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  • Torii Kiyonobu (Japanese painter)

    Torii Kiyonobu, Japanese painter who founded the Torii school, the only Ukiyo-e school to have survived to this day. (Ukiyo-e is a popular style of painting and woodblock printing utilizing colour and based on themes of the “floating world.”) Torii learned painting from his actor-painter father,

  • Toringo crab (tree)

    crabapple: baccata), Toringo crabapple (M. sieboldii), and Japanese flowering crabapple (M. floribunda). Among the notable American species are the garland, or sweet crab (M. coronaria); Oregon crabapple (M. fusca); prairie crabapple (M. ioensis); and southern crabapple (M. angustifolia).

  • Torino (Italy)

    Turin, city, capital of Torino provincia and of Piemonte (Piedmont) regione, northwestern Italy. It is located on the Po River near its junction with the Sangone, Dora Riparia, and Stura di Lanzo rivers. The original settlement of Taurisia, founded by the Taurini, was partly destroyed by the

  • Torino Impact Hazard Scale (astronomy)

    Earth impact hazard: Determining the hazard potential of an NEO: …potential is described by the Torino Impact Hazard Scale, an indicator named after the city of Turin (Italian: Torino), Italy, where it was presented at an international NEO conference in 1999. The purpose of the scale is to quantify the level of public concern warranted. The scale’s values, which are…

  • Torino, Università degli Studi di (university, Turin, Italy)

    University of Turin, autonomous coeducational state institution of higher learning in Turin, Italy, that was founded in 1404. Erasmus was a graduate of the school in 1506. The university was reorganized and reestablished in 1713. An Institute of Business and Economics was added in 1906, a

  • toritsugi (religious figure)

    Konkō-kyō: …act as a mediator (toritsugi) between god and mankind. The mediator takes on the pain and sufferings of his followers and transmits them to god. Succession to the mediatorship is reserved for descendants of the founder in the male line. Konkō-kyō emphasizes the interdependence of god and man, which…

  • Tork, Peter (American musician and actor)

    the Monkees: ), and Peter Tork (byname of Peter Thorkelson; b. February 13, 1942, Washington, D.C., U.S.—d. February 21, 2019).

  • Torkmānchāy, Treaty of (Russia-Iran [1828])

    Azerbaijan: Russian suzerainty: …of Golestān (Gulistan; 1813) and Turkmenchay (Torkmānchāy; 1828) established a new border between the empires. Russia acquired Baku, Shirvan, Ganja, Nakhichevan (Nax??van), and Yerevan. Henceforth the Azerbaijani Turks of Caucasia were separated from the majority of their linguistic and religious compatriots, who remained in Iran. Azerbaijanis on both sides of…

  • Torlon (chemical compound)

    major industrial polymers: Polyimides: Related commercial products are polyamideimide (PAI; trademarked as Torlon by Amoco Corporation) and polyetherimide (PEI; trademark Ultem); these two compounds combine the imide function with amide and ether groups, respectively.

  • Torlonia Museum (museum, Rome, Italy)

    Torlonia Museum, private archaeological museum in Rome founded in the 18th century by Giovanni Torlonia with sculptures from Roman collections, most originally found in the city of Rome. The Torlonia Museum contains about 600 items of sculpture, including a few Greek originals. The most important

  • Tormé, Mel (American singer and songwriter)

    Mel Tormé, American singer, songwriter, composer, arranger, pianist, drummer, actor, and author, one of the 20th century’s most versatile, respected, and influential jazz vocalists. Tormé began singing professionally when he was just 4 years old. At age 6 he was in vaudeville, at 8 he starred on

  • Tormé, Melvin Howard (American singer and songwriter)

    Mel Tormé, American singer, songwriter, composer, arranger, pianist, drummer, actor, and author, one of the 20th century’s most versatile, respected, and influential jazz vocalists. Tormé began singing professionally when he was just 4 years old. At age 6 he was in vaudeville, at 8 he starred on

  • Torment (film by Sj?berg)

    Svensk Filmindustri: …as Hets (1944; Torment, or Frenzy), directed by Alf Sj?berg and written by Ingmar Bergman (who had joined Svensk in 1942), focused worldwide attention on Swedish films. In the 1940s and ’50s Svensk continued to encourage such experimental filmmakers as G?sta Werner and Arne Sucksdorff, who were producers of short…

