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  • Louisiana Hayride (American radio program)

    Louisiana Hayride, country music show that aired over 50,000-watt KWKH radio in Shreveport, Louisiana, from April 3, 1948, through November 1958, more than 550 straight Saturday nights. The three-hour show, performed live in Shreveport’s Municipal Auditorium, was created and hosted by KWKH program

  • Louisiana Leper Home (building, Louisiana, United States)

    leprosy: History: …became officially known as the Gillis W. Long Hansen’s Disease Center. The new name Hansen’s disease was part of a determined effort by health authorities to rid leprosy of its old social stigma and to focus attention on the fact that leprosy was finally becoming a treatable disease.

  • Louisiana Negro Normal and Industrial Institute (university, Grambling, Lousiana, United States)

    Grambling State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Grambling, Louisiana, U.S. A historically African-American university, it comprises colleges of basic studies, business, education, liberal arts, and science and technology and the Earl Lester Cole Honors College.

  • Louisiana Polytechnic Institute (university, Ruston, Louisiana, United States)

    Louisiana Tech University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Ruston, Louisiana, U.S. It offers a broad range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs, emphasizing engineering, science, technology, and business and awarding doctorates in business, philosophy, and

  • Louisiana Purchase (United States history)

    Louisiana Purchase, western half of the Mississippi River basin purchased in 1803 from France by the United States; at less than three cents per acre for 828,000 square miles (2,144,520 square km), it was the greatest land bargain in U.S. history. The purchase doubled the size of the United States,

  • Louisiana Purchase Exposition (world’s fair, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States)

    St. Louis: History: In 1904 the Louisiana Purchase Exposition (also known as the St. Louis World’s Fair) was held just west of the city in Forest Park to commemorate the centennial of the Louisiana Purchase. This event, in conjunction with the 1904 Olympic Games in the city, brought it international attention.…

  • Louisiana Red (American musician)

    Louisiana Red, (Iverson Minter; Rocky Fuller), American blues musician (born March 23, 1932, Vicksburg, Miss./Bessemer, Ala.—died Feb. 25, 2012, Hannover, Ger.), launched his career as an uncanny imitator of other artists but evolved into a highly original stylist, mainly performing in Europe.

  • Louisiana Seminary of Learning and Military Academy (university system, Lousiana, United States)

    Louisiana State University, state system of higher education in Louisiana, U.S. It consists of nine academic institutions in five cities. There are some 29,000 students enrolled at the main university, and total enrollment in the state university system is approximately 57,000. The main

  • Louisiana Separate Car Act (Louisiana state law [1890])

    Jim Crow law: Origins: The Louisiana Separate Car Act passed in July 1890. In order to “promote the comfort of passengers,” railroads had to provide “equal but separate accommodations for the white and colored races” on lines running in the state.

  • Louisiana State University (university system, Lousiana, United States)

    Louisiana State University, state system of higher education in Louisiana, U.S. It consists of nine academic institutions in five cities. There are some 29,000 students enrolled at the main university, and total enrollment in the state university system is approximately 57,000. The main

  • Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College (university, Baton Rouge, Lousiana, United States)

    Louisiana State University: The main institution, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant university located in Baton Rouge. It offers comprehensive undergraduate and graduate programs and is noted for its extensive research facilities, operating some 2,000 sponsored research projects. Among these facilities are the…

  • Louisiana Superdome (stadium, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States)

    stadium: Design innovations: …eclipsed by the New Orleans Superdome, which opened in 1975 with an official seating capacity of 69,065 (though able to accommodate larger numbers); the 30-story structure is topped by a steel-ribbed roof that has a 680-foot (200-metre) clearspan. In the late 1980s stadiums with retractable domes began to appear, most…

  • Louisiana Tech University (university, Ruston, Louisiana, United States)

    Louisiana Tech University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Ruston, Louisiana, U.S. It offers a broad range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs, emphasizing engineering, science, technology, and business and awarding doctorates in business, philosophy, and

  • Louisiana’s Way Home (novel by DiCamillo)

    Kate DiCamillo: …her friends were chronicled in Louisiana’s Way Home (2018), and Beverly, who finds herself after leaving home in Beverly, Right Here (2019).

