in the family Simaroubaceae, native to China but widely naturalized elsewhere. It has been planted as a yard and street tree in urban centres, because of its resistance to pollution, freedom from insects and disease, and ability to grow in

  • tree of Jesse (Christian art theme)

    Western painting: Late 12th century: …many figures in the great Tree of Jesse on the ceiling of the Church of St. Michael at Hildesheim, figures conceived in elaborate three-dimensional attitudes, with angular broken drapery. Finally, the Zackenstil—the new, elegant, early Gothic, jagged style of early 13th-century Germany, most magnificently exemplified in the Saxon Gospels in…

  • tree of knowledge (religion)

    Christianity: Relics and saints: …fashioned of wood from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which grew in the Garden of Eden. Below the tree lies Adam’s buried skull, baptized in Christ’s blood. The bloodied cross-tree gives forth the oil, wheat, grapes, and herbs used to prepare the materials administered in the sacraments…

  • Tree of Knowledge, The (work by Baroja)

    Spanish literature: Novels and essays: …árbol de la ciencia (1911; The Tree of Knowledge), which tells the story of the education of the protagonist, a medical student; it depicts the shortcomings of those teaching medicine, the callousness of many doctors treating Spanish society’s most vulnerable, and the abject poverty and filth in the village where…

  • tree of life (religion)

    world tree: …of knowledge; the latter, the tree of life.

  • Tree of Life (work by Gaddi)

    Taddeo Gaddi: …impressive of his works, a “Tree of Life” surrounded by scenes from the life of St. Bonaventure, a work of much vigour, with a rich iconography. The scenes of this work, like those of the other refectory frescoes, are composed with a classical simplicity that represents a retreat from Gaddi’s…

  • Tree of Life (work by Whiteread)
  • Tree of Life, The (film by Malick [2011])

    Terrence Malick: Malick’s next production, The Tree of Life (2011), was an impressionistic essay on humankind’s place in the universe, presented through the lens of a troubled family in 1950s Texas. The film, which featured Brad Pitt and Sean Penn, won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes film festival, and…

  • tree peony (plant)

    peony: …herbaceous Eurasian peonies, the Asian tree, or moutan, peonies, and the North American peonies. The herbaceous peonies are perennials that grow to a height of almost 1 metre (about 3 feet). They have large, glossy, much-divided leaves borne on annual stems produced by fleshy rootstocks. In late spring and early…

  • tree poppy (plant)

    Tree poppy, (Dendromecon rigida), shrub or small tree of the poppy family (Papaveraceae), native to chaparral areas of southern California and northwestern Mexico. The related island tree poppy (Dendromecon harfordii), endemic to the Channel Islands off the southern California coast, reaches a

  • tree savanna (grassland)

    savanna: Environment: …shrubs forming a light canopy; tree savanna, with scattered trees and shrubs; shrub savanna, with scattered shrubs; and grass savanna, from which trees and shrubs are generally absent. Other classifications have also been suggested.

  • tree shaker (farm machinery)

    almond: Mechanized tree shakers are often used to expedite harvesting, and many growers must rent honeybees during flowering season to pollinate their trees. Indeed, the annual pollination of the almonds in California is the largest managed pollination event in the world, with more than 1.1 million beehives…

  • tree shrew (mammal)

    Tree shrew, (order Scandentia), any of 17 Southeast Asian species of small mammals resembling squirrels and “true” shrews. Tree shrews, however, are neither rodents nor insectivores and differ from them to the extent that they constitute their own mammalian order. They have large eyes, conspicuous

  • tree sloth (mammal)

    Sloth, (suborder Phyllophaga), tree-dwelling mammal noted for its slowness of movement. All five living species are limited to the lowland tropical forests of South and Central America, where they can be found high in the forest canopy sunning, resting, or feeding on leaves. Although two-toed

  • tree snail (gastropod)

    gastropod: Ecology and habitats: …wet and warm tropics have tree snails been able to evolve. These species have brightly coloured shells that usually are much thinner than those of their terrestrial counterparts. In the humid mountain regions of the world, where a constant supply of moisture is available throughout the year, there has been…

  • tree snake (reptile)

    Tree snake, any of a number of arboreal serpents, primarily of the family Colubridae. They prey on birds and on arboreal lizards and frogs. The green tree snakes of northern South America and Central America include the slender, broad-headed members of the genus Thalerophis and the parrotsnakes

