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  • La Plata River (river, Puerto Rico)

    La Plata River, river in east-central Puerto Rico, rising on the western slope of Mount Santa (2,963 feet [903 metres]), a peak of the Sierra de Cayey. Part of the stream is impounded by Lake Carite; the reservoir’s outlet diverts waters for a series of hydroelectric stations on the Guamaní River

  • La Plata river dolphin (mammal)

    river dolphin: …smallest river dolphin species, the La Plata river dolphin (Pontoporia blainvillei), also lives in South America. Also known as the franciscana, it inhabits the coastal waters of Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina. Gray above and pale below, this little dolphin grows only 1.2–1.7 metres (4–5.6 feet) long and weighs 20–60 kg…

  • la Plata, Río de (estuary, South America)

    Río de la Plata, (Spanish: “River of Silver”) a tapering intrusion of the Atlantic Ocean on the east coast of South America between Uruguay to the north and Argentina to the south. While some geographers regard it as a gulf or as a marginal sea of the Atlantic, and others consider it to be a river,

  • La Porrée, Gilbert de (French bishop)

    St. Bernard of Clairvaux: Pillar of the church: …participated in the condemnation of Gilbert de La Porrée—a scholarly dialectician and bishop of Poitiers who held that Christ’s divine nature was only a human concept. He exhorted Pope Eugenius to stress his role as spiritual leader of the church over his role as leader of a great temporal power,…

  • la Pouplinière, Le Riche de (French music patron)

    Jean-Philippe Rameau: …contact at this time was Le Riche de la Pouplinière, one of the wealthiest men in France and one of the greatest musical patrons of all time. Rameau was put in charge of La Pouplinière’s excellent private orchestra, a post he held for 22 years. He also taught the financier’s…

  • La Profession de foi du vicaire savoyard (essay by Rousseau)

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Years of seclusion and exile: …foi du vicaire savoyard (1765; The Profession of Faith of a Savoyard Vicar) Rousseau sets out what may fairly be regarded as his own religious views, since that book confirms what he says on the subject in his private correspondence. Rousseau could never entertain doubts about God’s existence or about…

  • La Renaudie (French noble)

    Conspiracy of Amboise: …a needy Périgord nobleman named La Renaudie as its nominal head, though the agitation had in the first instance been fostered by the agents of Louis I de Bourbon, prince de Condé. The Guises were warned of the conspiracy while the court was at Blois, and for greater security they…

  • La Republique du Genève (canton, Switzerland)

    Genève, canton, southwestern Switzerland. The canton lies between the Jura Mountains and the Alps and consists mainly of its capital, the city of Geneva (Genève). It is one of the smallest cantons in the Swiss Confederation. Bordering on Vaud canton for 3.5 miles (5.5 km) in the extreme north, it

  • La Révellière-Lépeaux, Louis-Marie de (French politician)

    Louis-Marie de La Révellière-Lépeaux, member of the French Revolutionary regime known as the Directory. In 1789 La Révellière-Lépeaux was elected as a representative of the Third Estate (the unprivileged order) to the States General, which converted itself into the revolutionary National Assembly.

  • La Rioja (province, Argentina)

    La Rioja, provincia (province), northwestern Argentina, extending southeastward from Chile. The northeast-central city of La Rioja is the provincial capital. The province’s southeastern half is an arid to semiarid plain, while the northwestern section is crossed north to south by alternating

  • La Rioja (Argentina)

    La Rioja, city, capital of La Rioja provincia (province), northwestern Argentina. It is located on the La Rioja River at the foot of the Velasco Mountains. Founded in 1591 by explorers for gold and silver, it long remained a small commercial and administrative centre close to intermittently worked

  • La Rioja (region, Spain)

    La Rioja, comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) and historical region of Spain coextensive with the north-central Spanish provincia (province) of La Rioja (until 1980 called Logro?o). La Rioja is bordered by the autonomous communities of the Basque Country to the north, Navarra to the

  • La Rive, Auguste-Arthur de (French physicist)

