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  • lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community (sociology)

    Gay Pride: …times in other countries, of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) identity. Gay Pride commemorates the Stonewall riots, which began in the early hours of June 28, 1969, after police raided the Stonewall Inn bar in New York City’s Greenwich Village neighbourhood. Gay Pride typically involves a series of…

  • lesbianism

    Lesbianism, the tendency of a human female to be emotionally and usually sexually attracted to other females, or the state of being so attracted. As it was first used in the late 16th century, the word Lesbian was the capitalized adjectival term referring to the Greek island of Lesbos. Its

  • Lesbos (island, Greece)

    Lésbos, largest island after Crete (Modern Greek: Kríti) and Euboea (évvoia) in the Aegean Sea. It constitutes a dímos (municipality) and a perifereiakí enótita (regional unit) in the North Aegean (Vóreio Aigaío) periféreia (region), eastern Greece. Mytilene (Mitilíni) is the chief town of the

  • Lésbos (island, Greece)

    Lésbos, largest island after Crete (Modern Greek: Kríti) and Euboea (évvoia) in the Aegean Sea. It constitutes a dímos (municipality) and a perifereiakí enótita (regional unit) in the North Aegean (Vóreio Aigaío) periféreia (region), eastern Greece. Mytilene (Mitilíni) is the chief town of the

  • Lescarbot, Marc (French author)

    Canadian literature: The French regime, 1535–1763: …in New France belongs to Marc Lescarbot, whose pageant Le Théatre de Neptune en la Nouvelle-France (The Theatre of Neptune in New France) was presented at Port-Royal in 1606. On his return to France, he published in 1609 Histoire de la Nouvelle-France (History of New France) and Les Muses de…

  • Lescaze, William (American architect)

    William Lescaze, Swiss-born American architect best known for conceiving, in conjunction with George Howe, the Philadelphia Savings Fund Society Building, or PSFS (1931–32), which effectively introduced the International style of architecture into the United States. It is considered one of the

  • Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (pathology)

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, hereditary metabolic disorder affecting the central nervous system and characterized by incoordination, mental retardation, aggressive behaviour, and compulsive biting. The cause of the syndrome is a defective organic catalyst or enzyme,

  • Leschenaultia (plant genus)

    Goodeniaceae: …shrubs in the Australian genus Leschenaultia sometimes are grown as mild-climate garden shrubs. They have violet, blue, red, or yellow flowers.

  • Leschetizky, Theodor (Polish pianist)

    Theodor Leschetizky, Polish pianist and teacher who, with Franz Liszt, was the most influential teacher of piano of his time. Leschetizky studied under Carl Czerny in Vienna and thus was linked indirectly with the playing of Czerny’s teacher, Ludwig van Beethoven. In 1852 he went to St. Petersburg

  • Lesclaircissement de la langue francoise (dictionary by Palgrave)

    dictionary: From Classical times to 1604: …(or Jehan) Palsgrave in 1530, Lesclaircissement de la langue francoise (“Elucidation of the French Tongue”). Palsgrave was a tutor of French in London, and a letter has survived showing that he arranged with his printer that no copy should be sold without his permission,

  • Lescot, Pierre (French architect)

    Pierre Lescot, one of the great French architects of the mid-16th century who contributed a decorative style that provided the foundation for the classical tradition of French architecture. In his youth Lescot, who came from a wealthy family of lawyers, studied mathematics, architecture, and

  • Lesdiguières, Fran?ois de Bonne, duc de (French constable)

    Fran?ois de Bonne, duke de Lesdiguières, constable of France and Protestant leader who late in life abjured the faith. Lesdiguières had begun to study law at Paris when he joined the Huguenot troops in Dauphiné and distinguished himself in mountain warfare. In 1575 he became the acknowledged leader

  • Lese (people)

    Ituri Forest: The Pygmies: …with the Sudanic-speaking Mamvu and Lese (Walese). The Mbuti live with the Bila (Babila) in the centre of the forest.