  • Louisiana, flag of (United States state flag)

    U.S. state flag consisting of a blue field (background) featuring a pelican and its young in a nest above a ribbon emblazoned with the state motto, “Union justice confidence.” The flag has a width-to-length ratio of 2 to 3.A pelican tearing at its breast to feed its young is the central emblem of

  • Louisiana, University of (university, New Orleans, Lousiana, United States)

    Tulane University, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S. It grants undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees through 11 schools and colleges. In addition to the main campus, there is the campus of Tulane Medical Center, which includes the

  • Louison (execution device)

    Guillotine, instrument for inflicting capital punishment by decapitation, introduced into France in 1792. The device consists of two upright posts surmounted by a crossbeam and grooved so as to guide an oblique-edged knife, the back of which is heavily weighted to make it fall forcefully upon (and

  • Louisville (Kentucky, United States)

    Louisville, largest city in Kentucky, U.S., and the seat of Jefferson county, opposite the Falls of the Ohio River. Louisville is the centre of a metropolitan area including Jefferson county in Kentucky and Clark and Floyd counties in Indiana. Bridges spanning the Ohio link the city with New Albany

  • Louisville (Iowa, United States)

    Ottumwa, city, seat (1844) of Wapello county, southeastern Iowa, U.S., on the Des Moines River, about 25 miles (40 km) southeast of Oskaloosa. It was laid out in 1843 during a land rush when the region was opened to settlers. Originally called Appanoose Rapids, the name was changed to Louisville

  • Louisville Collegiate Institute (university, Louisville, Kentucky, United States)

    University of Louisville, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S. It offers a wide range of bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, and professional degree programs. In addition to the main campus, called the Belknap campus, classes are held at the Health Science

  • Louisville Courier (American newspaper)

    The Courier-Journal, morning daily newspaper published in Louisville, Kentucky, long recognized as one of the outstanding regional newspapers of the United States. It was founded in 1868 by a merger of the Louisville Courier and the Louisville Journal brought about by Henry Watterson, The

  • Louisville Journal (American newspaper)

    The Courier-Journal, morning daily newspaper published in Louisville, Kentucky, long recognized as one of the outstanding regional newspapers of the United States. It was founded in 1868 by a merger of the Louisville Courier and the Louisville Journal brought about by Henry Watterson, The

  • Louisville Medical Institute (university, Louisville, Kentucky, United States)

    University of Louisville, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S. It offers a wide range of bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, and professional degree programs. In addition to the main campus, called the Belknap campus, classes are held at the Health Science

  • Louisville, University of (university, Louisville, Kentucky, United States)

    University of Louisville, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S. It offers a wide range of bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, and professional degree programs. In addition to the main campus, called the Belknap campus, classes are held at the Health Science

  • Loukaris, Kyrillos (patriarch of Constantinople)

    Cyril Lucaris, patriarch of Constantinople who strove for reforms along Protestant Calvinist lines. His efforts generated broad opposition both from his own communion and from the Jesuits. Lucaris pursued theological studies in Venice and Padua, and while studying further in Wittenberg and Geneva

  • Loukotka, ?estmír (Czech linguist)

    South American Indian languages: Classification of the South American Indian languages: C?estmír Loukotka, a Czech language specialist, contributed two classifications (1935, 1944) on the same lines as Rivet but with an increased number of families (94 and 114, respectively), the larger number resulting from newly discovered languages and from Loukotka’s splitting of several of Rivet’s families.…

  • Louly, Mohamed Mahmoud Ould (head of state, Mauritania)

    Mauritania: Struggle for postindependence stability: Mohamed Mahmoud Ould Louly, Mauritania signed a treaty with the Polisario Front in August in an effort to disentangle itself from Western Sahara. This worsened relations with Morocco. Ould Louly was in turn replaced in January 1980 by the prime minister, Lieut. Col. Mohamed Khouna…

