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  • Leverage (American television series)

    Timothy Hutton: He starred in Leverage (2008–12), and he received an Emmy Award nomination in 2015 for his work in American Crime (2015–17). Hutton then starred in the sitcom Almost Family (2019), playing a fertility doctor who, as a sperm donor, fathered a number of children. In addition, he had…

  • leverage (finance)

    capital structure: This is known as “leverage” or “trading on the equity.” In a capital structure of $100,000, for example, of which $50,000 represents bondholders’ investment at an interest rate of 5 percent and $50,000 represents equity, total earnings of $10,000 would represent a return of 10 percent on the total…

  • leverage ratio (finance)

    capital structure: This is known as “leverage” or “trading on the equity.” In a capital structure of $100,000, for example, of which $50,000 represents bondholders’ investment at an interest rate of 5 percent and $50,000 represents equity, total earnings of $10,000 would represent a return of 10 percent on the total…

  • leveraged buyout (business)

    Leveraged buyout (LBO), acquisition strategy whereby a company is purchased by another company using borrowed money such as bonds or loans. In numerous cases, leveraged buyouts (LBOs) have been used by managers to buy out shareholders to gain control over the company, and the strategy played an

  • Leverhulme of The Western Isles, William Hesketh Lever, 1st Viscount, Baron Leverhulme of Bolton-le-Moors (British entrepreneur)

    William Hesketh Lever, 1st Viscount Leverhulme, British soap and detergent entrepreneur who built the international firm of Lever Brothers. Lever entered the soap business in 1885, when he leased a small, unprofitable soapworks. With his brother, James Darcy Lever, he began to make soap from

  • Leverhulme, William Hesketh Lever, 1st Viscount (British entrepreneur)

    William Hesketh Lever, 1st Viscount Leverhulme, British soap and detergent entrepreneur who built the international firm of Lever Brothers. Lever entered the soap business in 1885, when he leased a small, unprofitable soapworks. With his brother, James Darcy Lever, he began to make soap from

  • Leverkusen (Germany)

    Leverkusen, city, North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), west-central Germany. It lies on the Rhine River at the mouth of the Wupper River, in the Dhünn valley, just north of Cologne. Formed in 1930 by the union of the villages of Schlebusch, Rheindorf, and Steinbüchel with the town of Wiesdorf, it

  • Levert, Eddie (American singer)

    the O'Jays: …late 1950s, when childhood friends Eddie Levert (b. June 16, 1942, Canton, Ohio, U.S.) and Walter Williams (b. Aug. 25, 1942, Canton) began performing gospel music together in their hometown of Canton. In 1959 the pair teamed with schoolmates William Powell (b. Jan. 20, 1942, Canton—d. May 26, 1977, Canton),…

  • Levert, Gerald (American singer)

    Gerald Levert, American singer (born July 13, 1966, Philadelphia, Pa.—died Nov. 10, 2006, Cleveland, Ohio), was a powerful and soulful vocalist whose string of R&B hits included “I Swear,” “I’d Give Anything,” and “Baby Hold on to Me,” a duet with his father, Eddie Levert, Sr., a member of the O

  • Levertin, Oscar Ivar (Swedish poet and scholar)

    Oscar Ivar Levertin, Swedish poet and scholar, a leader of the Swedish Romantic movement of the 1890s. Levertin was educated at Uppsala University and became in 1899 professor of literature at the University of Stockholm. After the death of his first wife and an attack of tuberculosis, which sent

  • Levertov, Denise (American poet)

    Denise Levertov, English-born American poet, essayist, and political activist who wrote deceptively matter-of-fact verse on both personal and political themes. Levertov’s father was an immigrant Russian Jew who converted to Christianity, married a Welsh woman, and became an Anglican clergyman.