  • Lesh, Phil (American musician)

    Grateful Dead: …8, 1973, San Francisco), bassist Phil Lesh (b. March 15, 1940, Berkeley, California), and drummer Bill Kreutzmann (also called Bill Sommers; b. May 7, 1946, Palo Alto, California). Later members included drummer Mickey Hart (b. September 11, 1943, Long Island, New York, U.S.), keyboard player Tom Constanten (b. March 19,…

  • Leshan (China)

    Sichuan: Settlement patterns: …Yangtze and Tuo rivers, and Leshan, at the confluence of the Dadu and the Min. The principal characteristic of these urban sites is that their areas are limited by their locations, so that urban expansion is hindered; in addition, the hazards of flooding are always a problem. Chengdu, the provincial…

  • Leshan Giant Buddha (statue, China)

    Wutongqiao: The Leshan Giant Buddha statue is located just north of Wutongqiao district; it and nearby Mount Emei were collectively designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1996. Both are popular tourist attractions, and the Wutongqiao district is a noted resort area.

  • leshy (Slavic mythology)

    Leshy, in Slavic mythology, the forest spirit. The leshy is a sportive spirit who enjoys playing tricks on people, though when angered he can be treacherous. He is seldom seen, but his voice can be heard in the forest laughing, whistling, or singing. When the leshy is spotted, he can be easily

  • lesiba (musical instrument)

    African music: Musical bows: …rattle stick, and the Sotho lesiba (like the gora of the Khoekhoe) is sounded by exhaling and inhaling across a piece of quill connecting the string to the stave. Bows with more than one string are rare, but the tingle apho of the Kara people in southern Ethiopia has three.

  • Lesina (island, Croatia)

    Hvar, island in the Adriatic Sea, part of Croatia. At 116 square miles (300 square km) in area and 43 miles (69 km) in length, it is the longest island in the Adriatic. A rocky island, it reaches 2,054 feet (626 m) in elevation at Mount Sveti Nikola and is separated from the island of Bra? by a

  • lesion (pathology)

    Lesion, in physiology, a structural or biochemical change in an organ or tissue produced by disease processes or a wound. The alteration may be associated with particular symptoms of a disease, as when a gastric ulcer produces stomach pain, or it may take place without producing symptoms, as in

  • Leskien, August (German linguist)

    August Leskien, German linguist noted for wide-ranging contributions to comparative Indo-European linguistics, particularly for his still authoritative work on the Baltic and Slavic groups. He significantly contributed to the development of the idea that “phonetic laws have no exceptions,” meaning

  • Leskiw, Greg (Canadian musician)

    the Guess Who: December 14, 1997, Winnipeg), and Greg Leskiw (b. August 5, 1947).

  • Leskov, Nikolay Semyonovich (Russian writer)

    Nikolay Semyonovich Leskov, novelist and short-story writer who has been described as the greatest of Russian storytellers. As a child Leskov was taken to different monasteries by his grandmother, and he used those early memories of Russian monastic life with good effect in his most famous novel,

  • Lesley J. McNair, Fort (fort, Washington, District of Columbia, United States)

    Washington, D.C.: Southwest: …1794 (today it is called Fort Lesley J. McNair). It is one of the oldest forts in the country; it has served as the headquarters of the U.S. Army Washington Military District since 1966 and has been the main campus of National Defense University since 1977.

  • Lesley, John (Scottish bishop)

    John Leslie, Scottish Roman Catholic bishop and historian and an adviser of Mary Stuart, queen of Scots. He was involved in plots to overthrow the Protestant government of Queen Elizabeth I and to place Mary on the throne of England. The illegitimate son of a parson at Kingussie, Inverness-shire,

  • Leslie’s Weekly (American magazine)

    history of publishing: Illustrated magazines: …main early illustrated magazines were Leslie’s Weekly (1855–1922) and Harper’s Weekly (1857). Soon after its founding, Leslie’s had a circulation of 100,000, which doubled or trebled whenever there was something sensational to portray. During the Civil War, of which it gave a good pictorial record, it had as many as…

  • Leslie, David (English general)

    Battle of Dunbar: … defeated the Scottish army under David Leslie, thereby opening Scotland to 10 years of English occupation and rule.