  • lounge suit (apparel)

    suit: …in 1860 as the “lounge suit,” which was for informal wear and consisted of long trousers; a waistcoat, or vest (often elaborately decorated); and a short coat. The desire on the part of the middle class for gentlemanly clothes led to great conformity in men’s suits; since the 19th…

  • Loup River (river, Nebraska, United States)

    Loup River, river, rising in three branches (North Loup, Middle Loup, and South Loup rivers) in east-central Nebraska, U.S., and flowing east past Fullerton and Genoa to join the Platte River in Platte county just southeast of Columbus. The Loup River itself is approximately 70 miles (115 km) long;

  • loup-garou (folklore)

    Werewolf, in European folklore, a man who turns into a wolf at night and devours animals, people, or corpses but returns to human form by day. Some werewolves change shape at will; others, in whom the condition is hereditary or acquired by having been bitten by a werewolf, change shape

  • louping ill (animal disease)

    Louping ill, viral disease mainly of sheep, causing inflammation of the brain and spinal cord. It is transmitted by bites of the castor-bean tick, species Ixodes ricinus. The disease is most common in northern England and Scotland and is called louping (or leaping) ill because infected sheep leap a

  • Loura, Mount (mountain, Guinea)

    Fouta Djallon: Mount Loura (Tamgué), its highest point (5,046 feet [1,538 m]), rises near the town of Mali. Originating in the Fouta Djallon’s central plateau are the headwaters of the Gambia, Bafing (Sénégal), Koliba, Kolenté (Great Scarcies), Kaba (Little Scarcies), and Konkouré rivers. The Fouta’s eastern slopes…

  • Lourdes (France)

    Lourdes, pilgrimage town, Hautes-Pyrénées département, Occitanie région, southwestern France, southwest of Toulouse. Situated at the foot of the Pyrenees and now on both banks of a torrent, the Gave de Pau, the town and its fortress formed a strategic stronghold in medieval times. During the

  • Louren?o Marques (national capital, Mozambique)

    Maputo, port city and capital of Mozambique. It lies along the north bank of Espírito Santo Estuary of Delagoa Bay, an inlet of the Indian Ocean. Maputo derived its former name from the Portuguese trader who first explored the region in 1544. The town developed around a Portuguese fortress

  • Louren?o Marques, Baía de (bay, Mozambique)

    Delagoa Bay, bay on the southeast coast of Mozambique, East Africa, near the South African border. The name probably derives from Baía da Lagoa (Bay of the Lagoon). It is 19 mi (31 km) long and 16 mi wide, with Inhaca Island, a tourist resort, at its mouth and the port of Maputo, capital of M

  • Louren?o Marques, University of (university, Maputo, Mozambique)

    Mozambique: Education: …established in 1962 and renamed Eduardo Mondlane University in 1976 for the first president of Frelimo, offers courses through a range of faculties, centres, and schools. Other universities include the Catholic University of Mozambique (1995) and Higher Polytechnic and University Institute (1994), both of which have branches in multiple cities.

  • Louren?o, Jo?o (president of Angola)

    José dos Santos: Presidency: …name came to the fore: Jo?o Louren?o, a longtime member of the MPLA who was serving as vice president of the party and as the country’s minister of defense. In February 2017 Louren?o was confirmed as the party’s presidential candidate in the general election scheduled for August of that year.