    Auguste-Arthur de La Rive, Swiss physicist who was one of the founders of the electrochemical theory of batteries. La Rive was elected to the chair of natural philosophy at the Academy of Geneva in 1823, and for the next seven years he conducted studies on the specific heat of various gases and the

  • La Roca, Pete (American musician)

    Pete La Roca, (Peter Sims), American jazz artist (born April 7, 1938, New York , N.Y.—died Nov. 20, 2012, New York City), delighted jazz aficionados with his energetic yet sympathetic drum accompaniments to bop-era modernists, beginning with his work (1957–59) with Sonny Rollins. La Roca went on to

  • La Rocca, Nick (American musician)

    Dixieland: Nick La Rocca, one of the many musicians who apprenticed with Laine, incorporated the sound, and much of the repertoire, of Laine’s band when forming the Original Dixieland Jazz (originally “Jass”) Band (ODJB) in 1916. A highly influential group, the ODJB also borrowed from the…

  • La Roche, Sophie von (German writer)

    Sophie von La Roche, German writer whose first and most important work, Geschichte des Fr?uleins von Sternheim (1771; History of Lady Sophia Sternheim), was the first German novel written by a woman and is considered to be among the best works from the period in which English novels, particularly

  • La Roche-sur-Yon (France)

    La Roche-sur-Yon, town, capital of Vendée département, Pays de la Loire région, western France, south of Nantes. The Vendée region had been pacified at the time of the French Revolution but still remained disaffected after the counterrevolutionary insurrection of 1793. Napoleon in 1804 established

  • La Rochefoucauld family (French noble family)

    La Rochefoucauld Family, one of France’s noblest families, traceable in Angoumois to the year 1019. Ducal titles belonging to it are: duke (duc) de La Rochefoucauld (1622); duke de La Roche-Guyon (1679); duke d’Anville (1732); duke d’Estissac; duke de Liancourt (1747); duke de Doudeauville (1780);

  • La Rochefoucauld, Count Robert Jean-Marie de (French Resistance leader and saboteur)

    Robert de La Rochefoucauld, (Count Robert Jean-Marie de La Rochefoucauld), French Resistance leader and saboteur (born Sept. 16, 1923, Paris, France—died May 8, 2012, Ouzouer-sur-Trézée, Loiret, France), fought on behalf of the Resistance in France during World War II as an agent of Britain’s

  • La Rochefoucauld, Fran?ois VI, duke de (French writer)

    Fran?ois VI, duc de La Rochefoucauld, French classical author who had been one of the most active rebels of the Fronde before he became the leading exponent of the maxime, a French literary form of epigram that expresses a harsh or paradoxical truth with brevity. La Rochefoucauld was the son of

  • La Rochefoucauld, Robert de (French Resistance leader and saboteur)

    Robert de La Rochefoucauld, (Count Robert Jean-Marie de La Rochefoucauld), French Resistance leader and saboteur (born Sept. 16, 1923, Paris, France—died May 8, 2012, Ouzouer-sur-Trézée, Loiret, France), fought on behalf of the Resistance in France during World War II as an agent of Britain’s

  • La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, Fran?ois-Alexandre-Frédéric, duc de (French educator)

    Fran?ois-Alexandre-Frédéric, duke de La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, educator and social reformer who founded the école Nationale Supérieure des Arts et Métiers at Chalons and whose model farm at Liancourt contributed to the development of French agriculture. La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, the son of

  • La Rochejaquelein, Henri du Vergier, Count de (French noble)

    Wars of the Vendée: …Charette de La Contrie, and Henri du Vergier, Count de La Rochejaquelein. In May the rebels (about 30,000 strong) took the towns of Thouars, Parthenay, and Fontenay, and their army, which had changed its name from “the Catholic Army” to “the Catholic and Royal Army,” turned north and on June…

  • La Rochelle (France)

    La Rochelle, city, Atlantic seaport and capital of Charente-Maritime département, Nouvelle-Aquitainerégion, western France, situated on an inlet opposite Ré Island. The city, which has straight, regular streets, a large park, and shady promenades on the sites of its old fortifications, grew