  • Leslie, Frank (British-American illustrator and journalist)

    Frank Leslie, British-U.S. illustrator and journalist. The Illustrated London News published his early sketches. He moved to the U.S. in 1848. There he founded numerous newspapers and journals, including the New York Journal (1854), Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper (1855)—having changed his

  • Leslie, John (Scottish bishop)

    John Leslie, Scottish Roman Catholic bishop and historian and an adviser of Mary Stuart, queen of Scots. He was involved in plots to overthrow the Protestant government of Queen Elizabeth I and to place Mary on the throne of England. The illegitimate son of a parson at Kingussie, Inverness-shire,

  • Leslie, Lisa (American basketball player)

    Women's National Basketball Association: …players such as Rebecca Lobo, Lisa Leslie, and Lauren Jackson.

  • Leslie, Sir John (Scottish physicist and mathematician)

    Sir John Leslie, Scottish physicist and mathematician who first created artificial ice. In 1802 Leslie’s explanation of capillary action was the first that is consistent with present-day theory. Two years later he published An Experimental Inquiry into the Nature and Propagation of Heat. In 1810 he

  • Le?mian, Boles?aw (Polish poet)

    Boles?aw Le?mian, lyric poet who was among the first to adapt Symbolism and Expressionism to Polish verse. Born into a Jewish family, Le?mian was educated in Kiev, Ukraine, where he studied law. He spent several years in France. During most of his later life he functioned as a minor public official

  • Lesnaya, Battle of (Russian history)

    Peter I: The Northern War (1700–21): …and in the battles of Lesnaya (1708) and of Poltava (1709). At Poltava, where Charles XII of Sweden suffered a catastrophic defeat, the plan of operations was Peter’s own: it was his idea to transform the battlefield by works of his military engineers—the redoubts erected in the path of the…

  • Lesne, Michael (French artist)

    printmaking: France: Michael Lesne, a French portraitist whose influence was considerable, worked for a time in the Rubens workshop, later returning to France. Claude Mellan, another major influence, was trained in Rome. Technical virtuosity dominated his prints; for example, the modelling of a face with one continuous…

  • Lesnie, Andrew (Australian cinematographer)

    Andrew Lesnie, Australian cameraman and cinematographer (born Jan. 1, 1956, Sydney, Australia—died April 27, 2015, Sydney), merged scenes shot amid the impressive physical landscape of New Zealand with computer-generated special effects to create a richly magical world in a series of six films

  • Le?niewski, Stanis?aw (Polish logician and mathematician)

    Stanis?aw Le?niewski, Polish logician and mathematician who was a co-founder and leading representative of the Warsaw school of logic. Le?niewski was the son of one of the civil engineers chiefly responsible for the construction and supervision of the trans-Siberian railroad. After preliminary

  • Lesosibirsk (Russia)

    Lesosibirsk, city, Krasnoyarsk kray (territory), Russia. The city extends for 19 miles (30 km) along the Yenisey River. It is a wood-processing centre and an important Yenisey River port. Lesosibirsk was formed in 1975 from two merged towns—Maklakovo and Novomaklakovo. The city is linked by

  • Lesotho

    Lesotho, country in Southern Africa. A scenic land of tall mountains and narrow valleys, Lesotho owes a long history of political autonomy to the mountains that surround it and protect it from encroachment. Since the Neolithic Period, the mountain kingdom was the domain of Khoisan-speaking

  • Lesotho Congress of Democrats (political party, Lesotho)

    Lesotho: Political crisis: …formed his own party, the Lesotho Congress for Democracy (LCD). The LCD overwhelmingly won the general elections of May 1998, and, upon Mokhehle’s resignation, Pakalitha Mosisili became prime minister. Although claims of voting fraud were raised, the election was declared free and fair by many international observers. Opposition parties protesting…

  • Lesotho Highlands (region, South Africa)

    Orange River: Physiography: …dissected plateau formed by the Lesotho Highlands that extends from the Drakensberg escarpment in the east to the Maloti (Maluti) Mountains in the west. The main source of the Orange River is officially recognized as the Sinqu (Senqu) River, which rises near the plateau’s eastern edge. The Seati (Khubedu) headwater…

  • Lesotho Highlands Water Project (water project, Lesotho)

    Lesotho: The Lesotho Highlands Water Project: Of primary importance to the country is the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP), a large-scale water-transfer plan involving Lesotho and South Africa. Although similar plans had been discussed since the 1930s, the LHWP first took shape in the late 1980s and…

  • Lesotho National Party (political party, Lesotho)

    flag of Lesotho: …flag of his own ruling Basotho National Party, which had four equal horizontal stripes from top to bottom of blue, white, red, and green. Other parties objected, and instead the national flag displayed green, red, and blue vertically with a white silhouette version of a typical Sotho straw hat.

