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  • Lusaka (national capital, Zambia)

    Lusaka, city, capital of Zambia. It is situated in the south-central part of the country on a limestone plateau 4,198 feet (1,280 metres) above sea level. In the 1890s the area in which Lusaka is situated was taken over by the British South Africa Company from the local chiefs in the course of the

  • Lusaka Accord (Angola [1994])

    Angola: Independence and civil war: Eventually, an agreement called the Lusaka Accord was signed by the government and UNITA on November 20, 1994. The agreement allowed UNITA to be reintegrated into the government, provided fighting ceased on that date. Although minor fighting between the two groups continued, dos Santos and Savimbi met several times over…

  • Lusaka Peace Accord (South Africa [1999])

    Democratic Republic of the Congo: The Democratic Republic of the Congo: …the provisions of the 1999 Lusaka Peace Accord, an agreement intended to end the hostilities. Although it was eventually signed by most parties involved in the conflict, the accord was not fully implemented, and fighting continued. Meanwhile, long-standing ethnic tensions between the Hema and the Lendu peoples erupted into violence…

  • Lusatia (region, Germany)

    Lusatia, central European territory of the Sorbs (Lusatians, or Wends), called Sorben (or Wenden) by the Germans. Historic Lusatia was centred on the Neisse and upper Spree rivers, in what is now eastern Germany, between the present-day cities of Cottbus (north) and Dresden (south). In the 9th

  • Lusatian languages

    Sorbian languages, closely related West Slavic languages or dialects; their small number of speakers in eastern Germany are the survivors of a more extensive medieval language group. The centre of the Upper Sorbian speech area is Bautzen, near the border with the Czech Republic, while Cottbus,

  • Lusatian Mountains (mountains, Czech Republic)

    Lusatian Mountains, mountain group, situated in extreme northern Bohemia, Czech Republic; it is part of the Sudeten mountains (Czech: Sudety). The group extends from the Je?těd ridge in the east (3,320 feet [1,012 m]) to the gorge of the Elbe (Labe) River at Dě?ín in the west and also into Poland

  • Lusatian Neisse (river, Europe)

    Neisse River, either of two rivers now in southwestern Poland (until 1945, in Germany). The better-known Nysa ?u?ycka, or Lusatian Neisse, is the longer (157 miles [252 km]) and more westerly; it forms part of the German-Polish frontier (see Oder–Neisse Line). The Nysa K?odzka (Glatzer Neisse), or

  • Luscinia luscinia (bird)

    Sprosser, species of nightingale

  • Luscinia megarhynchos (bird)

    songbird: The nightingale of Europe (Erithacus, or Luscinia, megarhynchos), a small thrush, perhaps heads the list of famous songsters of European literature. Also a favourite of the poets was the European skylark (Alaudia arvensis). In North America the mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) is a wonderful performer with a…

  • Luscinia svecica (bird)

    Bluethroat, (Erithacus svecicus or Luscinia svecica), Eurasian chat-thrush of the thrush family, Turdidae (order Passeriformes). The bluethroat is aobut 14 centimetres (5 12 inches) long and has a bright blue throat, incorporating a crescentic spot of red or white, depending on the subspecies.

  • Lushai (people)

    Mizo: …the Mizo groups are the Lushai (whose name is often mistakenly applied to the entire Mizo community), Pawi (Lai), Lakher (Mara), and Hmar. In the early 21st century the Mizo numbered about one million.

  • Lushai Hills (mountain range, India)

    Mizo Hills, mountain range in southeastern Mizoram state, northeastern India, forming part of the north Arakan Yoma system. The Mizo Hills rise to about 7,000 feet (2,125 metres), and their slopes are covered with thick evergreen forest containing valuable timber and bamboo. In the intermontane

  • Lushai Hills District (state, India)

    Mizoram, state of India. It is located in the northeastern part of the country and is bounded by Myanmar (Burma) to the east and south and Bangladesh to the west and by the states of Tripura to the northwest, Assam to the north, and Manipur to the northeast. The capital is Aizawl, in the

  • lüshi (Chinese poetic form)

    Lüshi, a form of Chinese poetry that flourished in the Tang dynasty (618–907). It consists of eight lines of five or seven syllables, each line set down in accordance with strict tonal patterns. Exposition (qi) was called for in the first two lines; the development of the theme (cheng), in parallel

  • Lüshi (empress of Han dynasty)

    Gaohou, the first woman ruler of China, wife of Gaozu, the first emperor (reigned 206–195 bc) of the Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 220). After Gaozu’s death, his and Gaohou’s young son, the emperor Huidi (reigned 195–188 bc), ascended the throne. Gaohou, whose ambition had spurred her husband’s rise to

  • Lüshi chunqiu (Chinese literary work)

    Lü Buwei: …arranged full-length book, the famous Lüshi chunqiu (“The Spring and Autumn [Annals] of Mr. Lü”), a compendium of folklore and pseudoscientific and Daoist writings.