  • lourie (bird)

    Turaco, (order Musophagiformes), any of about 18 species in six genera of colourful, fruit-eating African birds. The green and iridescent turacos (Tauraco, Musophaga, and Corythaeola) are primarily residents of dense broad-leaved evergreen forest; the grayer forms (Crinifer), most of which are

  • louse (insect)

    Louse, (order Phthiraptera), any of a group of small wingless parasitic insects divisible into two main groups: the Amblycera and Ischnocera, or chewing or biting lice, which are parasites of birds and mammals, and the Anoplura, or sucking lice, parasites of mammals only. One of the sucking lice,

  • louse fly (insect)

    Louse fly, any insect of the parasitic family Hippoboscidae (order Diptera) characterized by piercing mouthparts used to suck blood from warm-blooded animals. Genera occur in both winged and wingless forms. The winged louse flies, parasitic on birds, are usually dark brown in colour, flat in shape,

  • louse-borne typhus (pathology)

    typhus: Epidemic typhus: Epidemic typhus has also been called camp fever, jail fever, and war fever, names that suggest overcrowding, underwashing, and lowered standards of living. It is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia prowazekii and is conveyed from person to person by the body louse, Pediculus humanus humanus.…

  • lousewort (plant)

    Lousewort, herbaceous plant of the genus Pedicularis (in the broomrape family, Orobanchaceae), which contains about 350 species found throughout the Northern Hemisphere but especially on the mountains of Central and eastern Asia. Louseworts have bilaterally symmetrical flowers, sometimes highly

  • Lousiad, an Heroi-Comic Poem, The (work by Pindar)

    Peter Pindar: …lampoons of George III in The Lousiad, an Heroi-Comic Poem (1785–95), Ode upon Ode; or, A Peep at St. James’s; or, New Year’s Day; or, What You Will (1787), and The Royal Visit to Exeter (1795; a tour de force of Devon dialect humour) and in the virtuosity of his…

  • Louth (county, Ireland)

    Louth, county, in the province of Leinster, northeastern Ireland. The smallest county in area in Ireland, it is bounded by Northern Ireland (north), the Irish Sea (east), County Meath (south and west), and County Monaghan (northwest). Dundalk, in northern Louth, is the county town (seat), and there

  • Louth, Robert (English bishop)

    Robert Lowth, Church of England bishop of London (appointed 1777) and literary scholar. During his Oxford professorship (1741–50) he was noted for his analyses and commentaries on Hebrew poetry, later published as De sacra poesi Hebraeorum (1753; Eng. trans., Lectures on Hebrew Poetry, 1787). As

  • Loutherbourg, Philip James de (artist)

    Philip James de Loutherbourg, early Romantic painter, illustrator, printmaker, and scenographer, especially known for his paintings of landscapes and battles and for his innovative scenery designs and special effects for the theatre. First trained under his father, a miniature painter from

  • loutrophoros (Greek pottery)

    amphora: …contests and victors); and the loutrophoros, slender-bodied, with a tall neck and flaring mouth, used from the 6th century for ritual purposes at weddings and funerals. The one-piece amphora maintained a more consistent shape, with cylindrical handles, flaring lip, echinus foot, and amply curved belly. Amphorae, such as wine containers,…

  • Loutsenhizer, Mary (American singer)

    Chris Connor, (Mary Loutsenhizer), American singer (born Nov. 8, 1927, Kansas City, Mo.—died Aug. 29, 2009, Toms River, N.J.), performed standard songs with a smooth honey-coated contralto voice in a style that conveyed painful emotional subtleties and rhythmic ingenuity behind a fashionable

  • Louvain (Belgium)

    Leuven, municipality, Flanders Region, central Belgium. It lies along the Dyle (Dijle) River and is connected by canal with the Scheldt (Schelde). The city is about 16 miles (26 km) east of Brussels. It was founded in the 9th century around a fortress built by a German emperor against the Normans,

  • Louvain Bible

    biblical literature: French versions: …produced a new version, the Louvain Bible of 1550, based on both Lefèvre and Olivétan. Modernizations of Olivétan appeared in succeeding centuries. The most important French version of the 20th century is the Jerusalem Bible, prepared by professors at the Dominican école Biblique de Jérusalem (Paris 1949–54, complete 1956).

