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  • Lemuria (Roman religion)

    Lemures: …the household, ritual observances called Lemuria were held yearly on May 9, 11, and 13. These Lemuria, reputedly instituted by Romulus in expiation of his brother’s murder, required the father of every family to rise at midnight, purify his hands, toss black beans for the spirits to gather, and recite…

  • Lemuridae (primate)

    lemur: Lemur diversity: The “true lemurs” (family Lemuridae) include five genera and about 18 species. The best known of these is the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), commonly seen in zoos. It is unique both in its habitat (some dry and rocky areas of Madagascar) and for its striped tail…

  • Lemuriformes (primate infraorder)

    primate: Classification: Infraorder Lemuriformes (lemurs) Family Cheirogaleidae (dwarf, mouse, and fork-crowned lemurs) 5 genera, 25 or more species from Madagascar. The number of species cannot be precisely given, as new species continue to be discovered. Holocene. Subfamily

  • Lemus, José María (president of El Salvador)

    El Salvador: Military dictatorships: José María Lemus (1956–60), continued these programs, but there was no improvement in the living standards of workers. When faced with open discontent, Lemus resorted to repressive measures, and a military coup deposed him in October 1960.

  • Lena Horne at the Waldorf-Astoria (album by Horne)

    Lena Horne: One of her albums, Lena Horne at the Waldorf-Astoria (1957), was a longtime best seller, and her first featured performance on Broadway—in the musical Jamaica (1957)—won her a New York Drama Critics’ Poll Award in 1958.

  • Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music (American theatrical production)

    Lena Horne: Her one-woman show, Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music (1981), garnered many awards, including a Drama Critics’ Circle Award and a special achievement Tony Award. In 1984 Horne received a Kennedy Center honour for lifetime contribution to the arts, and in 1989 she was given a Grammy…

  • Lena River (river, Russia)

    Russia: Rivers: …miles [4,090 km]), and the Lena (2,734 miles [4,400 km]). Their catchments cover a total area in excess of 3 million square miles (8 million square km) in Siberia north of the Stanovoy Range, and their combined discharge into the Arctic averages 1,750,000 cubic feet (50,000 cubic metres) per second.…

  • Lena River Basin (basin, Russia)

    Russia: The mountains of the south and east: …Pacific coast and separates the Lena and Amur drainage systems, which flow to the Arctic and Pacific oceans, respectively. Branching northeastward from the eastern end of the Stanovoy, the Dzhugdzhur Range rises to 6,253 feet (1,906 metres) along the coast, and its line is continued toward the Chukchi Peninsula by…

  • Lenaea (ancient Greek festival)

    Great Dionysia: …was also introduced into the Lenaea, the minor festival of Dionysus held in January, and tragedy was added 10 years later.

  • Lenana (mountain peak, Kenya)

    East African mountains: Physiography: …closely followed in height by Lenana (16,355 feet).

  • Lenana (Maasai chief)

    Kenya: Maasai and Kikuyu: …time before his younger son, Lenana, was able to restore order. Power was never revived, however, because their problems coincided with the arrival of European traders and administrators who eventually gained control of the region.

  • Lenape (people)

    Delaware, a confederation of Algonquian-speaking North American Indians who occupied the Atlantic seaboard from Cape Henlopen, Delaware, to western Long Island. Before colonization, they were especially concentrated in the Delaware River valley, for which the confederation was named.

  • Lenard, Philipp (German physicist)

    Philipp Lenard, German physicist and recipient of the 1905 Nobel Prize for Physics for his research on cathode rays and the discovery of many of their properties. His results had important implications for the development of electronics and nuclear physics. After working as a lecturer and as an

  • Lenard, Philipp Eduard Anton (German physicist)

    Philipp Lenard, German physicist and recipient of the 1905 Nobel Prize for Physics for his research on cathode rays and the discovery of many of their properties. His results had important implications for the development of electronics and nuclear physics. After working as a lecturer and as an

  • Lenart, Jozef (Czechoslovak politician)

    Jozef Lenart, Czechoslovak politician (born April 3, 1923, Liptovska Porubka, Czechoslovakia [now in Slovakia]—died Feb. 11, 2004, Prague, Czech Rep.), through a studied ambiguity that permitted him to be seen as all things to all people, remained at the pinnacle of the communist political system i

  • Lenasia (township, South Africa)

    Johannesburg: The city layout: …Filipinos, and Chinese) lives in Lenasia, a special “Asiatic” township built in the 1950s to accommodate Indians forcibly removed from the city centre. The balance of the city is occupied by whites.

