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  • leucophore (biology)

    chromatophore: leucophores (white). The distribution of the chromatophores and the pigments they contain determine the colour patterns of an organism.

  • Leucophoyx thula (bird)

    Snowy egret, (Egretta thula), white New World egret (family Ardeidae). It is about 24 inches (60 cm) long and has filmy recurved plumes on the back and head. Formerly hunted for its plumes, it ranges from the United States to Chile and

  • Leucoraja erinacea (fish)
  • leucorrhoea (medical disorder)

    Leukorrhea, flow of a whitish, yellowish, or greenish discharge from the vagina of the female that may be normal or that may be a sign of infection. Such discharges may originate from the vagina, ovaries, fallopian tubes, or, most commonly, the cervix. Leukorrhea may occur during pregnancy and is

  • Leucoselenia (sponge genus)

    Leucosolenia, genus of tubular branched sponges of the class Calcispongiae (phylum Porifera). Found in tide pools and on wharves and represented by numerous species, the widespread genus includes most of the asconoids, structurally the simplest sponges. Most species of Leucosolenia are 2.5

  • Leucosolenia (sponge genus)

    Leucosolenia, genus of tubular branched sponges of the class Calcispongiae (phylum Porifera). Found in tide pools and on wharves and represented by numerous species, the widespread genus includes most of the asconoids, structurally the simplest sponges. Most species of Leucosolenia are 2.5

  • Leucosporidiales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Leucosporidiales Mycoparasitic; mycelia lack clamp connections; septate basidia; example genera include Leucosporidiella, Leucosporidium, and Mastigobasidium. Order Sporidiales Nonpathogenic; basidia may be very long; hyphae with clamp connections; some species emit peachlike odour; example genera include Sporidiobolus

  • Leucothea (Greek mythology)

    Leucothea, (Greek: White Goddess [of the Foam]), in Greek mythology, a sea goddess first mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey, in which she rescued the Greek hero Odysseus from drowning. She was customarily identified with Ino, daughter of the Phoenician Cadmus; because she cared for the infant god

  • Leucotho? (plant genus)

    Leucotho?, genus of about eight species of shrubs in the heath family (Ericaceae), native to North America and eastern Asia. Species such as highland doghobble (Leucotho? fontanesiana) are grown as ornamentals, chiefly for their foliage and attractive flowers. The plants grow to about 1.8 metres (6

  • Leucotho? fontanesiana (plant)

    Leucotho?: Species such as highland doghobble (Leucotho? fontanesiana) are grown as ornamentals, chiefly for their foliage and attractive flowers.

  • leucotomy (surgery)

    Lobotomy, surgical procedure in which the nerve pathways in a lobe or lobes of the brain are severed from those in other areas. The procedure formerly was used as a radical therapeutic measure to help grossly disturbed patients with schizophrenia, manic depression and mania (bipolar disorder), and

  • Leuctra, Battle of (Greek history [371 bce])

    Battle of Leuctra, (6 July 371 bce). Fought in Boeotia, Greece, the Battle of Leuctra made Thebes the leading military power among the Greek city-states, ending the long dominance of Sparta. The battle also marked a revolutionary advance in battlefield tactics and demonstrated the effectiveness of

  • Leuenberger, Niklaus (Swiss hero)

    Niklaus Leuenberger, Swiss peasant hero, spokesman for rural discontent, and leader of the peasant revolt at Bern (1653), for which he earned the sobriquet King of the Peasants. By the mid-17th century, Swiss peasants had come to bitterly resent the domination of the towns and to openly complain of

  • leuga (measurement)

    League, any of several European units of measurement ranging from 2.4 to 4.6 statute miles (3.9 to 7.4 km). In English-speaking countries the land league is generally accepted as 3 statute miles (4.83 km), although varying lengths from 7,500 feet to 15,000 feet (2.29 to 4.57 km) were sometimes

  • leukapheresis (biology)

    prostate cancer: Treatment: …using a procedure known as leukapheresis (the separation of leukocytes, or white blood cells, from other blood components). The APCs are then cultured in a laboratory, where they are grown in the presence of a protein that occurs on the surface of prostate cancer cells. This process results in APC…

  • Leukas (island, Greece)