  • Louvain, Université Catholique de (university, Leuven, Belgium)

    Catholic University of Leuven, renowned institution of higher learning founded in 1425 in Leuven (Louvain), Brabant (now in Belgium). The university was a unitary entity until 1970 when it was partitioned, based on linguistic differences, into two separate universities. In the one university

  • Louvemont, Battle of (World War I [1916])

    Battle of Verdun: The tide turns at Verdun: …to be known as the Battle of Louvemont, was completed on December 18 with the recapture of Chambrettes and the capture of over 11,000 German prisoners. This marked the end of the Battle of Verdun.

  • louver (architecture)

    Louver, arrangement of parallel, horizontal blades, slats, laths, slips of glass, wood, or other material designed to regulate airflow or light penetration. Louvers are often used in windows or doors in order to allow air or light in while keeping sunshine or moisture out. They may be either

  • Louvet de Couvray, Jean-Baptiste (French author)

    Jean-Baptiste Louvet, French literary figure prominent as a Girondin during the Revolution. While working as a bookseller, Louvet won fame as the author of a licentious novel published from 1786 to 1791; the work was reprinted many times as Les Amours (or, in some editions, Les Aventures) du

  • Louvet, Jean (Belgian dramatist)

    Jean Louvet, Belgian playwright whose main subject is the lives and sufferings of the working class. Louvet was the son of a miner. As a young man, he was influenced by Existentialism, and left-wing politics led him into work in the theatre. Strongly autobiographical, his work goes beyond ideology

  • Louvet, Jean-Baptiste (French author)

    Jean-Baptiste Louvet, French literary figure prominent as a Girondin during the Revolution. While working as a bookseller, Louvet won fame as the author of a licentious novel published from 1786 to 1791; the work was reprinted many times as Les Amours (or, in some editions, Les Aventures) du

  • Louvin Brothers, the (American music duo)

    The Louvin Brothers, American country music vocal duo of the 1940s, ’50s, and ’60s, remembered for their simple but pure gospel-tinged style and distinctive harmonies. The members were Ira Louvin (original name Ira Lonnie Loudermilk; b. April 21, 1924, Henagar, Alabama, U.S.—d. June 20, 1965,

  • Louvin, Charlie (American musician)

    Charlie Louvin, (Charlie Elzer Loudermilk), American country singer (born July 7, 1927, Henagar, Ala.—died Jan. 26, 2011, Wartrace, Tenn.), together with his older brother, Ira, made up the Louvin Brothers, which was often called the greatest duet act in country music. They performed in the 1940s,

  • Louvin, Ira (American musician)

    the Louvin Brothers: The members were Ira Louvin (original name Ira Lonnie Loudermilk; b. April 21, 1924, Henagar, Alabama, U.S.—d. June 20, 1965, Williamsburg, Missouri) and Charlie Louvin (original name Charlie Elzer Loudermilk; b. July 7, 1927, Henagar, Alabama—d. January 26, 2011, Wartrace, Tennessee).

  • Louvois, Fran?ois-Michel Le Tellier, marquis de (French statesman)

    Fran?ois-Michel Le Tellier, marquis de Louvois, secretary of state for war under Louis XIV of France and his most influential minister in the period 1677–91. He contributed to the reorganization of the French army. Louvois was the son of one of the wealthiest and most powerful officials in France,

  • louvre (architecture)

    Louver, arrangement of parallel, horizontal blades, slats, laths, slips of glass, wood, or other material designed to regulate airflow or light penetration. Louvers are often used in windows or doors in order to allow air or light in while keeping sunshine or moisture out. They may be either

  • Louvre Abu Dhabi (museum, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)

    Abu Dhabi: …a decade of delays, the Louvre Abu Dhabi opened in 2017 in a building designed by French architect Jean Nouvel. It was the first of the planned institutions to be completed. Despite provoking a great deal of debate, the arrangement underscored the emirate’s growing determination to draw and foster an…

  • Louvre Museum (museum, Paris, France)

    Louvre Museum, national museum and art gallery of France, housed in part of a large palace in Paris that was built on the right-bank site of the 12th-century fortress of Philip Augustus. It is the world’s most-visited art museum, with a collection that spans work from ancient civilizations to the