  • Lesotho, flag of

    national flag consisting of three unequal horizontal stripes of blue, white, and green with a black emblem in the centre. The flag has a width-to-length ratio of 2 to 3.The British protectorate of Basutoland was established in 1868 to preserve the mountain kingdom of Basotho from being absorbed by

  • Lesotho, history of

    Lesotho: History: This discussion focuses on Lesotho since the mid-19th century. For a more-detailed treatment of earlier periods and of the country in its regional context, see Southern Africa.

  • Lesotho, Kingdom of

    Lesotho, country in Southern Africa. A scenic land of tall mountains and narrow valleys, Lesotho owes a long history of political autonomy to the mountains that surround it and protect it from encroachment. Since the Neolithic Period, the mountain kingdom was the domain of Khoisan-speaking

  • Lesotho, National University of (university, Roma, Lesotho)

    Maseru: …is the site of the National University of Lesotho (established 1975). Pop. (2006) urban centre, 227,880; urban agglom., 436,399.

  • Lesothosaurus (dinosaur)

    dinosaur: Ornithischia: Basal Jurassic forms include Lesothosaurus and other fabrosaurids, small animals that are the best-known basal ornithischians. They have the ornithischian features mentioned above but few specializations beyond these. Otherwise, the two main ornithischian lineages are the Cerapoda and Thyreophora.

  • lespedeza (plant)

    Lespedeza, (genus Lespedeza), genus of about 40 species of plants in the pea family (Fabaceae). All lespedezas are adapted to warm humid climates and are native to North America, tropical and East Asia, and Australia. A number of species are useful as forage and green manure crops, and some are

  • Lespedeza (plant)

    Lespedeza, (genus Lespedeza), genus of about 40 species of plants in the pea family (Fabaceae). All lespedezas are adapted to warm humid climates and are native to North America, tropical and East Asia, and Australia. A number of species are useful as forage and green manure crops, and some are

  • Lespedeza bicolor (plant)

    lespedeza: …lespedeza species, such as the bicolour lespedeza (L. bicolor), are grown as ornamentals.

  • Lespedeza cuneata (plant)

    lespedeza: Sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) is widely used in American agriculture as a pasture crop. Because of its great root system, its dense growth canopy, and its ability to grow on badly eroded soils, the sericea lespedeza is also extremely useful in soil conservation. Some shrublike…

  • Lespedeza stipulacea (plant)

    lespedeza: striata), and the Korean lespedeza (K. stipulacea, formerly L. stipulacea), which are both native to Asia.

  • Lespedeza striata (plant)

    lespedeza: …annual species have been reclassified: common lespedeza, or Japanese clover (Kummerowia striata, formerly L. striata), and the Korean lespedeza (K. stipulacea, formerly L. stipulacea), which are both native to Asia.

  • Lespinasse, Julie de (French writer)

    Julie de Lespinasse, French hostess of one of the most brilliant and emancipated of Parisian salons and the author of several volumes of passionate letters that reveal her romantic sensibility and literary gifts. Born out of wedlock to the comtesse d’Albon, she was sent to convent school and made

  • Lespinasse, Julie-Jeanne-éléanore de (French writer)

    Julie de Lespinasse, French hostess of one of the most brilliant and emancipated of Parisian salons and the author of several volumes of passionate letters that reveal her romantic sensibility and literary gifts. Born out of wedlock to the comtesse d’Albon, she was sent to convent school and made

  • Less Deceived, The (work by Larkin)

    Philip Larkin: He became well known with The Less Deceived (1955), a volume of verse the title of which suggests Larkin’s reaction and that of other British writers who then came into notice (e.g., Kingsley Amis and John Wain) against the political enthusiasms of the 1930s and what they saw as the…

  • less developed country (economics)

    marketing: Marketing intermediaries: the distribution channel: …is, shorter and simpler—in the less industrialized nations. There are notable exceptions, however. For instance, the Ghana Cocoa Marketing Board collects cacao beans in Ghana and licenses trading firms to process the commodity. Similar marketing processes are used in other West African nations. Because of the vast number of small-scale…

  • Less Than Zero (film by Kanievska [1987])

    Robert Downey, Jr.: …as a cocaine addict in Less Than Zero (1987).