    Leucas, Greek island in the Ionian Sea (Modern Greek: Ióvio Pélagos). It constitutes a dímos (municipality) and with the island of Meganísi forms the perifereiakí enótita (regional unit) of Levkás in the Ionian Islands (Iónia Nisiá) periféreia (region), western Greece. The 117-square-mile

  • Leuke Akte (Syria)

    Latakia, city and mu?āfa?ah (governorate), northwestern Syria. The city, capital of the governorate, is situated on the low-lying Ra?s Ziyārah promontory that projects into the Mediterranean Sea. It was known to the Phoenicians as Ramitha and to the Greeks as Leuke Akte. Its present name is a

  • leukemia (pathology)

    Leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissues characterized by a large increase in the numbers of white blood cells (leukocytes) in the circulation or bone marrow. A number of different leukemias are classified according to the course of the disease and the predominant type of white blood cell

  • leukemia inhibitory factor (biology)

    stem cell: Mouse embryonic stem cells: …indefinitely in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a glycoprotein cytokine. If cultured mouse embryonic stem cells are injected into an early mouse embryo at the blastocyst stage, they will become integrated into the embryo and produce cells that differentiate into most or all of the tissue types that…

  • Leukerbad (Switzerland)

    Switzerland: Rural communities: … in the Rhine valley and Leukerbad in Valais canton are noted as spas. Valley forks, where the traffic from two valleys combines, were natural sites for settlement. Two of the best examples are Martigny (the Roman city of Octodurum), at the meeting of the Great Saint Bernard Pass route and…

  • leukocyte (biology)

    White blood cell, a cellular component of the blood that lacks hemoglobin, has a nucleus, is capable of motility, and defends the body against infection and disease by ingesting foreign materials and cellular debris, by destroying infectious agents and cancer cells, or by producing antibodies. A

  • leukocyte-poor red blood cell (biology)

    therapeutics: Blood and blood cells: Leukocyte-poor red blood cells are obtained by employing a filter to remove white blood cells (leukocytes) from a unit of packed red blood cells. This type of transfusion is used to prevent febrile (fever) reactions in patients who have had multiple febrile transfusion reactions in…

  • leukocytosis (medical disorder)

    Leukocytosis, abnormally high number of white blood cells (leukocytes) in the blood circulation, defined as more than 10,000 leukocytes per cubic millimetre of blood. Leukocytosis is most commonly the result of infection. It may also occur after strenuous exercise, convulsions (e.g., epilepsy),

  • leukoderma (medical disorder)

    Vitiligo, patchy loss of melanin pigment from the skin. Though the pigment-making cells of the skin, or melanocytes, are structurally intact, they have lost the ability to synthesize the pigment. The reason for this condition is unclear; research suggests that it may be an autoimmune condition.

  • leukoma (pathology)

    human eye: The outermost coat: …an opaque patch called a leukoma, may occur.

  • leukopenia (medical disorder)

    Leukopenia, abnormally low number of white blood cells (leukocytes) in the blood circulation, defined as less than 5,000 leukocytes per cubic millimetre of blood. Leukopenia often accompanies certain infections, especially those caused by viruses or protozoans. Other causes of the condition include

  • leukoplakia (medical disorder)

    Leukoplakia, precancerous tumour of the mucous membranes, usually seen in the mouth or on the tongue or cheeks, but also known to occur on the lips, as well as on the vagina, vulva, or anus. Leukoplakia first appears as a small, smooth, white spot (that cannot be scraped off) but develops into a

  • leukorrhea (medical disorder)

    Leukorrhea, flow of a whitish, yellowish, or greenish discharge from the vagina of the female that may be normal or that may be a sign of infection. Such discharges may originate from the vagina, ovaries, fallopian tubes, or, most commonly, the cervix. Leukorrhea may occur during pregnancy and is

  • leukotome (instrument)

    Walter Jackson Freeman II: The rise of prefrontal lobotomy: …an instrument known as the leukotome, which contained a deployable wire loop designed to cut sections of tissue. (Later models used a steel band to compress tissue cores.) The procedure of drilling holes in the front of the head and creating cores of brain matter with the instrument became known…

  • leukotriene (biochemistry)

    carboxylic acid: Unsaturated aliphatic acids: substances, the prostaglandins and the leukotrienes, both of which are also unsaturated carboxylic acids. Examples are PGE2 (a prostaglandin) and LTB4 (a leukotriene). The symbol PG represents prostaglandin, E indicates the presence of a keto group on the five-membered ring, and the subscript 2 indicates two double bonds. Similarly, LT…