  • La Rochelle, Pierre Drieu (French writer)

    Pierre Drieu La Rochelle, French writer of novels, short stories, and political essays whose life and works illustrate the malaise common among European youth after World War I. Drieu, the brilliant son of a middle-class family, attended the école des Sciences Politiques with the intention of

  • La Rochelle, Siege of (French history [1627–28])

    Siege of La Rochelle, (1627–28). The Siege of La Rochelle effectively ended the final Huguenot (French Protestant) rebellion against the French crown and was a marker in the rise of the French absolute monarchy. Cardinal Richelieu’s royal forces captured the city after a fourteen-month siege in

  • La Rocque, Jean-Fran?ois de, Sieur de Roberval (French explorer)

    Jean-Fran?ois de La Rocque, sieur de Roberval, French colonizer chosen by Francis I to create a settlement on North American lands found earlier by Jacques Cartier. Roberval was born into a noble family and lived at the court of Francis of Angoulême. Roberval converted to Protestantism and was

  • La Romana (Dominican Republic)

    La Romana, city and port, southeastern Dominican Republic, on the Caribbean Sea opposite Catalina Island. Founded near the end of the 19th century, La Romana grew rapidly after the establishment of a large sugar mill there in 1911. In addition to sugarcane, the surrounding region produces coffee,

  • La Rue, Bubbles (marionette character)

    Bil and Cora Baird: …creations became classic puppet figures: Bubbles La Rue, the marionette striptease dancer; the singing frogs; Snarky Parker, the master of ceremonies; and Heathcliff, the talking horse. Bil Baird trained a generation of younger puppeteers, including the creator of the Muppets, Jim Henson, and many of Henson’s associates. He was also…

  • La Rue, Danny (Irish-born British actor and female impersonator)

    Danny La Rue, (Daniel Patrick Carroll), Irish-born British actor and female impersonator (born July 26, 1927, Cork, Ire.—died May 31, 2009, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, Eng.), was a self-described “comic in a frock,” elevating female impersonation from its dubious history as a bawdy drag act into a

  • La Rue, Perchon de (Flemish composer)

    Pierre de La Rue, composer in the Flemish, or Netherlandish, style that dominated Renaissance music, known for his religious music. Little is known of La Rue’s early life. He may have worked first as a part-time singer in Brussels (1469), then perhaps in Ghent (1471–72) and Nieuwpoort (1472–77).

  • La Rue, Pierchon de (Flemish composer)

    Pierre de La Rue, composer in the Flemish, or Netherlandish, style that dominated Renaissance music, known for his religious music. Little is known of La Rue’s early life. He may have worked first as a part-time singer in Brussels (1469), then perhaps in Ghent (1471–72) and Nieuwpoort (1472–77).

  • La Rue, Pierre de (Flemish composer)

    Pierre de La Rue, composer in the Flemish, or Netherlandish, style that dominated Renaissance music, known for his religious music. Little is known of La Rue’s early life. He may have worked first as a part-time singer in Brussels (1469), then perhaps in Ghent (1471–72) and Nieuwpoort (1472–77).

  • La Rue, Pierson de (Flemish composer)

    Pierre de La Rue, composer in the Flemish, or Netherlandish, style that dominated Renaissance music, known for his religious music. Little is known of La Rue’s early life. He may have worked first as a part-time singer in Brussels (1469), then perhaps in Ghent (1471–72) and Nieuwpoort (1472–77).

  • La Russa, Anthony, Jr. (American baseball player and manager)

    Tony La Russa, American professional baseball manager who led his teams to three World Series titles (1989, 2006, and 2011) and accumulated the third most managerial wins (2,728) in major league history. La Russa signed to play baseball with the Kansas City Athletics (or “A’s”) out of high school.

  • La Russa, Tony (American baseball player and manager)

    Tony La Russa, American professional baseball manager who led his teams to three World Series titles (1989, 2006, and 2011) and accumulated the third most managerial wins (2,728) in major league history. La Russa signed to play baseball with the Kansas City Athletics (or “A’s”) out of high school.