  • Lévesque, Georges-Henri (Canadian clergyman and educator)

    Georges-Henri Lévesque, Canadian cleric and educator (born Feb. 16, 1903, Roberval, Que.—died Jan. 15, 2000, Quebec, Que.), was instrumental in bringing about Quebec’s “Quiet Revolution,” the period of social change and modernization that the province experienced from 1960 to 1966. Ordained in t

  • Lévesque, René (premier of Quebec)

    René Lévesque, premier of the French-speaking Canadian province of Quebec (1976–85) and a leading advocate of sovereignty for that province. Lévesque went to school in Gaspésie and afterward to Laval University, Quebec. Already a part-time journalist while still a student, he broke off his law

  • Levet, Pierre (French bookseller)

    Fran?ois Villon: Poetry: …1489 by the Parisian bookseller Pierre Levet, whose edition served as the basis for some 20 more in the next century. Apart from the works mentioned, there are also 12 single ballades and rondeaux (basically 13-line poems with a sophisticated double rhyme pattern), another 4 of doubtful authenticity, and 7…

  • Levey, Howard Stanton (American author)

    Anton LaVey, American author and counterculture figure who founded the Church of Satan. Many details of LaVey’s early life are disputed or unknown. Soon after he was born, his family moved to the San Francisco Bay area. According to some accounts, he left high school to join a circus. He

  • Levi (apostle)

    St. Matthew, ; Western feast day September 21, Eastern feast day November 16), one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus Christ and the traditional author of the first Synoptic Gospel. According to Matthew 9:9 and Mark 2:14, Matthew was sitting by the customs house in Capernaum (near modern Almagor,

  • Levi (Hebrew patriarch)

    Dinah: Dinah’s brothers Simeon and Levi pretended to agree to the marriage and the covenant if Shechem and all the other males of the city of Shechem were circumcised. After the operations, while the men were still weakened, Simeon and Levi attacked the city, killed all the males, including Shechem…

  • Levi and Sarah, or, The Jewish Lovers: A Polish Tale (work by Niemcewicz)

    Julian Ursyn Niemcewicz: …and Lebje i Sióra (1821; Levi and Sarah, or, The Jewish Lovers: A Polish Tale), the first Polish novel to discuss the problems of Jews in Polish society. In 1831 he journeyed to England to attempt to persuade the western European powers to intervene on behalf of the Polish insurrection…

  • Levi ben Gershom (French scholar)

    Levi ben Gershom, French Jewish mathematician, philosopher, astronomer, and Talmudic scholar. In 1321 Levi wrote his first work, Sefer ha-mispar (“Book of the Number”), dealing with arithmetical operations, including extraction of roots. In De sinibus, chordis et arcubus (1342; “On Sines, Chords,

  • Levi Strauss & Co. (American company)

    Levi Strauss & Co., world’s largest maker of pants, noted especially for its blue denim jeans called Levi’s (registered trademark). Its other products include tailored slacks, jackets, hats, shirts, skirts, and belts, and it licenses the manufacture of novelty items. The company is headquartered in

  • Levi’s (clothing)

    Jeans, trousers originally designed in the United States by Levi Strauss in the mid-19th century as durable work clothes, with the seams and other points of stress reinforced with small copper rivets. They were eventually adopted by workingmen throughout the United States and then worldwide. Jeans

  • Levi, Carlo (Italian author)

    Carlo Levi, Italian writer, painter, and political journalist whose first documentary novel became an international literary sensation and enhanced the trend toward social realism in postwar Italian literature. Levi was a painter and a practicing physician when he was exiled (1935–36) to the

  • Levi, Carlo Graziadio (Italian author)

    Carlo Levi, Italian writer, painter, and political journalist whose first documentary novel became an international literary sensation and enhanced the trend toward social realism in postwar Italian literature. Levi was a painter and a practicing physician when he was exiled (1935–36) to the

  • Levi, Edward Hirsch (American lawyer and educator)

    Edward Hirsch Levi, American lawyer and educator (born June 16, 1911, Chicago, Ill.—died March 7, 2000, Chicago), as U.S. attorney general under Pres. Gerald Ford from 1975 to 1977, he helped restore public confidence in the Department of Justice following the Watergate scandal. Before his s