  • Lüshun (former city, Dalian, China)

    Lüshun, former city and naval port, southern Liaoning sheng (province), northeastern China. In 1950 it was amalgamated with nearby Dalian to form the city of Lüda. In 1981, when Lüda was renamed Dalian, it became a district (under the name Lüshunkou) of the newly named

  • Lusíadas, Os (work by Cam?es)

    The Lusiads, epic poem by Luís de Cam?es, published in 1572 as Os Lusíadas. The work describes the discovery of a sea route to India by Vasco da Gama. The 10 cantos of the poem are in ottava rima and amount to 1,102 stanzas. The action of the poem begins after an introduction, an invocation, and a

  • Lusiads, The (work by Cam?es)

    The Lusiads, epic poem by Luís de Cam?es, published in 1572 as Os Lusíadas. The work describes the discovery of a sea route to India by Vasco da Gama. The 10 cantos of the poem are in ottava rima and amount to 1,102 stanzas. The action of the poem begins after an introduction, an invocation, and a

  • Lusignan family (French royal family)

    Lusignan Family, noble family of Poitou (a province of western France) that provided numerous crusaders and kings of Jerusalem, Cyprus, and Lesser Armenia. A branch of the family became counts of La Marche and Angoulême and played a role in precipitating the baronial revolt in England against King

  • Lusignan, Gui de (king of Jerusalem)

    Guy, king of Jerusalem who lost that Crusader kingdom in a struggle with rival Conrad of Montferrat. In 1180 he married Sibyl, sister of the leprous Baldwin IV, king of Jerusalem. When Baldwin died in 1185, Sibyl’s son by a previous marriage, the six-year-old Baldwin V, inherited the crown but died

  • Lusinchi, Jaime (president of Venezuela)

    Jaime Ramón Lusinchi, Venezuelan politician (born May 27, 1924, Clarines, Venez.—died May 21, 2014, Caracas, Venez.), served (1984–89) as the president of Venezuela during a period of economic crisis. His reputation as a defender of democracy was sullied by rising inflation and accusations of

  • Lusinchi, Jaime Ramón (president of Venezuela)

    Jaime Ramón Lusinchi, Venezuelan politician (born May 27, 1924, Clarines, Venez.—died May 21, 2014, Caracas, Venez.), served (1984–89) as the president of Venezuela during a period of economic crisis. His reputation as a defender of democracy was sullied by rising inflation and accusations of

  • Lusitani (people)

    Lusitani, an Iberian people living in what is now Portugal who resisted Roman penetration in the 2nd century bc. It is uncertain to what extent the Lusitani were Celticized, though they may have been related to the Celtic Lusones of northeastern Iberia. They first clashed with the Romans in 194 bc

  • Lusitania (Roman province, Spain)

    ancient Rome: Foreign policy: …formed: senatorial Baetica and imperial Lusitania and Tarraconensis. Three legions enforced Roman authority from Gibraltar to the mouth of the Rhine. Augustus ignored the advice of court poets and others to advance still farther and annex Britain.

  • Lusitania (British ship)

    Lusitania, British ocean liner, the sinking of which by a German U-boat on May 7, 1915, contributed indirectly to the entry of the United States into World War I. The Lusitania, which was owned by the Cunard Line, was built to compete for the highly lucrative transatlantic passenger trade.

