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  • Local Supercluster (astronomy)

    supercluster: Abell—as the Local Supercluster, a flattened collection of about 100 groups and clusters of galaxies including the Local Group. The Local Supercluster is centred approximately on the Virgo cluster and has a total extent of roughly 2 108 light-years. Its precise boundaries, however, are difficult to define…

  • local symptom (plant pathology)

    plant disease: Symptoms: Local symptoms are physiological or structural changes within a limited area of host tissue, such as leaf spots, galls, and cankers. Systemic symptoms are those involving the reaction of a greater part or all of the plant, such as wilting, yellowing, and dwarfing. Primary symptoms…

  • local syncope (medical disorder)

    syncope: Local syncope is whitening, weakness, coldness, and numbness of a small area of the body, especially the fingers, as a result of diminished blood flow to the part. It is associated with Raynaud’s disease.

  • local tax (taxation)

    income tax: Personal deductions: …the United States state and local taxes on property and income are deductible. These deductions are tantamount to subsidies from the national to the subnational governments. Foreign taxes on real property and income are also deductible, although most taxpayers elect instead to credit their foreign income taxes against their U.S.…

  • local theory of hunger (physiology)

    motivation: Hunger: …these two, known as the local theory of hunger, suggested that the hunger signals that initiate eating originate in the gastrointestinal tract, specifically the stomach. Hunger pangs were thought to be the result of stomach contractions. Considerable research has shown that such an analysis is inadequate to explain hunger motivation.…

  • local thunderstorm (meteorology)

    thunderstorm: Isolated thunderstorms: These storms are sometimes called air-mass or local thunderstorms. They are mostly vertical in structure, are relatively short-lived, and usually do not produce violent weather at the ground. Aircraft and radar measurements show that such storms are composed of one or more convective cells, each of which goes through a…

  • local topos (philosophy)

    foundations of mathematics: G?del and category theory: …special kind of topos called local. Given an arrow p into Ω in ??, then, p is true in ?? if p coincides with the arrow true in ??, or, equivalently, if p is a theorem in the internal language of ??. ?? is called a local topos provided that…

  • local toxic response (pathology)

    poison: Local versus systemic toxic responses: Toxic responses are also classified according to the site at which the response is produced. The site of toxic response can be local (at the site of first contact or portal of entry of the chemical) or systemic (produced in…

  • local transit

    Mass transit, the movement of people within urban areas using group travel technologies such as buses and trains. The essential feature of mass transportation is that many people are carried in the same vehicle (e.g., buses) or collection of attached vehicles (trains). This makes it possible to

  • local wind system (meteorology)

    climate: Scale classes: …are often referred to as local wind systems.

  • localist theory (linguistics)

    language: Language and conceptualization: This “localist” theory, as it has been called, has been debated since the beginning of the 19th century and probably cannot be accepted as it stands, but the fact that it can be proposed and argued shows the dominant position that spatial relations hold in the…

  • localization (politics)

    Localization, in politics, the emphasis or increased salience of locality. The term localization appears frequently in policy analysis within two contexts. The first can be called the organizational context, where localization denotes efforts to tailor services to local settings as much as possible

  • localized potential (biochemistry)

    nervous system: Localized potential: When a physical stimulus, such as touch, taste, or colour, acts on a sensory receptor cell specifically designed to respond to that stimulus, then the energy of the stimulus (e.g., mechanical, chemical, light) is transduced, or transformed, into an electrical response. This response…

  • locandiera, La (work by Goldoni)

    Carlo Goldoni: , Mine Hostess, 1928) and two fine plays in Venetian dialect, I rusteghi (performed 1760; “The Tyrants”) and Le baruffe chiozzote (performed 1762; “Quarrels at Chioggia”).

  • locant (chemical nomenclature)

    hydrocarbon: Nomenclature: …a number (3-), called a locant, obtained by successively numbering the carbons in the parent chain starting at the end nearer the branch. The compound is therefore called 3-methylheptane.