  • Lesse River (river, Belgium)

    Lesse River, river in southeastern Belgium. The Lesse River rises west of Libramont in the Ardennes and follows a short (52-mile [84-km]), meandering northwesterly course to the Meuse River at Anseremme, a few miles south of Dinant. The river’s early northward course lies in a shallow valley of the

  • lessee (law)

    landlord and tenant: tenant, also called Lessor And Lessee, the parties to the leasing of real estate, whose relationship is bound by contract. The landlord, or lessor, as owner or possessor of a property—whether corporeal, such as lands or buildings, or incorporeal, such as rights of common or…

  • Lesseps, Ferdinand, vicomte de (French diplomat)

    Ferdinand, viscount de Lesseps, French diplomat famous for building the Suez Canal across the Isthmus of Suez (1859–69) in Egypt. Lesseps was from a family long distinguished in government service. Appointed assistant vice-consul at Lisbon in 1825, he was sent in 1828 to Tunis and in 1832 to

  • lesser adelantado (Spanish governor)

    adelantado: Lesser adelantados (adelantados menores) held similar powers, but they were often stationed along the frontiers, becoming known as frontier adelantados (adelantados fronterizos), and figured prominently in the military conquest of the Americas. In the 16th century the office was replaced by that of alcalde (magistrate).…

  • lesser adjutant stork (bird)

    stork: …and southeastern Asia, and the lesser adjutant (L. javanicus) are typical scavengers with naked pink skin on the head and neck.

  • Lesser Antarctica (region, Antarctica)

    Antarctica: Structural framework: …and Cenozoic mobile belt in West Antarctica—separated by the fault-block belt, or horst, of the Transantarctic Mountains. East and West Antarctica have come to be known respectively as the Gondwana and Andean provinces, indicating general affinities of each sector with other regions; that is, the east seems to have affinity…

  • Lesser Antilles (islands, West Indies)

    Lesser Antilles, long arc of small islands in the Caribbean Sea extending in a north-south direction from the Virgin Islands to Grenada. A number of other islands—Trinidad and Tobago, off the northeastern coast of Venezuela, and the east-west island chain from Margarita Island to Aruba, off the

  • lesser ape (primate)

    ape: …features; the gibbons are called lesser apes. The great apes are much more intelligent than monkeys and gibbons. Great apes, for example, are able to recognize themselves in mirrors (monkeys and other nonhumans cannot, with the exception of bottlenose dolphins). They can also reason abstractly, learn quasi-linguistic communication, at least…

  • Lesser Arcana (cards)

    tarot: …known as trumps, and the minor arcana, which has 56 cards.

  • Lesser Armenia (medieval kingdom, Asia)

    Little Armenia, kingdom established in Cilicia, on the southeast coast of Anatolia, by the Armenian Rubenid dynasty in the 12th century. The Rubenids ruled first as barons and then, from 1199 to 1226, as kings of Cilicia. Thereafter the family of Oshin, another Armenian noble, ruled as the

  • Lesser Atlas (mountains, North Africa)

    Anti-Atlas, mountain range in Morocco running parallel to and southward of the central range of the Atlas Mountains of North Africa. Although it has a mean elevation of 5,000 feet (1,500 metres), some peaks and passes exceed 6,000 feet (1,800 metres). This rugged, arid region, which encloses the

  • lesser bamboo bat (mammal)

    vesper bat: The lesser bamboo bat, one of the smallest of bats, is about 4 cm (1.5 inches) in head and body length; it weighs about 2 grams (0.07 ounce) and has a wingspan of 15 cm (6 inches). Other species range up to 10 cm (4 inches)…

  • lesser bamboo lemur (primate)

    lemur: Lemur diversity: The gentle lemurs, or lesser bamboo lemurs (genus Hapalemur), and the highly endangered greater bamboo lemurs (Prolemur simus) feed on bamboo stems in the eastern and northwestern rainforests of the island.