  • Lusna (ancient city, Turkey)

    Anatolia: The Old Hittite Kingdom: … (Purushkhanda; probably modern Acemh?yük); and Lusna (classical Lystra). With the exception of Landa (probably to the north), the sites are all located in the territory to the south of the K?z?l River called by the Hittites the Lower Land, suggesting the first extension of the Hittite Kingdom from its restricted…

  • lu?nu nin

    Svan language, unwritten language spoken in the high valleys south of Mount Elbrus in the Caucasus. Svan and the Georgian, Mingrelian (Megrelian), and Laz (Chan) languages constitute the Kartvelian, or South Caucasian, language family. Svan has four dialects and differs from the other Kartvelian

  • Luso-Indian (Indian people)

    India: The Portuguese: …population of Goans and other Luso-Indians along the western coast of India and in Sri Lanka and with them a lingua franca in the ports and markets. Then came Roman Catholicism, which today has millions of followers and an array of churches, convents, and colleges all over India. More tangible…

  • lussatite (mineral)

    Lussatite, a widespread silica mineral, the fibrous variety of low-temperature cristobalite (compare opal) that occurs with opal and chalcedony near the surface of low-temperature hydrothermal deposits. Originally found in the bitumen veins at Lussat, Fr. (whence its name), it also occurs in the

  • lussekatter (food)

    St. Lucia's Day: … and baked goods, such as saffron bread (lussekatter) and ginger biscuits, to the other members of the family. These traditional foods are also given to visitors during the day.

  • Lussy, Melchior (Swiss politician)

    Melchior Lussy, Roman Catholic partisan and champion of the Counter-Reformation in Switzerland who was one of the most important Swiss political leaders in the latter half of the 16th century. Representative of the Catholic cantons at the Council of Trent and at the courts of four popes—Paul IV,

  • Lust for Life (film by Minnelli [1956])

    Lust for Life, American film drama, released in 1956, that chronicles the life of artist Vincent van Gogh and was notable for the acclaimed performances by Kirk Douglas and Anthony Quinn. Lust for Life details the passions and frustrations of van Gogh (played by Douglas), who eventually took his

  • Lust for Life (album by Pop)

    Iggy and the Stooges: …solo albums, The Idiot and Lust for Life, both produced and cowritten by Bowie in Berlin. The albums, which revealed a new maturity, were praised by critics and gave Iggy his first commercial success. He continued recording through the 1980s and ’90s, scoring hits with the new wave-influenced Blah Blah…

  • Lust for Life (work by Stone)

    Irving Stone: …prominence with the publication of Lust for Life (1934), a vivid fictionalized biography of the painter Vincent Van Gogh.

  • Lust, Caution (film by Lee [2007])

    Ang Lee: …subsequently directed Se, jie (2007; Lust, Caution), an erotic tale set during the Japanese occupation of Shanghai in World War II, and Taking Woodstock (2009), a comedy about a young man’s pivotal role in staging the famed Woodstock Music and Art Fair. He returned in 2012 with Life of Pi,…

  • Lustenau (Austria)

    Lustenau, town, western Austria, on the Rhine River, just west of Dornbirn. First mentioned in 887, it later became an imperial free city (until 1803) and passed to Austria in 1814. Lustenau is a customs station on the Swiss border. It has a well-known embroidery industry and manufactures textiles

  • Lustgarten (work by Hassler)

    Hans Leo Hassler: …of these songs is the Lustgarten (1601; “Pleasure Garden”), which contains the charming “Mein Gemüt ist mir verwirret.” This tune reappears in Johann Sebastian Bach’s St. Matthew Passion under the title “O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden.”

  • Lustig Cohen, Elaine (American graphic designer and artist)

    Elaine Lustig Cohen, (Elaine Firstenberg), American graphic designer and artist (born March 6, 1927, Jersey City, N.J.—died Oct. 4, 2016, New York, N.Y.), was admired for the originality of her designs, which combined a Modernist sensibility with elements of the European and Russian early

  • Lustig, Arno?t (Czech writer)

    Arno?t Lustig, Czech writer (born Dec. 21, 1926, Prague, Czech.—died Feb. 26, 2011, Prague, Cz.Rep.), survived a series of Nazi concentration camps in World War II Europe and later used the Holocaust as the inspiration for much of his fiction. Lustig and his family were constrained in 1939 when

  • Lustig, Branko (Croatian-American producer and production manager)
  • Lustige Geschichten und drollige Bilder mit füntzehn sch?n kolorten Tafeln für Kinder von 3–6 Jahren (work by Hoffmann)

    Der Struwwelpeter, illustrated collection of cautionary tales for young children, published in German as Lustige Geschichten und drollige Bilder mit fünfzehn sch?n kolorierten Tafeln für Kinder von 3–6 Jahren (1845; “Cheerful Stories and Funny Pictures with 15 Beautiful Colour Plates for Children

  • lustige Witwe, Die (operetta by Lehár)

    The Merry Widow, comic operetta in three acts by Hungarian composer Franz Lehár (libretto in German by Viktor Léon and Leo Stein, based upon L’Attaché d’ambassade by Henri Meilhac) that premiered at the Theater an der Wien in Vienna on December 30, 1905. The operetta was to become one of the most

  • lustigen Weiber von Windsor, Die (opera by Nicolai)

    Otto Nicolai: …lustigen Weiber von Windsor (The Merry Wives of Windsor), based on William Shakespeare’s comedy.