  • Lévi, éliphas (French occultist)

    Baphomet: …Ritual), the influential French occultist éliphas Lévi created the Baphomet that has become a recognized occult icon. The book’s frontispiece was a drawing of Baphomet imagined as a “Sabbatic Goat”—a hermaphroditic winged human figure with the head and feet of a goat that is adorned with numerous esoteric symbols. Lévi…

  • Levi, Natalia (Italian author)

    Natalia Ginzburg, Italian author who dealt unsentimentally with family relationships in her writings. Ginzburg was the widow of the Italian literary figure and patriot Leone Ginzburg, who operated a publishing house for a time, was arrested for antifascist activities, and died in prison in 1944.

  • Levi, Primo (Italian writer and chemist)

    Primo Levi, Italian-Jewish writer and chemist, noted for his restrained and moving autobiographical account of and reflections on survival in the Nazi concentration camps. Levi was brought up in the small Jewish community in Turin, studied at the University of Turin, and graduated summa cum laude

  • Levi, Salomon (Austrian composer)

    Salomon Sulzer, Austrian Jewish cantor, considered the most important composer of synagogue music in the 19th century. Sulzer was trained in cantorial singing from childhood, studying in Austria and Switzerland and travelling in France. In 1820 he was appointed cantor at Hohenems and served there

  • Lévi, Sylvain (French orientalist)

    Sylvain Lévi, French Orientalist who wrote on Eastern religion, literature, and history and is particularly noted for his dictionary of Buddhism. Appointed a lecturer at the school of higher studies in Paris (1886), he taught Sanskrit at the Sorbonne (1889–94) and wrote his doctoral dissertation,

  • Levi, Testament of (Pseudepigrapha)

    biblical literature: Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs: …Scrolls: the Aramaic “Testament of Levi” (fragments of it were also discovered in Aramaic in the medieval Geniza, or synagogue storeroom, in Cairo) and a Hebrew fragment of the “Testaments of Naphtali.” A Hebrew “Testament of Judah,” which was used both by the Book of Jubilees and the Testaments of…

  • Levi-Civita, Tullio (Italian mathematician)

    Tullio Levi-Civita, Italian mathematician known for his work in differential calculus and relativity theory. At the University of Padua (1891–95), he studied under Gregorio Ricci Curbastro, with whom he later collaborated in founding the absolute differential calculus (now known as tensor

  • Levi-Montalcini, Rita (Italian-American neurologist)

    Rita Levi-Montalcini, Italian American neurologist who, with biochemist Stanley Cohen, shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1986 for her discovery of a bodily substance that stimulates and influences the growth of nerve cells. Levi-Montalcini studied medicine at the University of

  • Lévi-Strauss, Claude (French anthropologist)

    Claude Lévi-Strauss, French social anthropologist and leading exponent of structuralism, a name applied to the analysis of cultural systems (e.g., kinship and mythical systems) in terms of the structural relations among their elements. Structuralism has influenced not only 20th-century social

  • Leviathan (ship)

    ship: Passenger liners in the 20th century: Line’s Leviathan; the Imperator became the Cunard Line’s Berengaria; and the Bismarck became the White Star Line’s Majestic. That war severely cut traffic, although ships were used for troop transport. By eliminating German competition and seizing their great ships, the Western Allies returned to competing among…

  • Leviathan (telescope, Birr, Ireland)

    William Parsons, 3rd earl of Rosse: …largest reflecting telescope, the “Leviathan,” of the 19th century.

