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  • Lufkin (Texas, United States)

    Lufkin, city, seat (1890) of Angelina county, in the Piney Woods region of eastern Texas, U.S. The city is situated near the Angelina River and between Davy Crockett and Angelina national forests, some 110 miles (175 km) northwest of Beaumont. Founded in 1882 when the Houston, East, and West Texas

  • Luft, Lya (Brazilian author)

    Brazilian literature: Redemocratization: …from their regional hometowns, and Lya Luft, whose works evoke the difficulty of communication, especially within families, as in her novel O quarto fechado (1990; “The Closed Door”; Eng. trans. The Island of the Dead). Other important female writers are Marina Colasanti, Márcia Denser, Zulmira Ribeiro Tavares, Tania Faillace, Ana…

  • Luftag (German airline)

    Lufthansa, German airline organized in Cologne, W.Ger., on Jan. 6, 1953, jointly by the federal government, the German National Railway, and the state of North Rhine–Westphalia; later it accepted private investors. It was the successor to Deutsche Luft Hansa, or DLH, which was founded in 1926,

  • Lufthansa (German airline)

    Lufthansa, German airline organized in Cologne, W.Ger., on Jan. 6, 1953, jointly by the federal government, the German National Railway, and the state of North Rhine–Westphalia; later it accepted private investors. It was the successor to Deutsche Luft Hansa, or DLH, which was founded in 1926,

  • Lufthansa heist (theft [1978])

    Lufthansa heist, theft on December 11, 1978, of some $5.8 million in cash and jewels from the air cargo building of the German airline Lufthansa at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City—at the time the biggest cash theft to have taken place in the United States. Of the many

  • Luftschiff (zeppelin)

    airship: …completed his first airship, the LZ-1, in 1900. This technically sophisticated craft, 128 metres (420 feet) long and 11.6 metres (38 feet) in diameter, had an aluminum frame of 24 longitudinal girders set within 16 transverse rings and was powered by two 16-horsepower engines; it attained speeds approaching 32 km…

  • Luftslottet som spr?ngdes (work by Larsson)

    Stieg Larsson: The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest), an adrenaline-fueled exploration of institutional corruption—earned similar acclaim. Though some critics charged that the novels’ determined focus on systematic violence against women was complicated by overly graphic depictions of such violence, the trilogy became wildly popular both within…

  • Luftwaffe (German armed forces)

    Luftwaffe, (German: “air weapon”) component of the German armed forces tasked with the air defense of Germany and fulfillment of the country’s airpower commitments abroad. The Luftwaffe was formally created in 1935, but military aviation had existed in the shadows in Germany since the end of World

  • Lug (Celtic deity)

    Lugus, (Celtic: “Lynx,” or “Light”?), in ancient Celtic religion, one of the major gods. He is one of the deities whom Julius Caesar identified with the Roman god Mercury (Greek: Hermes). His cult was widespread throughout the early Celtic world, and his name occurs as an element in many

  • Lug Lamfota (Celtic deity)

    Lugus, (Celtic: “Lynx,” or “Light”?), in ancient Celtic religion, one of the major gods. He is one of the deities whom Julius Caesar identified with the Roman god Mercury (Greek: Hermes). His cult was widespread throughout the early Celtic world, and his name occurs as an element in many

  • lugal (Mesopotamian title)

    history of Mesopotamia: The Sumerians to the end of the Early Dynastic period: …for ruler par excellence is lugal, which etymologically means “big person.” The first occurrence comes from Kish about 2700 bce, since an earlier instance from Uruk is uncertain because it could simply be intended as a personal name: “Monsieur Legrand.” In Uruk the ruler’s special title was en. In later…

  • Lugal-anne-mundu (king of Adab)

    Adab: …dynasties, comprising only one king, Lugal-anne-mundu, who was said to have reigned for 90 years; according to his position on the king list this reign would have been about 2400. At almost all other times in its history Adab was ruled by kings who controlled all or most of Babylonia…