  • La Sal Mountains (mountains, Utah, United States)

    Colorado Plateau: …feet (3,870 m) in the La Sal Mountains, Utah. Erosion by the Colorado River system has carved deep, brilliantly coloured gorges, notably the Grand Canyon. (The erosive power of the river is shown in the video.) The province embraces numerous conservation areas and also many Indian reservations.

  • La Sale, Antoine de (French writer)

    Antoine de La Sale, French writer chiefly remembered for his Petit Jehan de Saintré, a romance marked by a great gift for the observation of court manners and a keen sense of comic situation and dialogue. From 1400 to 1448 La Sale served the dukes of Anjou, Louis II, Louis III, and René, as squire,

  • La Salle (borough, Montreal, Quebec, Canada)

    La Salle, former city, Montréal region, southern Quebec province, Canada, on the south shore of ?le de Montréal (Montreal Island), at the head of the Lachine Rapids of the St. Lawrence River. Until 2002 it was a suburb of Montreal city, at which time it was incorporated into Montreal as a borough

  • La Salle (Illinois, United States)

    La Salle, city, La Salle county, north-central Illinois, U.S. It lies on the Illinois River, about 90 miles (150 km) southwest of Chicago. With Peru (adjacent to the west) and Oglesby (southeast), La Salle forms a tri-city unit. The city was named for the French explorer René-Robert Cavelier, sieur

  • La Salle and the Discovery of the Great West (work by Parkman)

    Francis Parkman: Literary career.: …persistent Iroquois attacks, and his La Salle and the Discovery of the Great West, first published in 1869 as The Discovery of the Great West but later revised after French documents were made available, is in many respects one of the best one-volume biographies in the English language. René-Robert Cavelier,…

  • La Salle Street (street, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    the Loop: …several large department stores, and LaSalle Street (sometimes considered Chicago’s Wall Street), the location of several large financial institutions, including the Chicago Stock Exchange (founded 1882; from 1949 to 1993, the Midwest Stock Exchange), the Chicago Board of Trade (1848), and the Chicago Board Options Exchange (1973). The Loop was…

  • La Salle University (university, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States)

    La Salle University, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is operated by the Christian Brothers, a teaching order of the Roman Catholic church. It comprises schools of Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, and Nursing, offering a range

  • La Salle, René-Robert Cavelier, sieur de (French explorer)

    René-Robert Cavelier, sieur de La Salle, French explorer in North America, who led an expedition down the Illinois and Mississippi rivers and claimed all the region watered by the Mississippi and its tributaries for Louis XIV of France, naming the region “Louisiana.” A few years later, in a

  • La Salle, Saint Jean-Baptiste de (French educator)

    Saint Jean-Baptiste de La Salle, ; canonized 1900; feast day April 7), French educator and founder of the Brothers of the Christian Schools (sometimes called the de La Salle Brothers), the first Roman Catholic congregation of male nonclerics devoted solely to schools, learning, and teaching. Of

  • La Scala (opera house, Milan, Italy)

    La Scala, theatre in Milan, one of the principal opera houses of the world and the leading Italian house. Built in 1776–78 by Empress Maria Theresa of Austria (whose country then ruled Milan), it replaced an earlier theatre that had burned. In 1872 it became the property of the city of Milan. The

  • la Selle, Mount (mountain, Haiti)

    Hispaniola: …southwestern peninsula, which rises to Mount Selle at 8,773 feet (2,674 metres). In contrast to the highlands, the basin of Lake Enriquillo in southwestern Dominican Republic is quite low, the surface of the lake being about 150 feet (45 metres) below sea level. The main rivers are the Yaque del…

  • La Serena (Chile)

    La Serena, city, northern Chile. It lies on a marine terrace overlooking Bahía (bay) de Coquimbo, just south of the Río Elqui and east of Coquimbo city. Founded around 1543 on the river’s northern bank, it was named after the birthplace of the conquistador Pedro de Valdivia. Razed by Diaguita

  • La Sila (mountains, Italy)