  • Tormis, Veljo (Estonian composer)

    Veljo Tormis, Estonian composer (born Aug. 7, 1930, Kuusalu, Est.—died Jan. 21, 2017, Tallinn, Est.), wrote numerous choral works based on the folk music and celebrations of rural peoples of Estonia and other Baltic countries. His compositions were true to the original forms of the music rather

  • Torn Curtain (film by Hitchcock [1966])

    Torn Curtain, American spy film, released in 1966, that was notable for being one of Alfred Hitchcock’s least-successful productions. Michael Armstrong (played by Paul Newman) is a famous American physicist who travels to Copenhagen with his fiancée, Sarah Sherman (Julie Andrews), to attend a

  • Torn, Rip (American actor)

    Sissy Spacek: …stayed with a cousin, actor Rip Torn, and his wife, actress Geraldine Page. After recording a novelty single under the name Rainbo, Spacek enrolled at the Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute (now the Lee Strasberg Theatre & Film Institute) to study acting. Her first credited movie role was in the thriller…

  • tornado (meteorology)

    Tornado, a small-diameter column of violently rotating air developed within a convective cloud and in contact with the ground. Tornadoes occur most often in association with thunderstorms during the spring and summer in the mid-latitudes of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. These whirling

  • Tornado (airplane)

    military aircraft: Multimission: …from the ground; the Panavia Tornado, a compact variable-geometry aircraft developed jointly by West Germany, Italy, and Great Britain in no fewer than four versions, ranging from two-seat all-weather, low-altitude attack to single-seat air-superiority; the U.S. General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon, a high-performance single-seat multirole aircraft with impressive air-to-ground

  • Tornado Alley (region, United States)

    tornado: Geographic distribution: …maximum tornado frequency, rightfully called Tornado Alley, extends from west Texas northeast through the western and central portions of Oklahoma and Kansas and across most of Nebraska.

  • tornado core (meteorology)

    tornado: The tornado core and the condensation funnel: …dynamic pipe is called the tornado core. Once it forms, the parent mesocyclone is reclassified as a tornado cyclone.

  • tornado cyclone (meteorology)

    tornado: Tornado cyclones, tornado families, and long-track tornadoes: About 90 percent of tornadoes are associated with thunderstorms, usually supercells; this association accounts for many weak and almost all strong and violent tornadoes. The other 10 percent of tornado occurrences are associated with rapidly growing cumulus clouds;

  • tornado family (meteorology)

    tornado: Tornado cyclones, tornado families, and long-track tornadoes: About 90 percent of tornadoes are associated with thunderstorms, usually supercells; this association accounts for many weak and almost all strong and violent tornadoes. The other 10 percent of tornado occurrences are associated with rapidly growing cumulus clouds; these vortices…

  • tornado outbreak (meteorology)

    tornado: Tornado outbreaks: A tornado outbreak is the occurrence of several tornadoes over a region, usually due to thunderstorms embedded in the same synoptic-scale weather system. Outbreaks are classified according to the number of tornadoes reported: small (6 to 9 tornadoes), medium (10 to 19), and…

  • tornado over water (meteorology)

    Waterspout, a small-diameter column of rapidly swirling air in contact with a water surface. Waterspouts are almost always produced by a swiftly growing cumulus cloud. They may assume many shapes and often occur in a series, called a waterspout family, produced by the same upward-moving air

  • Tornado Super Outbreak of 1974 (tornado disaster, North America)

    Super Outbreak of 1974, series of tornadoes that caused severe damage to the Midwestern, southern, and eastern United States and Ontario, Canada, on April 3–4, 1974. One of the largest outbreaks of tornadoes ever recorded, it consisted of 148 tornadoes and resulted in more than $1 billion in damage

  • Tornado Super Outbreak of 2011 (tornado disaster, United States)

    Super Outbreak of 2011, series of tornadoes on April 26–28, 2011, that affected parts of the southern, eastern, and central United States and produced particularly severe damage in the state of Alabama. It was the largest outbreak of tornadoes ever recorded; preliminary estimates suggested that

  • tornado vortex signature (meteorology)

    tornado: Prediction and detection of tornadoes: …concentrated rotation is called the tornado vortex signature, although this area does not always evolve into a tornado core. These improvements have allowed forecasters to increase warning times while reducing false alarms.