  • Lugal-e (Mesopotamian mythology)

    Mesopotamian religion: Myths: …called from its opening word Lugal-e (“O King”). This myth begins with a description of the young king, Ninurta, sitting at home in Nippur when, through his general, reports reach him of a new power that has arisen in the mountains to challenge him—i.e., Azag, son of Anu (Sky) and…

  • Lugal-Zaggisi (ruler of Uruk)

    Lugalzagesi, (reigned c. 2375–50 bc), ensi (“sacred king”) of the southern Mesopotamian city of Umma, who first conquered the major cities of Lagash (c. 2375 bc) and Kish, then overcame the Sumerian cities of Ur and Uruk (he alone represents the 3rd dynasty of Uruk). After uniting all of Sumer, he

  • Lugalbanda (Mesopotamian hero)

    Lugalbanda, one of the major figures in the surviving Sumerian epics and the hero of the tale called the Lugalbanda Epic, or Lugalbanda and Enmerkar. See

  • Lugalbanda and Enmerkar (Mesopotamian epic)

    Enmerkar: A third epic, Lugalbanda and Enmerkar, tells of the heroic journey to Aratta made by Lugalbanda in the service of Enmerkar. According to the epic, Uruk was under attack by Semitic nomads. In order to save his domain, Enmerkar required the aid of Inanna, who was in Aratta.…

  • Lugalzagesi (ruler of Uruk)

    Lugalzagesi, (reigned c. 2375–50 bc), ensi (“sacred king”) of the southern Mesopotamian city of Umma, who first conquered the major cities of Lagash (c. 2375 bc) and Kish, then overcame the Sumerian cities of Ur and Uruk (he alone represents the 3rd dynasty of Uruk). After uniting all of Sumer, he

  • Lugalzaggisi (ruler of Uruk)

    Lugalzagesi, (reigned c. 2375–50 bc), ensi (“sacred king”) of the southern Mesopotamian city of Umma, who first conquered the major cities of Lagash (c. 2375 bc) and Kish, then overcame the Sumerian cities of Ur and Uruk (he alone represents the 3rd dynasty of Uruk). After uniting all of Sumer, he

  • Luganda (African language)

    phonetics: Suprasegmentals: …number of languages, among them Luganda (the language spoken by the largest tribe in Uganda) and Japanese, also have long and short consonants. In most languages segments followed by voiced consonants are longer than those followed by voiceless consonants. Thus the vowel in cad before the voiced d is much…

  • Lugang (Taiwan)

    Lu-kang, town and port in Chang-hua (Zhanghua) county, western coastal Taiwan. It is situated on the Taiwan Strait west of the city of Chang-hua, with which its fortunes have been closely linked. Lu-kang was formerly one of the chief ports of Taiwan, and it absorbed many immigrants from the Chinese

  • Lugano (Switzerland)

    Lugano, largest town in Ticino canton, southern Switzerland. It lies along Lake Lugano, northwest of Como, Italy; to the south is Mount San Salvatore (2,992 feet [912 metres]), and to the east is Mount Brè (3,035 feet [925 metres]). First mentioned in the 6th century, it was occupied in 1499 by the

  • Lugano, Lago di (lake, Europe)

    Lake Lugano, lake between Lakes Maggiore and Como with an area of 19 square miles (49 square km), of which the middle 12 square miles (31 square km) are in Ticino canton (Switzerland) and the northeastern and southwestern ends in the Lombardy regione (Italy). It lies at 889 feet (271 m) above sea

  • Lugano, Lake (lake, Europe)

    Lake Lugano, lake between Lakes Maggiore and Como with an area of 19 square miles (49 square km), of which the middle 12 square miles (31 square km) are in Ticino canton (Switzerland) and the northeastern and southwestern ends in the Lombardy regione (Italy). It lies at 889 feet (271 m) above sea

  • Lugansk (Ukraine)

