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  • liner conference system

    ship: The liner trade: …provide such service through the liner conference system, which was first used on the Britain-Calcutta trade in 1875. The object of the conference system is to regulate uneconomic competition. Shipping companies of different ownership and nationality that service the same range of ports form a conference agreement to regulate rates…

  • liner trade (transport)

    ship: The liner trade: Other shipping is done by the “liner trade”—i.e., the passage of ships between designated ports on a fixed schedule and at published rates. Liner companies are able to provide such service through the liner conference system, which was first used on the Britain-Calcutta…

  • liner-plate technique (tunneling)

    tunnels and underground excavations: Hand-mined tunnels: …modern support system uses steel liner-plate sections placed against the soil and bolted into a solid sheeted complete circle and, in larger tunnels, strengthened inside by circular steel ribs. Individual liner plates are light in weight and are easily erected by hand. By employing small drifts (horizontal passageways), braced to…

  • Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey (work by Wordsworth)

    William Wordsworth: Early life and education: …his first important poems, “Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey…,” namely, “that Nature never did betray the heart that loved her.”

  • Lines on the Island of Utopia by the Poet Laureate, Mr. Windbag Nonsenso’s Sister’s Son (poem by More)

    utopian poetry: …Utopian Poetry”; the second, “Lines on the Island of Utopia by the Poet Laureate, Mr. Windbag Nonsenso’s Sister’s Son,” is a brief satirical poem believed to be a gibe at John Skelton. The fictional speaker of this equivocally voiced poem claims descent from Plato’s Republic—itself a work of utopian…

  • Lines Written Among the Euganean Hills (poem by Shelley)

    Percy Bysshe Shelley: In “Lines Written Among the Euganean Hills” (published with Rosalind and Helen), Shelley writes how visions arising from the beautiful landscape seen from a hill near Este had revived him from despair to hopes for the political regeneration of Italy, thus transforming the scene into “a…

  • lineup (baseball)

    baseball: The batting order: At the start of each game, managers from both teams submit a batting order to the umpire. The order lists the name and defensive position of each player in the game and the order in which they will hit. The order may not…

  • Lineup, The (film by Siegel [1958])

    Don Siegel: Early action dramas: Siegel had more success with The Lineup (1958), which was based on a popular TV series. It offered Eli Wallach as a paid killer who must recover heroin that was hidden in the luggage of unsuspecting travelers; Richard Jaeckel portrayed a mobster acting as his chauffeur. The Gun Runners (1958),…

  • Lineus longissimus (ribbon worm)

    ribbon worm: …long, but the giant species Lineus longissimus may reach a length of 30 m (100 feet). Some forms that swim in deep water are flat and broad, with finlike appendages. Often uniformly coloured, various species of ribbon worms are vividly patterned with stripes, bands, speckles, or geometric shapes.

  • Linfen (China)

    Linfen, city, southern Shanxi sheng (province), China. It is situated on the east bank of the Fen River about 140 miles (220 km) south of Taiyuan, the provincial capital. The Fen River valley was one of the earliest centres of Chinese civilization, being the site of well-developed prehistoric

  • ling (Chinese bell)

    percussion instrument: Idiophones: …differentiate between clapper bells (ling) and clapperless ones (zhong); their temple bells, like those of Japan, are always of the zhong type. Temple bells usually assume the form of chimes in China; one from the 6th century has 13 bells, but more modern chimes consist of 16 bells hung…

  • ling (fish)

    Ling, (Molva molva), in zoology, commercially valuable marine fish of the cod family (Gadidae), found in deep northern waters near Iceland, the British Isles, and Scandinavia. The ling is a slim, long-bodied fish with small scales, a long anal fin, and two dorsal fins, the second being much longer

  • ling (plant)

    Heather, (Calluna vulgaris), low evergreen shrub of the heath family (Ericaceae), widespread in western Europe and Asia, North America, and Greenland. It is the chief vegetation on many wastelands of northern and western Europe. The young juicy shoots and the seeds of heather are the principal food

  • Ling Canal (canal, China)

    Ling Canal, canal in the northern part of the Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi, southeastern China. The Ling Canal was constructed to connect the headwaters of the Xiang River, flowing north into Hunan province, with the Li River, one of the headwater tributaries of the Gui River, which is a

