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  • long-tailed field mouse (rodent)

    wood mouse: The long-tailed field mouse (A. sylvaticus) is one of the most intensively studied species in the genus. In Europe it ranges north to Scandinavia and east to Ukraine. This wood mouse is also found in North Africa and on many islands. Once considered indigenous to Iceland,…

  • long-tailed goral (mammal)

    goral: …Tibet, Myanmar, and India; the long-tailed goral (N. caudatus), which ranges from southeast Asia up to the Sikhote-Alin mountains of eastern Siberia; and the Himalayan goral (N. goral), which occurs over the entire Himalayan region. The first two species are vulnerable to extinction, whereas the third species is still fairly…

  • long-tailed jaeger (bird)

    jaeger: Smallest is the long-tailed jaeger (S. longicaudus), 35 cm (14 inches) long. Intermediate in body size is the parasitic jaeger (S. parasiticus).

  • long-tailed macaque (primate)

    cloning: Early cloning experiments: …of two clones of the crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis), the first primate clones using the SCNT process. (SCNT has been carried out with very limited success in humans, in part because of problems with human egg cells resulting from the mother’s age and environmental factors.)

  • long-tailed manakin (bird)

    manakin: The long-tailed manakins (Chiroxiphia linearis) of Costa Rica perform their dances on a horizontal perch in the understory of forest. Several males line up on the perch, and each one sequentially flutters over the others, turning a cartwheel in midair and singing a brief song. Only…

  • long-tailed pangolin (mammal)

    pangolin: African black-bellied pangolin (Manis longicaudata, also classified as Phataginus tetradactyla) and the Chinese pangolin (M. pentadactyla), are almost entirely arboreal; others, such as the giant ground pangolin (M. gigantea, also classified as Smutsia gigantea) of Africa, are terrestrial. All are nocturnal and able to swim…

  • long-tailed porcupine (rodent)

    porcupine: Old World porcupines (family Hystricidae): …are primarily terrestrial, although the long-tailed porcupine of Southeast Asia (Trichys fasciculata) also climbs in trees and shrubs for food. It is the smallest member of the family, weighing less than 4 kg, and is somewhat ratlike in appearance; it is about a half metre long, not including the tail,…

  • long-tailed pouched rat (mammal)

    African pouched rat: Natural history: The long-tailed pouched rat (Beamys hindei) is nocturnal and a nimble climber. Medium-sized, it weighs up to 97 grams and has a body up to 16 cm long and a scantily haired tail about as long as the head and body. It constructs burrows in soft…

  • long-tailed thresher (shark species)

    Fox shark, species of thresher shark

  • long-tailed tit (bird)

    Aegithalidae: …best-known species is the common, long-tailed tit (Aegithalos caudatus) of Eurasia. It is pinkish and black, with white head, and its tail makes up half of its 14-centimetre (6-inch) total length. One of the world’s tiniest birds is the pygmy tit (Psaltria exilis) of Java, with head and body length…

  • long-tailed weasel (mammal)

    weasel: …the largest weasel is the long-tailed weasel (M. frenata); in South America it is the tropical weasel (M. africana). Both measure 25–30 cm (about 10–12 inches), excluding the 10–20-cm (4–8-inch) tail; weight is 85–350 grams (3–12.3 ounces). With most weasels, males are usually twice the size of females.

  • long-tailed widowbird (bird)

    runaway selection hypothesis: …dramatic examples is the African long-tailed widowbird (Euplectes progne); the male possesses an extraordinarily long tail. This feature can be explained by the females’ preference for males with the longest tails. This preference can be demonstrated experimentally by artificially elongating the tails of male widowbirds. Similarly, male European sedge warblers…

  • long-term capital

    international payment and exchange: Long-term flows: Long-term capital movement divides into direct investments (in plant and equipment) and portfolio investments (in securities). In the 19th century direct investment in plant and equipment was preponderant. The United Kingdom was by far the most important contributor to direct investment overseas. In…

  • Long-Term Capital Management (American corporation)

    Myron S. Scholes: …of Economic Research; Salomon Brothers; Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), which Merton cofounded in 1994; Platinum Grove Asset Management, L.P., which he cofounded in 1999; the Chicago Mercantile Exchange; and Dimensional Fund Advisors. Because of its highly leveraged positions, LTCM lost more than $4 billion in 1998. (After an Internal Revenue…