  • Lenau, Nikolaus (Austrian poet)

    Nikolaus Lenau, Austrian poet known for melancholy lyrical verse that mirrors the pessimism of his time as well as his personal despair. Severe depression and dissatisfaction characterized Lenau’s life. He began, but never completed, studies in law, medicine, and philosophy. A legacy in 1830

  • Lenbach, Franz von (German painter)

    Franz von Lenbach, painter whose powerful characterizations made him the favoured portraitist of late 19th-century Germany. In 1857 Lenbach became a pupil of Karl von Piloty, with whom he traveled in Italy. The works of this first journey were painted from nature and were frequently attacked for

  • Lenca (people)

    Lenca, Indians of the northern highlands of Honduras and El Salvador who are somewhat intermediate culturally between the Maya to the north and circum-Caribbean peoples such as the Kuna to the south. The aboriginal culture of the Lenca has virtually disappeared and is not well known. It is thought

  • Lencan languages

    Mesoamerican Indian languages: The classification and status of Mesoamerican languages:

  • Lenclos, Anne De (French courtesan)

    Ninon de Lenclos, celebrated French courtesan. From her father, Henri de Lenclos, sieur de La Douardière, she acquired a lasting interest in Epicurean philosophy. Although her father fled from France after killing a man in 1632, she remained in Paris and established there a salon that attracted a

  • Lenclos, Ninon de (French courtesan)

    Ninon de Lenclos, celebrated French courtesan. From her father, Henri de Lenclos, sieur de La Douardière, she acquired a lasting interest in Epicurean philosophy. Although her father fled from France after killing a man in 1632, she remained in Paris and established there a salon that attracted a

  • lend-lease (United States [1941])

    Lend-lease, system by which the United States aided its World War II allies with war materials, such as ammunition, tanks, airplanes, and trucks, and with food and other raw materials. Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt had committed the United States in June 1940 to materially aiding the opponents of

  • Lend-Lease Act (United States [1941])

    Lend-lease, system by which the United States aided its World War II allies with war materials, such as ammunition, tanks, airplanes, and trucks, and with food and other raw materials. Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt had committed the United States in June 1940 to materially aiding the opponents of

  • lending (finance)

    Credit, transaction between two parties in which one (the creditor or lender) supplies money, goods, services, or securities in return for a promised future payment by the other (the debtor or borrower). Such transactions normally include the payment of interest to the lender. Credit may be

  • lending circle (finance)

    development bank: …are required to join “lending circles.” The fellow members of a circle, which typically contains fewer than 10 people, are other borrowers whose credit rating is at risk if one of their members defaults. Therefore, each member drives other members to pay on time. The Grameen approach has spurred…

  • lending library

    library: Circulation: …faculties, but the notion of lending, or circulating, libraries did not become popular until the 18th century.

  • Lendl, Ivan (Czech tennis player)

    Andy Murray: …he tapped former Czech star Ivan Lendl, an eight-time Grand Slam champion, to serve as his coach, and the partnership proved fruitful for Murray. The inscrutable Lendl, who had also lost his first four Grand Slam finals, taught Murray better self-control and self-reliance.

  • Leneghan, Mary Patricia (president of Ireland)

    Mary McAleese, president of Ireland from 1997 to 2011. She was Ireland’s second female president and its first president from Northern Ireland. McAleese was raised on the edge of the nationalist Ardoyne area of Belfast, from which her family was forced to flee in the early 1970s because of

  • Leng-hu (China)

    Lenghu, town, northwestern Qinghai sheng (province), western China. It is situated in the northwestern part of the Qaidam Basin, to the southwest of Dangjin Pass, which leads from the Qaidam region into western Gansu province and to the Uygur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang. Lenghu is one of the

  • Lengenbach Mine (mine, Switzerland)

    sulfosalt: At the Lengenbach Mine in Switzerland, for example, more than 30 distinct species have been recognized, 15 of which are not found elsewhere. Most sulfosalts have formed at low temperature in open cavities, usually in association with copper–zinc–arsenic sulfide ores. Very often they occur in cavities of…

