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  • Lymphocystivirus (genus of viruses)

    virus: Annotated classification: …invertebrate iridescent virus 6, and Lymphocystivirus, which contains lymphocystis disease virus 1 of fish. Family Asfarviridae Icosahedral, enveloped virions approximately 175–215 nm in diameter that contain linear double-stranded DNA. This family consists of one genus, Asfivirus, which contains the African swine fever virus.

  • lymphocyte (blood cell)

    Lymphocyte, type of white blood cell (leukocyte) that is of fundamental importance in the immune system because lymphocytes are the cells that determine the specificity of the immune response to infectious microorganisms and other foreign substances. In human adults lymphocytes make up roughly 20

  • lymphocytic choriomeningitis (pathology)

    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis, inflammation of the meninges (membranes covering the central nervous system) and choroid plexus (an area of the brain that regulates the pressure of cerebrospinal fluid), characterized by marked infiltration of lymphocytes into the cerebrospinal fluid. It is a viral

  • lymphocytic leukemia (pathology)

    blood disease: Leukemia: …leukemia: myelogenous, or granulocytic, and lymphocytic. These terms refer to the types of cell that are involved. Each of these types is further subdivided into acute and chronic categories, referring to the duration of the untreated disease. Before the advent of modern chemotherapy, patients with acute leukemia usually died within…

  • lymphocytic lymphoma (pathology)

    lymphoma: …two types, Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  • lymphocytopenia (medical condition)

    lymphocyte: Lymphocyte counts: …children, may be indicative of lymphocytopenia (lymphopenia), whereas those above it are a sign of lymphocytosis. Lymphocytopenia is associated with a variety of conditions, ranging from malnutrition to rare inherited disorders such as ataxia-telangiectasia or severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome. Lymphocytosis typically is associated with infections, such as mononucleosis or whooping…

  • lymphocytosis (pathology)

    blood disease: Leukocytosis: Such lymphocytosis is usually of viral origin. Moderate degrees of lymphocytosis are encountered in certain chronic infections such as tuberculosis and brucellosis.

  • lymphogranuloma inguinale (pathology)

    Lymphogranuloma venereum, infection of lymph vessels and lymph nodes by the microorganism Chlamydia trachomatis. Like chlamydia, which is also a disease caused by C. trachomatis, lymphogranuloma venereum is usually sexually transmitted. The disease produces swollen lymph nodes, ulcerations,

  • lymphogranuloma venereum (pathology)

    Lymphogranuloma venereum, infection of lymph vessels and lymph nodes by the microorganism Chlamydia trachomatis. Like chlamydia, which is also a disease caused by C. trachomatis, lymphogranuloma venereum is usually sexually transmitted. The disease produces swollen lymph nodes, ulcerations,

  • lymphoid tissue (anatomy)

    Lymphoid tissue, cells and organs that make up the lymphatic system, such as white blood cells (leukocytes), bone marrow, and the thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes. Lymphoid tissue has several different structural organizations related to its particular function in the immune response. The most

  • lymphoma (pathology)

    Lymphoma, any of a group of malignant diseases of the lymphatic system, usually starting in the lymph nodes or in lymphoid tissues of other organs, such as the lungs, spleen, and skin. Lymphomas are generally classified into two types, Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Hodgkin disease

  • lymphopenia (medical condition)

    lymphocyte: Lymphocyte counts: …children, may be indicative of lymphocytopenia (lymphopenia), whereas those above it are a sign of lymphocytosis. Lymphocytopenia is associated with a variety of conditions, ranging from malnutrition to rare inherited disorders such as ataxia-telangiectasia or severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome. Lymphocytosis typically is associated with infections, such as mononucleosis or whooping…

  • lymphoreticuloma (pathology)

    Hodgkin lymphoma, an uncommon cancer of the lymphatic system (malignant lymphoma) that usually strikes young adults and people 55 years of age or older. Most patients can be cured if the disease is detected in its early stages, but even those with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma have a significant chance

  • Lynceus (Greek mythology)

    Danaus: …obeyed except Hypermestra, who spared Lynceus. Being unable to find suitors for the other daughters, Danaus offered them as prizes in a footrace. (According to another story, Lynceus slew Danaus and his daughters and seized the throne of Argos.) In punishment for their crime the Dana?ds in Hades were condemned…

  • lynch law

    Lynchburg: …rise to the expressions “lynch law” and lynching.