  • lesser bamboo rat (rodent)

    bamboo rat: The lesser bamboo rat (genus Cannomys) is smaller—15 to 27 cm long, excluding the 6- to 8-cm tail. Its long, dense fur ranges from chestnut brown to a bright pale gray.

  • lesser bandicoot rat (rodent)

    bandicoot rat: The lesser bandicoot rat (B. bengalensis) and Savile’s bandicoot rat (B. savilei) have dark brown or brownish gray body fur, weigh up to 350 grams, and measure up to 40 cm long including their brown tails. The lesser bandicoot rat is found on the Indian subcontinent,…

  • Lesser Bear (constellation)

    Ursa Minor, (Latin: “Lesser Bear”) in astronomy, a constellation of the northern sky, at about 15 hours right ascension and 80° north declination, and seven of whose stars outline the Little Dipper. Polaris (Alpha Ursae Minoris), at the end of the Little Dipper’s handle, marks (roughly) the

  • Lesser Breeds (novel by Sahgal)

    Nayantara Sahgal: (1985), Mistaken Identity (1988), and Lesser Breeds (2003)—are set in colonial India. When the Moon Shines by Day (2017) is a dystopian satire. Sahgal also wrote Day of Reckoning: Stories (2015).

  • Lesser Brothers (branch of Franciscan order)

    Franciscan: Orders: …into three independent branches: the Friars Minor (O.F.M.), the Friars Minor Conventual (O.F.M. Conv.), and the Friars Minor Capuchin (O.F.M. Cap.). The Second Order consists of cloistered nuns who belong to the Order of St. Clare (O.S.C.) and are known as Poor Clares (P.C.). The Third Order consists of religious…

  • lesser bulldog bat (mammal)

    bulldog bat: The lesser bulldog bat (Noctilio albiventris, formerly N. labialis) is about 9 cm (3.5 inches) long with a wingspan of 40–44 cm (15.7–17.3 inches). The greater bulldog, or fisherman, bat (N. leporinus) is considerably larger, with a length of 11–12 cm (4.3–4.7 inches) and a wingspan…

  • lesser burdock (plant)

    burdock: Common, or lesser, burdock (Arctium minus) is a weed in North American pastures and hayfields and can be grown as a vegetable. The plant forms a low rosette during its first year and develops a tall branched stem during its second year. The leaves have a wavy…

  • lesser bush baby (primate)

    bush baby: …smaller forms, such as the lesser bush baby (Galago senegalensis), are extremely active and agile. When they descend to the ground, they sit upright, and they move around by jumping with their hind legs like jerboas. Gestation is about three to four months; young usually number one or two.

  • lesser cane rat

    cane rat: …rat (Thryonomys swinderianus) and the lesser cane rat (T. gregorianus) both inhabit nonforested sub-Saharan Africa except for Namibia and most of South Africa and Botswana. The two species are found together in certain regions, but they occupy different habitats. The greater cane rat lives along rivers and lakes and in…

  • Lesser Caucasus (mountain range, Eurasia)

    Lesser Caucasus, range of folded mountains in the southern part of the Caucasus region, connected with the main Caucasus Mountains by means of the Likhsky Mountains, which form the divide between the basins of the Rioni and Kura rivers. The range covers portions of Georgia, Armenia, and

  • lesser celandine (plant)

    celandine: The lesser celandine, or pilewort (Ranunculus ficaria), is a member of the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae). It has heart-shaped leaves and typical buttercup flowers. Native to Europe, it has become naturalized in North America.

  • lesser club moss (plant)

    spike moss: Major species: Lesser club moss, or club spike moss, (Selaginella selaginoides), is a small forest and bog-side plant in northern North America and Eurasia. Its branches trail along the ground, but the upright yellow-green strobili rise up to 8 cm (about 3 inches). The similar rock selaginella…

  • lesser cornua (anatomy)

    human skeleton: The hyoid: example of the anchoring function: …of smaller horns, called the lesser cornua. The bone is more or less in the shape of a U, with the body forming the central part, or base, of the letter. In the act of swallowing, the hyoid bone, tongue, and larynx all move upward rapidly.