  • leukotriene modifier (drug)

    asthma: Treatment and management of asthma: …receptor antagonists (LTRAs; sometimes called leukotriene modifiers), which interrupt the chemical signaling within the body that leads to constriction and inflammation. These medications may be taken on a long-term daily basis to maintain and control persistent asthma (long-term control medications), or they may be used to provide rapid relief from…

  • leukotriene receptor antagonist (drug)

    asthma: Treatment and management of asthma: …receptor antagonists (LTRAs; sometimes called leukotriene modifiers), which interrupt the chemical signaling within the body that leads to constriction and inflammation. These medications may be taken on a long-term daily basis to maintain and control persistent asthma (long-term control medications), or they may be used to provide rapid relief from…

  • Leung Chiu-wai, Tony (Hong Kong actor)

    Wong Kar-Wai: Tony Leung. Set in 1960 in Hong Kong, the film follows Yuddy, a feckless ladies’ man, as he rejects the love of two women, as well as his foster mother, to seek his birth mother. Time first emerges as a major theme in Wong’s work…

  • Leunianum (Italy)

    Legnano, city, Lombardia (Lombardy) regione, northern Italy, on the Olona River. An unimportant Roman settlement called Leunianum, it became the site of a fortified castle of the bishops of Milan in the 11th century and in 1176 was the scene of a decisive defeat of the Holy Roman emperor Frederick

  • Leurechon, Jean (French scholar)

    number game: Pioneers and imitators: In 1624 a French Jesuit, Jean Leurechon, writing under the pen name of van Etten, published Récréations mathématiques. This volume struck the popular fancy, passing through at least 30 editions before 1700, despite the fact that it was based largely on the work of Bachet, from whom he took the…

  • Leuresthes tenuis (fish)

    Grunion, (species Leuresthes tenuis), small Pacific fish of the family Atherinidae (order Atheriniformes). The species is found in the Pacific Ocean along the western coast of the United States. A unique feature of the grunion’s breeding biology results in its spawning on particular nights during

  • Leuser, Mount (mountain, Indonesia)

    Aceh: Geography: Aceh is largely mountainous; Mounts Leuser and Abong Abong rise to elevations of 11,092 feet (3,381 metres) and 9,793 feet (2,985 metres), respectively. Except in the extreme north, there is a fairly wide coastal plain, and the rivers are short and have little value for shipping. The southwestern coast is…

  • Leute von Seldwyla (work by Keller)

    Gottfried Keller: …Die Leute von Seldwyla (1856–74; The People of Seldwyla) and Sieben Legenden (1872; Seven Legends). His last novel, Martin Salander (1886), deals with political life in Switzerland in his time.

  • Leuthen, Battle of (Seven Years’ War [1757])

    Seven Years' War: 1757: …support Brunswick-Bevern, and at the Battle of Leuthen (December 5, 1757), he won the greatest of his victories. With 43,000 men, he attacked the 72,000 under Charles of Lorraine and utterly routed them with an unexpected cavalry charge followed by an artillery bombardment. Frederick suffered 6,000 casualties, but Charles lost…

  • Leutnant Gustl (work by Schnitzler)

    Arthur Schnitzler: …successful novel, Leutnant Gustl (1901; None but the Brave), dealing with a similar theme, was the first European masterpiece written as an interior monologue. In Flucht in die Finsternis (1931; Flight into Darkness) he showed the onset of madness, stage by stage. In the play Professor Bernhardi (1912) and the…

  • Leutwein, Theodor (German military officer)

    German-Herero conflict of 1904–07: Conflict: Theodor Leutwein, military commander and governor of the colony, was in charge of the German response. Since the Herero were well armed and, moreover, significantly outnumbered the German colonial garrison, he favoured a negotiated settlement of the conflict. He was, however, overruled by the General…

  • Leutwyler, Heinrich (Swiss physicist)

    quantum chromodynamics: …European physicists Harald Fritzsch and Heinrich Leutwyler, together with American physicist Murray Gell-Mann. In particular, they employed the general field theory developed in the 1950s by Chen Ning Yang and Robert Mills, in which the carrier particles of a force can themselves radiate further carrier particles. (This is different from…

  • Leutze, Emanuel (German-American painter)