  • long-term care insurance

    insurance: Types of policies: Long-term care insurance (LTC) has been developed to cover expenses associated with old age, such as care in nursing homes and home care visits. LTC insurance, though relatively new, is already attracting strong interest because of the rapid growth of the elderly population in the…

  • long-term debt (finance)

    business finance: Long-term debt: There are various forms of long-term debt. A mortgage bond is one secured by a lien on fixed assets such as plant and equipment. A debenture is a bond not secured by specific assets but accepted by investors because the firm has a…

  • long-term financing

    international payment and exchange: Long-term flows: Long-term capital movement divides into direct investments (in plant and equipment) and portfolio investments (in securities). In the 19th century direct investment in plant and equipment was preponderant. The United Kingdom was by far the most important contributor to direct investment overseas. In…

  • long-term memory (psychology)

    memory: Long-term memory: Memories that endure outside of immediate consciousness are known as long-term memories. They may be about something that happened many years ago, such as who attended one’s fifth birthday party, or they may concern relatively recent experiences, such as the courses that were served…

  • long-term regulation (biology)

    motivation: Hunger: A second mechanism, called long-term regulation, is directed toward storing away sufficient energy for possible later use should the short-term mechanism fail to adequately replenish energy expended. Energy for long-term use is stored in the form of fat within the fat cells of the body. Short-term regulation processes have…

  • long-term security

    international payment and exchange: Long-term flows: Long-term capital movement divides into direct investments (in plant and equipment) and portfolio investments (in securities). In the 19th century direct investment in plant and equipment was preponderant. The United Kingdom was by far the most important contributor to direct investment overseas. In…

  • long-term warning system (military science)

    warning system: Long-term, or political, warning systems employ diplomatic, political, technological, and economic indicators to forecast hostilities. The defender may react by strengthening defenses, by negotiating treaties or concessions, or by taking other action. Political warning, equivocal and incapable of disclosing fully an attacker’s intention, often results…

  • long-toed lapwing (bird)

    lapwing: …of eastern Asia, and the long-toed lapwing (Hemiparra crassirostris), of Africa.

  • long-toed water beetle (insect)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Dryopidae (long-toed water beetles) Small, downy; crawl on stream bottoms; few species; widely distributed. Family Elmidae (riffle beetles) Varied habitat; several hundred widely distributed species. Family Eulichadidae A few species in

  • long-tongued bee (bee tribe)

    Euglossine bee, (tribe Euglossini), any of a large group of brightly coloured, bees important to the ecology of New World tropical forests. Colour combinations include metallic blues, greens, and bronzes. They are noted for their long tongues and their role in the pollination of over 700 species of

  • long-tongued fruit bat

    Old World fruit bat: …are the pollen- and nectar-eating long-tongued fruit bats (Macroglossus), which attain a head and body length of about 6–7 cm (2.4–2.8 inches) and a wingspan of about 25 cm (10 inches). Colour varies among the pteropodids; some are red or yellow, some striped or spotted. With the exception of rousette…

  • long-toothed ferret badger (mammal)

    badger: moschata), Burmese (M. personata), Everett’s (M. everetti), and Javan (M. orientalis). They live in grasslands and forests from northeast India to central China and Southeast Asia where they consume mostly insects, worms, small birds, rodents, and wild fruits. They are brownish to blackish gray, with white…

  • long-track tornado (meteorology)

    tornado: Tornado cyclones, tornado families, and long-track tornadoes: About 90 percent of tornadoes are associated with thunderstorms, usually supercells; this association accounts for many weak and almost all strong and violent tornadoes. The other 10 percent of tornado occurrences are associated with rapidly growing cumulus clouds; these vortices are almost always…

  • long-wattled umbrellabird (bird)

    umbrellabird: In the long-wattled umbrellabird (Cephalopterus penduliger), found west of the Andes in Ecuador and Colombia, the wattle may be 28 cm (11 inches) long and is entirely shingled with short, black feathers. The bare-necked umbrellabird (C. glabricollis) of Panama and Costa Rica has a short, round wattle,…

  • long-whiskered catfish (fish)

    ostariophysan: Annotated classification: Family Pimelodidae (long-whiskered catfishes) Similar to Bagridae but lack nasal barbels. Food, aquarium fishes. Size to 1.3 metres (about 4 feet), 65 kg (145 pounds). South and Central America. About 31 genera, at least 85 species. Family Trichomycteridae (candirus and other parasitic catfishes) Operculum (gill

  • long-winged harrier (bird)

    harrier: …the Straits of Magellan; the long-winged harrier (C. buffoni), ranging over all of South America, especially east of the Andes; the South African marsh harrier (C. ranivorus), ranging north to Uganda on the east; and the pied harrier (C. melanoleucus), of central eastern Asia.