  • tree sparrow (bird)

    sparrow: …sparrow (Spizella passerina) and the tree sparrow (S. arborea), trim-looking little birds with reddish-brown caps; the savanna sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) and the vesper sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus), finely streaked birds of grassy fields; the song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) and the fox sparrow (Passerella iliaca), heavily streaked

  • tree spiking (activism)

    monkeywrenching: A clear example is tree spiking, in which metal or ceramic spikes are driven deep within trees for the purpose of damaging chain saws or blades at sawmills. Spiking has been credited with halting or delaying some U.S. Forest Service logging contracts, but it has also caused the serious…

  • tree squirrel (rodent)

    squirrel: …to the 122 species of tree squirrels, which belong to 22 genera of the subfamily Sciurinae. The North American gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) has adapted to urban and suburban areas where it is regarded as aesthetic or as a minor annoyance. In northern Europe the red squirrel (S. vulgaris) is…

  • tree squirrel bot fly (insect)

    bot fly: …which infects rabbits, and the tree squirrel bot fly (C. emasculator), which attacks the scrotum of squirrels, sometimes emasculating them. The human bot fly (Dermatobia hominis) attacks livestock, deer, and humans. The female attaches her eggs to mosquitoes, stable flies, and other insects that carry the eggs to the actual…

  • tree surgery (horticulture)

    pruning: Common tree surgery procedures include the removal of broken, dead, or diseased branches; cutting back limbs that interfere with traffic, impede power and telephone lines, obstruct views, or mar the shape of a tree; thinning to permit air circulation and secure more light; removal of branches…

  • tree swift (bird)

    Crested swift, (family Hemiprocnidae), any of three or four species of fork-tailed forest birds ranging from Southeast Asia and Australia to the Solomon Islands. Crested swifts differ from all other members of the order Apodiformes (e.g., hummingbirds) in having feet developed for effective p

  • tree toad (amphibian, family Hylidae)

    Anura: Annotated classification: Family Hylidae (tree frogs) Miocene (23 million–5.3 million years ago) to present; 8 presacral vertebrae; pectoral girdle arciferal; intercalary cartilages present; omosternum absent; Bidder’s organ absent; maxillary teeth usually present; terminal phalanges claw-shaped; astragalus and calcaneum not fused; aquatic larvae or direct development; 37 genera and…

  • tree tomato (plant)

    Solanales: Tomato: The tree tomato (Solanum betaceum), also known as tamarillo, is closely related to S. lycopersicum and bears an egg-shaped edible fruit.

  • Tree Way Tavern, The (poetry by Ko Un)

    Ko Un: …the Ten Thousand Lives project; The Tree Way Tavern (2006); and First Person Sorrowful (2012). Ko’s work drew the attention of prominent American poets, including Allen Ginsberg, Robert Hass, and Gary Snyder, all of whom contributed forewords to these books. Ko also published novels, drama, and literary criticism.

  • Tree, Ellen (British actress)

    Ellen Kean, one of the finest English actresses of her day and the wife of the actor Charles Kean, with whom she performed. Ellen was born of English parents and first appeared at Covent Garden, London, in 1823 as Olivia in William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. She then performed at Bath (1824–26),

  • Tree, Sir Herbert Draper Beerbohm (British actor and manager)

    Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree, one of the great figures of the English theatre, who became the most successful actor-manager of his time. His half brother, Max Beerbohm, received recognition as a writer and caricaturist. (See Tree reading from “Julius Caesar”.) Herbert was educated in England and

  • tree, world (religion)

    World tree, centre of the world, a widespread motif in many myths and folktales among various preliterate peoples, especially in Asia, Australia, and North America, by which they understand the human and profane condition in relation to the divine and sacred realm. Two main forms are known and both

  • tree-ring dating (paleontology)

    Dendrochronology, the scientific discipline concerned with dating and interpreting past events, particularly paleoclimates and climatic trends, based on the analysis of tree rings. Samples are obtained by means of an increment borer, a simple metal tube of small diameter that can be driven into a

  • tree-swinging (animal behaviour)

    Brachiation, in animal behaviour, specialized form of arboreal locomotion in which movement is accomplished by swinging from one hold to another by the arms. The process is highly developed in the gibbon and siamang, which are anatomically adapted for it in the length of their forelimbs, their