  • tornado warning (meteorology)

    tornado: Prediction and detection of tornadoes: A tornado warning is issued when a tornado has been spotted either visually or on a weather radar.

  • tornado watch (meteorology)

    tornado: Prediction and detection of tornadoes: …to the public as a tornado watch. A tornado warning is issued when a tornado has been spotted either visually or on a weather radar.

  • Tornado, The (Japanese baseball player)

    Nomo Hideo, professional baseball player. In 1995 Nomo became the first Japanese citizen to join an American major league team after having played professionally in the Japanese major leagues. (The first player born in Japan to appear on a major league team in the United States, however, was

  • tornaria larva (zoology)

    acorn worm: …into swimming juvenile forms called tornaria larvae. Tornaria larvae eventually metamorphose into young worms.

  • Tornatore, Giuseppe (Italian director)
  • Torne River (river, Northern Europe)

    Torne River, northernmost river of Sweden. It rises near the Norwegian border west of Torne Lake, the largest lake in Swedish Lapland, and flows for 354 miles (570 km) to the Gulf of Bothnia, which it enters at a point between Haparanda and Tornio, Fin. The Torne River’s lower course forms the

  • Torne?lv (river, Northern Europe)

    Torne River, northernmost river of Sweden. It rises near the Norwegian border west of Torne Lake, the largest lake in Swedish Lapland, and flows for 354 miles (570 km) to the Gulf of Bothnia, which it enters at a point between Haparanda and Tornio, Fin. The Torne River’s lower course forms the

  • Torne?lven (river, Northern Europe)

    Torne River, northernmost river of Sweden. It rises near the Norwegian border west of Torne Lake, the largest lake in Swedish Lapland, and flows for 354 miles (570 km) to the Gulf of Bothnia, which it enters at a point between Haparanda and Tornio, Fin. The Torne River’s lower course forms the

  • T?rnebohm, Alfred Elis (Swedish geologist)

    Alfred Elis T?rnebohm, Swedish geologist and pioneer in the study and analysis of mountain structure. In 1888 he presented the first outlines of his theory of the overthrust of the Caledonian Range (the mountainous region in northwestern Europe extending from the British Isles to western

  • Torngat Mountains (mountains, Labrador, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Torngat Mountains, range in northern Labrador, Newfoundland, Canada. The Torngat range extends northward for 120 miles (190 km) from Hebron Fjord to Cape Chidley, between the Quebec border (west) and the Atlantic Ocean (east). Named from an Eskimo (Inuit) term Torngarsuak, meaning “ruler of all

  • Torngat Mountains National Park Reserve (national park, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Newfoundland and Labrador: Sports and recreation: Torngat Mountains National Park Reserve, in far northern Labrador, was established in 2005, and it became a national park in 2008.

  • Tornio (river, Northern Europe)

    Torne River, northernmost river of Sweden. It rises near the Norwegian border west of Torne Lake, the largest lake in Swedish Lapland, and flows for 354 miles (570 km) to the Gulf of Bothnia, which it enters at a point between Haparanda and Tornio, Fin. The Torne River’s lower course forms the

  • Torniojoki (river, Northern Europe)

    Torne River, northernmost river of Sweden. It rises near the Norwegian border west of Torne Lake, the largest lake in Swedish Lapland, and flows for 354 miles (570 km) to the Gulf of Bothnia, which it enters at a point between Haparanda and Tornio, Fin. The Torne River’s lower course forms the

  • Tornion (river, Northern Europe)

    Torne River, northernmost river of Sweden. It rises near the Norwegian border west of Torne Lake, the largest lake in Swedish Lapland, and flows for 354 miles (570 km) to the Gulf of Bothnia, which it enters at a point between Haparanda and Tornio, Fin. The Torne River’s lower course forms the

  • Tornoceras (fossil cephalopod genus)

    Tornoceras, extinct genus of cephalopods, forms related to the modern pearly nautilus. Tornoceras is a form that emerged during the Devonian Period (416 million years to 359 million years ago). The shell is circular in outline and rather flat; the final whorl covers earlier whorls. The sutural

  • Toro (people)