    Emanuel Leutze, German-born American historical painter whose picture Washington Crossing the Delaware (1851) numbers among the most popular and widely reproduced images of an American historical event. Leutze was brought to the United States as a child. In 1841 he returned to Germany to study at

  • Leutze, Emanuel Gottlieb (German-American painter)

    Emanuel Leutze, German-born American historical painter whose picture Washington Crossing the Delaware (1851) numbers among the most popular and widely reproduced images of an American historical event. Leutze was brought to the United States as a child. In 1841 he returned to Germany to study at

  • Leuven (Belgium)

    Leuven, municipality, Flanders Region, central Belgium. It lies along the Dyle (Dijle) River and is connected by canal with the Scheldt (Schelde). The city is about 16 miles (26 km) east of Brussels. It was founded in the 9th century around a fortress built by a German emperor against the Normans,

  • Leuven, Catholic University of (university, Leuven, Belgium)

    Catholic University of Leuven, renowned institution of higher learning founded in 1425 in Leuven (Louvain), Brabant (now in Belgium). The university was a unitary entity until 1970 when it was partitioned, based on linguistic differences, into two separate universities. In the one university

  • Leuven, Katholieke Universiteit te (university, Leuven, Belgium)

    Catholic University of Leuven, renowned institution of higher learning founded in 1425 in Leuven (Louvain), Brabant (now in Belgium). The university was a unitary entity until 1970 when it was partitioned, based on linguistic differences, into two separate universities. In the one university

  • lev (currency)

    Bulgaria: Finance: …board, the national currency (lev) was tied to the German mark. Upon the debut of the euro in 2002, the lev was pegged to that currency at a fixed rate. Bulgarian plans to adopt the euro stalled in the wake of the euro-zone debt crisis that began in 2009,…

  • Lev, Zdeněk (Bohemian noble)

    Czechoslovak history: The Jagiellonian kings: …of loyal lords, he relieved Zdeněk Lev of Ro?mitál of the office of supreme burgrave in February 1523 and appointed Prince Karel of Minstrberk, a grandson of George of Poděbrady, to that key position in provincial administration. Religious controversies that flared up soon after Martin Luther’s attack on indulgences (October…

  • levade (horse movement)

    horsemanship: Dressage: …more upward than forward; the levade, in which the horse stands balanced on its hindlegs, its forelegs drawn in; the courvet, which is a jump forward in the levade position; and the croupade, ballotade, and capriole, a variety of spectacular airs in which the horse jumps and lands again in…

  • Levallois-Perret (France)

    Levallois-Perret, city, Hauts-de-Seine département, ?le-de-France région, France. The city is a northwestern industrial and residential suburb of Paris and is located on the right bank of the Seine River, 4 miles (6.5 km) northwest of Notre Dame cathedral. With an area of less than 1 square mile

  • Levalloisian stone-flaking technique (anthropology)

    Levalloisian stone-flaking technique, toolmaking technique of prehistoric Europe and Africa, characterized by the production of large flakes from a tortoise core (prepared core shaped much like an inverted tortoise shell). Such flakes, seldom further trimmed, were flat on one side, had sharp c

  • levallorphan (drug)

    Levallorphan, drug derived from morphine that can activate certain receptors and inhibit others. Levallorphan’s mixed actions are a result of its ability to bind to two different kinds of opioid receptors (so-called because they are the natural receptors for opiates, or narcotics). At kappa (κ)

  • levalto (dance)

    La volta, (Italian: “the turn,” or “turning”) 16th-century leaping and turning dance for couples, originating in Italy and popular at French and German court balls until about 1750. Performed with a notoriously intimate embrace, it became respectable, but never completely dignified, after Queen

  • Levan, Henry Robert Merrill (American composer and lyricist)

    Bob Merrill, American composer-lyricist (born May 17, 1921?, Atlantic City, N.J.—died Feb. 17, 1998, Beverly Hills, Calif.), wrote prolifically for both the pop music market and the Broadway musical stage. Although he could not read music and composed his tunes on a toy xylophone, 25 of his songs m

  • Levant

    Levant, (from the French lever, “to rise,” as in sunrise, meaning the east), historically, the countries along the eastern Mediterranean shores. Common use of the term is associated with Venetian and other trading ventures and the establishment of commerce with cities such as Tyre and Sidon as a

  • Levant sparrowhawk (bird)

    sparrowhawk: The Levant sparrowhawk, or shikra (A. brevipes), is gray above and brown barred white below. It occurs from southeastern Europe throughout most of continental southern Asia and subequatorial Africa. For the small falcon called sparrow hawk in the United States, see kestrel.