  • Lynch syndrome (pathology)

    colorectal cancer: Causes and symptoms: …polyposis (FAP), Gardner syndrome, and hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC)—can predispose an individual to developing colorectal cancer. Each of these conditions is caused in part by a known genetic mutation. In addition, Ashkenazi Jews have a slightly higher incidence of colorectal cancer due to a mutated gene, and there exists…

  • Lynch, B. Suarez (Argentine author)

    Adolfo Bioy Casares, Argentine writer and editor, known both for his own work and for his collaborations with Jorge Luis Borges. His elegantly constructed works are oriented toward metaphysical possibilities and employ the fantastic to achieve their meanings. Born into a wealthy family, Bioy

  • Lynch, B. Suarez (Argentine author)

    Jorge Luis Borges, Argentine poet, essayist, and short-story writer whose works became classics of 20th-century world literature. Borges was reared in the then-shabby Palermo district of Buenos Aires, the setting of some of his works. His family, which had been notable in Argentine history,

  • Lynch, B. Suarez (Argentine author)

    Adolfo Bioy Casares, Argentine writer and editor, known both for his own work and for his collaborations with Jorge Luis Borges. His elegantly constructed works are oriented toward metaphysical possibilities and employ the fantastic to achieve their meanings. Born into a wealthy family, Bioy

  • Lynch, Benito (Argentine author)

    Benito Lynch, Argentine novelist and short-story writer whose tales of Argentine country life examined in a simple and direct style the psychology of ordinary persons at everyday activities. Lynch thus brought a new realism to the tradition of the gaucho novel, a genre that portrays the people of

  • Lynch, Charles (American patriot)

    lynching: …derived from the name of Charles Lynch (1736–96), a Virginia planter and justice of the peace who, during the American Revolution, headed an irregular court formed to punish loyalists.

  • Lynch, Charles Burchill (Canadian journalist and author)

    Charles Burchill Lynch, Canadian journalist and author (born Dec. 3, 1919, Cambridge, Mass.—died July 21, 1994, Ottawa, Ont.), was a gifted storyteller who attracted a wide and loyal readership as the longtime (1958-84) Ottawa syndicated columnist for Southam News Services. His folksy approach e

  • Lynch, David (American filmmaker and screenwriter)

    David Lynch, American filmmaker and screenwriter who was known for his uniquely disturbing and mind-bending visual work. His films juxtapose the cheerfully mundane with the shockingly macabre and often defy explanation. Lynch’s father was a research scientist with the U.S. Forest Service, and the

  • Lynch, David Keith (American filmmaker and screenwriter)

    David Lynch, American filmmaker and screenwriter who was known for his uniquely disturbing and mind-bending visual work. His films juxtapose the cheerfully mundane with the shockingly macabre and often defy explanation. Lynch’s father was a research scientist with the U.S. Forest Service, and the

  • Lynch, Edmund C. (American businessman)

    Charles E. Merrill: …& Company, in partnership with Edmund C. Lynch. Merrill served as its director until his death.

  • Lynch, Jack (prime minister of Ireland)

    Jack Lynch, Irish politician who was taoiseach (prime minister) of Ireland from 1966 to 1973 and from 1977 to 1979. Lynch studied law and entered the civil service (Department of Justice) in 1936. He eventually decided on a legal career, was called to the bar (1945), resigned from the civil

  • Lynch, Jane (American actress and comedian)

    Jane Lynch, American television and film actress and comedian who specialized in playing off-kilter characters with strong (often tyrannical) personalities. She was best known for her work on the television series Glee (2009–15). Lynch grew up in suburban Chicago. As a teenager, she performed with

  • Lynch, John (American football player)

    Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Derrick Brooks, and defensive backs John Lynch and Ronde Barber. The Bucs made four postseason appearances in the five seasons between 1997 and 2001, but the offensively limited team scored fewer than 10 points in each of its four playoff losses in that span, and Dungy was fired in early…

  • Lynch, John Mary (prime minister of Ireland)

    Jack Lynch, Irish politician who was taoiseach (prime minister) of Ireland from 1966 to 1973 and from 1977 to 1979. Lynch studied law and entered the civil service (Department of Justice) in 1936. He eventually decided on a legal career, was called to the bar (1945), resigned from the civil

  • Lynch, John R. (American politician)