  • Lustiger, Jean-Marie Cardinal (French cleric)

    Jean-Marie Cardinal Lustiger, (Aaron Lustiger), French cleric (born Sept. 17, 1926, Paris, France—died Aug. 5, 2007, Paris), converted from Judaism to Roman Catholicism at the age of 13 and went on to become archbishop (1981–2005) of Paris, the head of the Roman Catholic Church in France. Lustiger

  • Lustmord (crime)

    Peter Kürten: …represented a perfect example of Lustmord, or murder for pleasure. At his trial on nine counts of murder and seven counts of attempted murder, Kürten was placed in a special cage to prevent his escape. He was sentenced to death and executed by guillotine.

  • Lustra (work by Pound)

    Ezra Pound: Development as a poet: …perfectly worded free-verse poems in Lustra. In his poetry Pound was now able to deal efficiently with a whole range of human activities and emotions, without raising his voice. The movement of the words and the images they create are no longer the secondhand borrowings of youth or apprenticeship but…

  • lustration (ancient ritual)

    Lustration, (from Latin lustratio, “purification by sacrifice”), any of various processes in ancient Greece and Rome whereby individuals or communities rid themselves of ceremonial impurity (e.g., bloodguilt, pollution incurred by contact with childbirth or with a corpse) or simply of the profane

  • lustre (mineralogy)

    Lustre, in mineralogy, the appearance of a mineral surface in terms of its light-reflective qualities. Lustre depends upon a mineral’s refractive power, diaphaneity (degree of transparency), and structure. Variations in these properties produce different kinds of lustre, whereas variations in the

  • lustred glass (art)

    Lustred glass, art glass in the Art Nouveau style. It is a delicately iridescent glass with rich colours. Lustred glass was first produced in the United States by Louis Comfort Tiffany during the late 1800s for use as windowpanes. The intention of the inventor of Tiffany lustred glass, Arthur J.

  • lustreware (ceramics)

    Lustreware, type of pottery ware decorated with metallic lustres by techniques dating at least from the 9th century. One technique of Middle Eastern origin, which produced the famous Hispano-Moresque pottery in Spain and Italian and Spanish majolica, involved a multistaged process that produced a

  • Lusty Men, The (film by Ray [1952])

    Nicholas Ray: Films of the early 1950s: …noteworthy efforts, the deeply melancholic The Lusty Men (1952), in which Robert Mitchum brought his characteristic stoic grace to a memorable portrayal of a world-weary retired rodeo champion who is smitten with the underappreciated wife (Susan Hayward) of the ranch hand (Arthur Kennedy) he trains in the art of rodeo.

  • Lusutfu (river, Mozambique)

    Maputo River, river formed by the confluence in southwestern Mozambique of the Great Usutu River (flowing from Swaziland) and the Pongola River (flowing from South Africa). From the confluence it flows about 50 miles (80 km) northeastward to enter Delagoa Bay, 14 miles (23 km) south-southeast of t

  • Lūt Desert (desert, Iran)

    Lūt Desert, desert in eastern Iran. It stretches about 200 miles (320 km) from northwest to southeast and is about 100 miles (160 km) wide. In the east rises a great massif of dunes and sand, while in the west an extensive area of high ridges is separated by wind-swept corridors. In its lowest,

  • lute (musical instrument)

    Lute, in music, any plucked or bowed chordophone whose strings are parallel to its belly, or soundboard, and run along a distinct neck or pole. In this sense, instruments such as the Indian sitar are classified as lutes. The violin and the Indonesian rebab are bowed lutes, and the Japanese samisen

  • lute family (musical instrument)

    stringed instrument: Lutes: …in the world is the lute (the word is used here to designate the family and not solely the lute of Renaissance Europe). The characteristic structure consists of an enclosed sound chamber, or resonator, with strings passing over all or part of it, and a neck along which the strings…

  • lute stop (musical instrument device)

    keyboard instrument: Special effects: …were also equipped with a buff stop (sometimes also called a lute stop), a device that presses pieces of soft leather against one of the sets of unison strings, producing a muted, pizzicato tone.