  • Leviathan (work by Hobbes)

    Thomas Hobbes: Political philosophy: Hobbes’s masterpiece, Leviathan (1651), does not significantly depart from the view of De Cive concerning the relation between protection and obedience, but it devotes much more attention to the civil obligations of Christian believers and the proper and improper roles of a church within a state. Hobbes…

  • Leviathan (Middle Eastern mythology)

    Leviathan, in Jewish mythology, a primordial sea serpent. Its source is in prebiblical Mesopotamian myth, especially that of the sea monster in the Ugaritic myth of Baal (see Yamm). In the Old Testament, Leviathan appears in Psalms 74:14 as a multiheaded sea serpent that is killed by God and given

  • Leviathan (work by Schmidt)

    Arno Schmidt: …series of novellas, beginning with Leviathan (1949; Eng. trans. Leviathan), in which a doomed attempt to escape a bombing raid in a commandeered train reflects the plight of humankind as the plaything of a malicious God.

  • Leviathan of the Seven Heads (Middle Eastern mythology)

    Leviathan, in Jewish mythology, a primordial sea serpent. Its source is in prebiblical Mesopotamian myth, especially that of the sea monster in the Ugaritic myth of Baal (see Yamm). In the Old Testament, Leviathan appears in Psalms 74:14 as a multiheaded sea serpent that is killed by God and given

  • Leviathan; or the Matter, Form, and Power of a Commonwealth, Ecclesiastical and Civil (work by Hobbes)

    Thomas Hobbes: Political philosophy: Hobbes’s masterpiece, Leviathan (1651), does not significantly depart from the view of De Cive concerning the relation between protection and obedience, but it devotes much more attention to the civil obligations of Christian believers and the proper and improper roles of a church within a state. Hobbes…

  • Levien, Sonya (American screenwriter)
  • Levin, Bernard (British journalist)

    Bernard Levin, British journalist (born Aug. 19, 1928, London, Eng.—died Aug. 7, 2004, London), applied his acerbic wit for almost 40 years as a political columnist and entertainment critic for such newspapers as The Spectator, The Guardian, the Daily Mail, and, especially, The Times, where he w

  • Levin, Carl (United States senator)

    Gary Peters: Carl Levin announced that he would not seek reelection in 2014, Peters ran for his seat and won by a large margin. He entered the Senate the following year.

  • Levin, Fishel Aaronovich (American chemist)

    Phoebus Levene, Russian-born American chemist and pioneer in the study of nucleic acids. On receiving an M.D. degree from the St. Petersburg Imperial Medical Academy in 1891, Levene fled from Russian anti-Semitism and settled in New York City. While practicing medicine there, he studied chemistry

  • Levin, Gerald (American entrepreneur)

    WarnerMedia: Time Warner: …died in December 1992, and Gerald (Jerry) Levin became CEO of Time Warner Inc.

  • Levin, Henry (American director)

    Henry Levin, American filmmaker who was an efficient contract director of B-movies and worked in a variety of genres, including film noir, musical, western, and science fiction. Levin worked in the theatre as an actor and director before launching a film career in the early 1940s. He was hired by

  • Levin, Henry Bernard (British journalist)

    Bernard Levin, British journalist (born Aug. 19, 1928, London, Eng.—died Aug. 7, 2004, London), applied his acerbic wit for almost 40 years as a political columnist and entertainment critic for such newspapers as The Spectator, The Guardian, the Daily Mail, and, especially, The Times, where he w

  • Levin, Ira Marvin (American author)

    Ira Marvin Levin, American author (born Aug. 27, 1929, New York, N.Y.—died Nov. 12, 2007, New York City), thrilled readers with his best-selling Gothic and suspense novels, most famously A Kiss Before Dying (1953 ) Rosemary’s Baby (1967), and The Stepford Wives (1972). Though his works were not

  • Levin, Irv (American sports owner)

    Los Angeles Clippers: …owner of the Boston Celtics, Irv Levin, a Californian, wanted to move the Celtics to his home state but was prevented by the NBA from moving the historic franchise. As a compromise, the owner of the Braves, John Y. Brown, traded franchises with Levin, who relocated his new team to…

  • Levin, Jerry (American entrepreneur)

    WarnerMedia: Time Warner: …died in December 1992, and Gerald (Jerry) Levin became CEO of Time Warner Inc.