    John R. Lynch, black politician after the American Civil War who served in the Mississippi state legislature and U.S. House of Representatives and was prominent in Republican Party affairs of the 1870s and ’80s. Born a slave, Lynch was freed during the American Civil War and settled in Natchez,

  • Lynch, John Roy (American politician)

    John R. Lynch, black politician after the American Civil War who served in the Mississippi state legislature and U.S. House of Representatives and was prominent in Republican Party affairs of the 1870s and ’80s. Born a slave, Lynch was freed during the American Civil War and settled in Natchez,

  • Lynch, Loretta (American lawyer and official)

    Loretta Lynch, American lawyer who was the first African American woman to serve as U.S. attorney general (2015–17). Lynch’s grandfather, a sharecropper, assisted those seeking to escape punishment under Jim Crow laws, and Lynch later recalled how her father, a fourth-generation Baptist minister

  • Lynch, Loretta Elizabeth (American lawyer and official)

    Loretta Lynch, American lawyer who was the first African American woman to serve as U.S. attorney general (2015–17). Lynch’s grandfather, a sharecropper, assisted those seeking to escape punishment under Jim Crow laws, and Lynch later recalled how her father, a fourth-generation Baptist minister

  • Lynch, Marshawn (American football player)

    Marshawn Lynch, (born April 22, 1986, Oakland, Calif.), Marshawn Lynch of the NFL Seattle Seahawks was the focus of one of the biggest stories during the hype-filled week leading up to Super Bowl XLIX on Feb. 1, 2015. The idiosyncratic running back, who had previously sustained fines for violating

  • Lynch, Marshawn Terrell (American football player)

    Marshawn Lynch, (born April 22, 1986, Oakland, Calif.), Marshawn Lynch of the NFL Seattle Seahawks was the focus of one of the biggest stories during the hype-filled week leading up to Super Bowl XLIX on Feb. 1, 2015. The idiosyncratic running back, who had previously sustained fines for violating

  • Lynch, Stan (American musician)

    Tom Petty: …Tench, joined Ron Blair and Stan Lynch to form Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. The band’s eponymous debut album, released in 1976, initially caused little stir in the United States, but the single “Breakdown” was a smash in Britain, and, when it was re-released in the U.S., the song made…

  • Lynch, Thomas C. (American lawyer)

    Hells Angels: …general public until 1965, when Thomas C. Lynch, attorney general of California, issued a report on motorcycle gangs, including the Hells Angels, and their “hoodlum activities.” Critics accused Lynch of sensationalism, but his report was heavily publicized in the American national media. Then Hunter S. Thompson made the San Francisco…

  • Lynchburg (Mississippi, United States)

    Ocean Springs, resort city, Jackson county, southeastern Mississippi, U.S., on Biloxi Bay across from Biloxi. It developed around the site of Old Biloxi, where the explorer Pierre Le Moyne d’Iberville established Fort Maurepas in 1699 for France; it was the first permanent European settlement in

  • Lynchburg (Virginia, United States)

    Lynchburg, city, administratively independent of, but located in, Campbell and Bedford counties, south-central Virginia, U.S. It is situated on the James River, in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The city grew from a ferry landing settled in 1757 by Quakers; it was named for John Lynch,

  • Lynchers, The (novel by Wideman)

    John Edgar Wideman: …1971 to 1973, Wideman published The Lynchers (1973), his first novel to focus on interracial issues.

  • lynching (mob violence)

    Lynching, a form of violence in which a mob, under the pretext of administering justice without trial, executes a presumed offender, often after inflicting torture and corporal mutilation. The term lynch law refers to a self-constituted court that imposes sentence on a person without due process of

  • Lyncodon patagonicus (mammal)

    weasel: The Patagonian weasel (Lyncodon patagonicus) is a larger mustelid of the South American Pampas. It is about 30–35 cm (12–14 inches) long, excluding the 6–9-cm (2.5–3.5-inch) tail. That weasel is grayish with dark brown underparts and a white stripe running across the forehead to the sides…

  • Lynd, Helen (American sociologist)

    Robert Lynd and Helen Lynd: …September 3, 1921, he and Helen Merrell were married. Helen Lynd taught at Sarah Lawrence College (Bronxville, New York) from 1929 to 1964, and her independent writings include On Shame and the Search for Identity (1958) and Toward Discovery (1965).

