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  • lammergeier (bird)

    Lammergeier, (German: “lamb vulture”) (Gypaetus barbatus), big eaglelike vulture of the Old World (family Accipitridae), frequently over 1 metre (40 inches) long, with a wingspread of nearly 3 metres (10 feet). Brown above and tawny below, the lammergeier has spots on the breast, black and white

  • lammergeir (bird)

    Lammergeier, (German: “lamb vulture”) (Gypaetus barbatus), big eaglelike vulture of the Old World (family Accipitridae), frequently over 1 metre (40 inches) long, with a wingspread of nearly 3 metres (10 feet). Brown above and tawny below, the lammergeier has spots on the breast, black and white

  • lammergeyer (bird)

    Lammergeier, (German: “lamb vulture”) (Gypaetus barbatus), big eaglelike vulture of the Old World (family Accipitridae), frequently over 1 metre (40 inches) long, with a wingspread of nearly 3 metres (10 feet). Brown above and tawny below, the lammergeier has spots on the breast, black and white

  • Lamming, George (West Indian author)

    George Lamming, West Indian novelist and essayist who wrote about decolonization and reconstruction in the Caribbean nations. At Combermere High School, Lamming studied under Frank Collymore, editor of the Caribbean literary journal Bim, which published some of Lamming’s early work. Lamming left

  • Lamming, George William (West Indian author)

    George Lamming, West Indian novelist and essayist who wrote about decolonization and reconstruction in the Caribbean nations. At Combermere High School, Lamming studied under Frank Collymore, editor of the Caribbean literary journal Bim, which published some of Lamming’s early work. Lamming left

  • Lamna (fish genus)

    Mackerel shark, (genus Lamna), either of two species of sharks in the genus Lamna. The genus includes the porbeagle, or Atlantic mackerel shark (L. nasus), and the salmon shark (L. ditropis). The name mackerel shark is also used as the common name for the family Lamnidae (which contains the genus

  • Lamna ditropis (fish)

    mackerel shark: nasus), and the salmon shark (L. ditropis). The name mackerel shark is also used as the common name for the family Lamnidae (which contains the genus Lamna) and the order Lamniformes (which contains the family Lamnidae). For example, some authorities refer to white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) and mako…

  • Lamna nasus (fish)

    Porbeagle, species of mackerel shark

  • Lamnidae (shark family)

    chondrichthyan: Annotated classification: Family Lamnidae (salmon sharks, mako sharks, white sharks, and relatives) Distinguished by 2 dorsal fins, of which the 1st is much larger than the 2nd and the rear end of its base situated well in advance of the pelvic fins; caudal fin lunate (crescent-shaped), its axis…

  • lamoid (mammal)

    llama: …which are known collectively as lamoids. Unlike camels, lamoids do not have the characteristic camel humps; they are slender-bodied animals and have long legs and necks, short tails, small heads, and large, pointed ears. Gregarious animals, they graze on grass and other plants. When annoyed, they spit. Lamoids are able…

  • Lamoille (county, Vermont, United States)

    Lamoille, county, north-central Vermont, U.S. Its topography is mountainous, with the main ridge of the Green Mountains traversing the western part of the county. The region contains some of the state’s highest mountains—including the Sterling Range and Hogback, Cold Hollow, and Lowell

  • Lamonica, Daryle (American football player)

    Oakland Raiders: With an offense starring quarterback Daryle Lamonica and centre Jim Otto, the Raiders won the AFL championship in December 1967, a victory that sent the team to its first Super Bowl the following January (a loss to the Green Bay Packers). John Madden was hired as head coach in 1969,…

  • Lamont, Corliss (American philosopher)

    Corliss Lamont, U.S. humanist philosopher, author, and socialist, who was the son of the chairman of the J.P. Morgan investment bank but devoted his life to fighting for radical causes (b. May 28, 1902--d. April 26,

  • Lamont, Johann von (German astronomer)

    Johann von Lamont, Scottish-born German astronomer noted for discovering that the magnetic field of the Earth fluctuates with a period somewhat in excess of 10 years. In 1827 Lamont began working at the Royal Observatory, Bogenhausen, near Munich. He adopted German nationality and worked at

  • Lamont, Ned (American politician)