    Calabria: …Crati River from the extensive La Sila massif (rising to 6,325 feet [1,928 m]). A narrow isthmus between the gulfs of Sant’Eufemia (west) and Squillace (east) separates the northern from the southern part of the region, in which the uplands continue as the Appennino Calabrese and culminate in the extreme…

  • La Silla Observatory (observatory, Chile)

    European Southern Observatory: …at three sites in Chile—the La Silla Observatory, located about 600 km (370 miles) north of Santiago at an altitude of 2,400 metres (7,900 feet), the Very Large Telescope (Paranal Observatory) on Paranal, a 2,600-metre- (8,600-foot-) high mountain about 130 km (80 miles) south of Antofagasta, and the Atacama Large…

  • La Spezia (Italy)

    La Spezia, city, Liguria region, northern Italy. The city, a major naval base, is located at the head of the Golfo della Spezia, southeast of Genoa. The site was inhabited in Roman times, but little is known of its history before 1276, when it was sold to Genoa by the Fieschi family. It became a

  • La Taille, Jean de (French author)

    Jean de La Taille, poet and dramatist who, through his plays and his influential treatise on the art of tragedy, helped to effect the transition from native French drama to classical tragedy. While studying in Paris La Taille came under the influence, shown in his minor poems, of Pierre de Ronsard

  • La Tène (archaeological site, Switzerland)

    La Tène, (French: The Shallows), archaeological site at the eastern end of Lake Neuchatel, Switz., the name of which has been extended to distinguish the Late Iron Age culture of European Celts. La Tène culture originated in the mid-5th century bc, when the Celts came into contact with Greek and

  • La Tène culture (European culture)

    La Tène: La Tène culture originated in the mid-5th century bc, when the Celts came into contact with Greek and Etruscan influences from south of the Alps. This culture passed through several phases and regional variations during the next four centuries as the Celts expanded throughout most…

  • La Tour, Charles (French colonial governor and trader)

    Charles La Tour, French colonist and fur trader who served as governor of Acadia (region of the North American Atlantic seaboard centred on Nova Scotia) under the French and the English. La Tour went to Acadia with his father in 1610. When the English destroyed the French settlements there in

  • La Tour, Charles Cagniard de (French engineer)

    siren: …it by the French engineer Charles Cagniard de La Tour, who devised an acoustical instrument of the type in 1819. A disk with evenly spaced holes around its edge is rotated at high speed, interrupting at regular intervals a jet of air directed at the holes. The resulting regular pulsations…

  • La Tour, Charles Turgis de Saint-étienne de (French colonial governor and trader)

    Charles La Tour, French colonist and fur trader who served as governor of Acadia (region of the North American Atlantic seaboard centred on Nova Scotia) under the French and the English. La Tour went to Acadia with his father in 1610. When the English destroyed the French settlements there in

  • La Tour, Georges de (French artist)

    Georges de La Tour, painter, mostly of candlelit subjects, who was well known in his own time but then forgotten until well into the 20th century, when the identification of many formerly misattributed works established his modern reputation as a giant of French painting. La Tour became a master

  • La Tour, Maurice-Quentin de (French artist)

    Maurice-Quentin de La Tour, pastelist whose animated and sharply characterized portraits made him one of the most successful and imitated portraitists of 18th-century France. Early in his youth La Tour went to Paris, where he entered the studio of the Flemish painter Jacques Spoede. He then went to

  • La Tragédie du Roi Christophe (work by Césaire)

    Aimé Césaire: …Tragédie du Roi Christophe (1963; The Tragedy of King Christophe), a drama of decolonization in 19th-century Haiti, and Une Saison au Congo (1966; A Season in the Congo), the epic of the 1960 Congo rebellion and of the assassination of the Congolese political leader Patrice Lumumba. Both depict the fate…

  • La Tranche River (river, Ontario, Canada)

    Thames River, river in southern Ontario, Canada. The Thames is 160 miles (260 km) long. It rises north-northwest of Woodstock, in the uplands between Lakes Huron and Erie, and flows southwest past the towns of Woodstock, London, and Chatham to Lake Saint Clair. The river is navigable below Chatham.