  • Lynd, Robert (American sociologist)

    Robert Lynd and Helen Lynd: Robert Lynd edited the trade magazine Publishers Weekly (1914–18) and later worked for book-publishing firms in New York City. He directed a sociological study of small cities for the Institute of Social and Religious Research (1923–26), served as an official of the Social Science Research…

  • Lynd, Robert Staughton (American sociologist)

    Robert Lynd and Helen Lynd: Robert Lynd edited the trade magazine Publishers Weekly (1914–18) and later worked for book-publishing firms in New York City. He directed a sociological study of small cities for the Institute of Social and Religious Research (1923–26), served as an official of the Social Science Research…

  • Lynd, Robert; and Lynd, Helen (American sociologists)

    Robert Lynd and Helen Lynd, husband-and-wife team of American sociologists who collaborated on the Middletown books, which became classics of sociological literature as well as popular successes. The Lynds are said to have been the first to apply the methods of cultural anthropology to the study of

  • Lyndanisse, Battle of (Danish history)

    flag of Denmark: …June 15, 1219, during the Battle of Lyndanisse (near modern Tallinn, Estonia) as a sign from God of his support for King Valdemar II against the pagan Estonians. Contemporary references to this flag date from a century later, and evidence suggests that the flag was not unique to Denmark. Many…

  • Lynde, Paul (American comedian and actor)

    Paul Lynde, American comedian and actor who was best known for his one-line wisecracks on the television game show The Hollywood Squares. After graduating from Northwestern University in 1948, Lynde performed stand-up comedy in New York City. He made his Broadway debut in Leonard Sillman’s New

  • Lynde, Paul Edward (American comedian and actor)

    Paul Lynde, American comedian and actor who was best known for his one-line wisecracks on the television game show The Hollywood Squares. After graduating from Northwestern University in 1948, Lynde performed stand-up comedy in New York City. He made his Broadway debut in Leonard Sillman’s New

  • Lyndon (Maine, United States)

    Caribou, city, Aroostook county, northeastern Maine, U.S. It lies along the Aroostook River, near the New Brunswick border, 13 miles (21 km) north of Presque Isle. Settled in 1824, it developed as a lumbering centre and was incorporated in 1859 as Lyndon. It was renamed Caribou in 1877 for the

  • Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (Houston, Texas, United States)

    Houston: History: …Manned Spacecraft Center (renamed the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in 1973), the command post for flights by U.S. astronauts, was opened near Clear Lake, about 25 miles (40 km) southeast of downtown, making Houston a focus of the nation’s space program. Houston experienced an economic boom in the 1970s…

  • Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream (work by Goodwin)

    Doris Kearns Goodwin: …resulted in her first book, Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream (1976).

  • Lyndon, Barry (fictional character)

    Barry Lyndon, fictional character, the roguish Irish protagonist and narrator of William Makepeace Thackeray’s Barry Lyndon (1844; revised version

  • Lynds, Elma (American prison warden)

    Auburn State Prison: …corrupt one another, Brittin’s successor, Elma Lynds, enforced a quasi-military routine of absolute silence, strict discipline, and economic productivity. In response to bells, head-shaven inmates dressed in striped clothing silently marched in lockstep formation to and from their cells for meals and work assignments. Letters were banned, and the chaplain…

  • Lyndsay, Sir David (Scottish poet)

    Sir David Lyndsay, Scottish poet of the pre-Reformation period who satirized the corruption of the Roman Catholic church and contemporary government. He was one of the company of gifted courtly poets (makaris) who flourished in the golden age of Scottish literature. His didactic writings in

  • Lynen, Feodor (German biochemist)

    Feodor Lynen, German biochemist who, for his research on the metabolism of cholesterol and fatty acids, was a corecipient (with Konrad Bloch) of the 1964 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. Lynen was trained at the University of Munich. After several years as a lecturer in the chemistry

  • Lyng v. Northwest Indian Cemetery Protective Association (law case)

    Native American religions: Issues and concerns: In the case of Lyng v. Northwest Indian Cemetery Protective Association (1988), the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the disturbance of the practice of religion need not be weighed against economic benefit in determining how public lands are to be used.

  • Lyngbirk, Jytte (Danish author)

    children's literature: Denmark: Jytte Lyngbirk’s girls’ novels, notably the love story “Two Days in November,” however, are well reputed, as are the realistic fictions, laid against an industrial background, of Tove Ditlevsen. Perhaps Denmark’s boldest original talent is Anne Holm, who aroused healthy controversy with her (to some)…

  • Lyngby tools (prehistoric tool)

    hand tool: Ax and adz: … implements have survived as the Lyngby tools, named from a Danish site of perhaps 8000 bce.