    Joseph Lieberman: …the relatively unknown antiwar candidate Ned Lamont, who narrowly defeated the incumbent. In response, Lieberman announced that he would continue in the race as an independent (or, as he phrased it, an “independent Democrat”) and defeated Lamont in the election by a comfortable margin. Though elected as an independent, Lieberman…

  • Lamont, Peter (British production designer and art director)
  • Lamont, Thomas William (American banker)

    Thomas William Lamont, American banker and financier who began his career by reorganizing corporations and went on to help establish financial stability in countries around the world. Lamont graduated from Harvard University in 1892 and, after a brief stint on the financial desk of the New York

  • Lamontagne-Beauregard, Blanche (Canadian poet)

    Blanche Lamontagne-Beauregard, French-Canadian poet who is recognized as the first important female poet of French Canada. Lamontagne studied literature at the University of Montreal. Her early writing explored historical themes, but she later shifted to regionalism, extolling her homeland, the

  • Lamoore, Louis Dearborn (American writer)

    Louis L’Amour, American writer, best-selling author of more than 100 books, most of which were formula westerns that were highly popular because of their well-researched portrayals of frontier life. L’Amour, who left school at the age of 15, was a world traveler who mined in the West, sailed aboard

  • Lamoraal, count van Egmond (Dutch noble)

    Lamoraal, graaf van Egmond, leader in the early opposition to the policies of Philip II of Spain in the Netherlands. Although Egmond did not favour the overthrow of Spanish sovereignty, he became one of the first and most illustrious victims of the duke of Alba’s repressive regime (1567–73). He is

  • Lamoreaux, Steven (American physicist)

    Casimir effect: In 1996 American physicist Steven Lamoreaux measured this force for the first time. The amount of the attractive force, less than a billionth of a newton, agreed with the theory to within 5 percent.

  • Lamoricière, Christophe-Louis-Leon Juchault de (French general)

    Christophe-Louis-Leon Juchault de Lamoricière, French general and administrator noted for his part in the conquest of Algeria. After entering the engineers in 1829, Lamoricière was sent to Algiers (1830) as a captain in the Zouaves. In 1833 he played a prominent role in the creation of the Arab

  • Lamorisse, Albert (French director, producer, and writer)
  • LaMotta, Giacobbe (American boxer)

    Jake LaMotta, American boxer and world middleweight boxing champion (1949–51) whose stamina and fierceness in the ring earned him the nickname “the Bronx Bull.” Lacking finesse, he often allowed himself to take a severe beating before ferociously turning on his foe. His opponents failed to knock

  • LaMotta, Jake (American boxer)

    Jake LaMotta, American boxer and world middleweight boxing champion (1949–51) whose stamina and fierceness in the ring earned him the nickname “the Bronx Bull.” Lacking finesse, he often allowed himself to take a severe beating before ferociously turning on his foe. His opponents failed to knock

  • Lamour, Dorothy (American actress)

    Dorothy Lamour, (MARY LETA DOROTHY SLATON), U.S. actress (born Dec. 10, 1914, New Orleans, La.—died Sept. 22, 1996, Los Angeles, Calif.), was best remembered by filmgoers as the sarong-clad object of Bob Hope’s and Bing Crosby’s attention in a series of "Road" pictures. She was a favourite pinup o

  • Lamoureux, Lucien (Canadian politician and statesman)

    Lucien Lamoureux, Canadian politician whose service as speaker of the House of Commons, from 1966 to 1974, was the longest in Canada’s history; he later was ambassador to Belgium and Luxembourg and to Portugal (b. Aug. 3, 1920, Ottawa, Ont.--d. July 16, 1998, Waterloo,

  • lamp (lighting)

    Lamp, a device for producing illumination, consisting originally of a vessel containing a wick soaked in combustible material, and subsequently such other light-producing instruments as gas and electric lamps. The lamp was invented at least as early as 70,000 bce. Originally it consisted of a

  • lamp envelope (electronics)

    motion-picture technology: Light sources: tungsten-halogen lamps with quartz envelopes came into wide use. The halogen compound is included inside the envelope, and its purpose is to combine with the tungsten evaporated from the hot filament. This forms a compound that is electrically attracted back to the tungsten filament. It thus prevents the evaporated…

  • lamp shell (animal)

    Lamp shells, any member of the phylum Brachiopoda, a group of bottom-dwelling marine invertebrates. They are covered by two valves, or shells; one valve covers the dorsal, or top, side; the other covers the ventral, or bottom, side. The valves, of unequal size, are bilaterally symmetrical; i.e.,