  • Levant Trilogy, The (work by Manning)

    The Balkan Trilogy: …continued in Manning’s later series, The Levant Trilogy.

  • levante (wind)

    Levanter, strong wind of the western Mediterranean Sea and the southern coasts of France and Spain. It is mild, damp, and rainy and is most common in spring and fall. Its name is derived from Levant, the land at the eastern end of the Mediterranean, and refers to the wind’s easterly direction. The

  • levanter (wind)

    Levanter, strong wind of the western Mediterranean Sea and the southern coasts of France and Spain. It is mild, damp, and rainy and is most common in spring and fall. Its name is derived from Levant, the land at the eastern end of the Mediterranean, and refers to the wind’s easterly direction. The

  • Levantine Basin (basin, Mediterranean Sea)

    Mediterranean Sea: Natural divisions: …the Ionian Basin from the Levantine Basin to the south of Anatolia (Turkey); and the island of Crete separates the Levantine Basin from the Aegean Sea, which comprises that part of the Mediterranean Sea north of Crete and bounded on the west and north by the coast of Greece and…

  • Levassor, émile (French inventor)

    émile Levassor, French businessman and inventor who developed the basic configuration of the automobile. Levassor took over a firm that made woodworking machinery. When René Panhard joined the firm in 1886, the renamed firm of Panhard and Levassor began to make metal-sawing machines as well. Around

  • levator ani muscle (anatomy)

    human muscle system: Changes in the muscles of the trunk: …seen in the musculature, the levator ani, that supports the floor of the pelvis and that also controls the passage of feces. The loss of the tail in all apes has led to a major rearrangement of that muscle. There is more overlap and fusion between the various parts of…

  • levator muscle (anatomy)

    Levator muscle, any of the muscles that raise a body part. In humans these include the levator anguli oris, which raises the corner of the mouth; the levator ani, collective name for a thin sheet of muscle that stretches across the pelvic cavity and helps hold the pelvic viscera in position,

  • levator palatoquadrati muscle (anatomy)

    muscle: Tetrapod musculature: The levator palatoquadrati, which elevates the upper jaw in jawed fishes, is retained as a jaw muscle in birds and in some reptiles, as they share the ability of fishes to move the upper jaw. The adductor mandibulae is much altered in tetrapods, although its overall…

  • levator palpebri muscle (anatomy)

    eyelid: …of the lid-raising muscle, the levator of the upper lid. Impulses for closing come by way of the facial (seventh cranial) nerve, and for opening by way of the oculomotor (third cranial) nerve. The lid borders are kept lubricated by an oily secretion (called sebum) of the meibomian glands. This…

  • levator scapulae muscle (anatomy)

    muscle: Tetrapod musculature: …the neighbouring ribs, and the levator scapulae, which are fused with serratus along its caudal (tail-end) border. Levator scapulae consist of fibres running more anteriorly to ribs or transverse processes of the neck. Mammals and some reptiles have a third such muscle, attaching the pectoral girdle to the region of…

  • leveche (wind)

    Spain: Climate: …the Strait of Gibraltar; the leveche brings a hot, dry, dust-laden wind that blights vegetation in spring from the southern sector to the Spanish Levantine lowlands (the provinces of Castellón, Valencia, and Alicante); and in spring and summer a wind from the same sector, the solano, carries unbearably hot, dry,…

  • levee (civil engineering)

    Levee, any low ridge or earthen embankment built along the edges of a stream or river channel to prevent flooding of the adjacent land. Artificial levees are typically needed to control the flow of rivers meandering through broad, flat floodplains. Levees are usually embankments of dirt built wide

  • levée en masse (French history)

    France: The Army of the Republic: …August 1793 it decreed the lévee en masse—a “requisition” of all able-bodied, unmarried men between the ages of 18 and 25. Despite massive draft evasion and desertion, within a year almost three-quarters of a million men were under arms, the citizen-soldiers merged with line-army troops in new units called demibrigades.…

  • level (tool)

    Level, device for establishing a horizontal plane. It consists of a small glass tube containing alcohol or similar liquid and an air bubble; the tube is sealed and fixed horizontally in a wooden or metallic block or frame with a smooth lower surface. The glass tube is slightly bowed, and

  • level (mining)

    mining: Vertical openings: shafts and raises: …working horizons is called a level. The shaft is equipped with elevators (called cages) by which workers, machines, and material enter the mine. Ore is transported to the surface in special conveyances called skips.