  • Longabaugh, Harry (American outlaw)

    Sundance Kid, American outlaw, reputed to be the best shot and fastest gunslinger of the Wild Bunch, a group of robbers and rustlers who ranged through the Rocky Mountains and plateau desert regions of the West in the 1880s and ’90s. Harry Longabaugh left home when he was 15 and took his nickname

  • Longaberger, David (American entrepreneur)

    David Longaberger, American businessman who created an empire as the visionary founder (1973) of the Longaberger Co., renowned primarily for the heirloom-quality craftsmanship of its handmade maple baskets; though he did not graduate from high school until age 21 and dealt with a stuttering

  • Longacre Square (square, New York City, New York, United States)

    Times Square, square in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, formed by the intersection of Seventh Avenue, 42nd Street, and Broadway. Times Square is also the centre of the Theatre District, which is bounded roughly by Sixth and Eighth avenues to the east and west, respectively, and by 40th and 53rd

  • Longair, Malcolm (British astronomer)

    Malcolm Longair, Scottish astronomer, noted for his scholarship and teaching, who served as astronomer royal for Scotland from 1980 to 1990. Longair was educated at the University of St. Andrews, Dundee, and at the University of Cambridge (M.A., Ph.D., 1967). In 1968–69 he went as an exchange

  • Longair, Malcolm Sim (British astronomer)

    Malcolm Longair, Scottish astronomer, noted for his scholarship and teaching, who served as astronomer royal for Scotland from 1980 to 1990. Longair was educated at the University of St. Andrews, Dundee, and at the University of Cambridge (M.A., Ph.D., 1967). In 1968–69 he went as an exchange

  • longan (plant and fruit)

    Longan, (Dimocarpus longan), tropical fruit tree of the soapberry family (Sapindaceae), native to Asia and introduced into other warm regions of the world. The edible white-fleshed fruits are somewhat similar to the related lychee and are commonly sold fresh, dried, or canned in syrup. The juicy

  • Longaval, Antoine de (French composer)

    Passion music: The 16th-century French composer Antoine de Longaval, who made extensive use of the plainsong formulas, was more concerned with declamation of the text than with elaborate polyphony. Among the Germans, Jacob Handl and Leonhard Lechner produced dignified settings.

  • Longaville (fictional character)

    Love's Labour's Lost: …three of his noblemen—Berowne (Biron), Longaville, and Dumaine (Dumain)—debate their intellectual intentions. Their plans are thrown into disarray, however, when the Princess of France, attended by three ladies (Rosaline, Maria, and Katharine), arrives on a diplomatic mission from the king of France and must therefore be admitted into Navarre’s park.…

  • Longban (mountains, China)

    Liupan Mountains: …southern section is called the Long Mountains (also called Guan Mountains, Longtou, or Longban).

  • Longbaugh, Harry (American outlaw)

    Sundance Kid, American outlaw, reputed to be the best shot and fastest gunslinger of the Wild Bunch, a group of robbers and rustlers who ranged through the Rocky Mountains and plateau desert regions of the West in the 1880s and ’90s. Harry Longabaugh left home when he was 15 and took his nickname

  • Longbeard (English crusader)

    William FitzOsbert, English crusader and populist, a martyr for the poorer classes of London. A London citizen of good family, FitzOsbert took part in the English expedition against the Muslims in Portugal (1190). On his return he made himself leader of the common people of London against the mayor

  • longboat (boat)

    Launch, largest of a ship’s boats, at one time sloop-rigged and often armed, such as those used in the Mediterranean Sea during the 18th and 19th centuries. Although present-day launches can travel under sail or by oar, most are power-driven. Because of their weight, they are seldom used by m

  • longbow

    Longbow, bow commonly 6 feet (1.8 metres) tall and the predominant missile weapon of the English in the Hundred Years’ War and on into the 16th century. It was probably of Welsh origin. The best longbows were made of yew, might have required a force of as much as 150 to 180 pounds (70 to 80 kg) to

  • longcase clock (clock)

    Grandfather clock, tall pendulum clock (see animation) enclosed in a wooden case that stands upon the floor and is typically 1.8 to 2.3 metres (6 to 7.5 feet) in height. The name grandfather clock was adopted after the song “Grandfather’s Clock,” written in 1876 by Henry Clay Work, became popular.