  • Louw, N. P. van Wyk (South African writer)

    South African literature: In Afrikaans: …followed by his elder brother, N.P. van Wyk Louw, the principal creative artist and theoretician of the new movement. Van Wyk Louw achieved mastery in every form, writing the finest odes, sonnets, modern ballads, and love lyrics in Afrikaans. His dramatic monologue “Die Hond van God” (1942; “The Hound of…

  • Louw, W. E. G. (South African writer)

    South African literature: In Afrikaans: …of the ’30s”), begun by W.E.G. Louw with Die ryke dwaas (1934; “The Rich Fool”). This sensitive poet, with his searing conflicts between God and Eros, exemplified qualities soon to become the new generation’s hallmark. He was followed by his elder brother, N.P. van Wyk Louw, the principal creative artist…

  • Lou?s, Pierre (French author)

    Pierre Lou?s, French novelist and poet whose merit and limitation were to express pagan sensuality with stylistic perfection. Lou?s frequented Parnassian and Symbolist circles and was a friend of the composer Claude Debussy. He founded short-lived literary reviews, notably La Conque (1891). His

  • lovage (herb)

    Lovage, (Levisticum officinale), herb of the family Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) native to southern Europe. It is cultivated for its stalks and foliage, which are used for tea, as a vegetable, and to flavour foods, particularly meats. Its rhizomes (underground stems) are used as a carminative and its

  • Lovale (people)

    Luvale, Bantu-speaking people of northwestern Zambia and southeastern Angola. In terms of history, language, material culture, and religion, the Luvale are closely related to the Lunda and Ndembu to the northeast, who extend northward into southern Congo (Kinshasa). They are also culturally similar

  • Lovat, Simon Fraser, 11th Lord (Scottish Jacobite)

    Simon Fraser, 11th Lord Lovat, Scottish Jacobite, chief of clan Fraser, noted for his violent feuds and changes of allegiance. Grandson of the 7th Lord Lovat, Simon Fraser persuaded the weak 9th Lord Lovat to settle the liferent of his estates on his father in 1696, but the destination of the

  • Lovat, Simon Fraser, 17th Lord (British military officer)

    Battles of Saratoga: Second Battle of Saratoga: Simon Fraser, in charge of probing the American left, was met by a division of Continental infantry, including Col. Daniel Morgan’s riflemen. They opened fire on the exposed British, fatally wounding Fraser as he attempted to cover a British withdrawal. Just as the American attack…

  • Lovati, Lovato (Italian scholar)

    classical scholarship: The later Middle Ages: …of scholars in Padua around Lovato Lovati (1241–1309) and Albertino Mussato (1261–1329) were active humanists. Lovato read Lucretius and Catullus, studied Seneca’s tragedies in the famous Codex Etruscus, and found and read some of the lost books of Livy. Both men wrote Latin poetry, Mussato composing a Senecan tragedy, the…

  • Lov?en, Mount (mountain, Montenegro)

    Cetinje: …and at the foot of Mount Lov?en (5,738 feet [1,749 metres]). The city’s name derives from the river, the Cetina (or Cetinja). The monastery at Cetinje became the seat of the prince-bishops, or vladike, theocratic rulers of Montenegro, from 1516 to 1851. The Montenegrins constantly battled the Turks and Albanians,…

  • Love (novel by Morrison)

    Toni Morrison: …utopian community in Oklahoma, and Love (2003), an intricate family story that reveals the myriad facets of love and its ostensible opposite. A Mercy (2008) deals with slavery in 17th-century America. In the redemptive Home (2012), a traumatized Korean War veteran encounters racism after returning home and later overcomes apathy…

  • love (emotion)

    drug use: The functions of psychotropic drugs: Love is a highly valued human emotion. Thus, not surprisingly, there has been a great deal of preoccupation with the feeling of love and with those conditions believed to enhance the attainment of love. Little is known concerning the aphrodisiac action of certain foods and…