  • level premium

    insurance: Types of contracts: …policies are issued on a level-premium basis, which makes it necessary to charge more than the true cost of the insurance in the earlier years of the contract in order to make up for much higher costs in the later years; the so-called overcharges in the earlier years are not…

  • level surface (geophysics)

    ocean current: Pressure gradients: …along a horizontal plane or geopotential surface, a surface perpendicular to the direction of the gravity acceleration. Horizontal gradients of pressure, though much smaller than vertical changes in pressure, give rise to ocean currents.

  • level-tone language (linguistics)

    Tai languages: Phonological characteristics: …Thai tones are as follows: level (using no diacritic), low (using a grave accent), falling (using a circumflex), high (using an acute accent), and rising (using a wedge, or ha?ek); for example, maa (with no diacritic) ‘to come,’ màak (with a grave accent) ‘areca nut,’ maak (with a circumflex) ‘much,’…

  • Leveler (English history)

    Leveler, member of a republican and democratic faction in England during the period of the Civil Wars and Commonwealth. The name Levelers was given by enemies of the movement to suggest that its supporters wished to “level men’s estates.” The Leveler movement originated in 1645–46 among radical s

  • leveler (psychology)

    George S. Klein: …fall into two general categories: levelers, who perceive similarities between things and overlook differences, and sharpeners, who see contrasts and maintain a high level of awareness of differences between stimuli. In 1951 Klein and Herbert J. Schlesinger introduced the term cognitive style to refer to the combination of several cognitive…

  • Levelers, Organization of (Japanese organization)

    burakumin: …a national organization, Suiheisha (Organization of Levelers), was created, and it engaged in various school boycotts, tax revolts, and other protests until its disbandment in 1941. After World War II, in 1946, a more militant and politically active organization was formed: the Buraku Kaihō Zenkoku Iinkai (All-Japan Committee for…

  • levelized cost of electricity (energy)

    nuclear power: Economics: …industry is known as the levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, which is the cost of generating one kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity averaged over the lifetime of the power plant. The LCOE is also known as the “busbar cost,” as it represents the cost of the electricity up to the…

  • Leveller (English history)

    Leveler, member of a republican and democratic faction in England during the period of the Civil Wars and Commonwealth. The name Levelers was given by enemies of the movement to suggest that its supporters wished to “level men’s estates.” The Leveler movement originated in 1645–46 among radical s

  • levelling effect (chemistry)

    acid–base reaction: Acidic solvents: …often referred to as a levelling effect of the solvent. The converse is true for acids; for example, the strong mineral acids, nitric, hydrochloric, sulfuric, hydrobromic, and perchloric (HNO3, HCl, H2SO4, HBr, and HClO4) are “levelled” in aqueous solution by complete conversion to the hydronium ion, but in acetic acid…

  • levels-of analysis question (political science)

    international relations: Structures, institutions, and levels of analysis: …neorealist structural theory is the levels-of-analysis question—i.e., the question of whether international inquiry should be focused at the individual, state, international-system, or other level. Introduced in the 1950s as part of an attempt to make research in international relations more scientific, the levels-of-analysis question provided a conceptual basis for addressing…

  • leven van Rozeke van Dalen, Het (work by Buysse)

    Cyriel Buysse: In such subsequent works as Het leven van Rozeke van Dalen (1906; “The Life of Rozeke van Dalen”), he shunned the raw sentimentality of his early writings. His novel Het ezelken (1910; “The Little Donkey”) contains a satirical anti-Catholic vein, which alienated him from his predominantly Roman Catholic Flemish readership.