  • Longchamp, William (chancellor of England)

    William Longchamp, ecclesiastical statesman who governed England in 1190–91, while King Richard I (reigned 1189–99) was away from the kingdom during the Third Crusade. Of Norman origin, Longchamp was made chancellor of England and bishop of Ely when Richard ascended the throne. After Richard’s

  • Longchamps (national capital, Guyana)

    Georgetown, capital city of Guyana. The country’s chief port, Georgetown lies on the Atlantic Ocean at the mouth of the Demerara River. Although the settlement was founded by the British in 1781 and named for George III, it had been largely rebuilt by the French by 1784. Known during the Dutch

  • longchi (musical instrument)

    qin: …called the “dragon pond” (longchi), and the smaller of which is called the “phoenix pool” (fengzhao). The qin’s high bridge near the wide end of the soundboard is called the “great mountain” (yueshan), the low bridge at the narrow end is called the “dragon’s gums” (longyin), and the two…

  • longclaw (bird)

    Longclaw, (genus Macronyx), any of eight species of African insect-eating birds that are related to the pipits. Found on prairies and grasslands, they are surprisingly like meadowlarks (family Icteridae), which are New World birds; both are the same size and shape and have streaked brown backs,

  • Longde (China)

    Changzhi, city in southeastern Shanxi sheng (province), China. It is situated in the Lu’an plain—a basin surrounded by the western highlands of the Taihang Mountains, watered by the upper streams of the Zhuozhang River. It is a communication centre; to the northeast a route and a railway via

  • Longden, John Eric (American jockey)

    Johnny Longden, English-born American jockey who, in a career of 40 years (1927–66), established a world record in Thoroughbred racing with 6,032 victories (some sources give 6,026). This mark was surpassed in 1970 by Willie Shoemaker. On May 15, 1952, Longden became the first jockey in the United

  • Longden, Johnny (American jockey)

    Johnny Longden, English-born American jockey who, in a career of 40 years (1927–66), established a world record in Thoroughbred racing with 6,032 victories (some sources give 6,026). This mark was surpassed in 1970 by Willie Shoemaker. On May 15, 1952, Longden became the first jockey in the United

  • Longer Landscape Scroll (work by Sesshū)

    Sesshū: Mature years and works: …or “Sansui chōkan” (formally titled Landscape of Four Seasons, 1486), is generally considered Sesshū’s masterpiece and is often regarded as the greatest Japanese ink painting. Depicting the four seasons, beginning with spring and ending with winter, it extends more than 50 feet (15 metres). Though based in both theme and…

  • Longer Rules (work by Basil the Great)

    St. Basil the Great: Works and legacy: The Longer Rules and Shorter Rules (for monasteries) and other ascetic writings distill the experience that began at Annesi and continued in his supervision of the monasteries of Cappadocia: they were to exert strong influence on the monastic life of Eastern Christianity. A notable feature is…

  • Longespée, William (English noble)

    William Longsword, 3rd earl of Salisbury, an illegitimate son of Henry II of England who became a prominent baron, soldier, and administrator under Kings John and Henry III. His date of birth is not known, and his parentage was, for many centuries, a mystery. He was long assumed to have been the

  • Longest Day, The (film by Annakin, Marton, Wicki, and Zanuck [1962])

    The Longest Day, American war movie, released in 1962, that was producer Darryl F. Zanuck’s homage to the Allied soldiers who fought in the Normandy Invasion during World War II. The Longest Day centres on the preparations for the Allied invasion of occupied France that was launched on June 6,

  • Longest Journey, The (work by Forster)

    E.M. Forster: In an early novel, The Longest Journey (1907), he suggested that cultivation of either in isolation is not enough, reliance on the earth alone leading to a genial brutishness and exaggerated development of imagination undermining the individual’s sense of reality.