  • Levin, Joseph (American attorney)

    Morris Dees: …Center (SPLC) with American attorney Joseph Levin in 1971 in Montgomery, Alabama. Under Dees’s leadership, the SPLC won several unprecedented lawsuits against hate organizations and their leaders.

  • Levin, Konstantine (fictional character)

    Konstantine Levin, fictional character whose happy marriage is presented as a contrast to the tragic love affair between Anna Karenina and Count Vronsky in Leo Tolstoy’s novel Anna Karenina

  • Levin, Meyer (American author)

    Meyer Levin, American author of novels and nonfiction about the Jewish people and Israel. Levin first became known with the novel Yehuda (1931). In 1945 he wrote and produced the first Palestinian feature film, My Father’s House (book, 1947), which tells of Jews who are driven out of Poland and

  • Levin, Rahel (German patroness)

    Rahel Varnhagen von Ense, German literary hostess from early in the 19th century whose soirees were attended by many of the German Romantics, notably August Wilhelm von Schlegel, Friedrich von Schlegel, Ludwig Tieck, and Heinrich Heine. Levin was from a wealthy Jewish family of Berlin. Her brother

  • Levin, Simon A. (American ecologist)

    patch dynamics: History of patch dynamics: In the 1970s, American ecologist Simon A. Levin and American zoologist Robert T. Paine developed a mathematical theory to describe the pattern and dynamics of an intertidal community as a patch mosaic created and maintained by tidal disturbances. By the end of the following decade, patch dynamics had emerged as…

  • Levin, Vladimir (Russian computer programmer)

    cybercrime: Wire fraud: …fraud schemes was orchestrated by Vladimir Levin, a Russian programmer with a computer software firm in St. Petersburg. In 1994, with the aid of dozens of confederates, Levin began transferring some $10 million from subsidiaries of Citibank, N.A., in Argentina and Indonesia to bank accounts in San Francisco, Tel Aviv,…

  • Lévinas, Emmanuel (French philosopher)

    Emmanuel Lévinas, Lithuanian-born French philosopher renowned for his powerful critique of the preeminence of ontology (the philosophical study of being) in the history of Western philosophy, particularly in the work of the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889–1976). Lévinas began his studies

  • Levine, Adam (American musician)

    Adam Levine, American musician, actor, and television personality who first gained fame as the lead singer and chief songwriter of Maroon 5 and later broadened his audience as a coach on the television singing competition The Voice (2011–19). Levine grew up in Los Angeles; his father was the

  • Levine, Adam Noah (American musician)

    Adam Levine, American musician, actor, and television personality who first gained fame as the lead singer and chief songwriter of Maroon 5 and later broadened his audience as a coach on the television singing competition The Voice (2011–19). Levine grew up in Los Angeles; his father was the

  • Levine, Amos (Israeli journalist, writer, and artist)

    Amos Kenan, (Amos Levine), Israeli journalist, writer, and artist (born May 2, 1927, Tel Aviv, British Palestine—died Aug. 4, 2009, Tel Aviv, Israel), was a member of the Lehi (Stern Gang) paramilitary group that fought for Israeli independence from the U.K., but he was strongly influenced by the

  • Levine, Arthur (American playwright, director, and screenwriter)

    Arthur Laurents, (Arthur Levine), American playwright, director, and screenwriter (born July 14, 1917, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died May 5, 2011, New York, N.Y.), wrote the books for several successful Broadway productions, most notably the hit musicals West Side Story (1957; filmed 1961) and Gypsy (1959;

  • Levine, David (American caricaturist and artist)

    David Levine, American caricaturist and artist (born Dec. 20, 1926, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Dec. 29, 2009, New York, N.Y.), for nearly 45 years (1963–2007) produced poignant pen-and-ink drawings for the New York Review of Books (NYRB) that served as commentaries on politicians, writers, celebrities,