    Luhansk, city, eastern Ukraine. It lies along the Luhan (Lugan) River at the latter’s confluence with the Vilkhivka (Olkhovaya) River. The city dates from 1795, when a state iron foundry was established there to supply ordnance to the Black Sea fleet. Luhansk grew with the development of the Donets

  • Luganville (Vanuatu)

    Espiritu Santo: …on the south coast near Luganville, the second largest town of Vanuatu, which has a deepwater port and an airport. Luganville was an important Allied military base during World War II. Exports include copra, coffee, cacao, canned meat, and tuna. Tourism gained importance in the late 20th century; divers are…

  • lugar sin límites, El (work by Donoso)

    José Donoso: … (1966; “The Place Without Limits”; Hell Has No Limits), depict characters barely able to subsist in an atmosphere of desolation and anguish. El obsceno pajaro de la noche (1970; The Obscene Bird of Night), regarded as his masterpiece, presents a hallucinatory, often grotesque, world, and explores the fears, frustrations, dreams,…

  • Lugar, Richard (United States senator)

    Cooperative Threat Reduction: Nunn (Democrat, Georgia) and Richard Lugar (Republican, Indiana) to assist Russia and other former Soviet states in dismantling and disposing of their nuclear weapons during the 1990s.

  • Lugard Hall (government building, Kaduna, Nigeria)

    Kaduna: Lugard Hall, the legislative assembly building constructed in simplified Islamic style, stands at the head of the main street. The assassination in Kaduna of Sir Ahmadu Bello, sardauna (sultan) of Sokoto and Northern premier, in an Igbo (Ibo) military coup in January 1966 led to…

  • Lugard, F. D. (British colonial administrator)

    Frederick Lugard, administrator who played a major part in Britain’s colonial history between 1888 and 1945, serving in East Africa, West Africa, and Hong Kong. His name is especially associated with Nigeria, where he served as high commissioner (1900–06) and governor and governor-general

  • Lugard, Frederick (British colonial administrator)

    Frederick Lugard, administrator who played a major part in Britain’s colonial history between 1888 and 1945, serving in East Africa, West Africa, and Hong Kong. His name is especially associated with Nigeria, where he served as high commissioner (1900–06) and governor and governor-general

  • Lugaro, Emilio (Italian biologist)

    neuroglia: ” In 1907 Italian biologist Emilio Lugaro suggested that neuroglial cells exchange substances with the extracellular fluid and in this way exert control on the neuronal environment. It has since been shown that glucose, amino acids, and ions—all of which influence neuronal function—are exchanged between the extracellular space and neuroglial…

  • Lugbara (people)

    Lugbara, people living mainly in northwestern Uganda and the adjoining area of Congo (Kinshasa). They speak a Central Sudanic language of the Nilo-Saharan language family. They are settled agriculturists, subsisting primarily by shifting hoe cultivation. Millet is the traditional staple; much

  • Lugbara language

    Nilo-Saharan languages: Tone: …as the western dialect of Lugbara (a Central Sudanic language spoken in the border area of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda and bordering on highly tonal Niger-Congo languages), sometimes distinguish between as many as four tonal levels.

  • Lugdunensis (Roman province, Europe)

    Lugdunensis, a province of the Roman Empire, one of the “Three Gauls” called the Gallia Comata. It extended from the capital of Lugdunum (modern Lyon) northwest to all the land between the Seine and the Loire rivers to Brittany and the Atlantic Ocean. It included what came to be Paris. The area w

  • Lugdunum (France)

    Lyon, capital of both the Rh?ne département and the Auvergne-Rh?ne-Alpes région, east-central France, set on a hilly site at the confluence of the Rh?ne and Sa?ne rivers. It is the third largest city in France, after Paris and Marseille. A Roman military colony called Lugdunum was founded there in

  • luge tobogganing (sledding sport)

    Lugeing, form of small-sled racing. Luge sledding is distinctive from bob and skeleton sledding in that the sled is ridden in a supine position (lying on the back) and steered by subtle leg and shoulder movements. The sport takes its name from the French word for “sled.” Dating to the 15th century,