  • Longest Ride, The (film by Tillman [2015])

    Alan Alda: …Tower Heist (2011), Wanderlust (2012), The Longest Ride (2015), Bridge of Spies (2015), and Marriage Story (2019). He received an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor for his performance in The Aviator (2004). Films he directed included Sweet Liberty (1986) and Betsy’s Wedding

  • Longest Ride, The (novel by Sparks)

    Nicholas Sparks: …Me (2011; film 2014), and The Longest Ride (2013; film 2015). In 2015 he released the novel See Me, about a pair of lovers with troubled pasts. Later works included Two by Two (2016) and Every Breath (2018).

  • Longest Silence: A Life in Fishing, The (essays by McGuane)

    Thomas McGuane: …1990), Some Horses (1999), and The Longest Silence: A Life in Fishing (1999)—reflect mostly on leisure and the outdoors, especially his passion for fly-fishing and horseback riding. McGuane was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2010.

  • Longest Yard, The (film by Segal [2005])

    Chris Rock: Rock’s subsequent films included The Longest Yard (2005), in which he starred with Adam Sandler, and the animated Madagascar series (2005, 2008, and 2012), for which he provided the voice of a zebra. In 2007 he starred in I Think I Love My Wife, a remake of Eric Rohmer’s…

  • Longest Yard, The (film by Aldrich [1974])

    Robert Aldrich: The 1970s: …another major box-office hit with The Longest Yard. The comedy-drama starred Burt Reynolds as Paul Crewe, a former professional quarterback who earns a prison sentence for impulsively destroying his girlfriend’s car. Crewe gets a chance for redemption when he leads the prisoners’ football team against a squad of tough prison…

  • Longeuil, René de (French financier)

    Fran?ois Mansart: The chateau of Maisons.: In 1642 René de Longeuil, an immensely wealthy financier and officer of the royal treasury, commissioned Mansart to build a chateau on his estate. The chateau of Maisons (now called Maisons-Laffitte, in the chief town of the département of Yvelines) is unique in that it is the…

  • longevity

    Life span, the period of time between the birth and death of an organism. It is a commonplace that all organisms die. Some die after only a brief existence, like that of the mayfly, whose adult life burns out in a day, and others like that of the gnarled bristlecone pines, which have lived

  • Longfellow National Historic Site (site, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States)

    Cambridge: …(1837–82), and has been designated Longfellow National Historic Site.

  • Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth (American poet)

    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, the most popular American poet in the 19th century, known for such works as The Song of Hiawatha (1855) and “Paul Revere’s Ride” (1863). Longfellow attended private schools and the Portland Academy. He graduated from Bowdoin College in 1825. At college he was attracted

  • Longfellow-Evangeline State Commemorative Area (historical site, Louisiana, United States)

    Longfellow-Evangeline State Commemorative Area, historic site just north of St. Martinville, southern Louisiana, U.S. The site lies on Bayou Teche, about 12 miles (19 km) southeast of Lafayette. Established in 1934, it occupies an area of 157 acres (64 hectares). Its chief feature is Acadian House

  • Longfield, Mountifort (Irish economist)

    Mountifort Longfield, Irish judge, economist, and the first professor of political economy at Trinity College, Dublin. In his varied career, Longfield served as a property lawyer, a professor of law at Trinity College (1834), and a judge of the Irish landed estates court. He became a member of the

  • longfin mako (fish)

    mako shark: …and temperate seas, and the longfin mako (I. paucus) is scattered worldwide in tropical seas.

  • Longford (Ireland)

    Longford: The town of Longford, in the west-central part of the county, is the county seat.

  • Longford (county, Ireland)

    Longford, county in the province of Leinster, north-central Ireland. The town of Longford, in the west-central part of the county, is the county seat. County Longford is bounded by Counties Leitrim (northwest), Cavan (northeast), Westmeath (southeast), and Roscommon (west). The main features of

  • Longford, Edward Arthur Henry Pakenham, 6th earl of (British dramatist)

    Edward Arthur Henry Pakenham, 6th earl of Longford, theatre patron and playwright who is best-remembered as the director of the Gate Theatre in Dublin. Longford succeeded to the earldom in 1915 and was educated at the University of Oxford (B.A., 1925; M.A., 1928). In 1931 he bought up the

  • Longford, Edward Arthur Henry Pakenham, 6th earl of, Baron Silchester of Silchester (British dramatist)

    Edward Arthur Henry Pakenham, 6th earl of Longford, theatre patron and playwright who is best-remembered as the director of the Gate Theatre in Dublin. Longford succeeded to the earldom in 1915 and was educated at the University of Oxford (B.A., 1925; M.A., 1928). In 1931 he bought up the