  • Levine, Dov (American physicist)

    quasicrystal: Quasiperiodicity: Dov Levine and Paul Steinhardt, physicists at the University of Pennsylvania, proposed a resolution of this apparent conflict. They suggested that the translational order of atoms in quasicrystalline alloys might be quasiperiodic rather than periodic. Quasiperiodic patterns share certain characteristics with periodic patterns. In particular,…

  • Levine, Jack (American artist)

    Jack Levine, painter who was prominent in the American Social Realist school of the 1930s. Trained first at the Jewish Welfare Center in Roxbury, Massachusetts, and later at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Levine also studied at Harvard University from 1929 to 1931. From 1935 to

  • Levine, James (American conductor and pianist)

    James Levine, American conductor and pianist, especially noted for his work with the Metropolitan Opera of New York City. He was considered the preeminent American conductor of his generation. As a piano prodigy, Levine made his debut in 1953 with the Cincinnati Orchestra in Ohio. He studied piano

  • Levine, Larry (American sound engineer)

    Gold Star Studios and the “Wall of Sound”: …of percussion—and he encouraged engineer Larry Levine to swamp everything in echo, seeking to convey intense emotion through texture, atmosphere, and rhythm.

  • Levine, Lawrence William (American historian)

    Lawrence William Levine, American historian (born Feb. 27, 1933, New York, N.Y.—died Oct. 23, 2006, Berkeley, Calif.), spent more than 30 years (1962–94) as a professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley, and wrote pathbreaking books that challenged conventional thought about s

  • Levine, Philip (American poet)

    Philip Levine, American poet of urban working-class life. Levine was of Russian Jewish descent. He studied at Wayne University (now Wayne State University), Detroit (B.A., 1950; M.A., 1955), and the University of Iowa (M.F.A., 1957). He worked at a series of industrial jobs before he began teaching

  • LeVine, Robert (American anthropologist)

    personality: Deviation from trait theory: …anthropologists, such as the American Robert LeVine, to remark that modern personality trait theory is ethnocentric. For example, the folk-psychological concepts and the trait matrices derived from factor analyses include culture-specific assumptions about personal experiences, such as the distinctions between mind and body, natural and supernatural, and intellect and morality,…

  • Levine, Sherrie (American artist)

    Sherrie Levine, American conceptual artist known for remaking famous 20th-century works of art either through photographic reproductions (termed re-photography), drawing, watercolour, or sculpture. Her appropriations are conceptual gestures that question the Modernist myths of originality and

  • Levine, Ted (American actor)

    The Silence of the Lambs: …the meantime, Buffalo Bill (Ted Levine) kidnaps Catherine Martin (Brooke Smith), the daughter of a U.S. senator.

  • Levinger, Moshe (Israeli rabbi and Zionist political activist)

    Moshe Levinger, Israeli rabbi and Zionist political activist (born 1935, Jerusalem—died May 16, 2015, Jerusalem), played a pivotal role in the movement to expand and defend Jewish settlements in the West Bank and other territories occupied by Israel in the aftermath of the Six-Day War of June 1967.

  • Levingston, Roberto Marcelo (president of Argentina)

    Argentina: Military government, 1966–73: General Roberto Marcelo Levingston replaced Onganía, but inflation returned and terrorist acts increased; Levingston was overthrown in March 1971 and replaced by General Alejandro Agustín Lanusse, who promised to reestablish democratic elections by the end of 1973.