  • La Trappe, abbey of (abbey, France)

    Cistercian: …Rancé, who became abbot of La Trappe in 1664. He was so successful in restoring a well-balanced rule of silence, prayer, manual labour, and seclusion from the world that the various attempts at a strict observance became popularly associated with the name Trappists.

  • La Trémoille family (French family)

    La Trémoille Family, noble family that contributed numerous generals to France. The family’s name was taken from a village in Poitou (modern La Trimouille). A Pierre de La Trémoille is recorded as early as the 11th century, but the family’s ascendance dates from the 15th century. Early family

  • La Trémoille, Claude de (French noble)

    La Trémoille Family: Louis III’s son Claude (1566–1604) at first fought in the campaigns against the Huguenots under Henry III but then changed sides, joining the Protestant king of Navarre, Henry III, in 1586. After Henry de Navarre became King Henry IV, of France, Claude was made a peer (1595).

  • La Trémoille, Fran?ois de (French noble)

    La Trémoille Family: …Marignan in 1515, his grandson Fran?ois (1502–41) succeeded to the family estates. Through his marriage to Anne de Laval, granddaughter of Frederick of Aragon, deposed king of Naples, the family derived its pretension to the kingdom of Naples and the claim to recognition at the French court as foreign princes.…

  • La Trémoille, Georges de (French noble)

    Georges de La Trémoille, powerful lord who exercised considerable influence over Charles VII of France. At first allied with the duke of Burgundy in the power struggle that continued for many years during Charles VI’s madness, La Trémoille switched his loyalty when the rival faction, the Armagnacs,

  • La Trémoille, Gui de (French noble)

    La Trémoille Family: A Pierre de La Trémoille is recorded as early as the 11th century, but the family’s ascendance dates from the 15th century. Early family members fought in several crusades. Gui (d. 1397) went with John the Fearless, duke of Burgundy, on the crusade to Hungary, was taken prisoner…

  • La Trinité (town, Martinique)

    La Trinité, town and port on the Caribbean island of Martinique, in the southeastern West Indies. Situated on the east coast 11 miles (18 km) northeast of Fort-de-France, it is a trading centre for sugarcane and pineapples. Industries include sugar milling and rum distilling. Pop. (2006 est.)

  • La Trobe River (river, Victoria, Australia)

    Latrobe Valley: The Latrobe River rises in the Eastern Highlands near Mount Baw Baw in the Gippsland district. Flowing in a southeasterly direction, it passes the cities of Moe and Yallourn, where it turns to flow almost directly east, past Traralgon. The Latrobe is joined by its main…

  • La Trobe Valley (valley, Victoria, Australia)

    Latrobe Valley, river valley in southeastern Victoria, Australia. It is one of the most important economic areas in the state. The Latrobe River rises in the Eastern Highlands near Mount Baw Baw in the Gippsland district. Flowing in a southeasterly direction, it passes the cities of Moe and

  • La Tuque (Quebec, Canada)

    La Tuque, city, Mauricie–Bois-Francs region, southern Quebec province, Canada, situated on the Saint-Maurice River. During the French regime the site was occupied by a trading post of the Company of New France. The original lumbering settlement of 1908 was named for a rock on the river’s edge that

  • La Unión (El Salvador)

    La Unión, city, eastern El Salvador. It is located at the northern foot of Conchagua Volcano (about 4,100 feet [1,250 m]), on La Unión Bay, an inlet of the Gulf of Fonseca. The city’s economic activity centres on a tortoiseshell industry and beach resort facilities. The nearby port of Cutuco, once

  • La Vallière, Louise-Fran?oise de La Baume le Blanc, Duchesse de (French mistress)

    Louise-Fran?oise de La Baume le Blanc, duchess de La Vallière, mistress of King Louis XIV (reigned 1643–1715) from 1661 to 1667. La Vallière, the daughter of a military governor, was appointed maid of honour in 1661 to Louis XIV’s sister-in-law Henrietta Anne of England, Duchess d’Orléans. Although