  • Lenghu (China)

    Lenghu, town, northwestern Qinghai sheng (province), western China. It is situated in the northwestern part of the Qaidam Basin, to the southwest of Dangjin Pass, which leads from the Qaidam region into western Gansu province and to the Uygur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang. Lenghu is one of the

  • Lenglen, Suzanne (French tennis player)

    Suzanne Lenglen, French tennis player and six-time Wimbledon champion in both singles and doubles competition, whose athletic play, combining strength and speed, changed the nature of women’s tennis and positioned her as the dominant women’s amateur player from 1919 until 1926, when she turned

  • length (cricket)

    cricket: Bowling: …good bowler is command of length—i.e., the ability to pitch (bounce) the ball on a desired spot, usually at or slightly in front of the batsman’s feet. The location varies with the pace of the bowler, the state of the pitch, and the reach and technique of the batsman. The…

  • length (dimension)

    length, area, and volume: Length is the size of a line segment (see distance formulas), area is the size of a closed region in a plane, and volume is the size of a solid. Formulas for area and volume are based on lengths. For example, the area of a…

  • length (speech)

    phonetics: Suprasegmentals: Variations in length are also usually considered to be suprasegmental features, although they can affect single segments as well as whole syllables. All of the suprasegmental features are characterized by the fact that they must be described in relation to other items in the same utterance. It…

  • length of a curve (integral calculus)

    Length of a curve, Geometrical concept addressed by integral calculus. Methods for calculating exact lengths of line segments and arcs of circles have been known since ancient times. Analytic geometry allowed them to be stated as formulas involving coordinates (see coordinate systems) of points and

  • length, area, and volume (geometry)

    Length, area, and volume, Dimensional measures of one-, two-, and three-dimensional geometric objects. All three are magnitudes, representing the “size” of an object. Length is the size of a line segment (see distance formulas), area is the size of a closed region in a plane, and volume is the size

  • Lengua (people)

    Gran Chaco: Early settlement: …major linguistic associations: the Guaycurú, Lengua, Wichí, Zamuco, and Tupí-Guaraní. Most of these people lived under extremely primitive conditions; settlement depended on the availability of fresh water, making stream courses the most coveted sites. Implements were fashioned largely from wood and bones because of the absence of stones, while the…

  • Lengyel, József (Hungarian author)

    Hungarian literature: Writing after 1945: …the adherents of realistic fiction, József Lengyel, who died in 1975, occupied a special place. In his stories (which could not be published until the loosening of restrictions in the early 1960s) he gave a moving testimony of human suffering in Soviet labour camps.

  • Lenica, Jan (Polish animator)

    animation: Animation in Europe: The collaborative efforts of Jan Lenica and Walerian Borowczyk foresaw the bleak themes and absurdist trends of the Polish school of the 1960s; such films as By? sobie raz… (1957; Once Upon a Time…), Nagrodzone uczucie (1957; Love Rewarded), and Dom (1958; The House) are surreal, pessimistic, plotless, and…

  • Lenihan, Brian (Irish politician)

    Brian Joseph Lenihan, Jr., Irish politician (born May 21, 1959, Dublin, Ire.—died June 10, 2011, Dublin), became finance minister for Ireland in May 2008 just months before the country succumbed to a devastating financial crisis. After the failure of the American investment bank Lehman Brothers

  • Lenin (ship)

    Lenin, world’s first nuclear-powered surface ship, a large icebreaker built by the Soviet Union in Leningrad (St. Petersburg) in 1957. The Lenin was 134 metres (440 feet) long, displaced 16,000 tons, and cruised in normal waters at 18 knots (33 km/hr, or 21 mph). The ship went into service in 1959,

  • Lenin Atyndagy Choku (mountain, Central Asia)

    Lenin Peak, highest summit (23,406 feet [7,134 metres]) of the Trans-Alai Range on the frontier of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Once thought to be the highest mountain in what was then the Soviet Union, Lenin Peak was relegated to third place by the discovery in 1932–33 that Stalin Peak (after 1962

  • Lenin Library (library, Moscow, Russia)

    Russian State Library, national library of Russia, located in Moscow, notable for its extensive collection of early printed books and a collection of manuscripts that includes ancient Slavonic codices. Originally founded in 1862 as the library of the Rumyantsev Museum, it was reorganized after the

  • Lenin Mausoleum (mausoleum, Moscow, Russia)

    Konstantin Stepanovich Melnikov: …Vladimir Lenin’s sarcophagus in the Lenin Mausoleum. Melnikov’s design was in the form of a glass crystal pyramid (1924).