  • Ling Ch’ü (canal, China)

    Ling Canal, canal in the northern part of the Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi, southeastern China. The Ling Canal was constructed to connect the headwaters of the Xiang River, flowing north into Hunan province, with the Li River, one of the headwater tributaries of the Gui River, which is a

  • Ling Lun (Chinese scholar)

    Chinese music: Ancient artifacts and writings: …emperor Huangdi sent a scholar, Ling Lun, to the western mountain area to cut bamboo pipes that could emit sounds matching the call of the fenghuang, an immortal bird whose rare appearance signaled harmony in the reign of a new emperor. By imitating the sound of the bird, Huangdi made…

  • ling nut (plant)

    water chestnut: The ling nut (T. bicornis) is cultivated in most of East Asia.

  • Ling Qu (canal, China)

    Ling Canal, canal in the northern part of the Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi, southeastern China. The Ling Canal was constructed to connect the headwaters of the Xiang River, flowing north into Hunan province, with the Li River, one of the headwater tributaries of the Gui River, which is a

  • Ling, Laura (American journalist)

    Lisa Ling: In 2009 journalist Laura Ling, Lisa’s sister, was imprisoned in North Korea for several months, convicted of illegally entering the country, and the two later cowrote Somewhere Inside: One Sister’s Captivity in North Korea and the Other’s Fight to Bring Her Home (2010).

  • Ling, Lisa (American journalist and television personality)

    Lisa Ling, American journalist and television personality who cohosted (1999–2002) The View, a daytime talk show on ABC, and who later was involved in a number of documentary series. Ling grew up in Sacramento. At age 16 she became one of the hosts of Scratch, an adolescent news program that was

  • Ling, Per Henrik (Swedish physical educator)

    gymnastics: History: …developer of natural gymnastics was Per Henrik Ling. In 1813 Ling founded a teacher-training centre, the Royal Gymnastics Central Institute, in Stockholm. Ling devised and taught a system of gymnastic exercises designed to produce medical benefits for the athlete. Calisthenics are attributed to him, including free calisthenics—that is, exercises without…

  • ling-lung-tz’u (pottery)

    Linglong ware, Chinese porcelain made in the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911/12) dynasties and characterized by pierced ornamentation. Linglong ware was generally limited to small objects such as cups, brush pots, and covered jars. The decoration was sometimes biscuit (unglazed porcelain),

  • Ling-pao (Daoism)

    Lingbao, (Chinese: “Numinous Treasure”) Chinese religious movement that produced scriptural and liturgical innovations that greatly influenced the subsequent practice of Daoism. Ge Chaofu is credited with the composition of the Lingbao jing (“Classic of the Numinous Treasure”) about 397 ce and

  • Ling-yu (ancient zoo, China)

    zoo: …extent, which he named the Ling-Yu, or Garden of Intelligence.

  • linga (Hindu symbol)

    Lingam, (Sanskrit: “sign” or “distinguishing symbol”) in Hinduism, a votary object that symbolizes the god Shiva and is revered as an emblem of generative power. The lingam appears in Shaivite temples and in private shrines throughout India. In Shaivite temples the lingam is often at the centre,

  • linga ?arīra (Hinduism)

    death: The fate of the soul: …a vaporous thumb-sized structure (linga ?arīra). This is immediately seized by two servants of Yama, the god of death, who carry it to their master for a preliminary identity check. Afterward, the soul is promptly returned to the abode of the deceased, where it hovers around the doorstep. It…

  • Lingala language

    Lingala language, according to some linguists, a Bantu-based creole of Central Africa. Lingala is spoken by more than 10 million people in a region comprising the northwestern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo south to its capital, Kinshasa, and the northern part of the Republic of the

  • Lingala Makanza (language)

    Lingala language: …features are more common in Lingala Makanza, the standard variety of Lingala designed by missionaries and promoted by the school system. Lingala is one of the four major indigenous lingua francas, called “national languages,” in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as well as a vernacular of urban centres in…

  • lingam (Hindu symbol)

    Lingam, (Sanskrit: “sign” or “distinguishing symbol”) in Hinduism, a votary object that symbolizes the god Shiva and is revered as an emblem of generative power. The lingam appears in Shaivite temples and in private shrines throughout India. In Shaivite temples the lingam is often at the centre,