  • lute stop (harpsichord register)

    keyboard instrument: Special effects: …type of register, called a lute stop, was first used in Germany in the 16th century and later spread to Flanders and to England, where it was added to the normal three registers on two-manual instruments. It did not have its own set of strings but, rather, plucked those of…

  • Lute, The (opera by Gao Ming)

    Gao Ming: …playwright whose sole surviving opera, Pipaji (The Lute), became the model for drama of the Ming dynasty.

  • luteal phase (biology)

    ovary: Regulation of ovarian function: This is known as the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, which lasts until the corpus luteum degenerates (luteolysis) and estradiol and progesterone production decreases. The decreasing serum estrogen and progesterone concentrations result in constriction of uterine arteries, thus interrupting the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the endometrium. The…

  • luteal stage (biology)

    ovary: Regulation of ovarian function: This is known as the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, which lasts until the corpus luteum degenerates (luteolysis) and estradiol and progesterone production decreases. The decreasing serum estrogen and progesterone concentrations result in constriction of uterine arteries, thus interrupting the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the endometrium. The…

  • lutefisk (food)

    Sweden: Daily life and social customs: Lutefisk (dried cod soaked in water and lye so it swells), pickled herring, lingonberries (which keep well without preservatives), kn?ckebr?d (crispbread), and fermented or preserved dairy products such as the yogurtlike fil, the stringy l?ngfil, and cheeses all reflect this need for foods that will…

  • luteinizing hormone

    Luteinizing hormone (LH), one of two gonadotropic hormones (i.e., hormones concerned with the regulation of the gonads, or sex glands) that is produced by the pituitary gland. LH is a glycoprotein and operates in conjunction with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Following the release of the egg

  • luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (biochemistry)

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a neurohormone consisting of 10 amino acids that is produced in the arcuate nuclei of the hypothalamus. GnRH stimulates the synthesis and secretion of the two gonadotropins—luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)—by the anterior

  • luteotropic hormone (physiology)

    Prolactin, a protein hormone produced by the pituitary gland of mammals that acts with other hormones to initiate secretion of milk by the mammary glands. On the evolutionary scale, prolactin is an ancient hormone serving multiple roles in mediating the care of progeny (sometimes called the

  • luteotropin (physiology)

    Prolactin, a protein hormone produced by the pituitary gland of mammals that acts with other hormones to initiate secretion of milk by the mammary glands. On the evolutionary scale, prolactin is an ancient hormone serving multiple roles in mediating the care of progeny (sometimes called the

  • Luter, Fred, Jr. (American religious leader)

    Fred Luter, Jr., American Protestant religious leader and president of the Southern Baptist Convention (2012–14), the first African American to hold the position. Luter was born in the Ninth Ward of New Orleans. He narrowly survived a motorcycle accident when he was 21 years old, an event that

  • Luteri, Giovanni (Italian painter)

    Dosso Dossi, late Italian Renaissance painter and leader of the Ferrarese school in the 16th century. Very little is known about his early life, and his artistic influences and training have long been open to speculation. His byname comes from the name of the family estate near his place of birth.

  • Luteri, Giovanni (Italian painter)

    Dosso Dossi, late Italian Renaissance painter and leader of the Ferrarese school in the 16th century. Very little is known about his early life, and his artistic influences and training have long been open to speculation. His byname comes from the name of the family estate near his place of birth.

  • Luteri, Giovanni Francesco di Niccolò di (Italian painter)

    Dosso Dossi, late Italian Renaissance painter and leader of the Ferrarese school in the 16th century. Very little is known about his early life, and his artistic influences and training have long been open to speculation. His byname comes from the name of the family estate near his place of birth.

  • Lutero, Giovanni (Italian painter)

    Dosso Dossi, late Italian Renaissance painter and leader of the Ferrarese school in the 16th century. Very little is known about his early life, and his artistic influences and training have long been open to speculation. His byname comes from the name of the family estate near his place of birth.