  • Lenin Peak (mountain, Central Asia)

    Lenin Peak, highest summit (23,406 feet [7,134 metres]) of the Trans-Alai Range on the frontier of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Once thought to be the highest mountain in what was then the Soviet Union, Lenin Peak was relegated to third place by the discovery in 1932–33 that Stalin Peak (after 1962

  • Lenin’s Testament (document by Lenin)

    Lenin’s Testament, two-part document dictated by Vladimir I. Lenin on Dec. 23–26, 1922, and Jan. 4, 1923, and addressed to a future Communist Party Congress. It contained guideline proposals for changes in the Soviet political system and concise portrait assessments of six party leaders (Joseph

  • Lenin, Order of (Soviet award)

    Order of Lenin, highest civilian award of the U.S.S.R. It was established in 1930 by the Central Executive Committee of the Soviet Union and awarded to individuals, collectives, institutions, or organizations for outstanding achievements in research, art, technology, or economics or for the

  • Lenin, Vladimir (prime minister of Soviet Union)

    Vladimir Lenin, founder of the Russian Communist Party (Bolsheviks), inspirer and leader of the Bolshevik Revolution (1917), and the architect, builder, and first head (1917–24) of the Soviet state. He was the founder of the organization known as Comintern (Communist International) and the

  • Lenin, Vladimir Ilich (prime minister of Soviet Union)

    Vladimir Lenin, founder of the Russian Communist Party (Bolsheviks), inspirer and leader of the Bolshevik Revolution (1917), and the architect, builder, and first head (1917–24) of the Soviet state. He was the founder of the organization known as Comintern (Communist International) and the

  • Lenina, Pik (mountain, Central Asia)

    Lenin Peak, highest summit (23,406 feet [7,134 metres]) of the Trans-Alai Range on the frontier of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Once thought to be the highest mountain in what was then the Soviet Union, Lenin Peak was relegated to third place by the discovery in 1932–33 that Stalin Peak (after 1962

  • Leninabad (Tajikistan)

    Khujand, city, northwestern Tajikistan. The city lies along both banks of the Syr Darya (river) at the entrance to the fertile and heavily populated Fergana Valley. One of the most ancient cities of Central Asia, it lay along the great Silk Road from China to Europe. It was captured by the Arabs in

  • Leninakan (Armenia)

    Gyumri, city, western Armenia. It is believed to have been founded by the Greeks in 401 bc, but it did not have a continuous existence. A fortress was constructed on the site by the Russians in 1837, and in 1840 the town of Alexandropol was founded nearby. Alexandropol was a trading and

  • Leningrad (Russia)

    St. Petersburg, city and port, extreme northwestern Russia. A major historical and cultural centre and an important port, St. Petersburg lies about 400 miles (640 km) northwest of Moscow and only about 7° south of the Arctic Circle. It is the second largest city of Russia and one of the world’s

  • Leningrad (oblast, Russia)

    Leningrad, oblast (province), northwestern Russia. It comprises all the Karelian Isthmus and the southern shore of the Gulf of Finland as far west as Narva. It extends eastward along the southern shore of Lake Ladoga and the Svir River as far as Lake Onega. In the north the Karelian Isthmus

  • Leningrad A.A. Zhdanov State University (university, Saint Petersburg, Russia)

    Saint Petersburg State University, coeducational state institution of higher learning in St. Petersburg, founded in 1819 as the University of St. Petersburg. During World War II the university was evacuated to Saratov. The university’s buildings were severely damaged during the Siege of Leningrad

  • Leningrad Affair (Soviet history)

    Leningrad Affair, (1948–50), in the history of the Soviet Union, a sudden and sweeping purge of Communist Party and government officials in Leningrad and the surrounding region. The purge occurred several months after the sudden death of Andrey A. Zhdanov (Aug. 31, 1948), who had been the Leningrad

  • Leningrad Codex of the Latter Prophets

    biblical literature: Masoretic texts: Next in age is the Leningrad Codex of the Latter Prophets dated to 916, which was not originally the work of Ben Asher, but its Babylonian pointing—i.e., vowel signs used for pronunciation purposes—was brought into line with the Tiberian Masoretic system.

  • Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra (Russian orchestra)

    Saint Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, symphony orchestra based in St. Petersburg. The Philharmonic Society was founded there in 1802, and its orchestra included musicians from eastern Europe as well as from Russia. After the Russian Revolution of February 1917, the society’s orchestra became the

  • Leningrad State University (university, Saint Petersburg, Russia)

    Saint Petersburg State University, coeducational state institution of higher learning in St. Petersburg, founded in 1819 as the University of St. Petersburg. During World War II the university was evacuated to Saratov. The university’s buildings were severely damaged during the Siege of Leningrad

  • Leningrad Symphony No. 7 in C Major, Op. 60 (symphony by Shostakovich)

    Leningrad Symphony No. 7 in C Major, Op. 60, symphony by Dmitry Shostakovich, known as “Leningrad.” The work premiered informally on March 5, 1942, at a rural retreat by the Volga, where the composer and many of his colleagues were seeking refuge from World War II. Five months later, it would be

  • Leningrad Theatre of the Estrada and the Miniature (Soviet theatre)

    Arkady Isaakovich Raikin: …opened his own theatre, the Leningrad Theatre of the Estrada and the Miniature, where he offered homespun homilies and satirical skits (called “miniatures”). Over the years, he toured the Soviet Union and occasionally abroad but remained based in Leningrad (St. Petersburg) until 1984, when he moved his company to Moscow…

  • Leningrad, Siege of (Soviet history)

    Siege of Leningrad, prolonged siege (September 8, 1941–January 27, 1944) of the city of Leningrad (St. Petersburg) in the Soviet Union by German and Finnish armed forces during World War II. The siege actually lasted 872 days. After Nazi Germany invaded the Soviet Union in June 1941, German armies

  • Leningradsky Gosudarstvenny Universitet (university, Saint Petersburg, Russia)

    Saint Petersburg State University, coeducational state institution of higher learning in St. Petersburg, founded in 1819 as the University of St. Petersburg. During World War II the university was evacuated to Saratov. The university’s buildings were severely damaged during the Siege of Leningrad

  • Leninism

    Leninism, principles expounded by Vladimir I. Lenin, who was the preeminent figure in the Russian Revolution of 1917. Whether Leninist concepts represented a contribution to or a corruption of Marxist thought has been debated, but their influence on the subsequent development of communism in the

  • Leninogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    Ridder, city, northeastern Kazakhstan. The city is situated in the southwestern Altai Mountains, along the Ulba River, at an elevation higher than 3,300 feet (1,000 metres). An Englishman, Philip Ridder, discovered a small mine containing gold, silver, copper, and lead there in 1786, and systematic

  • Leninsk-Kuznetsky (Russia)

    Leninsk-Kuznetsky, city, in Kemerovo oblast (region), central Russia. It lies along the Inya River, a tributary of the Ob. In 1912 a French company started coal-mining operations there; from the 1930s the city developed rapidly to become a major coal-mining centre, with many pits located in the

  • Leninváros (Hungary)

    Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén: Sárospatak, Szerencs, Sátoraljaújhely, Tiszaújváros, and Tokaj.

  • lenition (phonetics)

    Uralic languages: Consonant gradation: …known as consonant gradation (or lenition) is sometimes thought to be of Uralic origin. In Baltic-Finnic, excluding Veps and Livonian, earlier intervocalic single stops were typically replaced by voiced and fricative consonantal variants, and geminate (double) stops were shortened to single stops just in case the preceding vowel was stressed…

  • Leniwka River (river, Poland)

    Vistula River: Physiography: …the Leniwka (now called the Martwa Wis?a), which followed the true Vistula channel to the Gulf of Gdańsk. Improvements, the ultimate aim of which was to control the Vistula’s outlet to the sea and make the entire delta region economically productive, were initiated at the end of the 19th century:…

  • Lenkoran (Azerbaijan)

    L?nk?ran, city, southeastern Azerbaijan. It lies on the shore of the Caspian Sea, in the L?nk?ran Lowland. First mentioned in the 17th century, it was capital of the Talysh khanate of Iran in the 18th century. It was held by Russia from 1728 to 1735 but only fell definitively to Russia in 1813.