  • Lyngstad, Anni-Frid (Swedish singer)

    ABBA: …5, 1950, J?nk?ping, Sweden) and Anni-Frid Lyngstad (b. November 15, 1945, Narvik, Norway).

  • Lynley, Thomas (fictional character)

    Elizabeth George: …introduced her characters Detective Inspector Thomas Lynley of Scotland Yard, an aristocrat, and his working-class assistant, Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers. The novel won the 1989 Agatha and Anthony awards for best first mystery novel and the 1990 French Grand Prix de Littérature Policière. Its success enabled George to quit teaching…

  • Lynmouth (England, United Kingdom)

    Lynton and Lynmouth: Lynmouth, town (parish), North Devon district, administrative and historic county of Devon, southwestern England. The town consists of the communities of Lynmouth, which lies at the mouth of the East Lyn and West Lyn rivers, and Lynton, which stands on the cliff roughly 500 feet…

  • Lynn (Massachusetts, United States)

    Lynn, city, Essex county, northeastern Massachusetts, U.S. It lies on Nahant Bay and Lynn Harbor (inlets of Massachusetts Bay), just northeast of Boston. Settled in 1629 as Saugus, it was incorporated as a town in 1629 and renamed in 1637 for Lynn Regis, England. Tanning and shoemaking were early

  • Lynn Canal (fijord and waterway, Alaska, United States)

    Lynn Canal, narrow scenic passage, 3 to 12 miles (5 to 19 km) wide, in the eastern North Pacific Ocean, southeastern Alaska, U.S. It lies within the Alexander Archipelago and extends north from Chatham Strait for 60 miles (100 km). It is the northernmost fjord to penetrate the Coast Mountains,

  • Lynn Canal–Chatham Strait trough (fault, North America)

    Alaskan mountains: Physiography of the southern ranges: …fault system known as the Lynn Canal–Chatham Strait trough. That fault zone bounds the St. Elias Mountains on the northwest and west and continues to the north and west along the north side of the Alaska Range. It continues southeastward through the Alexander Archipelago and thence offshore along the coast…

  • Lynn, Dame Vera (English singer)

    Vera Lynn, English singer whose sentimental material and wholesome stage persona endeared her to the public during World War II. Broadcasts of her songs of love and longing were particularly resonant with members of the military fighting abroad, which led to her nickname, “the Forces’ Sweetheart.”

  • Lynn, Loretta (American singer)

    Loretta Lynn, American country music singer who was known as the “Queen of Country.” Webb was born in a coal miner’s shack. (Although she claimed 1935 as her birth year, various official documents indicate that she was born in 1932.) She married Oliver Lynn in January 1948 and bore the first of six

  • Lynn, Vera (English singer)

    Vera Lynn, English singer whose sentimental material and wholesome stage persona endeared her to the public during World War II. Broadcasts of her songs of love and longing were particularly resonant with members of the military fighting abroad, which led to her nickname, “the Forces’ Sweetheart.”

  • Lynne, Gloria (American vocalist)

    Gloria Lynne, (Gloria Mai Wilson Alleyne), American vocalist (born Nov. 23, 1929, New York, N.Y.—died Oct. 15, 2013, Newark, N.J.), was a dramatic song stylist who sang ballads with a warm contralto voice and peppered songs that had a faster tempo with an infectious swing—though all of her vocals

  • Lynne, Jeff (British musician)

    Tom Petty: … George Harrison, Roy Orbison, and Jeff Lynne (formerly of the Electric Light Orchestra) in the supergroup the Traveling Wilburys, with whom Petty garnered his first Grammy Award in 1989. That year Lynne produced Petty’s first solo album, Full Moon Fever, putting Petty back on the charts with the hit single…

  • lynnhaven (oyster)

    Lynnhaven, edible variety of oyster

  • Lynton (England, United Kingdom)

    Lynton and Lynmouth, town (parish), North Devon district, administrative and historic county of Devon, southwestern England. The town consists of the communities of Lynmouth, which lies at the mouth of the East Lyn and West Lyn rivers, and Lynton, which stands on the cliff roughly 500 feet (150

  • Lynx (constellation)