  • Locarno (Switzerland)

    Locarno, town, Ticino canton, southern Switzerland. It is situated at the northern end of Lago Maggiore, near the mouth of the Maggia River, west of Bellinzona. The site was settled in prehistoric times, and the town was first mentioned in 789. A possession of the dukes of Milan from 1342, it was

  • Locarno Conference (European history)

    Pact of Locarno, (Dec. 1, 1925), series of agreements whereby Germany, France, Belgium, Great Britain, and Italy mutually guaranteed peace in western Europe. The treaties were initialed at Locarno, Switz., on October 16 and signed in London on December 1. The agreements consisted of (1) a treaty of

  • Locarno, Pact of (European history)

    Pact of Locarno, (Dec. 1, 1925), series of agreements whereby Germany, France, Belgium, Great Britain, and Italy mutually guaranteed peace in western Europe. The treaties were initialed at Locarno, Switz., on October 16 and signed in London on December 1. The agreements consisted of (1) a treaty of

  • Locatelli, Pietro (Italian musician)

    Pietro Locatelli, Italian violinist and composer, one of the first great violinists who practiced virtuosity for virtuosity’s sake, thereby extending the technical vocabulary of the violin. He is perhaps best known for his L’Arte del violino, a group of 12 violin concerti issued with 24 capriccios

  • Locatelli, Pietro Antonio (Italian musician)

    Pietro Locatelli, Italian violinist and composer, one of the first great violinists who practiced virtuosity for virtuosity’s sake, thereby extending the technical vocabulary of the violin. He is perhaps best known for his L’Arte del violino, a group of 12 violin concerti issued with 24 capriccios

  • Location and Land Use: Toward a General Theory of Land Rent (work by Alonso)

    location theory: William Alonso (Location and Land Use: Toward a General Theory of Land Rent, 1964) built upon the Thünen model to account for intra-urban variations in land use. He attempted to apply accessibility requirements to the city centre for various types of land use (housing, commercial, and industry).…

  • location theory (economics and geography)

    Location theory, in economics and geography, theory concerned with the geographic location of economic activity; it has become an integral part of economic geography, regional science, and spatial economics. Location theory addresses the questions of what economic activities are located where and

  • location triangle (economics and geography)

    location theory: Weber’s theory, called the location triangle, sought the optimum location for the production of a good based on the fixed locations of the market and two raw material sources, which geographically form a triangle. He sought to determine the least-cost production location within the triangle by figuring the total…

  • locational analysis (geography)

    geography: Human geography as locational analysis: In human geography, the new approach became known as “locational” or “spatial analysis” or, to some, “spatial science.” It focused on spatial organization, and its key concepts were embedded into the functional region—the tributary area of a major node, whether a port, a…

  • locative case (grammar)

    Armenian language: Morphology and syntax: ablative, instrumental, and locative. However, many of these forms overlapped so that usually only three or four different forms existed; e.g., ?am ‘time’ was both nominative and accusative, ?amê was ablative, and ?amu was genitive, dative, instrumental, and locative. A special form of locative was very rare. There…

  • Loch Garman (Ireland)

    Wexford, seaport and county seat, County Wexford, Ireland, on the River Slaney. The name Wexford derives from the Norse settlement of Waesfjord. It was an early colony of the English, having been taken by Robert FitzStephen in 1169. The town received a charter in 1317, which was extended in 1411 by

  • Loch Garman (county, Ireland)

    Wexford, county in the province of Leinster, southeastern Ireland. It is bounded on the east and south by the Irish Sea and from west to north by Counties Kilkenny, Carlow, and Wicklow. The town of Wexford, on the Irish Sea coast, is the county seat, and there is a county manager. The Blackstairs

  • Loch Leven trout (fish)

    Loch Leven: …trout (Salmo trutta) known as Loch Leven trout—have been widely transplanted elsewhere in the world.