  • Lenkoran Lowland (lowlands, Azerbaijan)

    Azerbaijan: Relief, drainage, and soils: …peak (8,176 feet), and the L?nk?ran Lowland, along the Caspian coast. This lowland, an extension of the Kura-Aras Lowland, reaches the Iranian border near Astara.

  • Lenkoranskaya Nizmennost (lowlands, Azerbaijan)

    Azerbaijan: Relief, drainage, and soils: …peak (8,176 feet), and the L?nk?ran Lowland, along the Caspian coast. This lowland, an extension of the Kura-Aras Lowland, reaches the Iranian border near Astara.

  • Lennep, Emile van (Dutch official)

    Emile van Lennep, Dutch public official who was secretary-general of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, 1969-84, and helped build its effectiveness as a forum for international cooperation (b. Jan. 20, 1915--d. Oct. 3,

  • Lennep, Jacob van (Dutch writer)

    Jacob van Lennep, Dutch novelist, poet, and leading man of letters in the mid-19th century. Early in his career van Lennep found his natural genre, the historical novel, and his first such work, De pleegzoon (1833; The Adopted Son), was set in the 17th century. Like many of his later works it

  • Lenngren, Anna Maria (Swedish poet)

    Anna Maria Lenngren, Swedish poet whose Neoclassical satires and pastoral idylls show a balance and moderation characteristic of the Enlightenment period and are still read for their gaiety and elegance. Educated by her father, a lecturer at Uppsala University, Lenngren began to publish poetry at

  • Lenngren, Carl (Swedish editor)

    Anna Maria Lenngren: In 1780 she married Carl Lenngren, founder (with Johan Henric Kellgren) and later editor of the influential Stockholms Posten, to which she thereafter contributed anonymously. Insisting that she was a private individual, a housewife rather than a professional writer, Lenngren remained modest about her literary accomplishments. Her best work…

  • Lenni Lenape (people)

    Delaware, a confederation of Algonquian-speaking North American Indians who occupied the Atlantic seaboard from Cape Henlopen, Delaware, to western Long Island. Before colonization, they were especially concentrated in the Delaware River valley, for which the confederation was named.

  • Lennoa madreporoides (plant)

    Lennooideae: Flor de tierra (“flower of the earth”; L. madreporoides) usually grows on roots of the Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). The oval mushroomlike stem is 5–15 cm (2–6 inches) tall and is covered at maturity with small starlike flowers, violet with yellow throats.

  • Lennoaceae (plant subfamily)

    Lennooideae, the sand food subfamily of the family Boraginaceae, composed of two genera and four species of parasitic plants. The unusual plants inhabit desert regions in Colombia, Venezuela, Mexico, and the southwestern United States, and many are considered rare. Though formerly treated as its

  • Lennon, Cynthia (British personality)

    Cynthia Lennon, (Cynthia Lillian Powell), British personality (born Sept. 10, 1939, Blackpool, Lancashire, Eng.—died April 1, 2015, Mallorca, Spain), was married to singer-songwriter John Lennon during his rise to fame as a member of the Beatles; their marriage was initially kept a secret from the

  • Lennon, John (British musician)

    John Lennon, leader or coleader of the British rock group the Beatles, author and graphic artist, solo recording artist, and collaborator with Yoko Ono on recordings and other art projects. Lennon’s fun-loving working-class parents married briefly and late and declined to raise their quick,

  • Lennon, John Winston Ono (British musician)

    John Lennon, leader or coleader of the British rock group the Beatles, author and graphic artist, solo recording artist, and collaborator with Yoko Ono on recordings and other art projects. Lennon’s fun-loving working-class parents married briefly and late and declined to raise their quick,

  • Lennon, Paul (Australian politician)

    Tasmania: Tasmania since 1950: …as premier in 2004 by Paul Lennon. While the state remained reasonably prosperous, the following years were marked by conflict between environmentalist and prodevelopment forces as well as by voluble criticism of welfare services.