  • luge, street (sport)

    skateboarding: The sport of street luge began with the use of longboards, ridden in a prone position down a steep hill. The street luge vehicles are still essentially skateboards but are up to 8.5 feet (2.6 metres) long and have supports for the head and feet. They can reach…

  • lugeing (sledding sport)

    Lugeing, form of small-sled racing. Luge sledding is distinctive from bob and skeleton sledding in that the sled is ridden in a supine position (lying on the back) and steered by subtle leg and shoulder movements. The sport takes its name from the French word for “sled.” Dating to the 15th century,

  • lugeing, street (sport)

    skateboarding: The sport of street luge began with the use of longboards, ridden in a prone position down a steep hill. The street luge vehicles are still essentially skateboards but are up to 8.5 feet (2.6 metres) long and have supports for the head and feet. They can reach…

  • Lugeon, Maurice (Swiss geologist)

    Maurice Lugeon, Swiss geologist who provided the first comprehensive interpretation of the Alps as a whole. Lugeon moved with his parents to Lausanne, Switz., in 1876 and graduated in 1893 from the university, where he later accepted a professorship (1898). He had first encountered field geology

  • Luger pistol (weapon)

    Luger pistol, semiautomatic German hand weapon first manufactured in 1900 for both military and commercial use. It was made in 7.65- and 9-millimetre calibres and had a toggle-joint breech mechanism. On recoil after firing, the mechanism opened to receive a new cartridge from an eight-round, r

  • Luger, Georg (German gun designer)

    small arm: Self-loaders: …were improved by a German, Georg Luger, who came up with the 7.65-mm (later 9-mm) Parabellum pistol. This was adopted by the German army in 1908.

  • Lugert Dam (dam, Oklahoma, United States)

    Altus: …of the Red River by Lugert Dam, lies within Quartz Mountain State Park, 18 miles (29 km) north. Oil fields lie to the northwest. The city is the site of Western Oklahoma State College (1926) and Altus Air Force Base. The Museum of the Western Prairie houses American Indian and…

  • Luggarus (Switzerland)

    Locarno, town, Ticino canton, southern Switzerland. It is situated at the northern end of Lago Maggiore, near the mouth of the Maggia River, west of Bellinzona. The site was settled in prehistoric times, and the town was first mentioned in 789. A possession of the dukes of Milan from 1342, it was

  • Lugh (Celtic deity)

    Lugus, (Celtic: “Lynx,” or “Light”?), in ancient Celtic religion, one of the major gods. He is one of the deities whom Julius Caesar identified with the Roman god Mercury (Greek: Hermes). His cult was widespread throughout the early Celtic world, and his name occurs as an element in many

  • Lughnasadh (ancient Celtic religious festival)

    Lugnasad, Celtic religious festival celebrated August 1 as the feast of the marriage of the god Lugus; this was also the day of the harvest

  • Lugnaquillia Mountain (mountain, Ireland)

    Lugnaquillia Mountain, highest peak (3,039 feet [926 metres]) in the central mountain range of the Wicklow Mountains in County Wicklow, Ireland. The range’s summits are mainly granite hills, but Lugnaquillia is capped with very hard mica-schist rocks. The slopes are mainly bog-covered moorland,

  • Lugnasad (ancient Celtic religious festival)

    Lugnasad, Celtic religious festival celebrated August 1 as the feast of the marriage of the god Lugus; this was also the day of the harvest

  • Lugné-Po?, Aurélien (French actor and theatrical producer)

    Aurélien Lugné-Po?, French actor and theatrical producer who introduced the works of several great contemporary playwrights, particularly Maurice Maeterlinck and Paul Claudel. After studies at the Paris Conservatoire, Lugné-Po? acted first at the Théatre-Libre and then at the Théatre d’Art, later

  • Lugné-Po?, Aurélien-Fran?ois-Marie (French actor and theatrical producer)