    Toro, an interlacustrine Bantu-speaking people who inhabit a high plateau between Lakes Albert and Edward that is bounded on the west by the Ruwenzori Range in southwestern Uganda. Toro lands include rainforest, dense bamboo stands, papyrus swamps, plains of elephant grass, and the shores of Lakes

  • Toro (Spain)

    Toro, town, Zamora provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Castile-León in northwestern Spain. It lies along the north bank of the Duero (Portuguese: Douro) River, 18 miles (29 km) east of Zamora city. Dating from Roman times, the town served as the meeting place

  • Toro Pampero, El (Argentine boxer)

    Luis Firpo, Argentine professional boxer. Firpo moved to the United States in 1922 after having compiled an outstanding record during the first three years of his career in South America. He won his first 10 American matches by knockout before being involved in a 10-round no-decision match against

  • Toro, Battle of (Spanish-Portuguese history)

    Toro: Nearby was fought the Battle of Toro (1476) between the forces of the monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella and those of Alfonso V of Portugal, which secured the crown of Castile for Isabella. Notable buildings include the 12th-century (partially restored) Romanesque Collegiate church and the 18th-century Casa Consistorial, outside which…

  • Toro, David (Bolivian colonel)

    Bolivia: The Chaco War and military rule: …under the leadership of Colonel David Toro in 1936–37 and Major Germán Busch in 1937–39, they tried to reform Bolivian society. During this so-called era of military socialism the Standard Oil Company holdings were confiscated, an important labour code was created, and an advanced, socially oriented constitution was written in…

  • Toro, El (Mexican baseball player)

    Fernando Valenzuela, Mexican professional baseball player whose career spanned 17 seasons in the major leagues of the United States. Valenzuela was discovered in 1977 by Los Angeles scout Corito Varona while playing in the Mexican League. As a 20-year-old, Valenzuela caught the attention of fans

  • Toro, Laws of (Spanish history)

    Spain: Castile: The Laws of Toro (1505), which extended the right to entail family estates on the eldest child, further safeguarded the stability of noble property. In 1520 Charles I agreed to the nobles’ demand for a fixed hierarchy of rank, from the 25 grandees of Spain through…

  • toroidal confinement (nuclear physics)

    fusion reactor: Toroidal confinement: The most extensively investigated toroidal confinement concept is the tokamak. The tokamak (an acronym derived from the Russian words for “toroidal magnetic confinement”) was introduced in the mid-1960s by Soviet plasma physicists. The magnetic lines of force are helixes that spiral around the…

  • toroidal field (physics)

    geomagnetic field: The geomagnetic dynamo: …rotation axis, creating a large toroidal field (one lying in planes perpendicular to the rotation axis). Since the conductivity is not perfect, the toroidal loop may diffuse through the fluid, disconnecting itself from the original poloidal field (B). This process is called the omega effect because it depends on the…

  • toroidal plasma

    plasma: Applications of plasmas: …created plasma: the production of toroidal plasmas and the use of magnetic mirrors (see nuclear fusion). A toroidal plasma is essentially one in which a plasma of cylindrical cross section is bent in a circle so as to close on itself. For such plasmas to be in equilibrium and stable,…

  • toromiro tree (plant)

    Easter Island: Plant and animal life: …time of European arrival the toromiro tree, endemic to the island, was the only wild tree and the Carolina wolfberry the only wild shrub, the vegetation being predominantly herbaceous. The toromiro tree was overexploited by the island wood carvers, and the last local specimen died in the 1950s. The species…

  • Toronto (Ontario, Canada)

    Toronto, city, capital of the province of Ontario, southeastern Canada. It is the most populous city in Canada, a multicultural city, and the country’s financial and commercial centre. Its location on the northwestern shore of Lake Ontario, which forms part of the border between Canada and the

  • Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (Canadian agency)

    Toronto: Cultural life: The Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (established 1957) is an important joint provincial-municipal agency concerned with the development of recreational areas, flood control, and the conservation of existing woodlands and waterways. It is responsible for the implementation of a large part of Toronto’s regional waterfront development…

  • Toronto Arenas (Canadian hockey team)

    Toronto Maple Leafs, Canadian professional ice hockey team based in Toronto that plays in the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Maple Leafs have one of hockey’s most-storied pasts, having won the Stanley Cup 13 times. The Maple Leafs were one of the NHL’s founding teams in