  • Lingani, Jean-Baptiste Boukari (Burkinabé military officer)

    Blaise Compaoré: Jean-Baptiste Lingani and Capt. Henri Zongo—helped organize the coup and the resulting regime, and all held positions of leadership in the country. Compaoré served as minister of state at the presidency (1983–87), essentially making him second in command in the regime, and also as minister…

  • Lingaraja (temple, Bhubaneswar, India)

    North Indian temple architecture: The 11th-century Lingaraja Temple at Bhubaneshwar is an example of the Oriya style in its fullest development. The 13th-century Sun Temple (Surya Deul) at Konarak, the sanctum of which is badly damaged, is the largest and perhaps the most famous Oriya temple.

  • Lingayat (Hindu sect)

    Lingayat, member of a Hindu sect with a wide following in southern India that worships Shiva as the only deity. The followers take their name (“lingam-wearers”) from the small representations of a lingam, a votary object symbolizing Shiva, which both the men and the women always wear hanging by a

  • Lingayen Gulf (inlet, South China Sea)

    Lingayen Gulf, large inlet of the South China Sea that indents the western coast of central Luzon, Philippines, for 36 miles (56 km). It is 26 miles wide at its entrance between Santiago Island (west) and San Fernando Point (east). Santiago, Cabarruyan, and Hundred Islands (site of Manleluang

  • Lingbao (Daoism)

    Lingbao, (Chinese: “Numinous Treasure”) Chinese religious movement that produced scriptural and liturgical innovations that greatly influenced the subsequent practice of Daoism. Ge Chaofu is credited with the composition of the Lingbao jing (“Classic of the Numinous Treasure”) about 397 ce and

  • Lingbaojing (work by Ge Chaofu)

    Daoism: The Lingbao scriptures and liturgies: Ge Chaofu began composing the Lingbaojing (“Classic of the Sacred Jewel”) c. 397 ce. He claimed that they had been first revealed to his own ancestor, the famous Ge Xuan, early in the 3rd century. In these works the Dao is personified in a series of “celestial worthies” (tianzun), its…

  • lingcod (fish)

    Lingcod, (Ophiodon elongatus), commercially popular species of fish in the family Hexagrammidae (order Scorpaeniformes). A voracious predator, the lingcod has a large mouth and canine-like teeth for eating fishes and other aquatic prey, including squid. The species is strictly marine, occurring

  • Lingdan (khan of Mongolia)

    Ligdan, last of the paramount Mongol khans (ruled 1604–34). Ligdan was a member of the Chahar royal family in which the Mongol supreme khanate was vested. He lived at a time when the Mongols were abandoning their traditional shamanism to convert to Tibetan Buddhism. He had Buddhist temples

  • Linge, Abraham van (Dutch painter)

    stained glass: 17th and 18th centuries: …in the works (1620–40) of Abraham and Bernard van Linge, the realization of the window as a translucent canvas painting is complete. Abraham van Linge’s windows painted in 1630 to 1640 for Christ Church Cathedral at Oxford are an excellent example of the destruction of the lead line as an…

  • Linger Awhile (novel by Hoban)

    Russell Hoban: …Amaryllis Night and Day (2001); Linger Awhile (2006), about a dead B-movie actress from the 1950s who is reanimated at the behest of a love-struck 83-year-old widower; and My Tango with Barbara Strozzi (2007).

  • Linger brothers (Austrian athletes)

    Linger brothers, team of two Austrian brothers who competed together in men’s doubles luge, winning gold medals at the 2006 Winter Olympic Games in Turin, Italy, and the 2010 Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The older of the brothers was Andreas Linger (b. May 31, 1981,

  • Linger, Andreas (Austrian luger)

    Linger brothers: In 1991 Wolfgang and Andreas, aged 9 and 10, respectively, received access, along with their entire club of 500 members, to run the track in Igls, Austria, the site of the 1964 and 1976 Olympic luge events. They were 2 of only about 12 members of the group who…

  • Linger, Andreas and Wolfgang (Austrian lugers)

    Andreas and Wolfgang Linger, In February 2012, at the luge world championships in Altenberg, Ger., Austrian lugers Andreas and Wolfgang Linger earned their third world title in men’s doubles luge (in which the sled is driven by a team of two athletes). The Linger brothers had previously won gold