  • Levins, Richard (American mathematical ecologist)

    patch dynamics: History of patch dynamics: …developed by American mathematical ecologist Richard Levins and others in the 1970s, and with the theory of island biogeography, developed by American ecologist Robert MacArthur and American biologist E.O. Wilson in the 1960s. (The former theory proposed that the collective activities of several distinct but interacting populations drive the ecological…

  • Levinsohn, Isaac Baer (Russian-Jewish author)

    Hebrew literature: Romanticism: …the Enlightenment proper began with Isaac Baer Levinsohn in the Ukraine and with Mordecai Aaron Ginzberg (Günzburg), in Lithuania. In the 1820s an orthodox reaction set in, coinciding with the rise of a Romanticist Hebrew school of writers. A.D. Lebensohn wrote fervent love songs to the Hebrew language, and his…

  • Levinson, André (Russian writer)

    dance criticism: The 20th century: The Russian writer André Levinson provided early assessments of the Diaghilev troupe, working first for several publications in St. Petersburg and then, after 1918, in Paris. Levinson gained an international reputation through his criticism of ballet as well as other dance forms, exemplified by Fuller, Duncan, and the…

  • Levinson, Barry (American director and screenwriter)

    Barry Levinson, American film director and screenwriter known for his versatility. Levinson worked as a comedy writer for Carol Burnett and Mel Brooks in the 1970s. During that time he also cowrote the screenplay for the crime drama …And Justice for All, which earned him an Academy Award

  • Levinson, Daniel J. (American psychologist)

    human behaviour: Personality and social development: The American psychologist Daniel J. Levinson also divides adult life into qualitatively distinct periods. Confining his study to men, Levinson identified five eras within their lives that are not stages of biological, psychological, or social development but that together constitute a life-cycle structure. The eras are (1) preadulthood…

  • Levinson, Harry (American psychologist)

    Harry Levinson, American psychologist (born Jan. 16, 1922, Port Jervis, N.Y.—died June 26, 2012, Delray Beach, Fla.), applied psychoanalytic theory to workplace dynamics, finding connections between job conditions and mental health, a discovery that moved corporate human-resources strategies away

  • Levinson, Mon (American sculptor)

    Mon Levinson, American sculptor (born Jan. 6, 1926, New York, N.Y.—died March 25, 2014, New York City), manipulated nonart materials, particularly plexiglass, to create optical works (Op art) that played with visual perception; he painstakingly layered, scored, and bent plexiglass (by warming it)

  • Levinson, Salmon Oliver (American lawyer)

    Salmon Oliver Levinson, lawyer who originated and publicized the “outlawry of war” movement in the United States. Levinson practiced law in Chicago from 1891 and became noted for his skill in reorganizing the finances of distressed corporations. In an article in the New Republic, March 9, 1918, he

  • levirate (sociology)

    Levirate, custom or law decreeing that a widow should, or in rare cases must, marry her dead husband’s brother. The term comes from the Latin levir, meaning “husband’s brother.” The “brother” may be a biological sibling of the deceased or a person who is socially classified as such. Where the

  • Lévis (Quebec, Canada)

    Lévis, city, Chaudière-Appalaches region, southern Quebec province, Canada. It is located on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, opposite the city of Quebec, with which it is linked by ferry. The settlement, founded in 1647, was formerly called Aubigny in honour of the Duke of Richmond (who

  • Lévis-Lauzon (Quebec, Canada)

    Lévis, city, Chaudière-Appalaches region, southern Quebec province, Canada. It is located on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, opposite the city of Quebec, with which it is linked by ferry. The settlement, founded in 1647, was formerly called Aubigny in honour of the Duke of Richmond (who

  • Levison, Harold (American astronomer)

    comet: Dynamics: In 1996 American astronomer Harold Levison introduced a new taxonomy that involved a quantity called the Tisserand parameter:

  • Levisticum officinale (herb)

    Lovage, (Levisticum officinale), herb of the family Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) native to southern Europe. It is cultivated for its stalks and foliage, which are used for tea, as a vegetable, and to flavour foods, particularly meats. Its rhizomes (underground stems) are used as a carminative and its

  • Levita, Elijah Bokher (Italian grammarian)

    Elijah Bokher Levita, German-born Jewish grammarian whose writings and teaching furthered the study of Hebrew in European Christendom at a time of widespread hostility toward the Jews. Levita went to Italy early in life and in 1504 settled at Padua. There he wrote a manual of Hebrew (1508) that was

  • Levitan, Isaak Ilyich (Russian painter)