  • Lutetia (national capital, France)

    Paris, city and capital of France, situated in the north-central part of the country. People were living on the site of the present-day city, located along the Seine River some 233 miles (375 km) upstream from the river’s mouth on the English Channel (La Manche), by about 7600 bce. The modern city

  • Lutetia (typeface)

    Jan van Krimpen: The typeface he produced, Lutetia (the Roman name for Paris), was the official lettering for an exhibition of Dutch art in Paris in 1927, and its reception led to his lifelong association with the firm. In addition to Lutetia, van Krimpen’s well-known faces include Antigone Greek (1927), Romanée (1928),…

  • Lutetian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Lutetian Stage, second of the four stages (in ascending order) subdividing Eocene rocks, representing all rocks deposited worldwide during the Lutetian Age (47.8 million to 41.3 million years ago) of the Paleogene Period (66 million to 23 million years ago). The name of this stage is derived from

  • lutetium (chemical element)

    Lutetium (Lu), chemical element, a rare-earth metal of the lanthanide series of the periodic table, that is the densest and the highest-melting rare-earth element and the last member of the lanthanide series. In its pure form, lutetium metal is silvery white and stable in air. The metal is easily

  • lutetium-175 (chemical isotope)

    lutetium: …consists of two isotopes: stable lutetium-175 (97.4 percent) and radioactive lutetium-176 (2.6 percent, 3.76 × 1010-year half-life). The radioactive isotope is used to determine the age of meteorites relative to that of Earth. In addition to lutetium-176, and not counting nuclear isomers, 33 more radioactive isotopes of lutetium are known.…

  • lutetium-176 (chemical isotope)

    lutetium: 4 percent) and radioactive lutetium-176 (2.6 percent, 3.76 × 1010-year half-life). The radioactive isotope is used to determine the age of meteorites relative to that of Earth. In addition to lutetium-176, and not counting nuclear isomers, 33 more radioactive isotopes of lutetium are known. They range in mass from…

  • Lutezia (work by Heine)

    Heinrich Heine: Later life and works: …he reedited and published as Lutezia, the ancient Roman name for Paris, in 1854.

  • Lu?fī (Uzbek poet)

    Uzbek literature: The classical period: …outstanding poets of this period, Lu?fī was the great master of the ghazal (lyric love poem) and tuyugh (a Turkic quatrain, similar to the robā?ī), and he exerted a wide influence on poets of his time. In his sole narrative poem, Gul wa Nawruz (written in 1411; “Gul and Nawruz”),…

  • Lu?fī al-Sayyid, A?mad (Egyptian journalist)

    A?mad Lu?fī al-Sayyid, journalist and lawyer, a leading spokesman for Egyptian modernism in the first half of the 20th century. Throughout his career he held a number of political and nonpolitical positions, including several academic posts. Lu?fī completed his law degree in 1894 and accepted a job

  • Luth, Daniel Greysolon, Sieur Du (French soldier and explorer)

    Daniel Greysolon, Sieur DuLhut, French soldier and explorer who was largely responsible for establishing French control over the country north and west of Lake Superior. The city of Duluth, Minn., was named for him. DuLhut became an ensign in the regiment at Lyon in 1657, and about 1665 he became

  • Luther (play by Osborne)

    Luther, drama in three acts by John Osborne, performed and published in 1961. The play is a psychological study of the religious reformer Martin Luther, who is portrayed as an angry man struggling with self-doubts and his desire to believe. The drama highlights his work as a scholar, his defiance

  • Luther (British television series)

    Idris Elba: …Luther in the crime series Luther (2010–). His interpretation of the brilliant but self-destructive Luther earned him a Golden Globe Award (2012) as well as three Emmy Award nominations and a BAFTA (British Academy of Film and Television Arts) Award nod. Elba’s later TV credits included the miniseries Guerrilla (2017),…

  • Luther v. Borden (law case)

    Luther v. Borden, (1849), U.S. Supreme Court decision growing out of the 1842 conflict in Rhode Island called the “Dorr Rebellion.” In the spring of 1842, Rhode Island had two governors and two legislatures. One government was committed to retaining the old colonial charter, which severely limited

  • Luther, Hans (German statesman)

    Hans Luther, German statesman who was twice chancellor (1925, 1926) of the Weimar Republic and who helped bring Germany’s disastrous post-World War I inflation under control. After studying law at Berlin, Kiel, and Geneva, Luther joined the local civil service in Berlin. From 1907 to 1913 he was