  • La Varenne, Fran?ois-Pierre de (French chef)

    grande cuisine: …greatest of French chefs—Fran?ois-Pierre de La Varenne in the 17th century, Marie-Antoine Carême in the late 18th, and Auguste Escoffier in the 19th—advanced the systematization of French cuisine by their writings and through the legions of chefs they trained. In developing new dishes they accumulated a body of knowledge about…

  • La Vauguyon, Antoine de Quélen de Caussade, duke de (French educator)

    Louis XVI: Early life and accession: …education was entrusted to the duc de La Vauguyon (Antoine de Quélen de Caussade). He was taught to avoid letting others know his thoughts, which has led to sharp disagreement about his intelligence. Louis nevertheless possessed an excellent memory, acquired a sound knowledge of Latin and English, and took an…

  • La Vega (Dominican Republic)

    La Vega, city, central Dominican Republic. It was founded in 1495 by Bartholomew Columbus at the foot of Concepción fortress, which had been built by his brother Christopher Columbus in 1494. La Vega was moved to the bank of the Camú River after an earthquake in 1564. La Vega is a prosperous

  • La Venta (archaeological site, Mexico)

    La Venta, ancient Olmec settlement, located near the border of modern Tabasco and Veracruz states, on the gulf coast of Mexico. La Venta was originally built on an island in the Tonalá River; now it is part of a large swamp. After petroleum was found there, many of the artifacts were moved to an

  • La Vérendrye, Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, et de (French-Canadian soldier and explorer)

    Pierre Gaultier de Varennes et de La Vérendrye, French-Canadian soldier, fur trader, and explorer whose exploits, little honoured during his lifetime, rank him as one of the greatest explorers of the Canadian West. Moreover, the string of trading posts he and his sons built in the course of their

  • La Victoria (district, Peru)

    La Victoria, distrito (district) of the Lima-Callao metropolitan area of Peru, south of downtown Lima. It is mainly residential, with slums in the north, pueblos jóvenes (“young towns”), or squatter settlements, in the east, and middle-income housing in the south. The district is the site of Peru’s

  • La Ville Nouvelle (Algeria)

    Oran: The contemporary city: The newer city, called La Ville Nouvelle and built by the French after 1831, occupies the terraces on the east bank of the ravine. La Blanca is crowned by the Turkish citadel of Santa Cruz, which was subsequently modified by the Spanish and the French. The Spanish quarter, with…

  • La Virgen Milagrosa, Church of (church, Mexico City, Mexico)

    Felix Candela: …built in Mexico City the Church of La Virgen Milagrosa (1953–55; “The Miraculous Virgin”), with a warped roof of reinforced concrete 3.8 cm (1.5 inches) thick, and the Church of San Vicente de Paul (1960). In addition to Rio’s Warehouse in Mexico City (1955) and other warped-shell industrial buildings, he…

  • La Vrillière, Phélypeaux de (French officer)

    Fran?ois Mansart: Early years and works.: In the same period, Phélypeaux de La Vrillière, an officer of the crown, commissioned Mansart to build a town house in Paris (rebuilt after Mansart’s death). The building, known from engravings, was a fine example of Mansart’s ability to arrive at subtle, ingenious, and dignified solutions to the problems…

  • Lā‘ie (Hawaii, United States)

    Laie, town, Honolulu county, on Laie Bay, northeastern Oahu island, Hawaii, U.S. The land was acquired by Mormon missionaries in 1864 and settled by a colony of Hawaiian Mormons. The impressive white Laie Temple, where the highest rites of the Mormon church can be performed, was built in 1919 on

  • La’nga, Lake (lake, China)

    Tibet: Drainage and soils: …both Buddhists and Hindus, and Lake La’nga.

  • La, La Lucille (musical by Gershwin)

    George Gershwin: Early career and influences: That same year, La, La Lucille, the first show for which Gershwin composed the entire score, premiered; its most popular songs included “The Best of Everything,” “Nobody but You,” and “Tee-Oodle-Um-Bum-Bo.” Also in 1919, Gershwin composed his first “serious” work, the Lullaby for string quartet. A study in…

  • Là-bas (work by Huysmans)

    black mass: Joris-Karl Huysmans’s novel Là-bas (1891; Down There) describes a black mass celebrated in late 19th-century France.