  • Leven, Alexander Leslie, 1st earl of (Scottish army commander)

    Alexander Leslie, 1st earl of Leven, commander of the Scottish army that from 1644 to 1646 fought on the side of Parliament in the English Civil Wars between Parliament and King Charles I. Leslie joined the Swedish army in 1605 and served brilliantly in the Thirty Years’ War in central Europe. In

  • Leven, Alexander Leslie, 1st earl of, Lord Balgonie (Scottish army commander)

    Alexander Leslie, 1st earl of Leven, commander of the Scottish army that from 1644 to 1646 fought on the side of Parliament in the English Civil Wars between Parliament and King Charles I. Leslie joined the Swedish army in 1605 and served brilliantly in the Thirty Years’ War in central Europe. In

  • Leven, Boris (American art director and designer)
  • Leven, Loch (lake, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Loch Leven, lake in Perth and Kinross council area, central Scotland, at the centre of the historic county of Kinross-shire. Roughly circular in shape and about 3 miles (5 km) in diameter, it is one of the shallowest of the Scottish lochs—with a mean depth of 15 feet (4.5 metres)—and has become

  • levend (Ottoman rebel band)

    Ottoman Empire: Social unrest: …joined rebel bands, known as levends and Jelālīs (Celalis)—the latter fomenting what became known as the Jelālī Revolts—which took what they could from those who remained to cultivate and trade.

  • Levene, Phoebus (American chemist)

    Phoebus Levene, Russian-born American chemist and pioneer in the study of nucleic acids. On receiving an M.D. degree from the St. Petersburg Imperial Medical Academy in 1891, Levene fled from Russian anti-Semitism and settled in New York City. While practicing medicine there, he studied chemistry

  • Levene, Phoebus Aaron Theodor (American chemist)

    Phoebus Levene, Russian-born American chemist and pioneer in the study of nucleic acids. On receiving an M.D. degree from the St. Petersburg Imperial Medical Academy in 1891, Levene fled from Russian anti-Semitism and settled in New York City. While practicing medicine there, he studied chemistry

  • Levens, Peter (English lexicographer)

    dictionary: From Classical times to 1604: The first rhyming dictionary, by Peter Levens, was produced in 1570—Manipulus Vocabulorum. A Dictionary of English and Latin Words, Set Forth in Such Order, as None Heretofore Hath Been.

  • Leventon, Alla (Russian actress)

    Alla Nazimova, Russian-born and Russian-trained actress who won fame on the American stage and screen. At age 17 Alla Leventon abandoned her training as a violinist and went to Moscow to work in theatre with V.I. Nemirovich-Danchenko and Konstantin Stanislavsky. She graduated into the Moscow Art

  • Leventritt Foundation (American organization)

    Itzhak Perlman: (The Leventritt Foundation awarded its violin and piano prizes only sporadically; the rarity of the prize and the value of the guaranteed engagements that came with it separated the Leventritt from other competitions.) As well as performing virtually the entire classical concert repertoire, he occasionally played…

  • lever (mechanics)

    Lever, simple machine used to amplify physical force. All early people used the lever in some form, for moving heavy stones or as digging sticks for land cultivation. The principle of the lever was used in the swape, or shaduf, a long lever pivoted near one end with a platform or water container

  • Lever Art Gallery (museum, Bebington, England, United Kingdom)

    Lever Art Gallery, in Port Sunlight, a model village founded for workers in Bebington, Cheshire (now in Merseyside), Eng. The museum was a gift to the public of the 1st Viscount Leverhulme, as a memorial to his wife, who died in 1913. The building was begun in 1914 and opened in December 1922. The

  • Lever Brothers (British company)

    Lever Brothers, predecessor company of Unilever

  • lever escapement (watchmaking)

    Thomas Mudge: …was the inventor of the lever escapement, the most dependable and widely used device for regulating the movement of the spring-driven watch.

  • Lever House (building, New York City, New York, United States)

    Gordon Bunshaft: His design of the Lever House skyscraper in New York City (1952) exerted a strong influence in American architecture.

  • Lever of Manchester, Harold Lever, Baron (British politician)

    Harold Lever Lever of Manchester, BARON, British millionaire, Labour Party politician, and economic adviser to Labour Prime Ministers Harold Wilson and James Callaghan (b. Jan. 15, 1914--d. Aug. 6,

  • Lever, Charles James (British author)

    Charles James Lever, Irish editor and writer whose novels, set in post-Napoleonic Ireland and Europe, featured lively, picaresque heroes. In 1831, after study at Trinity College, Cambridge, he qualified for the practice of medicine. His gambling and extravagance, however, left him short of money

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