    Aurélien Lugné-Po?, French actor and theatrical producer who introduced the works of several great contemporary playwrights, particularly Maurice Maeterlinck and Paul Claudel. After studies at the Paris Conservatoire, Lugné-Po? acted first at the Théatre-Libre and then at the Théatre d’Art, later

  • Lugo (Italy)

    Lugo, town, Emilia-Romagna regione, northern Italy, just west of Ravenna. The arcaded marketplace, called the Pavaglione, and a 14th-century castle converted into the town hall are notable. The town was the scene of heavy fighting in World War II. An agricultural and commercial centre, Lugo

  • Lugo (province, Spain)

    Lugo, provincia (province) in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Galicia, northwestern Spain, bordering the Bay of Biscay to the north. It was formed in 1833. Its 60-mile- (100-km-) long coastline, extending from Ribadeo to the Barquero Estuary, is dotted with small ports and fishing

  • Lugo (Spain)

    Lugo, city, capital of Lugo provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Galicia, northwestern Spain. It lies on the Mi?o River, southeast of A Coru?a. Lugo originated as the Roman Lucus Augusti, and its Roman walls, which were added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List in

  • Lugo Méndez, Fernando Armindo (president of Paraguay)

    Fernando Lugo, former Roman Catholic bishop who became president of Paraguay (2008–12). His inauguration ended the conservative Colorado Party’s 62-year hold on power. Lugo was the nephew of Epifanio Méndez Fleitas, a Colorado Party leader who was forced into exile in 1956, during Gen. Alfredo

  • Lugo, Fernando (president of Paraguay)

    Fernando Lugo, former Roman Catholic bishop who became president of Paraguay (2008–12). His inauguration ended the conservative Colorado Party’s 62-year hold on power. Lugo was the nephew of Epifanio Méndez Fleitas, a Colorado Party leader who was forced into exile in 1956, during Gen. Alfredo

  • Lugoj (Romania)

    Lugoj, city, Timi? jude? (county), western Romania, on the banks of the Timi? River, 33 miles (53 km) east-southeast of Timi?oara and almost 220 miles (350 km) northwest of Bucharest. The town grew up on the site of a Roman fortified camp, which in turn was built near a Dacian fortress of the 1st

  • Lugol’s solution (antiseptic)

    Lugol’s solution, antiseptic introduced into medicine in 1829 by the French physician Jean Lugol. An effective bactericide and fungicide, Lugol’s solution is a transparent brown liquid prepared by dissolving, first, 10 parts of potassium iodide, then 5 parts of iodine, in 85 parts of water. It is

  • Lugones, Leopoldo (Argentine poet)

    Leopoldo Lugones, Argentine poet, literary and social critic, and cultural ambassador, considered by many the outstanding figure of his age in the cultural life of Argentina. He was a strong influence on the younger generation of writers that included the prominent short-story writer and novelist

  • Lugos (Romania)

    Lugoj, city, Timi? jude? (county), western Romania, on the banks of the Timi? River, 33 miles (53 km) east-southeast of Timi?oara and almost 220 miles (350 km) northwest of Bucharest. The town grew up on the site of a Roman fortified camp, which in turn was built near a Dacian fortress of the 1st

  • Lugosi, Bela (Hungarian-American actor)

    Bela Lugosi, Hungarian-born motion-picture actor who was most famous for his sinister portrayal of the elegantly mannered vampire Count Dracula. At age 12 Lugosi ran away from home and began working odd jobs, including stage acting. He studied at the Budapest Academy of Theatrical Arts and made his

  • Lugoues (Celtic deity)

    Lugus, (Celtic: “Lynx,” or “Light”?), in ancient Celtic religion, one of the major gods. He is one of the deities whom Julius Caesar identified with the Roman god Mercury (Greek: Hermes). His cult was widespread throughout the early Celtic world, and his name occurs as an element in many

  • Lugouibus (Celtic deity)

    Lugus, (Celtic: “Lynx,” or “Light”?), in ancient Celtic religion, one of the major gods. He is one of the deities whom Julius Caesar identified with the Roman god Mercury (Greek: Hermes). His cult was widespread throughout the early Celtic world, and his name occurs as an element in many