  • lesser curlew (bird)

    curlew: The whimbrel (N. phaeopus), or lesser curlew, is the most widely distributed curlew, occurring both in the Old World and in the New World (as two distinct races). Eurasian whimbrels are white-rumped, but the North American race (formerly called the Hudsonian curlew) is dark-rumped.

  • Lesser Delos (island, Greece)

    Delos, island, one of the smallest of the Cyclades (Modern Greek: Kykládes), Greece, an ancient centre of religious, political, and commercial life in the Aegean Sea. Now largely uninhabited, it is a rugged granite mass about 1.3 square miles (3.4 square km) in area. Also called Lesser Delos, it

  • lesser doxology (liturgical chant)

    doxology: The lesser doxology, or Gloria Patri, is used in most Christian traditions at the close of the psalmody:

  • lesser flamingo (bird)

    ciconiiform: Distribution, habitat, and abundance: …such as those of the lesser flamingo (Phoeniconaias minor) in Africa, are enormous. At the other extreme, the Japanese ibis (Nipponia nippon) is on the verge of extinction, only one small colony being known. Several other ibis species are rare and are declining in population.

  • lesser frigate bird

    frigate bird: The great and lesser frigate birds, F. minor and F. ariel, breed on islands worldwide.

  • lesser goldfinch (bird)

    goldfinch: The 10-cm (4-inch) dark-backed goldfinch (C. psaltria) ranges from the western U.S. (where it is called lesser goldfinch) to Peru.

  • lesser green broadbill (bird)

    broadbill: …represented by the 15-cm (6-inch) lesser green broadbill (Calyptomena viridis), of Malaysia; it is green, with a stubby tail and a puff of feathers over its bill.

  • lesser gymnure (mammal)

    gymnure: The short-tailed, or lesser, gymnure (Hylomys suillus) ranges from continental Southeast Asia offshore to Tioman Island to the Indonesian islands of Sumatra, Java, and northern Borneo in hilly lowlands. The dwarf, or Sumatran, gymnure (H. parvus) occurs in the mountains

  • lesser hedgehog tenrec (mammal)

    tenrec: The lesser and greater hedgehog tenrecs (Echinops telfairi and Setifer setosus, respectively) have densely spined upperparts and can curl into a protective ball. The lesser hedgehog tenrec weighs up to 250 grams and has a body up to 18 cm long. The streaked tenrec is about…

  • Lesser Himalayas (mountains, Asia)

    Lesser Himalayas, middle section of the vast Himalayas mountain system in south-central Asia. The Lesser Himalayas extend for some 1,550 miles (2,500 km) northwest-southeast across the northern limit of the Indian subcontinent. Areas include the disputed Kashmir region (Gilgit-Baltistan,

  • Lesser Khingan Range (mountains, China)

    Xiao Hinggan Range, mountain range in the northeastern section of Heilongjiang province, northeastern China. The range has a northwest-southeast axis and is located to the southwest of the Amur River (Heilong Jiang). To the west it is connected to the Da Hinggan Range by the Yilehuli Mountains,

  • lesser kudu (mammal)

    kudu: The lesser kudu stands only about 100 cm (39 inches) high and weighs 92–108 kg (202–238 pounds). Females and young have a bright rufous coat, which darkens to slate-gray in males. The lesser kudu is vividly marked with 11–15 vertical white stripes, broad chest and throat…

  • lesser moa (extinct bird family)
  • lesser one-horned rhinoceros (mammal)

    Javan rhinoceros, (Rhinoceros sondaicus), one of three Asian species of rhinoceros, found only on the island of Java in Indonesia. It is the rarest living rhinoceros and one of the world’s most endangered mammals. Some 46–66 adults survive, all restricted to Ujung Kulon National Park, a protected

  • lesser Oriental civet (mammal)

    Rasse, small Asiatic mammal, a species of civet

  • lesser panda (mammal)

    Red panda, (Ailurus fulgens), reddish brown, long-tailed, raccoonlike mammal, about the size of a large domestic cat, that is found in the mountain forests of the Himalayas and adjacent areas of eastern Asia and subsists mainly on bamboo and other vegetation, fruits, and insects. Once classified as

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