  • Toronto Argonauts (Canadian football team)

    gridiron football: Football in Canada: The purchase of the Toronto Argonauts in 1991 by millionaire Bruce McNall, actor John Candy, and hockey great Wayne Gretzky marked the most conspicuous effort to produce first-class football with highly paid U.S. stars, but the experiment failed, and McNall and Gretzky sold the club in 1994 after Candy…

  • Toronto Blue Jays (Canadian baseball team)

    Toronto Blue Jays, Canadian professional baseball team based in Toronto. The Blue Jays play in the American League (AL) and are the only franchise in Major League Baseball that plays in a city not in the United States. The team has won two AL pennants and two World Series titles (1992, 1993). The

  • Toronto Daily Star, The (Canadian newspaper)

    The Toronto Star, influential Canadian newspaper established in 1892 as the Evening Star by 25 printers who had lost their jobs in a labour dispute. A four-page paper at the outset, it changed hands several times until 1899, when a group of leading citizens bought the paper and Joseph E. Atkinson

  • Toronto Huskies (Canadian basketball team)

    Toronto Raptors: (An earlier team, the Toronto Huskies, played in the Basketball Association of America—one of the forerunners of the NBA—during the 1946–47 season.) The Raptors finished in last place in their division in each of their first three seasons in the league. Toronto acquired its first superstar, guard-forward Vince Carter,…

  • Toronto Industrial Exhibition (Canadian fair)

    Canadian National Exhibition (CNE), fair held annually since 1879 in Toronto. Generally lasting 18 days and ending on Labour Day (the first Monday in September), the event has historically showcased Canadian commercial and technological innovations, in addition to providing a wide variety of

  • Toronto International Film Festival (Canadian film festival)

    Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), film festival held annually in Toronto in September. It was founded in 1976 as the Festival of Festivals, with the aim of screening movies from other film festivals, and has since become one of the world’s largest annual showcases of film, attended by

  • Toronto Islands (islands, Canada)

    Toronto: City layout: …the dock area to the Toronto Islands, about half a mile (four-fifths of a kilometre) offshore, which have yacht clubs, an airport, recreational facilities, and a residential community.

  • Toronto Maple Leafs (Canadian hockey team)

    Toronto Maple Leafs, Canadian professional ice hockey team based in Toronto that plays in the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Maple Leafs have one of hockey’s most-storied pasts, having won the Stanley Cup 13 times. The Maple Leafs were one of the NHL’s founding teams in

  • Toronto Raptors (Canadian basketball team)

    Toronto Raptors, Canadian professional basketball team based in Toronto that plays in the Eastern Conference of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Raptors have won one conference title and one NBA championship (both 2019). The Raptors joined the NBA in 1995 as an expansion team

  • Toronto St. Patricks (Canadian hockey team)

    Toronto Maple Leafs, Canadian professional ice hockey team based in Toronto that plays in the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Maple Leafs have one of hockey’s most-storied pasts, having won the Stanley Cup 13 times. The Maple Leafs were one of the NHL’s founding teams in

  • Toronto Star, The (Canadian newspaper)

    The Toronto Star, influential Canadian newspaper established in 1892 as the Evening Star by 25 printers who had lost their jobs in a labour dispute. A four-page paper at the outset, it changed hands several times until 1899, when a group of leading citizens bought the paper and Joseph E. Atkinson

  • Toronto Stock Exchange (stock exchange, Toronto, Canada)

    Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX), the largest stock exchange in Canada and one of the largest in North America. It opened in 1861 with 18 stock listings and has since become an innovator in securities-trading technology. The Toronto Stock Exchange, which originally used the acronym TSE, was the first

  • Toronto Symphony Orchestra (orchestra, Toronto, Ontario, Canada)

    Seiji Ozawa: …1964 to 1968, of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra from 1965 to 1969, and of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra from 1970 to 1976. For an extraordinarily long period (1973–2002) Ozawa served as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra; during this period he was guest conductor for major opera and…

  • Toronto Trades Assembly (Canadian labour organization)

    organized labour: Origins of craft unionism: …with the formation of the Toronto Trades Assembly. The first national union of locals in a single trade to survive, the National Typographical Union, was formed in 1852 in the United States. Like other national unions that followed, it chartered locals in Canada as well; this led to its renaming…