  • Longford, Elizabeth Harman Pakenham, Countess of (British historian and biographer)

    Elizabeth Harman Pakenham, Countess of Longford, British historian and biographer (born Aug. 30, 1906, London, Eng.—died Oct. 23, 2002, Hurst Green, East Sussex, Eng.), was an acclaimed author and the matriarch of one of England’s most brilliant literary families—her eight children included b

  • Longford, Francis Aungier Pakenham, 7th earl of (British politician)

    Aungier Pakenham, 7th earl of Longford, British politician and social reformer (born Dec. 5, 1905, London, Eng.—died Aug. 3, 2001, London), was admired as an active, though sometimes eccentric, social reformer in a long political career as a government minister in the 1940s and ’50s and later as a

  • Longfort, An (county, Ireland)

    Longford, county in the province of Leinster, north-central Ireland. The town of Longford, in the west-central part of the county, is the county seat. County Longford is bounded by Counties Leitrim (northwest), Cavan (northeast), Westmeath (southeast), and Roscommon (west). The main features of

  • Longhai Railway (railway, China)

    Lianyungang: …with the construction of the Longhai Railway, an east-west route running through Baoji, in Shaanxi province, in the Wei River valley. Haizhou was the eastern terminus, and a harbour was constructed in the estuary at Dapu. The estuary rapidly silted up, however, and in 1933 the railway was extended to…

  • longhair (breed of cat)

    Longhair, breed of domestic cat noted for its long, soft, flowing coat. Long-haired cats were originally known as Persians or Angoras. These names were later discarded in favour of the name longhair, although the cats are still commonly called Persians in the United States. The longhair, a

  • Longhauser, William (American graphic designer)

    graphic design: Postmodern graphic design: …a 1983 poster designed by William Longhauser. The letters forming the last name of postmodern architect Michael Graves become fanciful edifices, which echo the patterns and textures found in Graves’s buildings. As with much postmodern design, the result is strikingly original.

  • longhead dab (fish)

    dab: …northern Pacific flatfish; and the longhead dab (L. proboscidea), a light-spotted, brownish northern Pacific fish with yellow on the edges of its body.

  • Longhena, Baldassare (Venetian architect)

    Baldassare Longhena, major Venetian architect of the 17th century. Longhena was a pupil of Vincenzo Scamozzi and completed Scamozzi’s Procuratie Nuove (1584–1640) in the Piazza San Marco in Venice. Among his churches are the cathedral at Chioggia (1624–47), Santa Maria degli Scalzi, Venice

  • Longhi family (Italian architectural family)

    Longhi family, a family of three generations of Italian architects who were originally from Viggiu, near Milan, but worked in Rome. Martino Longhi the Elder (died 1591) was a Mannerist architect who was commissioned by Pope Sixtus V (1585–90) to build the church of San Girolamo degli Schiavoni

  • Longhi, Alessandro (Venetian artist)

    Alessandro Longhi, painter, etcher, and biographer of Venetian artists, the most important Venetian portrait painter of his day. The son of the painter Pietro Longhi, he was given his first training by his father, who quite soon put him to study under the portrait painter Giuseppe Nogari. In 1759

  • Longhi, Martino, the Elder (Italian architect)

    Longhi family: Martino Longhi the Elder (died 1591) was a Mannerist architect who was commissioned by Pope Sixtus V (1585–90) to build the church of San Girolamo degli Schiavoni (1588–90) and continued work on the Chiesa Nuova (Santa Maria in Vallicella, Rome; 1599–1605 and on), which had…

  • Longhi, Martino, the Younger (Italian architect)

    Longhi family: …died in 1619, his son, Martino Longhi the Younger (1602–57), continued the work. Onorio Longhi also designed the large oval chapel in San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome.

  • Longhi, Onorio (Italian architect)

    Longhi family: His son, Onorio Longhi (1569–1619), began his major work, San Carlo al Corso, Rome, one of the largest churches in that city, in January 1612; and when he died in 1619, his son, Martino Longhi the Younger (1602–57), continued the work. Onorio Longhi also designed the large…

  • Longhi, Pietro (Venetian artist)

    Pietro Longhi, painter of the Rococo period known for his small scenes of Venetian social and domestic life. He was the son of a silversmith, Alessandro Falca, in whose workshop he received his first training. Later he worked under the Veronese historical painter Antonio Balestra, but his one

  • Longhorn (aircraft)

    Maurice Farman: The most successful was the Longhorn, first built in 1912. By the beginning of World War I, it was one of the standard trainers in France and Great Britain.