  • Lampang (Thailand)

    Lampang, city, northern Thailand, located about 45 miles (72 km) southeast of Chiang Mai. It lies on the Wang River in the forested Khun Tan Range and is an administrative and commercial centre for the surrounding region. Once the seat of an independent principality, Lampang retains the old walled

  • lampante (chemical product)

    olive oil: …oils, constitutes the oil called lampante, because of its use as fuel in lamps. Lampante is further refined to remove acid, colour, and odour and is sold as refined olive oil, which is used largely for mixing with first-extraction oils to produce edible products. Edible olive oil contains little free…

  • lampara net

    commercial fishing: Purse seines and lamparas: The most important sea-fishing gear is the surrounding net, represented by the older lampara nets and the more modern purse seines. Both are typical gear for pelagic fish schooling in large and dense shoals. When these nets are used, a shoal of fish is…

  • Lampasan Series (geology)

    Lampasan Series, division of Pennsylvanian rocks and time in the south central and southwestern U.S., especially Texas (the Pennsylvanian Period, roughly equivalent to the Upper Carboniferous, began about 318 million years ago and lasted about 19 million years). The Lampasan Series is correlated

  • Lampaul (France)

    Ouessant Island: Lampaul, a small port that is the capital of Ouessant, is the chief settlement of the island’s fishermen; its fields, which cover only a fraction of the island, traditionally have been worked by the fishermen’s wives. Today both fishing and agriculture (sheep grazing) are relatively…

  • lampblack (pigment)

    blackbody: A surface covered with lampblack will absorb about 97 percent of the incident light and, for most purposes, can be considered a blackbody. Polished metal surfaces, on the other hand, absorb only about 6 percent of the incident radiation, reflecting the rest.

  • Lampe d’Aladin, La (work by Cocteau)

    Jean Cocteau: Heritage and youth: …his first volume of poems, La Lampe d’Aladin (“Aladdin’s Lamp”).

  • Lampedusa Island (island, Italy)

    Lampedusa Island, largest (area 8 square miles [21 square km]) of the Isole Pelagie (Pelagie Islands), an island group that includes Linosa and Lampione islets. Administratively Lampedusa is part of the autonomous region of Sicily in Italy. It is located in the Mediterranean Sea between Malta and

  • Lampert, Eddie (American investor)

    Eddie Lampert, American investor who was perhaps best known for orchestrating the merger of the American retail giants Sears, Roebuck and Company and Kmart in 2005. He served as chairman of the resulting Sears Holdings until shortly after his hedge fund, ESL Investments, acquired the company in a

  • Lampert, Edward Scott (American investor)

    Eddie Lampert, American investor who was perhaps best known for orchestrating the merger of the American retail giants Sears, Roebuck and Company and Kmart in 2005. He served as chairman of the resulting Sears Holdings until shortly after his hedge fund, ESL Investments, acquired the company in a

  • Lampert, Harry (American artist)

    the Flash: …writer Gardner Fox and artist Harry Lampert. The character first appeared in Flash Comics no. 1 (January 1940).

  • Lampetra planeri (agnathan vertebrate)

    lamprey: Other lampreys, such as the brook lamprey (Lampetra planeri), also spend their entire lives in fresh water. They are nonparasitic, however, and do not feed after becoming adults; instead, they reproduce and die.

  • LAMPF (New Mexico, United States)

    linear accelerator: …proton linac is at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility in Los Alamos, N.M., U.S.; it is 875 m (2,870 feet) long and accelerates protons to 800 million electron volts (800 megaelectron volts). For much of its length, this machine utilizes a structural variation, known as the side-coupled cavity…

  • Lamphere, Robert Joseph (American intelligence officer)

    Robert Joseph Lamphere, American government agent (born Feb. 14, 1918, Wardner, Idaho—died Jan. 7, 2002, Tucson, Ariz.), as a counterintelligence specialist for the FBI, supervised investigations into several major Soviet espionage cases from the end of World War II to the mid-1950s. He joined t

  • Lamphun (Thailand)