  • Lugoves (Celtic deity)

    Lugus, (Celtic: “Lynx,” or “Light”?), in ancient Celtic religion, one of the major gods. He is one of the deities whom Julius Caesar identified with the Roman god Mercury (Greek: Hermes). His cult was widespread throughout the early Celtic world, and his name occurs as an element in many

  • Lugovoy, Andrey (Russian government agent)

    Vladimir Putin: Silencing critics and actions in the West: …both denied involvement and one—Andrey Lugovoy—had since been elected to the Duma and enjoyed parliamentary immunity from prosecution.

  • Lugrís, Urbano (Spanish painter)

    Galicia: Geography: …in exile in Argentina; and Urbano Lugrís (1902–73), a Surrealist painter who used the sea as a constant feature in his work.

  • Lugudunensis (Roman province, Europe)

    Lugdunensis, a province of the Roman Empire, one of the “Three Gauls” called the Gallia Comata. It extended from the capital of Lugdunum (modern Lyon) northwest to all the land between the Seine and the Loire rivers to Brittany and the Atlantic Ocean. It included what came to be Paris. The area w

  • Luguei (Celtic deity)

    Lugus, (Celtic: “Lynx,” or “Light”?), in ancient Celtic religion, one of the major gods. He is one of the deities whom Julius Caesar identified with the Roman god Mercury (Greek: Hermes). His cult was widespread throughout the early Celtic world, and his name occurs as an element in many

  • Luguru (people)

    Luguru, a Bantu-speaking people of the hills, Uluguru Mountains, and coastal plains of east-central Tanzania. The Luguru are reluctant to leave the mountain homeland that they have occupied for at least 300 years, despite the relatively serious population pressure in their area and the employment

  • Lugus (Celtic deity)

    Lugus, (Celtic: “Lynx,” or “Light”?), in ancient Celtic religion, one of the major gods. He is one of the deities whom Julius Caesar identified with the Roman god Mercury (Greek: Hermes). His cult was widespread throughout the early Celtic world, and his name occurs as an element in many

  • Luguvallium (England, United Kingdom)

    Carlisle, urban area (from 2011 built-up area) and city (district), administrative county of Cumbria, historic county of Cumberland, northwestern England, on the Scottish border. In the Roman period a civilian settlement, Luguvallium (later the town of Carlisle), grew up on the south bank of the

  • lugworm (polychaete genus)

    Lugworm, (genus Arenicola), any of several marine worms (class Polychaeta, phylum Annelida) that burrow deep into the sandy sea bottom or intertidal areas and are often quite large. Fishermen use them as bait. Adult lugworms of the coast of Europe (e.g., A. marina) attain lengths of about 23 cm (9

  • Luhaiyah, Al- (Yemen)

    Al-Lu?ayyah, town, western Yemen, on the Red Sea coast. Situated on the coastal plain known as the Tihāmah, it is one of the country’s minor ports. It was founded in the mid-15th century, and tradition connects its origin with a local holy man, Sheikh Salei, around whose dwelling and tomb the town

  • Luhan, Mabel Dodge (American biographer)

    Mabel Dodge Luhan, American writer whose candid autobiographical volumes contain much information about well-known Americans of her era. Luhan’s life and writing revolved around the literary, artistic, and political celebrities she gathered about her both in New York and abroad. She later settled

  • Luhan, Mabel Ganson Dodge (American biographer)

    Mabel Dodge Luhan, American writer whose candid autobiographical volumes contain much information about well-known Americans of her era. Luhan’s life and writing revolved around the literary, artistic, and political celebrities she gathered about her both in New York and abroad. She later settled

  • Luhansk (Ukraine)

    Luhansk, city, eastern Ukraine. It lies along the Luhan (Lugan) River at the latter’s confluence with the Vilkhivka (Olkhovaya) River. The city dates from 1795, when a state iron foundry was established there to supply ordnance to the Black Sea fleet. Luhansk grew with the development of the Donets