  • Luther, Irene (American actress)

    Irene Rich, American actress who abandoned her career as a successful real estate agent to become a popular star of the silent screen, appearing in scores of melodramas in the 1920s. Rich first appeared in motion pictures as an extra in 1918 and later played opposite such stars as Lon Chaney,

  • Luther, Martin (German religious leader)

    Martin Luther, German theologian and religious reformer who was the catalyst of the 16th-century Protestant Reformation. Through his words and actions, Luther precipitated a movement that reformulated certain basic tenets of Christian belief and resulted in the division of Western Christendom

  • Lutheran antigen (biology)

    Lutheran blood group system: …the presence of substances called Lutheran antigens on the surfaces of red blood cells. There are 19 known Lutheran antigens, all of which arise from variations in a gene called BCAM (basal cell adhesion molecule). The system is based on the expression of two codominant alleles, designated Lu

  • Lutheran blood group system (physiology)

    Lutheran blood group system, classification of human blood based on the presence of substances called Lutheran antigens on the surfaces of red blood cells. There are 19 known Lutheran antigens, all of which arise from variations in a gene called BCAM (basal cell adhesion molecule). The system is

  • Lutheran Book of Worship (religious text)

    Liturgical Movement: …United States published its revised Lutheran Book of Worship, offering more individual choices in liturgy and also an expanded variety of musical styles. In 1979 the Episcopal Church adopted a revised Book of Common Prayer, which offered a choice of texts, one preserving the traditional language.

  • Lutheran Church (Christianity)

    Lutheranism, the branch of Christianity that traces its interpretation of the Christian religion to the teachings of Martin Luther and the 16th-century movements that issued from his reforms. Along with Anglicanism, the Reformed and Presbyterian (Calvinist) churches, Methodism, and the Baptist

  • Lutheran Church in America (church, United States)

    Lutheran Church in America, Lutheran church in North America that in 1988 merged with two other Lutheran churches to form the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

  • Lutheran Church in Württemberg (church, Germany)

    Lutheran Church in Württemberg, independent Lutheran church established in the duchy of Württemberg in 1534 during the Protestant Reformation in Germany. A strong Lutheran church throughout the centuries, it was influenced in the 17th and 18th centuries by Pietism, the Lutheran-based movement that

  • Lutheran Church of Oldenburg (church, Oldenburg, Germany)

    Lutheran Church of Oldenburg, independent Lutheran church in Oldenburg, Ger. Pastors who had accepted the Lutheran faith were established in Oldenburg during the Protestant Reformation in Germany, and in 1573 an order for church government and the Lutheran confessions were accepted for the church.

  • Lutheran Church–Canada

    Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod: …1994 a related body, the Lutheran Church—Canada, reported more than 75,000 members and 329 congregations. Its headquarters are in Winnipeg, Man.

  • Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod

    Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod, conservative Lutheran church in the United States, organized in Chicago in 1847 by German immigrants from Saxony (settled in Missouri) and Bavaria (settled in Michigan and Indiana) as the German Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Missouri, Ohio, and Other States. C.F.W.

  • Lutheran Council in the United States of America (council of churches, United States)

    Lutheran Council in the United States of America (LCUSA), cooperative agency for four Lutheran churches whose membership included about 95 percent of all Lutherans in the U.S., established Jan. 1, 1967, as a successor to the National Lutheran Council (NLC). The member churches were the Lutheran

  • Lutheran orthodoxy (Christianity)

    Lutheranism, the branch of Christianity that traces its interpretation of the Christian religion to the teachings of Martin Luther and the 16th-century movements that issued from his reforms. Along with Anglicanism, the Reformed and Presbyterian (Calvinist) churches, Methodism, and the Baptist

  • Lutheran Synodical Conference (religious organization)

    Lutheran Synodical Conference, cooperative agency organized in 1872 by several conservative U.S. Lutheran groups. Its members accepted strict conservative interpretations of the Bible and the Lutheran confessions and insisted that fellowship among Lutheran groups could take place only after

  • Lutheran World Federation (religious organization)

    Lutheran World Federation (LWF), international cooperative agency of Lutheran churches, organized at Lund, Swed., in 1947. It developed from the Lutheran World Convention, which held conventions in 1923, 1929, and 1935. The effectiveness of the Lutheran World Convention during the war years was

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