    Lynx, constellation in the northern sky at about 8 hours right ascension and 50° north in declination. Its brightest star is Alpha Lyncis, with a magnitude of 3.2. Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius invented this constellation in 1687. Since all the stars in the constellation are quite faint,

  • lynx (mammal)

    Lynx, (genus Lynx), any of four species of short-tailed cats (family Felidae) found in the forests of Europe, Asia, and North America. The Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) and the bobcat (L. rufus) live in North America. The Eurasian lynx (L. lynx) and the Iberian lynx (L. pardinus) are their European

  • Lynx (mammal)

    Lynx, (genus Lynx), any of four species of short-tailed cats (family Felidae) found in the forests of Europe, Asia, and North America. The Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) and the bobcat (L. rufus) live in North America. The Eurasian lynx (L. lynx) and the Iberian lynx (L. pardinus) are their European

  • Lynx canadensis (mammal)

    lynx: Canada lynx: The Canada lynx (L. canadensis) is similar to the bobcat in appearance but can be identified by its longer legs, wider feet, longer ear tufts, and more prominent black-tipped tail. The weight of an adult ranges from 8.0 to 17.3 kg (about 18…

  • Lynx caracal (mammal species)

    Caracal, (Felis caracal), short-tailed cat (family Felidae) found in hills, deserts, and plains of Africa, the Middle East, and central and southwestern Asia. The caracal is a sleek, short-haired cat with a reddish brown-coat and long tufts of black hairs on the tips of its pointed ears. Long

  • Lynx lynx (mammal)

    lynx: Eurasian lynx: The Eurasian lynx (L. lynx) is the largest member of the genus and Europe’s third largest predator. The weight of a full-grown adult ranges from 18 to 36 kg (about 40 to 80 pounds), and its length ranges from 70 to 130 cm…

  • Lynx pardinus (mammal)

    lynx: Iberian lynx: The Iberian lynx (L. pardinus), which is also known as the Spanish lynx or the Pardel lynx, bears a strong resemblance to the Eurasian lynx but may be distinguished by its smaller size; short, dark-tipped tail; and the presence of long, white, beardlike…

  • Lynx rufus (mammal)

    Bobcat, (Lynx rufus), bobtailed North American cat (family Felidae), found from southern Canada to southern Mexico. The bobcat is a close relative of the somewhat larger Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis). A long-legged cat with large paws, a rather short body, and tufted ears, the bobcat is 60–100 cm

  • lynx spider (arachnid)

    Lynx spider, (family Oxyopidae), any of several groups of active spiders (order Araneida) that do not build a nest or web but capture their prey by pouncing upon them. Lynx spiders are distributed worldwide and in North America are most common in southern regions. The eyes are arranged in a

  • Lynx, Academy of the (academy, Italy)

    biology: The establishment of scientific societies: …Italian Accademia dei Lincei (Academy of the Lynx-eyed), founded in Rome around 1603. Galileo Galilei made a microscope for the society; another of its members, Johannes Faber, an entomologist, gave the instrument its name. Other academies in Europe included the French Academy of Sciences (founded in 1666), a German…

  • Lynyrd Skynyrd (American rock group)

    Lynyrd Skynyrd , American rock band that rose to prominence during the Southern rock boom of the 1970s on the strength of its triple-guitar attack and gritty working-class attitude. The principal members were Ronnie Van Zant (b. January 15, 1949, Jacksonville, Florida, U.S.—d. October 20, 1977,

  • lyochrome (biology)

    Flavin, any of a group of pale-yellow, greenly fluorescent biological pigments (biochromes) widely distributed in small quantities in plant and animal tissues. Flavins are synthesized only by bacteria, yeasts, and green plants; for this reason, animals are dependent on plant sources for them, i

  • lyolysis (chemistry)

    Solvolysis, a chemical reaction in which the solvent, such as water or alcohol, is one of the reagents and is present in great excess of that required for the reaction. Solvolytic reactions are usually substitution reactions—i.e., reactions in which an atom or a group of atoms in a molecule is

  • Lyomeri (fish)

    Gulper, any of nine species of deep-sea fish constituting three families, placed by some authorities in the order Anguilliformes (eels) and by others in a distinct order, Saccopharyngiformes (or Lyomeri). Gulpers range to depths of 2,700 m (9,000 feet) or more. The members of one family,

  • Lyon (county, Nevada, United States)