    Lamphun, town, northern Thailand. Lamphun is an old walled town on the Kuang River, 16 miles (26 km) south of Chiang Mai. Although located on the Bangkok–Chiang Mai railway, it lost its commercial importance to Chiang Mai after 1921. Wat Phra That Haripunjaya is Lamphun’s most famous temple; the

  • Lampi?o (work by Queiroz)

    Rachel de Queiroz: …first of her three plays, Lampi?o (1953), treats the actions of that legendary bandit and his lover, Maria Bonita, who abandons her husband and children to follow him. Most critics preferred her second play, A Beata Maria do Egito (1958; “Blessed Mary of Egypt”), which updates the legend of the…

  • Lamplighter, The (work by Cummins)

    Maria Susanna Cummins: In 1854 she published The Lamplighter, which was a huge and immediate success, selling 40,000 copies in a few weeks and 70,000 in a year. The Lamplighter combined sentimentality, piety, and improbability in about equal portions and was perfectly suited to the rudimentary taste of a newly awakened reading…

  • Lampman, Archibald (Canadian poet)

    Archibald Lampman, Canadian poet of the Confederation group, whose most characteristic work sensitively records the feelings evoked by scenes and incidents of northern landscapes and seasons. Educated at Trinity College in the University of Toronto, he lived in Ottawa, employed in the post office

  • Lampong (people)

    Lampong, people indigenous to Lampung province on the Sunda Strait in southern Sumatra, Indonesia. They speak Lampong, a Malayo-Polynesian language that has been written in a script related to the Hindu alphabet. A dependency of the Sultan of Bantam (western Java) after 1550, southern Sumatra

  • Lampoon (Thailand)

    Lamphun, town, northern Thailand. Lamphun is an old walled town on the Kuang River, 16 miles (26 km) south of Chiang Mai. Although located on the Bangkok–Chiang Mai railway, it lost its commercial importance to Chiang Mai after 1921. Wat Phra That Haripunjaya is Lamphun’s most famous temple; the

  • lampoon (literary form)

    Lampoon, virulent satire in prose or verse that is a gratuitous and sometimes unjust and malicious attack on an individual. Although the term came into use in the 17th century from the French, examples of the lampoon are found as early as the 3rd century bc in the plays of Aristophanes, who

  • Lamport’s bakery algorithm (computer science)

    Leslie Lamport: …which he called the “bakery algorithm,” involved assigning an integer to each process waiting to write to memory much the same way that a bakery patron obtains a number upon entering the store. Lamport worked to solve the problem of “Byzantine failures”—that is, conditions under which a malfunctioning component…

  • Lamport, Leslie (American computer scientist)

    Leslie Lamport, American computer scientist who was awarded the 2013 Turing Award for explaining and formulating the behaviour of distributed computing systems (i.e., systems made up of multiple autonomous computers that communicate by exchanging messages with one another). Lamport received the

  • Lamport, Leslie B. (American computer scientist)

    Leslie Lamport, American computer scientist who was awarded the 2013 Turing Award for explaining and formulating the behaviour of distributed computing systems (i.e., systems made up of multiple autonomous computers that communicate by exchanging messages with one another). Lamport received the

  • Lamprecht, Karl Gotthard (German historian)

    Karl Gotthard Lamprecht, German historian who was one of the first scholars to develop a systematic theory of psychological factors in history. He studied history, political science, economics, and art at the universities of G?ttingen, Leipzig, and Munich (1874–79). In 1878 he completed his

  • lamprey (agnathan vertebrate)

    Lamprey, any of about 43 species of primitive fishlike jawless vertebrates placed with hagfishes in the class Agnatha. Lampreys belong to the family Petromyzonidae. They live in coastal and fresh waters and are found in temperate regions around the world, except Africa. The eel-like, scaleless

  • Lampridiomorpha (fish superorder)

    fish: Annotated classification: Superorder Lampridiomorpha Order Lampriformes (opahs, oarfishes, and relatives) No subocular shelf and pelvic spine; some have a peculiar condition (hypurostegy) in which caudal rays are expanded. Medium to large size; to about 2 metres (about 7 feet) and 300 kg (660 pounds) in the opah (Lampridae)

  • Lampriformes (fish order)

    atheriniform: orders Beryciformes, Zeiformes, and Lampridiformes, the most primitive groups of the superorder Acanthopterygii, or spiny-finned fishes.