  • Love (American rock group)

    Love, American rock group formed in Los Angeles in the mid-1960s that was more popular with critics than with record buyers. The original members were Arthur Lee (b. 1945, Memphis, Tenn., U.S.—d. Aug. 3, 2006, Memphis), Bryan MacLean (b. 1947, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.—d. Dec. 25, 1998), John

  • love (tennis)

    language: Jargon: …tennis scores use the sequence love, 15, 30, 40, and game; cricketers verbally appeal to the umpire when a batsman may be out by calling “How’s that?” and the ways of being out are designated by stereotypes, “run out,” “leg before wicket,” “stumped,” and so forth.

  • Love & Mercy (film by Pohlad [2014])

    Paul Giamatti: …in the Brian Wilson biopic Love & Mercy.

  • Love Actually (film by Curtis [2003])

    Hugh Grant: …adaptation of Nick Hornby’s novel; Love Actually (2003); and Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason (2004). In 2007 Grant starred opposite Drew Barrymore as an aging pop star in Music and Lyrics. He next appeared in Did You Hear About the Morgans? (2009), a comedy about a married couple who…

  • Love Affair (film by McCarey [1939])

    Leo McCarey: Middle years: …RKO, McCarey made the ultraromantic Love Affair (1939), in which Charles Boyer and Dunne portrayed strangers who fall in love during a cruise and plan to meet again in six months, only to have their reunion disrupted when Dunne is struck by a car, crippling her. McCarey worked on the…

  • Love Affair (film by Caron [1994])

    Katharine Hepburn: …prominently in films such as Love Affair (1994), which was her last movie.

  • Love Among the Ruins (made-for-television movie by Cukor [1975])

    George Cukor: Last films: Only Love Among the Ruins (1975), a made-for-television romantic comedy shot in England with Hepburn and Laurence Olivier, and The Corn Is Green (1979), also made for television, with Katharine Hepburn in the role of a spinster schoolteacher in Wales, were on par with Cukor’s earlier…

  • Love and Anarchy (film by Wertmuller [1973])

    Lina Wertmüller: …Film d’amore e d’anarchia… (1973; Love and Anarchy), about an anarchist torn between his plot to assassinate Benito Mussolini and his love for a prostitute who has given him shelter in a Rome brothel. Wertmüller’s two finest films are Travolti da un insolito destino nell’azzurro mare d’agosto (1974; Swept Away),…

  • Love and Bullets (film by Rosenberg [1979])

    Charles Bronson: …later films were action-thrillers, including Love and Bullets (1979), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy’s Law (1986). In other movies he revealed humanity and tenderness beneath the toughness, as in Sean Penn’s The Indian Runner (1991) and the TV movie Yes Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus (1991).

  • Love and Death (work by Powys)

    Llewelyn Powys: …an exploration of spirituality; and Love and Death (1939), a partly fictionalized account of and reflection on a love affair.

  • Love and Death (film by Allen [1975])

    Woody Allen: The 1970s: Love and Death (1975), a parody of Leo Tolstoy’s fiction, Sergey Eisenstein’s filmmaking, and a clutch of other landmarks of Russian culture, was less universally applauded.

  • Love and Death in the American Novel (work by Fiedler)

    American literature: Literary and social criticism: …Leslie Fiedler, as, for example, Love and Death in the American Novel (1960), was marked by its provocative application of Freudian ideas to American literature. In his later work he turned to popular culture as a source of revealing social and psychological patterns. A more-subtle Freudian, Lionel Trilling, in The…

  • Love and Death on Long Island (film by Kwietniowski [1997])

    John Hurt: …young male movie idol in Love and Death on Long Island (1997). Hurt also enjoyed smaller parts in such films as The Field (1990), a drama set in an Irish village, and Rob Roy (1995), about the Scottish outlaw. On television he appeared as the title character in the children’s…

  • Love and Garbage (book by Klíma)

    Ivan Klíma: …and Láska a smetí (1988; Love and Garbage), the narrator of which is a banned Czech writer who sweeps streets for a living while meditating on Franz Kafka and other momentous matters. Klíma’s later fiction included ?ekání na tmu, ?ekání na světlo (1993; Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the…

  • Love and Hate: The Natural History of Behavior Patterns (work by Eibl-Eibesfeldt)

    motivation: Genetic contributions: In a book entitled Love and Hate: The Natural History of Behavior Patterns, he summarized many years of cross-cultural research on human genetic behaviour patterns. Interestingly, research on the facial expressions associated with emotion has provided some support for the existence of innate motivations in humans.