  • Linger, Wolfgang (Austrian luger)

    Linger brothers: In 1991 Wolfgang and Andreas, aged 9 and 10, respectively, received access, along with their entire club of 500 members, to run the track in Igls, Austria, the site of the 1964 and 1976 Olympic luge events. They were 2 of only about 12 members of the…

  • Linggadjati Agreement (Netherlands-Indonesia [1946])

    Linggadjati Agreement, treaty between the Dutch and the Republic of Indonesia drafted on Nov. 15, 1946, at Linggadjati (now Linggajati) near Cheribon (now Cirebon, formerly Tjirebon, western Java). Soon after the capitulation of the Japanese in World War II, the independence of the Republic of

  • Lingle, Linda (American politician)

    Mazie Hirono: …for the governorship by Republican Linda Lingle. Four years later Hirono won a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, and she served three terms. In 2012 she ran for the U.S. Senate to replace retiring Sen. Daniel Akaka. She defeated Lingle in the general election and assumed office in…

  • linglong ware (pottery)

    Linglong ware, Chinese porcelain made in the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911/12) dynasties and characterized by pierced ornamentation. Linglong ware was generally limited to small objects such as cups, brush pots, and covered jars. The decoration was sometimes biscuit (unglazed porcelain),

  • linglongci (pottery)

    Linglong ware, Chinese porcelain made in the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911/12) dynasties and characterized by pierced ornamentation. Linglong ware was generally limited to small objects such as cups, brush pots, and covered jars. The decoration was sometimes biscuit (unglazed porcelain),

  • Lingnan (Chinese art)

    Chinese painting: Painting and printmaking: …turn gave rise to a Cantonese, or Lingnan, regional style that incorporated Euro-Japanese characteristics. Although the new style did not produce satisfying or lasting solutions, it was a significant harbinger and continued to thrive in Hong Kong, practiced by such artists as Zhao Shao’ang.

  • lingodbhavamurti (Hindu icon)

    lingam: …in South India is the lingodbhavamurti, which shows Shiva emerging out of a fiery lingam. This is a representation of a story in which the gods Vishnu and Brahma were once arguing about their respective importance when Shiva appeared in the form of a blazing pillar to quell their pride.…

  • lingonberry (plant)

    Lingonberry, (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), small creeping plant of the heath family (Ericaceae), related to the blueberry and cranberry. Lingonberry plants are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere in boreal forests and tundra regions. The red fruit is used for jelly and juice by northern Europeans

  • Lingones (Celtic tribe)

    Lingones, Celtic tribe that originally lived in Gaul in the area of the Seine and Marne rivers. Some of the Lingones migrated across the Alps and settled near the mouth of the Po River in Italy around 400 bc. These Lingones were part of a wave of Celtic tribes that included the Boii and Senoni; the

  • lingua characteristica universalis

    history of logic: Leibniz: …a “universally characteristic language” (lingua characteristica universalis) that would, first, notationally represent concepts by displaying the more basic concepts of which they were composed, and second, naturally represent (in the manner of graphs or pictures, “iconically”) the concept in a way that could be easily grasped by readers, no…

  • lingua franca (linguistics)

    Lingua franca, (Italian: “Frankish language”) language used as a means of communication between populations speaking vernaculars that are not mutually intelligible. The term was first used during the Middle Ages to describe a French- and Italian-based jargon, or pidgin, that was developed by

  • lingua Latina

    Latin language, Indo-European language in the Italic group and ancestral to the modern Romance languages. Originally spoken by small groups of people living along the lower Tiber River, Latin spread with the increase of Roman political power, first throughout Italy and then throughout most of

  • língua-geral (language)

    Língua-geral, lingua franca developed in Brazil under Portuguese influence in the 16th and 17th centuries as a medium of communication between Europeans and Indians and between Indians of different languages. Língua-geral was a modification of the Tupinambá Indian

  • lingual nerve (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Mandibular nerve: …floor of the mouth (lingual nerve), and (4) the mandibular teeth (inferior alveolar nerve). Skin over the lateral and anterior surfaces of the mandible and the lower lip is served by cutaneous branches of the mandibular nerve.