  • Toronto Zoo (zoo, Ontario, Canada)

    Toronto Zoo, zoological park in West Hill, Ontario, Canada, which ranks as one of the largest zoos in the world. The 287-hectare (710-acre) park was opened in 1974 by the municipality of Toronto and the Metropolitan Toronto Zoological Society. It replaced the overcrowded and outdated municipal

  • Toronto, University of (university, Toronto, Ontario, Canada)

    University of Toronto, coeducational institution of higher learning that is the provincial university of Ontario and one of the oldest and largest universities in Canada. It is composed of federated, affiliated, and constituent colleges, a union based originally on British models, and of faculties,

  • Toronto-Dominion Centre (architectural complex, Canada)

    Toronto: City layout: …Canadian Place (Bank of Montreal), Scotia Plaza, Canada Trust Tower, Manulife Centre, Commerce Court, Toronto-Dominion Centre, and Bay Adelaide Centre, each of which is more than 50 stories high. Other prominent buildings include City Hall (1965), Eaton Centre (a large indoor shopping complex), the gilded Royal Bank Plaza, the…

  • Toros Da?lari (mountains, Turkey)

    Taurus Mountains, mountain range in southern Turkey, a great chain running parallel to the Mediterranean coast. The system extends along a curve from Lake Egridir in the west to the upper reaches of the Euphrates River in the east. Alada? (10,935 feet [3,333 m]) in the Taurus proper and Mount

  • Toros de Guisando, Accord of (Spanish history)

    Isabella I: Early life: …the agreement known as the Accord of Toros de Guisando (September 19, 1468).

  • Toros Mountains (mountains, Turkey)

    Taurus Mountains, mountain range in southern Turkey, a great chain running parallel to the Mediterranean coast. The system extends along a curve from Lake Egridir in the west to the upper reaches of the Euphrates River in the east. Alada? (10,935 feet [3,333 m]) in the Taurus proper and Mount

  • toros, Los (work by Cossío)

    bullfighting: Bullfighting and the arts: …volume of the monumental work Los toros. This multivolume set explores every aspect of bullfighting and analyzes every torero, bullring, and bull of importance then known.

  • Torosaurus (dinosaur)

    Triceratops: Development: …alongside another large horned dinosaur, Torosaurus, which is distinguished from Triceratops by its larger, thinner cranial frill that is perforated by two large openings. Classically, Triceratops has been thought to possess a cranial frill that was both solid and extremely thick. Comparisons of the horns and frills of the two…

  • Torovirus (virus genus)

    coronavirus: …contain two genera, Coronavirus and Torovirus, which differ in nucleocapsid morphology, the former being helical and the latter being tubular. Coronaviruses are important agents of gastrointestinal disease in humans, poultry, and bovines. In humans, a species known as SARS coronavirus (or Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus) causes a highly contagious…

  • Torpedinoidei (fish)

    Electric ray, any of the rays of the families Torpedinidae, Narkidae, Narcinidae, and Hypnidae, named for their ability to produce electrical shocks. They are found worldwide in warm and temperate waters. There are numerous species of electric ray; most inhabit shallow water, but some (Benthobatis)

  • torpedo (weapon)

    Torpedo, cigar-shaped, self-propelled underwater missile, launched from a submarine, surface vessel, or airplane and designed for exploding upon contact with the hulls of surface vessels and submarines. A modern torpedo contains intricate devices to control its depth and direction according to a

  • torpedo (fish)

    Electric ray, any of the rays of the families Torpedinidae, Narkidae, Narcinidae, and Hypnidae, named for their ability to produce electrical shocks. They are found worldwide in warm and temperate waters. There are numerous species of electric ray; most inhabit shallow water, but some (Benthobatis)

  • torpedo boat

    naval ship: Torpedo boats: In the 1930s the German, Italian, British, and U.S. navies regained interest in motor torpedo boats, which had been largely discarded after World War I. All four navies built them in substantial numbers to fight in narrow seas during World War II. Against convoys in the English Channel and…

  • torpedo bomber (military weaponry)

    Torpedo plane, aircraft designed to launch torpedoes. In about 1910 the navies of several countries began to experiment with torpedo launching from low-flying aircraft, usually seaplanes. The first effective use of this technique occurred on Aug. 12, 1915, when a British Short Type 184 seaplane

  • torpedo fish (fish)

    Electric ray, any of the rays of the families Torpedinidae, Narkidae, Narcinidae, and Hypnidae, named for their ability to produce electrical shocks. They are found worldwide in warm and temperate waters. There are numerous species of electric ray; most inhabit shallow water, but some (Benthobatis)

  • Torpedo nobiliana (fish)

    electric ray: …the shocks of the species Torpedo nobiliana were used as a treatment for gout, headache, and other maladies.