  • Lampris (fish genus)

    Opah, (genus Lampris), any of two species of large marine fish of the family Lampridae (order Lampridiformes). One species, Lampris guttatus, is the only known fully warm-blooded fish. A deep-bodied fish with a small toothless mouth, the opah (L. guttatus) grows to a length of about 2 metres (7

  • Lampris guttatus (fish species, Lampris guttatus)

    opah: One species, Lampris guttatus, is the only known fully warm-blooded fish.

  • Lampris immaculatus (fish)

    opah: The southern opah (L. immaculatus) is smaller, averaging about 110 cm (43 inches) and 30 kg (66 pounds). Both species are distinctively coloured, blue above and rosy below, with scarlet fins and jaws and round white spots on the body. The opah occurs in the tropical…

  • Lamprocapnos spectabilis (plant)

    bleeding heart: …old garden favourite is the Asian bleeding heart (L. spectabilis), widespread for its small rosy-red and white heart-shaped flowers dangling from arching stems about 60 cm (2 feet) tall. There is also a white form, L. spectabilis ‘Alba.’ The deeply cut compound leaves are larger than those of the cultivated…

  • Lamprocapnos spectabilis alba (plant)

    bleeding heart: There is also a white form, L. spectabilis ‘Alba.’ The deeply cut compound leaves are larger than those of the cultivated species of Dicentra, such as the shorter eastern, or wild, bleeding heart (D. eximia), which produces sprays of small pink flowers from April to September in the Allegheny…

  • Lampropeltis (reptile)

    King snake, (genus Lampropeltis), any of seven species of moderate- to large-sized terrestrial snakes found from southeastern Canada to Ecuador. Adults generally range in length from 1 to 1.5 metres (3.3 to 5 feet), but some have grown to 2.1 metres. They are nonvenomous constrictors and have a

  • Lampropeltis doliata (snake)

    king snake: The common milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulatum, with 25 mostly tricoloured subspecies) has one of the largest distributions of any snake, occurring from 48° N to 4° S latitude. Its average length is 1 metre (maximum 1.9 metres). The scarlet king snake (L. triangulum elapsoides; considered by…

  • Lampropeltis getula (snake)

    king snake: The common king snake (Lampropeltis getula, with seven subspecies) is found throughout the United States and northern Mexico. It is variable in pattern and may be black or dark brown, with yellow or white stripes, rings, crossbars, or spots. The California king snake (Lampropeltis getula californiae)…

  • Lampropeltis getula californiae (snake)

    king snake: The California king snake (Lampropeltis getula californiae) exhibits two pattern types, the common ringed pattern and a rarer striped form; both patterns can appear from a single clutch of eggs. King snakes derive their common name from the common king snake’s habit of feeding upon other…

  • Lampropeltis triangulatum (snake)

    king snake: The common milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulatum, with 25 mostly tricoloured subspecies) has one of the largest distributions of any snake, occurring from 48° N to 4° S latitude. Its average length is 1 metre (maximum 1.9 metres). The scarlet king snake (L. triangulum elapsoides; considered by…

  • Lampropeltis triangulum elapsoides (snake)

    coevolution: …nonvenomous snakes, such as the scarlet king snake (Lampropeltis triangulum elapsoides), whose coloration closely resembles that of coral snakes, which can deliver a poisonous bite.

  • lamprophyre (rock)

    Lamprophyre, any of a group of dark gray to black intrusive igneous rocks that generally occur as dikes (tabular bodies inserted in fissures). Such rocks are characterized by a porphyritic texture in which large crystals (phenocrysts) of dark, iron-magnesium (mafic) minerals are enclosed in a

  • Lamprotornis regius (bird)

    starling: The 36-cm golden-breasted, or regal, starling (Lamprotornis regius) of eastern Africa, is green, blue, and yellow, with a long tail. The wattled starling (Creatophora cinerea) is brown, gray, and white; uniquely, the breeding male becomes bald, showing bright yellow skin, and grows large black wattles on the…

  • Lampsacus (ancient Greek settlement, Turkey)

    Lampsacus, ancient Greek city on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont, best known for its wines, and the chief seat of the worship of Priapus, a god of procreation and fertility. Colonized in 654 bc by Ionian Phocaea, the city had a fine harbour. It took part in the Ionian revolt against Persia

  • Lampson, Butler W. (computer scientist)