  • tree-worship dance (anthropology)

    dance: Tribal dance: Joan Lawson described the tree-worship dance performed both in Australia and up the Amazon River:

  • Treece, Henry (English author)

    Henry Treece, English poet and historical novelist whose ability to bring the ancient world to life in fiction makes his work especially appealing to young readers. As a poet he—together with J.F. Hendry—was a founder of the New Apocalypse movement, a reaction against the politically oriented,

  • treecreeper (bird)

    Treecreeper, any of more than a dozen species of small slender birds, with downcurved bills, that spiral up tree trunks in search of insects. They are variously classified in the families Certhiidae and Climacteridae. The nine species of the genus Certhia constitute most of the family Certhiidae

  • treefrog (amphibian, family Hylidae)

    Anura: Annotated classification: Family Hylidae (tree frogs) Miocene (23 million–5.3 million years ago) to present; 8 presacral vertebrae; pectoral girdle arciferal; intercalary cartilages present; omosternum absent; Bidder’s organ absent; maxillary teeth usually present; terminal phalanges claw-shaped; astragalus and calcaneum not fused; aquatic larvae or direct development; 37 genera and…

  • treehopper (insect)

    Treehopper, (family Membracidae), any of approximately 3,200 species of insects (order Homoptera) that are easily recognized by their vertical face and grotesquely enlarged thorax, which may extend anteriorly over the head to form one or more spines and expands posteriorly over the body to form a

  • Treehouse Kit (video installation by Ben-Ner)

    Guy Ben-Ner: …Biennale with his video installation Treehouse Kit, which consisted of a prefabricated tree sculpture and an instructional video featuring the artist. In 2007 he completed Stealing Beauty, a mischievous guerrilla video of sorts that he filmed without permission in several IKEA department stores. Using IKEA’s showrooms as if they were…

  • Treemonisha (opera by Joplin)

    Scott Joplin: …most of Joplin’s efforts involved Treemonisha, which synthesized his musical ideas into a conventional, three-act opera. He also wrote the libretto, about a mythical black leader, and choreographed it. Treemonisha had only one semipublic performance during Joplin’s lifetime; he became obsessed with its success, suffered a nervous breakdown and collapse…

  • treen (woodenware)

    Treen, small wooden objects in daily domestic or farm use and in use in trades and professions. Treen includes a wide variety of objects mostly associated with tableware, the kitchen, games, personal adornment, and toilet articles. The word is never applied to objects larger than a spinning wheel

  • treenail (wood pin)

    hand tool: Drilling and boring tools: …holes for wooden pins (treenails, or trunnels) or bolts for connections. The modern auger bit has a screw ahead of the cutting edges that pulls the auger into the workpiece. This screw provides an automatic feed and relieves the worker of the necessity of pushing the tool. Although the…

  • Treene substage (paleontology)

    Saale Glacial Stage: These are the Drente, Treene, and Warthe substages. The Drente and Warthe represent periods of glacial advance, or maxima, whereas the Treene represents an interstadial period of glacial retreat between the early Drente and the late Warthe. In the region of central Europe, the Saale is represented by three…

  • treerunner (bird)

    Sittella, any of about two species of Australasian birds of the genus Daphoenositta, sometimes placed in the nuthatch family, Sittidae, but many classifications group them in their own family, Neosittidae. They resemble nuthatches in build—short-tailed and large-footed—and in behaviour, but they

  • Trees (poem by Kilmer)

    Joyce Kilmer: His most famous poem, “Trees,” appeared in Poetry magazine in 1913. Its immediate and continued popularity has been attributed to its combination of sentiment and simple philosophy. His books include Trees and Other Poems (1914); The Circus and Other Essays (1916); Main Street and Other Poems (1917); and Literature…

  • Trees, The (novel by Richter)

    The Trees, novel by Conrad Richter, published in 1940. It was the first novel in a trilogy published collectively as The Awakening Land. The other novels in the trilogy are The Fields and The

  • tref (Judaism)

    Terefah, any food, food product, or utensil that, according to the Jewish dietary laws (kashruth, q.v.), is not ritually clean or prepared according to law and is thus prohibited as unfit for Jewish use. Terefah is thus the antithesis of kosher (“fit”). The broad connotation of terefah derives from

  • trefa (Judaism)