    Lyon, county, west-central Nevada, U.S., southeast of Reno and east and southeast of Carson City. It is a region of arid hills, mountains, and valleys, with part of Toiyabe National Forest in the south, on the California border. The county seat is Yerington, the trading centre of the Mason Valley,

  • Lyon (France)

    Lyon, capital of both the Rh?ne département and the Auvergne-Rh?ne-Alpes région, east-central France, set on a hilly site at the confluence of the Rh?ne and Sa?ne rivers. It is the third largest city in France, after Paris and Marseille. A Roman military colony called Lugdunum was founded there in

  • Lyon faience (pottery)

    Lyon faience, tin-glazed earthenware produced at Lyon, from the 16th century to 1770. Originally made by Italian potters, 16th-century Lyon faience remained close to its Italian prototype, the so-called istoriato Urbino maiolica, the subjects of which are either historical, mythological, or

  • Lyon, Amy (British mistress)

    Emma, Lady Hamilton, mistress of the British naval hero Admiral Horatio (afterward Viscount) Nelson. The daughter of a blacksmith, she was calling herself Emily Hart when, in 1781, she began to live with Charles Francis Greville, nephew of her future husband, Sir William Hamilton, British envoy to

  • Lyon, Corneille de (French painter)

    Corneille de Lyon, highly reputed portrait painter of 16th-century France, few of whose works have survived. Early in his life Corneille went to France, where in 1524 he became attached to the royal court in Lyon. In 1541 he was appointed official painter of the Dauphin (the future king Henry II).

  • Lyon, Council of (Second [1274])

    councils of Lyon: The second Council of Lyon was convened by Pope Gregory X in 1274 after Michael VIII Palaeologus, the Byzantine emperor, gave assurances that the Orthodox Church was prepared to reunite with Rome. By acknowledging the supremacy of the pope, Michael hoped to gain financial support for…

  • Lyon, Council of (First [1245])

    Councils of Lyon, 13th and 14th ecumenical councils of the Roman Catholic Church. In 1245 Pope Innocent IV fled to Lyon from the besieged city of Rome. Having convened a general council attended by only about 150 bishops, the Pope renewed the church’s excommunication of the Holy Roman emperor

  • Lyon, George Frances (English explorer)

    Sahara: Study and exploration: …Joseph Ritchie and George Francis Lyon to the Fezzan area in 1819, and in 1822 the British explorers Dixon Denham, Hugh Clapperton, and Walter Oudney succeeded in crossing the desert and discovering Lake Chad. The Scottish explorer Alexander Gordon Laing crossed the Sahara and reached the fabled city

  • Lyon, Jane (Scottish governess)

    Nicholas I: Education: …instructor was a Scottish nurse, Jane Lyon, who was appointed by Catherine II to care for the infant and who stayed with Nicholas constantly during the first seven years of his life. From Lyon the young grand duke learned even such things as the Russian alphabet, his first Russian prayers,…

  • Lyon, John (British yeoman)

    Harrow School: Its founder, John Lyon (d. 1592), was a yeoman of neighbouring Preston who yearly set aside resources for the education of poor children of Harrow. The school’s charter was granted by Elizabeth I in 1571, and its statutes were promulgated by Lyon in 1590, but it was…

  • Lyon, Mary (British geneticist)

    human genetic disease: Abnormalities of the sex chromosomes: …generally attributed to British geneticist Mary Lyon, and it is therefore often called “lyonization.”

  • Lyon, Mary (American educator)

    Mary Lyon, American pioneer in the field of higher education for women and founder and first principal of Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, the forerunner of Mount Holyoke College. Lyon began teaching in Massachusetts country schools in 1814 in order to finance her own further education. Between 1817

  • Lyon, Mary Mason (American educator)

    Mary Lyon, American pioneer in the field of higher education for women and founder and first principal of Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, the forerunner of Mount Holyoke College. Lyon began teaching in Massachusetts country schools in 1814 in order to finance her own further education. Between 1817

  • Lyon, Nathaniel (American general)

    American Civil War: Trans-Mississippi theatre and Missouri: …the Federals in Missouri when Nathaniel Lyon’s 5,000 Union troops were defeated at Wilson’s Creek on August 10, 1861, by a Confederate force of more than 10,000 under Sterling Price and Benjamin McCulloch, each side losing some 1,200 men. But the Federals under Samuel Curtis decisively set back a gray-clad…

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