    Butler W. Lampson, computer scientist and winner of the 1992 A.M. Turing Award, the highest honour in computer science, for “contributions to the development of distributed, personal computing environments and the technology for their implementation: workstations, networks, operating systems,

  • lampuka (fish)

    dolphin: …and game fish called the common dolphin (C. hippuras) is known in Hawaiian as mahimahi and sometimes in Spanish as the dorado. Reaching a length of about 1.5 metres (5 feet) and a weight of about 30 kg (66 pounds), the common dolphin has a blunt head, a tapered body,…

  • Lampung (province, Indonesia)

    Lampung, propinsi (or provinsi; province), southern Sumatra, Indonesia. It is bounded by the Java Sea to the east, the Sunda Strait to the south, the Indian Ocean to the west, and South Sumatra (Sumatera Selatan) province to the north and northwest. The province includes the islands of Sebuku,

  • Lampyridae (insect)

    Firefly, (family Lampyridae), any of some 2,000 species of beetles (insect order Coleoptera) found in most tropical and temperate regions that have special light-producing organs on the underside of the abdomen. Most fireflies are nocturnal, although some species are diurnal. They are soft-bodied

  • Lampyris noctiluca (insect)

    firefly: The common glowworm (Lampyris noctiluca) is a member of this family (see glowworm).

  • Lamsdorff, Matthew (general)

    Nicholas I: Education: Matthew Lamsdorff, it emphasized severe discipline and formalism. The growing grand duke studied French and German as well as Russian, world history, and general geography in French, together with the history and geography of Russia. Religion, drawing, arithmetic, geometry, algebra, and physics were added to…

  • Lam?ah (ancient city, Tunisia)

    Leptis Minor, small Carthaginian city located 10 miles (16 km) from modern Al-Munastīr (Ruspinum), Tunisia. In Roman times it was the centre of a prosperous olive-growing district, and its exports included olive oil and pottery. It was Julius Caesar’s base before the Battle of Thapsus in 46 bc.

  • Lamtunah (Berber tribe)

    North Africa: The Maghrib under the Almoravids and the Almohads: …to the chief of the Lamtūnah tribe, Abū Bakr ibn ?Umar. He returned to Mauretania in 1060 to fight against rebels challenging his authority. Command of the Almoravids in southern Morocco was then assumed by Abū Bakr’s cousin, Yūsuf ibn Tāshufīn (Tāshfīn), under whose leadership the Almoravids conquered most of…

  • Lamu (Kenya)

    Lamu, town, port, and island in the Indian Ocean off the East African coast, 150 miles (241 km) north-northeast of Mombasa. It is administered as part of Kenya. The port lies on the southeastern shore of the island. A former Persian, then Zanzibari, colony, Lamu Island rivaled Mombasa until the

  • Lamu Old Town (Kenya)

    Lamu, town, port, and island in the Indian Ocean off the East African coast, 150 miles (241 km) north-northeast of Mombasa. It is administered as part of Kenya. The port lies on the southeastern shore of the island. A former Persian, then Zanzibari, colony, Lamu Island rivaled Mombasa until the

  • Lamut (people)

    Even, northern Siberian people (12,000 according to the 1979 Soviet census) closely related to the Evenk (q.v.) in origin, language, and culture. They inhabit the territory to the north and northeast of the Evenki Autonomous Okrug, where they have influenced and have in turn been influenced by t

  • lamwong (dance)

    Thailand: Music and dance: The lamwong (“circle dance”) is the most popular form of dance at rural temple festivals and other celebrations. It is typically performed to mawlam or luk thung music. In the cities, however, Western forms of dance predominate, especially in the nightclubs.

  • LAN (computer technology)

    Local area network (LAN), any communication network for connecting computers within a building or small group of buildings. A LAN may be configured as (1) a bus, a main channel to which nodes or secondary channels are connected in a branching structure, (2) a ring, in which each computer is

  • l?n (Swedish political division)

    L?n, administrative subdivision (county) of Sweden; see

  • lan (cyanobacteria)

    commercial fishing: Seaweeds and plankton: In China a scum called lan, collected from ponds and freshwater lakes, provides sustenance for large numbers of people. A related scum, keklap, found in Java, is used chiefly as fish feed. Another species is made into dried sheets in Japan and prepared for food by heating in water. Successful…

  • Lan Caihe (Chinese religious figure)