  • torpedo plane (military weaponry)

    Torpedo plane, aircraft designed to launch torpedoes. In about 1910 the navies of several countries began to experiment with torpedo launching from low-flying aircraft, usually seaplanes. The first effective use of this technique occurred on Aug. 12, 1915, when a British Short Type 184 seaplane

  • Torpex (explosive)

    explosive: Picric acid and ammonium picrate: The torpedo warhead Torpex, for example, is a cast mixture of RDX, TNT, and aluminum.

  • torpor (biology)

    Torpor, a state of lowered body temperature and metabolic activity assumed by many animals in response to adverse environmental conditions, especially cold and heat. The torpid state may last overnight, as in temperate-zone hummingbirds and some insects and reptiles; or it may last for months, in

  • Torquato Tasso (play by Goethe)

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: Return to Weimar and the French Revolution (1788–94): …an outlet in the play Torquato Tasso (1790; Eng. trans. Torquato Tasso), the first tragedy in European literature with a poet as its hero, which was written largely in 1788–89, though it had been begun in 1780. In richly plangent verse but at inordinately untheatrical length, Tasso descends into madness,…

  • torque (physics)

    Torque, in physics, the tendency of a force to rotate the body to which it is applied. The torque, specified with regard to the axis of rotation, is equal to the magnitude of the component of the force vector lying in the plane perpendicular to the axis, multiplied by the shortest distance between

  • torque (jewelry)

    Torque, in jewelry, metal collar, neck ring, or armband consisting of a bar or ribbon of twisted metal curved into a loop, the ends of which are fashioned into knobs ornamented with motifs such as volutes or depicting animal heads, or drawn out and bent abruptly so as to hook into one another. The

  • Torquemada (fictional character)

    Torquemada, fictional character, a miserly pawnbroker and usurer in a series of novels by Benito Pérez Galdós. The series includes Torquemada en la hoguera (1889; “Torquemada at the Stake”), Torquemada en la cruz (1893; “Torquemada on the Cross”), Torquemada en el purgatorio (1894; “Torquemada in

  • Torquemada, Tomás de (Spanish inquisitor)

    Tomás de Torquemada, first grand inquisitor in Spain, whose name has become synonymous with the Christian Inquisition’s horror, religious bigotry, and cruel fanaticism. The nephew of a noted Dominican cardinal and theologian, Juan de Torquemada, the young Torquemada joined the Dominicans and in

  • torquemeter (instrument)

    avionics: …the tachometer (in propeller craft), torquemeter (in turboprops), and exhaust pressure ratio indicator (in turbojets). Performance instruments include the altimeter, Machmeter, turn and slip indicator, and varied devices that show airspeed, vertical velocity, and angle of attack. Communications instruments include two-way radios allowing direct voice communication between the aircraft and

  • torquetum (instrument)

    protractor: …astronomical observing device called the torquetum that was equipped with a semicircular protractor.

  • torr (unit of measurement)

    vacuum technology: …apparently different units, a term, torr, has been postulated; one standard atmosphere = 760 torr (1 torr = 1 mm Hg). This term was replaced in 1971 by an SI unit defined as the newton per square metre (N/m2) and called the pascal (one pascal = 7.5 × 10-3 torr).

  • Torralba (ancient site, Spain)

    Spain: Prehistory: Other important sites are at Torralba and Ambrona (Soria), where elephants (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) were trapped accidentally in marshy ground and their remains scavenged. From those sites were excavated shouldered points fashioned from young elephant tusks as well as hundreds of stone implements (hand axes, cleavers, and scrapers on flakes, made…

  • Torralva, Diogo de (Portuguese architect)

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