  • lingual papilla (anatomy)

    prenatal development: Gustatory organ: …the epithelium that clothes certain lingual papillae (small projections on the tongue), is a cluster of tall cells, some of which have differentiated into taste cells whose free ends bear receptive gustatory hairs. Sensory nerve fibres end at the surface of such cells. Other tall cells are presumably inertly supportive…

  • lingual tonsil (anatomy)

    tonsil: …pair of tonsils are the lingual tonsils, aggregations of lymphatic tissue on the surface tissue at the base of the tongue. The surface of this tonsil has pits leading to lower lymphatic tissue as in the other two tonsil types, but these pits are effectively drained by small glands (mucous…

  • Linguet, Simon-Nicolas-Henri (French journalist and lawyer)

    Simon-Nicolas-Henri Linguet, French journalist and lawyer whose delight in taking views opposing everyone else’s earned him exiles, imprisonment, and finally the guillotine. He attended the Collège de Beauvais, winning the three highest prizes there in 1751. Received at first into the ranks of the

  • Lingui (China)

    Guilin, city, northeastern Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi, southern China. The natural route centre of the Gui River basin, Guilin lies along the easiest of all the routes leading from central China to Guangdong province—that between the headwaters of the Xiang River in Hunan province and the

  • linguine (food)

    pasta: …wide lasagna and the narrow linguini. Farfels are ground, granulated, or shredded. The wide variety of special shapes includes farfalloni (“large butterflies”), lancette (“little spears”), fusilli (“spindles”), and riccioline (“little curls”).

  • linguini (food)

    pasta: …wide lasagna and the narrow linguini. Farfels are ground, granulated, or shredded. The wide variety of special shapes includes farfalloni (“large butterflies”), lancette (“little spears”), fusilli (“spindles”), and riccioline (“little curls”).

  • linguistic anthropology

    anthropology: Linguistic anthropology: Linguistic anthropologists argue that human production of talk and text, made possible by the unique human capacity for language, is a fundamental mechanism through which people create culture and social life. Contemporary scholars in the discipline explore how this creation is accomplished by…

  • linguistic atlas

    linguistics: Dialect atlases: Dialect atlases are compiled on the basis of investigations of the dialects of a large number of places; a questionnaire provides uniform data. There are two basic methods of data collection: fieldwork and survey by correspondence. Fieldwork, in which a trained investigator transcribes…

  • Linguistic Atlas of New England (dialect study)

    Hans Kurath: …the chief editor of the Linguistic Atlas of New England, the first comprehensive linguistic atlas of a large region.

  • linguistic change

    language: Linguistic change: Every language has a history, and, as in the rest of human culture, changes are constantly taking place in the course of the learned transmission of a language from one generation to another. This is just part of the difference between human culture…

  • linguistic geography

    linguistics: Dialectology and linguistic geography: Dialect study as a discipline—dialectology—dates from the first half of the 19th century, when local dialect dictionaries and dialect grammars first appeared in western Europe. Soon thereafter, dialect maps were developed; most often they depicted the division of a language’s territory…

  • linguistic philosophy

    Analytic philosophy, a loosely related set of approaches to philosophical problems, dominant in Anglo-American philosophy from the early 20th century, that emphasizes the study of language and the logical analysis of concepts. Although most work in analytic philosophy has been done in Great Britain

  • linguistic purism (linguistics)

    Serbo-Croatian language: Writing, pronunciation, and spelling: …a favourite cultural practice of purism, seeking to replace foreign words with old or newly coined Croatian ones. For Serbian univerzitet ‘university,’ Croatian combined sve ‘all’ and u?ili?te ‘place of learning’ to yield sveu?ili?te. Serbia, for its part, accepted Vuk Karad?i?’s new standard and simpler Cyrillic letters but changed one…

  • linguistic relativity (linguistics)

    North American Indian languages: Language and culture: …now often known as the Whorfian (or Sapir-Whorf) hypothesis. Whorf’s initial arguments focused on the striking differences between English and Native American ways of saying “the same thing.” From such linguistic differences, Whorf inferred underlying differences in habits of thought and tried to show how these thought patterns are reflected…

  • Linguistic Society of America (American organization)

    Hermann Collitz: …of her estate to the Linguistic Society of America (whose first president had been Hermann Collitz) with the goal of establishing a professorship in comparative philosophy in both their names. The Collitz Chair is still held by distinguished Indo-Europeanists during linguistic institutes put on under the auspices of the society.