  • Là-Bas: A Journey into the Self (work by Huysmans)

    black mass: Joris-Karl Huysmans’s novel Là-bas (1891; Down There) describes a black mass celebrated in late 19th-century France.

  • La-sa (China)

    Lhasa, capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region, southwestern China. It is located at an elevation of 11,975 feet (3,650 metres) in the Nyainqêntanglha Mountains of southern Tibet near the Lhasa River, a tributary of the Yarlung Zangbo (Tsangpo) River (the name of the Brahmaputra River in Tibet).

  • La-sa River (river, Asia)

    Tibet: Drainage and soils: …east and, after joining the Lhasa River south of Lhasa, forms the Brahmaputra.

  • Laarmans (fictional character)

    Willem Elsschot: Laarmans, who is the protagonist in Kaas, had been introduced in Lijmen, and he reappears in Pensioen (1937; “Pension”), De leeuwentemmer (1940; “The Lion Tamer”), and Elsschot’s masterpiece, Het dwaallicht (1946; Will-o’-the-wisp), a fruitless search for a remote ideal in an urban setting. Laarmans is…

  • Laatste Nieuws, Het (newspaper, Brussels)

    Het Laatste Nieuws, (Flemish: “The Latest News”) daily newspaper published in Brussels. It is the largest daily in Belgium and was founded in 1888 to serve Flemish-speaking citizens. Although it takes a serious approach to national and international news, it also features comic strips, crossword

  • Laayoune (Western Sahara)

    Laayoune, town, northern Western Sahara, 8 miles (13 km) inland from the Atlantic Ocean, situated in the geographic region of Saguia el-Hamra. It was the capital of Western Sahara from 1940 to 1976 (when Western Sahara was a northwest African overseas province of Spain known as Spanish Sahara);

  • Lab Schools (school, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, a pioneer school in the progressive education movement in the United States. The original University Elementary School was founded in Chicago in 1896 by American educator John Dewey as a research and demonstration centre for the Department of Pedagogy at

  • lab-on-chip (electronics)

    bird flu: Detection of bird flu: Tests based on lab-on-a-chip technology that take less than an hour to complete and can accurately identify specific subtypes of bird flu are being developed. This technology consists of a small device (the “chip”) that contains on its surface a series of scaled-down laboratory analyses requiring only a…

  • laba (Chinese musical instrument)

    Suona, Chinese double-reed woodwind instrument, the most commonly used double-reed instrument. Similar to the shawm, the suona originated in Arabia; it has been widely used in China since the 16th century. The reed is affixed to a conical wooden body covered by a copper tube with eight finger holes

  • Labadie, Jean de (French theologian)

    Jean de Labadie, French theologian, a Protestant convert from Roman Catholicism who founded the Labadists, a Pietist community. While a novice in the Jesuit religious order at Bordeaux, France, Labadie claimed a vision to reform the church. In 1639, however, seriously ill and increasingly

  • Labadists (Pietist community)

    Jean de Labadie: …Roman Catholicism who founded the Labadists, a Pietist community.

  • Laban (biblical figure)

    Jacob: Arriving at his uncle Laban’s home in Haran, Jacob fell in love with his cousin Rachel. He worked for her father, Laban, for seven years to obtain Rachel’s hand in marriage, but then Laban substituted his older daughter, Leah, for Rachel at the wedding ceremony. Unwittingly married to Leah,…

  • Laban, Rudolf (European dance theorist)

    Rudolf Laban, dance theorist and teacher whose studies of human motion provided the intellectual foundations for the development of central European modern dance. Laban also developed Labanotation, a widely used movement-notation system. Originally interested in painting and architecture, Laban

  • Laban, Rudolf von (European dance theorist)

    Rudolf Laban, dance theorist and teacher whose studies of human motion provided the intellectual foundations for the development of central European modern dance. Laban also developed Labanotation, a widely used movement-notation system. Originally interested in painting and architecture, Laban

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