    Terefah, any food, food product, or utensil that, according to the Jewish dietary laws (kashruth, q.v.), is not ritually clean or prepared according to law and is thus prohibited as unfit for Jewish use. Terefah is thus the antithesis of kosher (“fit”). The broad connotation of terefah derives from

  • Trefaldwyn (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Montgomery, town, Powys county, historic county of Montgomeryshire, eastern Wales. It is situated just west of the border with Shropshire, England, 8 miles (13 km) south of Welshpool. In the 11th century the Norman Roger de Montgomery, 1st earl of Shrewsbury, built his castle at Hendomen, northwest

  • Treffertheorie (biology)

    Target theory, in biology, the concept that the biological effects of radiations such as X rays result from ionization (i.e., the formation of electrically charged particles) by individual quanta, or photons, of radiation that are absorbed at sensitive points (targets) in a cell. It is supposed t

  • Treffynnon (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Holywell, town, historic and present county of Flintshire, northeastern Wales. It is situated near the River Dee estuary. The holy well for which the town is named is on the spot where in the 7th century the head of the Celtic St. Winifred (Gwenffrwd) is said to have fallen when she was

  • trefoil knot

    knot: The overhand knot is the simplest type of knot and is used to make a knob in a rope, string, or cord. It is used for tying packages, to keep rope ends from fraying, and as a first step in making more complex knots such as…

  • trefot (Judaism)

    Terefah, any food, food product, or utensil that, according to the Jewish dietary laws (kashruth, q.v.), is not ritually clean or prepared according to law and is thus prohibited as unfit for Jewish use. Terefah is thus the antithesis of kosher (“fit”). The broad connotation of terefah derives from

  • Trefynwy (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Monmouth, town, historic and present county of Monmouthshire (Sir Fynwy), southeastern Wales. It is situated at the confluence of the Rivers Wye and Monnow on the English border. The town of Monmouth, granted its first royal charter in 1256, became important as the market for a rich agricultural

  • Tregear Homilies, The (work by Tregear)

    Cornish literature: The Tregear Homilies) is the longest text in historical Cornish, the form of the language extant prior to the language’s disappearance by the early 19th century and its revival in the 20th. This manuscript renders into Cornish 12 sermons by Bishop Edmund Bonner of London;…

  • tregua, La (work by Benedetti)

    Mario Benedetti: His novel La tregua (1960; The Truce) was widely read, as was his allegorical novel El cumplea?os de Juan Angel (1971; Juan Angel’s Birthday). Benedetti had the misfortune of peaking as a writer at the same time as Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, Mario Vargas Llosa, and others who brought…

  • trehalose (chemical compound)

    disaccharide: Another important disaccharide, trehalose, which is found in single-celled organisms and in many insects, also consists of two molecules of glucose and an α-linkage, but the linkage is distinct from the one found in maltose.

  • Treichville (C?te d’Ivoire)

    C?te d'Ivoire: Urban environment: Treichville, located behind the fishing village of Anoumabo, owes its importance to the boom in colonial trade that followed World War I. It remained a very small town until 1934, when the seat of colonial government was moved to Abidjan from Bingerville. Urban growth was…

  • Treig, Loch (lake, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    lake: Cause and characteristics: The observed uninodal periods of Loch Treig and Loch Earn, Scotland; Lago di Garda, Italy; Lake Vetter, Sweden; and Lake Erie, North America, are approximately nine, 14.5, 43, 179, and 880 minutes, respectively.

  • Treinta y Tres (Uruguay)

    Treinta y Tres, city, east-central Uruguay, near the Olimar Grande River. It is the commercial and manufacturing centre for an agricultural and pastoral hinterland. Cattle and sheep are raised widely; wheat, corn (maize), oats, and linseed are the chief crops. Treinta y Tres lies on the

  • Treisman, David (British computer software engineer)

    David Caminer, (David Treisman), British computer software engineer (born June 26, 1915, London, Eng.—died June 19, 2008, London), developed (with hardware designer John Pinkerton) the world’s first business computer, LEO (Lyons Electronic Office), which revolutionized the speed and accuracy with

  • Treitschke’s History of Germany in the Nineteenth Century (work by Treitschke)