    Isaak Ilyich Levitan, Lithuanian-born Jewish painter who was one of Russia’s most influential landscape artists and the founder of what has been called the “mood landscape.” Levitan’s childhood and youth were marked by poverty and the death of his parents; his mother died when he was 15 years old

  • levitation

    Levitation, rising of a human body off the ground, in apparent defiance of the law of gravity. The term designates such alleged occurrences in the lives of saints and of spiritualist mediums, generally during a séance; levitation of furniture and other objects during a séance has also been

  • Levitch, Joseph (American comedian)

    Jerry Lewis, American comedian, actor, and director whose unrestrained comic style made him one of the most popular performers of the 1950s and ’60s. Lewis was born into a vaudeville family, and at age 12 he developed a comedy act in which he mimed to records. He dropped out of high school in order

  • Levites (ancient Israelite history)

    Levite, member of a group of clans of religious functionaries in ancient Israel who apparently were given a special religious status, conjecturally for slaughtering idolaters of the golden calf during the time of Moses (Ex. 32:25–29). They thus replaced the firstborn sons of Israel who were

  • Leviticus (Old Testament)

    Leviticus, (Latin: “And He Called”) third book of the Latin Vulgate Bible, the name of which designates its contents as a book (or manual) primarily concerned with the priests and their duties. Although Leviticus is basically a book of laws, it also contains some narrative (chapters 8–9, 10:1–7,

  • Levitra (drug)

    PDE-5 inhibitor: …as Viagra) and vardenafil (Levitra). PDE-5 inhibitors work by blocking, or inhibiting, the action of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5), an enzyme naturally present in the corpus cavernosum, the spongy erectile tissue of the penis. Under normal circumstances, sexual arousal in the male stimulates neurons in the corpus cavernosum to release nitric…

  • Levitsky, Dmitry Grigoryevich (Ukrainian-Russian painter)

    Dmitry Grigoryevich Levitsky, Ukrainian Russian artist who was the foremost portraitist of the era of Catherine the Great and conveyor of the ideals of the Enlightenment in the Russian Empire. The son of a priest who was also a master of Ukrainian gravure printing, Levitsky inherited both his

  • Levitsky, Ivan (Ukrainian author)

    Ivan Levitsky, Ukrainian Realist novelist of the postserfdom reform period. He drew upon his background as a seminary student and, later, a provincial teacher, to depict the educated and lower classes in some of the earliest social novels in Ukrainian literature. His works include Prichepa (1869;

  • Levitt and Sons, Inc. (American company)

    United States: Postwar domestic reorganization: …pioneered by the firm of Levitt and Sons, Inc., and other developers. All this activity created millions of new jobs. The Serviceman’s Readjustment Act of 1944, known as the G.I. Bill of Rights, also helped ease military personnel back into civilian life. It provided veterans with loans, educational subsidies, and…

  • Levitt, Helen (American photographer and filmmaker)

    Helen Levitt, American street photographer and filmmaker whose work captures the bustle, squalor, and beauty of everyday life in New York City. Levitt began her career in photography at age 18 working in a portrait studio in the Bronx. After seeing the works of French photographer Henri-Cartier

  • Levitt, Michael (American-British-Israeli chemist)

    Michael Levitt, American British Israeli chemist who was awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for developing accurate computer models of chemical reactions that were able to use features of both classical physics and quantum mechanics. He shared the prize with American-Austrian chemist Martin

  • Levitt, Steven D. (American economist)

    Steven D. Levitt, American economist whose work has been influential in many social science disciplines, including political economy, sociology, political science, the economics of crime, and the study of law. In 2003 he received the John Bates Clark Medal, which is awarded annually by the American

  • Levitt, Steven David (American economist)

    Steven D. Levitt, American economist whose work has been influential in many social science disciplines, including political economy, sociology, political science, the economics of crime, and the study of law. In 2003 he received the John Bates Clark Medal, which is awarded annually by the American

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