  • Love and Mr. Lewisham (work by Wells)

    H.G. Wells: Early writings: …middle-class life, most notably in Love and Mr. Lewisham (1900), Kipps: The Story of a Simple Soul (1905), and The History of Mr. Polly (1910). In these novels, and in Tono-Bungay (1909), he drew on memories of his own earlier life, and, through the thoughts of inarticulate yet often ambitious…

  • Love and Obstacles (short stories by Hemon)

    Aleksandar Hemon: He followed this with Love and Obstacles (2009), a collection of short stories narrated by a young man who leaves Sarajevo for the United States when war breaks out in his home country. The Making of Zombie Wars (2015) chronicles the quotidian difficulties of a workaday writer attempting to…

  • Love and Pain and the Whole Damn Thing (film by Pakula [1973])

    Alan J. Pakula: Films of the 1970s: Love and Pain and the Whole Damn Thing (1973) was a smaller, less-commercial enterprise, with Maggie Smith and Timothy Bottoms as a couple involved in a September-May romance.

  • Love and Responsibility (work by John Paul II)

    St. John Paul II: Decision to join the priesthood: …his first book of nonfiction, Love and Responsibility (1960), an exploration of the several graces available in conjugal sexual relationships. The work was considered radical by those who held the traditional church view that sex was solely for the purpose of procreation.

  • Love and Summer (novel by Trevor)

    William Trevor: His last novel, Love and Summer, was published in 2009.

  • Love and the Noble Heart Are the Same Thing (work by Dante)

    Dante: Dante’s intellectual development and public career: …gentil sono una cosa” (“Love and the Noble Heart Are the Same Thing”), the first line of which is clearly an adaptation of Guinizelli’s “Al cor gentil ripara sempre amore” (“In Every Noble Heart Love Finds Its Home”). This was the beginning of Dante’s association with a new poetic…

  • Love and Theft (album by Dylan)

    Bob Dylan: …Dylan’s way in 2002, for Love and Theft (2001).

  • Love at Twenty (motion picture [1962])

    Jean-Pierre Léaud: …L’Amour à vingt ans (1962; Love at Twenty), Baisers volés (1968; Stolen Kisses), Domicile conjugale (1970; Bed and Board), and L’Amour en fuite (1979; Love on the Run). Léaud was perfectly suited to play the part of Doinel, an engaging and innocent young man who is not particularly well equipped…

  • love boat (drug)

    PCP, hallucinogenic drug with anesthetic properties, having the chemical name 1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine. PCP was first developed in 1956 by Parke Davis Laboratories of Detroit for use as an anesthetic in veterinary medicine, though it is no longer used in this capacity. Used for a brief time

  • Love Boat, The (American television program)

    Television in the United States: Jiggle TV: Shows in this genre included The Love Boat (ABC, 1977–86), a romantic comedy that took place on a Caribbean cruise ship; Charlie’s Angels (ABC, 1977–81), which presented three female detectives whose undercover investigations required them to disguise themselves in beachwear and other revealing attire; Three’s Company (ABC, 1977–84), which had…

  • Love Bug, The (film by Stevenson [1968])

    The Love Bug, American live-action comedy film, coproduced by Disney and released in 1968, that centred on “Herbie,” a Volkswagen Beetle that has human qualities. The film spawned a loyal fan movement and numerous sequels. Disney regular Dean Jones played Jim Douglas, a down-and-out race car driver

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