    Heinrich von Treitschke: …evident in his magnum opus, Deutsche Geschichte im 19. Jahrhundert, 5 vol. (1879–94; Treitschke’s History of Germany in the Nineteenth Century), which covers the period from 1800 to 1848. Treitschke did not live to finish writing this work. His most important other works are the essays collected in Historische und…

  • Treitschke, Heinrich von (German historian)

    Heinrich von Treitschke, German historian and political writer whose advocacy of power politics was influential at home and contributed to distrust of Germany abroad. The son of a Saxon general, Treitschke studied at Bonn and Leipzig. He taught history and politics at the University of Leipzig

  • trekboer (South African history)

    Orange Free State: …farmers of Dutch descent, called trekboers or Boers, began to settle the area. After 1836 came the Great Trek, a migratory movement in which larger numbers of Boer farmers seeking freedom from British rule moved north across the Orange River. In 1848 the British annexed the territory between the Orange…

  • Trekvaart (canal system, Netherlands)

    Trekvaart, system of canals in the Low Countries, built in the 17th century and used exclusively by boats carrying passengers and parcels. The system of canals connected the main towns and cities of the area, its construction and operation being organized by local authorities. Newly built sections

  • Trelawny of the ‘Wells’? (play by Pinero)

    Sir Arthur Wing Pinero: In a less serious vein, Trelawny of the “Wells” (written for the Royal Court Theatre and produced in 1898) portrayed theatrical company life in the old style of the 1860s—already then a vanishing tradition—and The Gay Lord Quex (1899) was about a theatrical rake of no placeable period but having…

  • Trelawny, Edward (British colonial governor)

    Edward Trelawny, British governor of Jamaica from April 1738 to September 1752 who ended a long-standing war between white planters and descendants of black former slaves known as Maroons. Trelawny was a member of a noted Cornish family and the son of Sir Jonathan Trelawny, bishop of Exeter. In

  • Trelawny, Edward John (English author)

    Edward John Trelawny, English author and adventurer, the friend of Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron, whom he portrayed brilliantly in his books. Trelawny was a handsome, dashing, and quixotic personality from an old and famous Cornish family. He was brought up in London and went to a school in

  • Trelleborg (Sweden)

    Trelleborg, town and port, Sk?ne l?n (county), southern Sweden, on the Baltic Sea. During the Middle Ages it was an important herring-fishing and commercial centre, but it declined after the herring left the area in the 15th century. After being plundered during war (1563–70) between Denmark and

  • Trelling, Ursala (American librarian and playwright)

    Regina M. Anderson, American librarian, playwright, and patron of the arts whose New York City home was a salon for Harlem Renaissance writers and artists. Anderson attended several colleges, including Wilberforce University in Ohio and the University of Chicago. She received a Master of Library

  • Trelling, Ursula (American librarian and playwright)

    Regina M. Anderson, American librarian, playwright, and patron of the arts whose New York City home was a salon for Harlem Renaissance writers and artists. Anderson attended several colleges, including Wilberforce University in Ohio and the University of Chicago. She received a Master of Library

  • trellis (horticulture)

    Trellis, framework on which trees and climbing plants are trained. It is usually constructed of long, narrow wood or metal slats that are crisscrossed to produce square or diamond-shaped spaces. Trellises may also be made of any open construction, such as untrimmed branches loosely nailed or woven

  • trellis coding (communications)

    telecommunication: Convolutional encoding: …described above are employed in trellis coding, a coding scheme used in high-speed modems. However, instead of the sequence of bits that is produced by a convolutional encoder, a trellis encoder produces a sequence of modulation symbols. At the transmitter, the channel-encoding process is coupled with the modulation process, producing…

  • trellis drainage pattern (geology)

    river: Drainage patterns: Trellis (or espalier) drainage patterns result from adjustment to tight regional folding in which the folds plunge. Denudation produces a zigzag pattern of outcrops, and adjustment to this pattern produces a stream net in which the trunks are aligned on weak rocks exposed along fold…

  • Trellis House (architectural feature, Italy)

    Herculaneum: …middle class (such as the Trellis House), also finely decorated, or with commercial houses and workshops.

  • trellis-coded modulation (communications)

    modem: The second generation: …of coded modulation known as trellis-coded modulation, or TCM. Seven years later an upgraded V.32 standard was issued, permitting 14.4-kilobit-per-second full-duplex data transmission over a single PSTN circuit.