  • Lennon, Sean (American musician)

    John Lennon: …they soon conceived a son, Sean, born on Lennon’s birthday in 1975. Lennon retreated from music and became a reclusive househusband, leaving his business affairs to Ono. The details of this very private period are unclear, although it is unlikely that the couple’s domestic arrangements were as idyllic as they…

  • Lennooideae (plant subfamily)

    Lennooideae, the sand food subfamily of the family Boraginaceae, composed of two genera and four species of parasitic plants. The unusual plants inhabit desert regions in Colombia, Venezuela, Mexico, and the southwestern United States, and many are considered rare. Though formerly treated as its

  • Lennox (island, Chile)

    Beagle Channel: eastern end, Picton, Nueva, and Lennox islands, were the subject of a territorial dispute between Chile and Argentina that began in the 1840s and which almost led to war between the two countries in 1978. The dispute officially ended on May 2, 1985, when a treaty awarding the three islands…

  • Lennox, 1st Duke of (English noble [1672-1723])

    Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond, son of Charles II of England by his mistress Louise de Kéroualle, duchess of Portsmouth. He was aide-de-camp to William III from 1693 to 1702 and lord of the bedchamber to George I from 1714 to 1723. Charles II awarded a number of peerages (duchies, earldoms,

  • Lennox, Annie (Scottish singer and songwriter)
  • Lennox, Charles, 1st duke of Richmond (English noble [1672-1723])

    Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond, son of Charles II of England by his mistress Louise de Kéroualle, duchess of Portsmouth. He was aide-de-camp to William III from 1693 to 1702 and lord of the bedchamber to George I from 1714 to 1723. Charles II awarded a number of peerages (duchies, earldoms,

  • Lennox, Charles, 3rd duke of Richmond (British politician [1735-1806])

    Charles Lennox, 3rd duke of Richmond, one of the most progressive British politicians of the 18th century, being chiefly known for his advanced views on parliamentary reform. Richmond succeeded to the peerage in 1750 (his father, the 2nd duke, having added the Aubigny title to the Richmond and

  • Lennox, Charlotte (British author)

    Charlotte Lennox, English novelist whose work, especially The Female Quixote, was much admired by leading literary figures of her time, including Samuel Johnson and the novelists Henry Fielding and Samuel Richardson. Charlotte Ramsay was the daughter of a British army officer who was said to have

  • Lennox, Margaret Douglas, Countess of (English noble)

    Margaret Douglas, countess of Lennox, prominent intriguer in England during the early reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Lady Margaret Douglas was the daughter of Archibald Douglas, 6th Earl of Angus, and Margaret Tudor (daughter of King Henry VII of England and widow of King James IV of Scotland), and in

  • Lennox, Matthew Stewart, 4th earl of (British lord)

    Margaret Douglas, countess of Lennox: …Stewart (1516–71), 4th Earl of Lennox. Because of her nearness to the English crown, Lady Margaret Douglas was brought up chiefly at the English court in close association with Princess Mary (afterward Queen Mary I), who remained her fast friend throughout life.

  • Lennoys (mythological land)

    Lyonnesse, mythical “lost” land supposed once to have connected Cornwall in the west of England with the Scilly Isles lying in the English Channel. The name Lyonnesse first appeared in Sir Thomas Malory’s late 15th-century prose account of the rise and fall of King Arthur, Le Morte Darthur, in

  • Lenny (film by Fosse [1974])

    Bob Fosse: From Broadway to Cabaret: …the big screen—and left musicals—with Lenny (1974), a biopic of tragic comic Lenny Bruce, whose controversial routines resulted in charges of obscenity and various arrests. Julian Barry adapted and expanded his own play, and Fosse elected to shoot the film in black and white. But the core of the movie…

  • Lenny Henry Show, The (British television series)

    Lenny Henry: …the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), The Lenny Henry Show. The program consisted of a mix of stand-up comedy and sketches that featured him playing a number of offbeat, catchphrase-spouting characters, routines that quickly became his comedic calling card. Although his impersonations were mostly crowd-pleasing, they also drew criticism for playing…

  • leno weave (textiles)

    textile: Gauze or leno weave: Gauze weaving is an open weave made by twisting adjacent warps together. It is usually made by the leno, or doup, weaving process, in which a doup attachment, a thin hairpin-like needle attached to two healds, is used, and the adjacent warp yarns cross each…

  • Leno, Dan (British entertainer)

    Dan Leno, popular English entertainer who is considered the foremost representative of the British music hall at its height in the 19th century. In 1901 Leno gave a command performance for King Edward VII, becoming the first music-hall performer to be so honoured. Born into a family of traveling

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