  • Lu?ayyah, Al- (Yemen)

    Al-Lu?ayyah, town, western Yemen, on the Red Sea coast. Situated on the coastal plain known as the Tihāmah, it is one of the country’s minor ports. It was founded in the mid-15th century, and tradition connects its origin with a local holy man, Sheikh Salei, around whose dwelling and tomb the town

  • Luhit River (river, India)

    Mishmi: …are known as Midu) and Luhit rivers. Those of the Luhit Valley are divided into two groups, the Miju on the upper Luhit and the Digaru on that river’s lower reaches.

  • Luhman 16 (astronomy)

    Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer: It discovered a brown-dwarf binary, WISE 1049?5319, which was the third nearest star system after Alpha Centauri and Barnard’s star; these two objects were also the closest brown dwarfs to the Sun. WISE was also sensitive to emissions from young distant galaxies in which stars are forming. Because these galaxies…

  • Luhn, H. P. (American computer scientist)

    library: Thesauri: …1950s in the work of H.P. Luhn, at International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), who was searching for a computer process that could create a list of authorized terms for the indexing of scientific literature. The list was to include a structure of cross-references between families of notions, in the manner…

  • Lühou (empress of Han dynasty)

    Gaohou, the first woman ruler of China, wife of Gaozu, the first emperor (reigned 206–195 bc) of the Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 220). After Gaozu’s death, his and Gaohou’s young son, the emperor Huidi (reigned 195–188 bc), ascended the throne. Gaohou, whose ambition had spurred her husband’s rise to

  • Luhrmann, Baz (Australian filmmaker, writer, and producer)

    Baz Luhrmann, Australian filmmaker, writer, and producer known for his lavish productions, over-the-top techniques, and emphasis on heightened reality. Among his best-known films are Moulin Rouge! (2001) and The Great Gatsby (2013). Luhrmann grew up in the outback town of Herons Creek, New South

  • Luhrmann, Mark Anthony (Australian filmmaker, writer, and producer)

    Baz Luhrmann, Australian filmmaker, writer, and producer known for his lavish productions, over-the-top techniques, and emphasis on heightened reality. Among his best-known films are Moulin Rouge! (2001) and The Great Gatsby (2013). Luhrmann grew up in the outback town of Herons Creek, New South

  • Luhya (people)

    Luhya, ethnolinguistic cluster of several acephalous, closely related Bantu-speaking peoples including the Bukusu, Tadjoni, Wanga, Marama, Tsotso, Tiriki, Nyala, Kabras, Hayo, Marachi, Holo, Maragoli, Dakho, Isukha, Kisa, Nyole, and Samia of Western Province, western Kenya. The term Luhya, which i

  • Lui-pa (Indian religious leader)

    Matsyendranatha, first guru (spiritual teacher) of the Nathas, a popular Indian religious movement combining elements of Shaivism, Buddhism, and Hatha Yoga, a form of yoga that stresses breath control and physical postures. Matsyendranatha’s name appears on both the lists of the nine nathas

  • Luichow Peninsula (peninsula, China)

    Leizhou Peninsula, peninsula, some 75 miles (120 km) from north to south and 30 miles (48 km) east to west, jutting out southward from the coast of Guangdong province, extreme southern China, and separated from the island province of Hainan by the 10-mile- (16-km-) wide Hainan Strait (Qiongzhou

  • Luidia (echinoderm genus)

    sea star: Astropecten, Psilaster, and Luidia. The largest West Indies sea star, Oreaster reticulatus, is sometimes 50 cm (20 inches) across. Members of the chiefly Indo-Pacific genus Linckia can grow a new individual from a small piece of a single arm.