  • Linguistic Survey of India (work by Grierson)

    Sir George Abraham Grierson: …who from 1898 conducted the Linguistic Survey of India (published 1903–28), obtaining information on 364 languages and dialects.

  • linguistic turn (philosophy)

    epistemology: Analytic epistemology: …are in some important sense linguistic (or conceptual), a hallmark of the analytic approach, has been called the “linguistic turn.”

  • linguistics (science)

    Linguistics, the scientific study of language. The word was first used in the middle of the 19th century to emphasize the difference between a newer approach to the study of language that was then developing and the more traditional approach of philology. The differences were and are largely

  • Lingula (brachiopod genus)

    evolution: Gradual and punctuational evolution: …fossils”—for instance, the lamp shell Lingula, a genus of brachiopod (a phylum of shelled invertebrates) that appears to have remained essentially unchanged since the Ordovician Period, some 450 million years ago; or the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), a reptile that has shown little morphological evolution for nearly 200 million years, since…

  • Lingulata (pentastomid genus)

    pentastomid: Lingulata species parasitize various mammals, including dogs. A few species are of medical interest because they infest humans.

  • lingulid (brachiopod)

    Lingulid, any member of a group of brachiopods, or lamp shells, that includes very ancient extinct forms as well as surviving representatives. First known from Cambrian rocks (about 542 million to 488 million years old), they probably originated during Precambrian time. The lingulids are small,

  • lingulida (brachiopod)

    Lingulid, any member of a group of brachiopods, or lamp shells, that includes very ancient extinct forms as well as surviving representatives. First known from Cambrian rocks (about 542 million to 488 million years old), they probably originated during Precambrian time. The lingulids are small,

  • lingyang (mammal)

    Sichuan: Plant and animal life: …or bear cat, and the lingyang (a special species of antelope). Both inhabit the highlands of western Sichuan, and both have become endangered because of overcutting of the vegetation that is the mainstay of their diet. However, the province is best known as the principal home of the world-famous and…

  • Linh Peak (mountain, Vietnam)

    Annamese Cordillera: Although its highest point, Linh Peak, is only 8,524 feet (2,598 metres) high, the range has few substantial passes, the most important being the Keo Nua Pass in northern Vietnam, part of a route between Muang Khammouan, Laos, and Vinh, Vietnam, and the Mu Gia Pass.

  • Linhai Industrial Park (district, Kao-hsiung, Taiwan)

    Kao-hsiung: The 5,500-acre (2,225-hectare) Linhai Industrial Park, located on the waterfront, was completed in the mid-1970s. It includes a steel mill, shipyard, petrochemical complex, and other industries. The city also has an oil refinery, aluminum works, cement works, fertilizer factories, sugar refineries, brick and tile works, and salt-manufacturing and…

  • Linhas Aéreas de Mo?ambique (Mozambican company)

    Mozambique: Transportation and telecommunications: …was replaced in 1980 by Mozambique Airlines (Linhas Aéreas de Mo?ambique; LAM), the national carrier, which also provides international service. Mozambique has a number of domestic airports and international airports at Beira, Vilanculos, and Maputo.

  • Lini, Father Walter (prime minister of Vanuatu)

    The Rev. Walter Hayde Lini, Vanuatuan politician (born 1942, Pentecost Island, New Hebrides [now Vanuatu]—died Feb. 21, 1999, Vanuatu?), served as prime minister of his South Pacific homeland from the time of independence in 1980 until he was ousted in 1991. Lini studied for the Anglican p

  • Lini, the Rev. Walter Hayde (prime minister of Vanuatu)

    The Rev. Walter Hayde Lini, Vanuatuan politician (born 1942, Pentecost Island, New Hebrides [now Vanuatu]—died Feb. 21, 1999, Vanuatu?), served as prime minister of his South Pacific homeland from the time of independence in 1980 until he was ousted in 1991. Lini studied for the Anglican p

  • Linie aquavit (distilled liquor)

    aquavit: Norway’s production, comparatively low, includes Linie Aquavit, so called because it is shipped to Australia and back (across the Equator, or Line) in oak containers to produce mellow flavour. Finnish aquavit has a cinnamon flavour. The Danish product, also called snaps, is colourless, with a pronounced caraway flavour. One of…