  • longhorn beetle (insect family)

    Long-horned beetle, (family Cerambycidae), any of about 25,000 species of beetles (insect order Coleoptera) whose common name is derived from the extremely long antennae of most species. These beetles occur throughout the world but are most numerous in the tropics. They range in size from 2 to 152

  • longhorn sculpin (fish)

    sculpin: …Arctic, and North America; the longhorn sculpin (M. octodecemspinosus), a common North American species, variable in colour and with long cheek spines; and the sea raven, a North American fish distinctively adorned with fleshy tabs on its head and notable for its ability, like certain other sculpins, to inflate itself…

  • longhouse (dwelling)

    Longhouse, traditional dwelling of many Northeast Indians of North America. A traditional longhouse was built by using a rectangular frame of saplings, each 2 to 3 inches (5 to 7.5 cm) in diameter. The larger end of each sapling was placed in a posthole in the ground, and a domed roof was created

  • Longhouse Religion (religion)

    Gai’wiio, (Seneca: “Good Message”) new religious movement that emerged among the Seneca Indians of the northeastern United States, one of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, in the early 19th century. Its founder was a Seneca chief, healer, and prophet whose epithet was Ganioda’yo

  • Longhu, Mount (mountain, China)

    Jiangxi: History: …sanctioned a Daoist “papacy” at Mount Longhu, near Guixi, which lasted into the mid-20th century.

  • longicorn (insect family)

    Long-horned beetle, (family Cerambycidae), any of about 25,000 species of beetles (insect order Coleoptera) whose common name is derived from the extremely long antennae of most species. These beetles occur throughout the world but are most numerous in the tropics. They range in size from 2 to 152

  • Longimanus (king of Persia)

    Artaxerxes I, Achaemenid king of Persia (reigned 465–425 bc). He was surnamed in Greek Macrocheir (“Longhand”) and in Latin Longimanus. A younger son of Xerxes I and Amestris, he was raised to the throne by the commander of the guard, Artabanus, who had murdered Xerxes. A few months later,

  • Longing in Their Hearts (album by Raitt)

    Bonnie Raitt: …of the Draw (1991) and Longing in Their Hearts (1994), both of which received Grammy Awards. Raitt’s other recordings included the double-disc live set Road Tested (1995) and the studio albums Fundamental (1998), Souls Alike (2005), Grammy-winning Slipstream (2012), and Dig in Deep (2016). She was inducted into the Rock…

  • Longino, Helen (American philosopher)

    philosophical feminism: Feminist epistemology and philosophy of science: Sandra Harding, Lorraine Code, and Helen Longino noted that “communities of knowers”—those recognized as experts in some field of inquiry—were remarkably homogeneous, not only with respect to sex but also with respect to race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Most such knowers, in other words, were white, Western, heterosexual men. To…

  • Longinus (Greek literary critic)

    Longinus, name sometimes assigned to the author of On the Sublime (Greek Peri Hypsous), one of the great seminal works of literary criticism. The earliest surviving manuscript, from the 10th century, first printed in 1554, ascribes it to Dionysius Longinus. Later it was noticed that the index to

  • Longinus (Christian missionary)

    Sudan: Medieval Christian kingdoms: …Nobatia (543–545), and his successor Longinus, who between 569 and 575 consolidated the work of Julian in Nobatia and even carried Christianity to ?Alwah in the south. The new religion appears to have been adopted with considerable enthusiasm. Christian churches sprang up along the Nile, and ancient temples were refurbished…

  • Longinus, Gaius Cassius (Roman quaestor)

    Gaius Cassius Longinus, prime mover in the conspiracy to assassinate Julius Caesar in 44 bc. Little is known of his early life. As a quaestor in 53 bc, Cassius served under Marcus Licinius Crassus and saved the remnants of the Roman army defeated by the Parthians at Carrhae (modern Harran, Turkey).

  • Longinus, Johannes (Polish historian)

    Jan D?ugosz, Polish diplomat and historian whose monumental history of Poland, the first of its kind, inspired Poles with pride in their past and helped to favourably change the attitude of educated Europeans toward Poland. D?ugosz entered the service of Zbigniew Ole?nicki, bishop of Kraków, and

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