  • Luigi di Taranto (king of Naples)

    Louis, count of Provence (1347–62), as well as prince of Taranto and Achaia, who by his marriage to Queen Joan I of Naples (1343–82) became king of Naples after a struggle with King Louis I of Hungary. Louis, who is believed to have played a major role in the murder of Andrew of Hungary, Joan’s f

  • Luigi I (ruler of Mantua)

    Gonzaga Dynasty: …with the 14th century, when Luigi I (also called Ludovico; 1267–1360), after fierce struggles, supplanted his brother-in-law Rinaldo (nicknamed Passerino) Bonacolsi as lord of Mantua in August 1328, with the title of captain general and afterward of vicar-general of the empire, adding the designation of count of Mirandola and Concordia.…

  • Luik (Belgium)

    Liège, city, Walloon Region, eastern Belgium, on the Meuse River at its confluence with the Ourthe. (The grave accent in Liège was officially approved over the acute in 1946.) The site was inhabited in prehistoric times and was known to the Romans as Leodium. A chapel was built there to honour St.

  • Luik (province, Belgium)

    history of the Low Countries: The spiritual principalities: …Countries were the bishoprics of Liège, Utrecht, and, to a lesser degree, Cambrai, which, though within the Holy Roman Empire, belonged to the French church province of Rheims. The secular powers enjoyed by these bishops were based on the right of immunity that their churches exercised over their properties, and…

  • Luiken, Johannes (Dutch poet and engraver)

    Jan Luyken, Dutch lithographer and poet whose work ranges from hedonistic love songs to introspective religious poetry. As a young man, Luyken published De duyste lier (1671; “German Lyric”), a volume of erotic poetry. He was married in 1672 and baptized in the Baptist church the following year.

  • Luimneach (Ireland)

    Limerick, city, port, and county town (seat) of County Limerick, west-central Ireland. It occupies both banks and King’s Island of the River Shannon at the head of its estuary emptying into the Atlantic Ocean. Under the Local Government Act of 1888, Limerick became a county borough with a city

  • Luimneach (county, Ireland)

    Limerick, county, southwestern Ireland, in the province of Munster. The county seat is the administratively independent city of Limerick. The county’s northern boundary, with County Clare, is the River Shannon and its estuary. The River Maigue bisects County Limerick and flows north into the

  • Luini, Bernardino (Italian painter)

    Bernardino Luini, Renaissance painter of Lombardy, best known for his mythological and religious frescoes. Little is known of Luini’s life; the earliest surviving painting that is certainly his work is a fresco (1512) of the “Madonna and Child” at the Cistercian monastery of Chiaravalle, near

  • Luis (king of Portugal)

    Louis, king of Portugal whose reign (1861–89), in contrast to the first half of the century, saw the smooth operation of the constitutional system, the completion of the railway network, the adoption of economic and political reforms, and the modernization of many aspects of Portuguese life. The

  • Luis (king of Spain)

    Louis, king of Spain in 1724, son of Philip V. Louis was born during the War of the Spanish Succession, which disputed his French father’s succession to the Spanish throne; thus, his birth was celebrated by the French and the Spanish. Louis XIV of France was his great-grandfather. In 1709 he was

  • Luis Almagro (Uruguayan politician)

    Juan Guaidó: …Brazil’s new right-wing president, and Luis Almagro, the head of the Organization of American States, all but recognized him as Venezuela’s acting president.

  • Luis Alves craton (geology)

    South America: The Precambrian: …are known in the Amazonia, Luis Alves, and S?o Francisco cratons, although precisely dated rock samples are scarce. Ages older than 3 billion years have been reported in the Imataca Complex of Venezuela and in the Xingu area of Brazil, both in the Amazonia craton. The oldest rocks found so…

  • Luís Carneiro (island, Cabo Verde)

    Cabo Verde: Land: …three islets called the Rombos—Grande, Luís Carneiro, and Cima.

  • Luís Pereira de Sousa, Washington (president of Brazil)

    Washington Luís, president of Brazil (1926–30) who was unable to strengthen his country’s debilitated economy on the eve of the Great Depression. Reared in the state of S?o Paulo and identified with it as a career politician for more than 30 years, Luís held numerous public offices, including those

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