    Lan Caihe, in Chinese religion, one of the Baxian, the Eight Immortals of Daoism, whose true identity is much disputed. Artists depict Lan as a young man—or woman—carrying a flute or a pair of clappers and occasionally wearing only one shoe. Sometimes a basket of fruit is added. In Chinese theatre

  • Lan Chang (historical kingdom, Laos)

    Lan Xang, Laotian kingdom that flourished from the 14th century until it was split into two separate kingdoms, Vien Chang and Luang Prabang, in the 18th century. Conflict with its Myanmar (Burmese) and Thai (Siamese) neighbours forced the kingdom’s rulers to transfer the capital from Luang Prabang

  • Lan Na (historical kingdom, Thailand)

    Lan Na, One of the first major Tai (Siamese) kingdoms in Thai history. It was founded by Mangrai (r. c. 1259–1317) in the northern region of present-day Thailand; its capital was the city of Chiang Mai. Lan Na was a powerful state and a centre for the spread of Theravada Buddhism. Under Tilokaracha

  • Lan Na Thai (region, Thailand)

    Thailand: North: …often referred to collectively as Lan Na Thai, from the name for the loosely structured federation of principalities, with its capital at Chiang Mai, that existed in the area until the end of the 19th century. The people of Lan Na Thai speak the Kammüang (Northern Thai) dialect and follow…

  • Lan Ping (Chinese politician)

    Jiang Qing, third wife of Chinese communist leader Mao Zedong and the most influential woman in the People’s Republic of China for a while until her downfall in 1976, after Mao’s death. As a member of the Gang of Four she was convicted in 1981 of “counter-revolutionary crimes” and imprisoned.

  • Lan River (river, China)

    Fuchun River: …region is drained by the Lan River. At Lanxi the Lan is formed by the junction of two rivers, the Jinhua River system, flowing from central Zhejiang to the east, and the Qu River, which drains the mountains of the Zhejiang-Jiangxi and Zhejiang-Fujian border areas.

  • Lan Tao Island (island, Hong Kong, China)

    Lantao Island, island located about 6 miles (10 km) west of Hong Kong Island, part of the New Territories of Hong Kong, a special administrative region of China. About 17 miles (27 km) long and 6 miles (9.5 km) wide, it has an area of 58 square miles (150 square km). Consisting of mountains rising

  • Lan Tau Island (island, Hong Kong, China)

    Lantao Island, island located about 6 miles (10 km) west of Hong Kong Island, part of the New Territories of Hong Kong, a special administrative region of China. About 17 miles (27 km) long and 6 miles (9.5 km) wide, it has an area of 58 square miles (150 square km). Consisting of mountains rising

  • Lan Ts’ai-ho (Chinese religious figure)

    Lan Caihe, in Chinese religion, one of the Baxian, the Eight Immortals of Daoism, whose true identity is much disputed. Artists depict Lan as a young man—or woman—carrying a flute or a pair of clappers and occasionally wearing only one shoe. Sometimes a basket of fruit is added. In Chinese theatre

  • Lan Xang (historical kingdom, Laos)

    Lan Xang, Laotian kingdom that flourished from the 14th century until it was split into two separate kingdoms, Vien Chang and Luang Prabang, in the 18th century. Conflict with its Myanmar (Burmese) and Thai (Siamese) neighbours forced the kingdom’s rulers to transfer the capital from Luang Prabang

  • Lan-chou (China)

    Lanzhou, city, capital of Gansu sheng (province), west-central China. It is situated in the southeastern portion of the province on the upper course of the Huang He (Yellow River), where the river emerges from the mountains. Lanzhou has been a centre since early times, being at the southern end of

  • Lan-t’ien man (anthropology)

    Lantian man, fossils of hominins (members of the human lineage) found in 1963 and 1964 by Chinese archaeologists at two sites in Lantian district, Shaanxi province, China. One specimen was found at each site: a cranium (skullcap) at Gongwangling (Kung-wang-ling) and a mandible (lower jaw) at

  • Lan-ts’ang Chiang (river, Southeast Asia)

    Mekong River, river that is the longest river in Southeast Asia, the 7th longest in Asia, and the 12th longest in the world. It has a length of about 2,700 miles (4,350 km). Rising in southeastern Qinghai province, China, it flows through the eastern part of the Tibet Autonomous Region and Yunnan

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