  • Trema (plant genus)

    Cannabaceae: Major genera and species: The genus Trema, closely related to Celtis, comprises about 40 species of small evergreen trees. Small genera include Aphananthe, Chaetachme, Gironniera, Lozanella, Parasponia, and Pterocletis; the taxonomy of some of these groups is contentious.

  • Tremadoc Series (stratigraphy)

    Tremadocian Stage, lowermost of the two standard worldwide divisions of the Lower Ordovician Series and lowest of the seven stages within the Ordovician System. It encompasses all rocks formed during the Tremadocian Age, which spanned the interval between 485.4 million and 477.7 million years ago.

  • Tremadocian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Tremadocian Stage, lowermost of the two standard worldwide divisions of the Lower Ordovician Series and lowest of the seven stages within the Ordovician System. It encompasses all rocks formed during the Tremadocian Age, which spanned the interval between 485.4 million and 477.7 million years ago.

  • Tremain, Rose (British author)

    Rose Tremain, British novelist whose books often dramatize a moment of truth in the lives of lonely outsiders. After receiving a degree in English from the University of East Anglia in 1967, Tremain worked for the British Printing Corporation and wrote several nonfiction works about woman suffrage

  • Tremarctos (genus of mammals)

    bear: Evolution and classification: Genus Tremarctos (spectacled bear) 1 species of the Andes Mountains of South America. Assorted Referencescarnivores

  • Tremarctos ornatus (mammal)

    Spectacled bear, (Tremarctos ornatus), bear, the only South American species of the family Ursidae. It inhabits mountainous regions (particularly of the Andes), dwelling primarily in forested areas, and it feeds mainly on shoots and fruit. The spectacled bear is an agile climber. The adult stands

  • Tremasteren ‘Fremtiden’ eller liv nordp? (work by Lie)

    Jonas Lie: …eller liv nordp? (1872; The Barque “Future,” 1879), followed. Two novels from his Naturalistic period are Livsslaven (1883; “The Life Convict,” Eng. trans.One of Life’s Slaves, 1895), which tells of the social misfortunes of a boy born out of wedlock, and Familien paa Gilje (1883; The Family at Gilje, 1920),…

  • Trematoda (flatworm)

    Fluke, any member of the invertebrate class Trematoda (phylum Platyhelminthes), a group of parasitic flatworms that probably evolved from free-living forms millions of years ago. There are more than 10,000 species of flukes. They occur worldwide and range in size from about 5 millimetres (0.2 inch)

  • trematode (flatworm)

    Fluke, any member of the invertebrate class Trematoda (phylum Platyhelminthes), a group of parasitic flatworms that probably evolved from free-living forms millions of years ago. There are more than 10,000 species of flukes. They occur worldwide and range in size from about 5 millimetres (0.2 inch)

  • trematol (chemical compound)

    snakeroot poisoning: …and grazing animals caused by trematol, a poisonous alcohol present in white snakeroot (Ageratina altissima), a plant found in North America. When grazing is scarce, cattle may feed on snakeroot and develop a syndrome called trembles. Human poisoning, often called milk sickness, most commonly results from the consumption of the…

  • Trematopidae (fossil amphibian family)

    amphibian: Annotated classification: ?Family Trematopidae (trematopids) Upper Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian. Vertebrae weakly ossified, large intercentrum. ?Family Dissorophidae (dissorophids) Subclass Lissamphibia (lissamphibians) Lower Triassic to

  • Trembecki, Stanis?aw (Polish writer)

    Polish literature: Didactic element in prose and poetry: Two other outstanding poets were Stanis?aw Trembecki, whose works are models of stylistic fluency, and Kajetan W?gierski, a freethinker and admirer of Voltaire who is notorious for his lampoons of influential personalities and fashions.

  • tremblante du mouton (sheep and goat disease)

    Scrapie, fatal neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats. Scrapie has been endemic in British sheep, particularly the Suffolk breed, since the early 18th century. Since that time the disease has been detected in countries worldwide, with the exception of Australia and New Zealand, as well as in

  • Tremblay, Fran?ois Joseph Le Clerc du (French mystic and religious reformer)

    Father Joseph, French mystic and religious reformer whose collaboration with Cardinal de Richelieu (the “Red Eminence”) gave him powers akin to those of a foreign minister, especially during Richelieu’s ambitious campaign to finance France’s participation in what became known as the Thirty Years’

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