  • Linienbandkeramik (prehistory)

    LBK culture, Neolithic culture that expanded over large areas of Europe north and west of the Danube River (from Slovakia to the Netherlands) about the 5th millennium bc. Farmers probably practiced a form of shifting cultivation on the loess soil. Emmer wheat and barley were grown, and domestic

  • lining (violin family)

    stringed instrument: Morphology: …fillet of pine, called the linings, which runs between the blocks. Despite the very considerable stresses to which it is subject, the violin body is held together by simple flush glued joints, which can in emergency be opened up, without damaging the instrument, for repairs.

  • lining (art restoration)

    art conservation and restoration: Paintings on canvas: …also referred to as “relining.” A number of techniques and adhesives have been employed for lining, but with all methods there is a risk of altering the surface texture of the painting if the procedure is not carried out with the utmost care and skill. The most frequently used…

  • link (robotics)

    automation: The robot manipulator: …up of a sequence of link and joint combinations. The links are the rigid members connecting the joints. The joints (also called axes) are the movable components of the robot that cause relative motion between adjacent links. As shown in Figure 3, there are five principal types of mechanical joints…

  • LINK project (economy)

    Lawrence R. Klein: A more ambitious effort, the LINK project, incorporated data gathered from a large number of industrialized, centrally planned, and developing countries to forecast trade and capital movements and to test the effects of proposed changes in political and economic policies. The project is discussed in the 1995 book Economics, Econometrics…

  • Link River (river, United States)

    Klamath River: …miles (2 km) as the Link River to Lake Ewauna, where it emerges as the Klamath River, and continues generally southwesterly 250 miles (400 km) through the Klamath Mountains in California to the Pacific Ocean near Requa, Calif. The upstream basin section has extensive irrigation developments. Copco No. 1 Dam…

  • link span

    harbours and sea works: Roll-on, roll-off facilities: …the outer end of the link span on a float, or pontoon, so that it would automatically follow the rise and fall of the tide. Several disadvantages of structural detail arise, however, and the system is vulnerable to damage caused by the movement of the pontoon under adverse weather conditions.…

  • Link Trainer (flight simulator)

    Link Trainer, airplane cockpit replicated, with full instruments and controls, in such a way that it can be used in a ground location for pilot training. The cockpit responds to the controls as though it were an airplane in flight. The Link Trainer was the first effective flight simulator

  • Link, Caroline (German director and writer)
  • Link, Edward A. (American inventor)

    flight simulator: …Trainer, to appear, devised by Edwin A. Link, a self-educated aviator and inventor from Binghamton, New York. By then, airplane instrumentation had been developed sufficiently to permit “blind” flying on instruments alone, but training pilots to do so involved considerable risk. Link built a model of an airplane cockpit equipped…

  • link-and-link stitch (knitting)

    knitting: …the preceding loop, and the purl stitch, drawn through the back. Some filling knits are fragile because of the dependency of each loop in a vertical row on the stitch next to it. Runs can occur when one loop breaks, releasing other loops in the same row. Filling knits have…

  • linkage (foreign policy)

    20th-century international relations: Détente as realism: Journalists dubbed this tactic “linkage” insofar as the United States would link positive inducements (e.g., arms control, technology transfers, grain sales) to expected Soviet reciprocity in other areas (e.g., restraint in promoting revolutionary movements). Nixon had no illusions that U.S.–Soviet competition would disappear, but he expected that this carrot-and-stick…

  • linkage (machine component)

    Linkage, in mechanical engineering, a system of solid, usually metallic, links (bars) connected to two or more other links by pin joints (hinges), sliding joints, or ball-and-socket joints so as to form a closed chain or a series of closed chains. When one of the links is fixed, the possible

  • linkage (genetics)

    Linkage group, in genetics, all of the genes on a single chromosome. They are inherited as a group; that is, during cell division they act and move as a unit rather than independently. The existence of linkage groups is the reason some traits do not comply with Mendel’s law of independent

  • linkage group (genetics)

    Linkage group, in genetics, all of the genes on a single chromosome. They are inherited as a group; that is, during cell division they act and move as a unit rather than independently. The existence of linkage groups is the reason some traits do not comply with Mendel’s law of independent

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