  • Loch Ness monster (legendary creature)

    Loch Ness monster, large marine creature believed by some people to inhabit Loch Ness, Scotland. However, much of the alleged evidence supporting its existence has been discredited, and it is widely thought that the monster is a myth. Reports of a monster inhabiting Loch Ness date back to ancient

  • Loch of Drylaw, Henry Brougham Loch, 1st Baron (British colonial official)

    Henry Brougham Loch, 1st Baron Loch, British soldier and administrator who served as high commissioner in Southern Africa and governor of Cape Colony from 1889 to 1895, a period of mounting tension between the British and the Boers. A career soldier, Loch began his service in India (1844–53) and

  • Loch, Henry Brougham Loch, 1st Baron (British colonial official)

    Henry Brougham Loch, 1st Baron Loch, British soldier and administrator who served as high commissioner in Southern Africa and governor of Cape Colony from 1889 to 1895, a period of mounting tension between the British and the Boers. A career soldier, Loch began his service in India (1844–53) and

  • Lochaber, Treaty of (North America [1770])

    Treaties of Fort Stanwix: …Labor (October 1768) and the Treaty of Lochaber (October 1770). These three treaties launched a new period of eager land speculation, accompanied by a stream of homesteaders who quickly poured into the Ohio River region.

  • Loches (France)

    Loches, town, Indre-et-Loire département, Centre région, west-central France, located on the left bank of the Indre River southeast of Tours. The town is dominated by the medieval citadel, which is surrounded by 1.5 miles (2 km) of old walls. It embraces three separate buildings: the Royal Lodge

  • Lochgilphead (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Lochgilphead, burgh (town) and holiday resort, Argyll and Bute council area, historic county of Argyllshire, Scotland, situated at the head of Loch Gilp (a marine inlet of Loch Fyne) by the side of the Crinan Canal (built 1793–1801). The burgh developed from an older herring fishing village and is

  • Lochinvar (fictional character)

    Lochinvar, fictional romantic hero of the ballad “Marmion” (1808) by Sir Walter Scott. Lochinvar is a brave knight who arrives unannounced at the bridal feast of Ellen, his beloved, who is about to be married to “a laggard in love and a dastard in war.” Lochinvar claims one dance with the bride and

  • Lochinvar National Park (national park, Zambia)

    Zambia: Plant and animal life: Lochinvar, on the Kafue Flats, is of particular interest to bird-watchers, with more than 400 species recorded. The Kafue lechwe is unique to the flats. The Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park protects the environs of Victoria Falls and is recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage site.…

  • Lochkovian Stage (geology)

    Lochkovian Stage, lowermost of the three standard worldwide divisions of Early Devonian rocks and time. It is the lowest division of the Devonian Period and the Lower Devonian Series. The Lochkovian Stage spans the interval between 419.2 million and 410.8 million years ago. The name is derived from

  • Lochleven Castle (castle, Kinross, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Kinross: Lochleven Castle, on an island in the lake, was the scene of the imprisonment (1567–68) of Mary, Queen of Scots. Kinross House (1685–92), designed by Sir William Bruce, is situated on the peninsula east of the burgh. Kinross is the historic county town (seat) of…

  • Lochmaben (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Lochmaben, royal burgh (town), Dumfries and Galloway council area, historic county of Dumfriesshire, Scotland, situated near several small lochs in Annandale valley. Robert the Bruce, who ruled Scotland as Robert I from 1306 to 1329, had close associations with the town and, according to local

  • Lochnagar (mountain, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Lochnagar, scenic mountain of coarse red granite, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, south of the River Dee in the Grampian Mountains. The mountain ridge, popularized in the 19th century by Lord Byron’s poem “Lachin y Gair,” has 11 summits with elevations greater than 3,000 feet (900 metres); the highest is

  • Lochner Concession (South African history)

    Lewanika: …was led into signing the Lochner Concession in June 1890—which assigned mineral and trading rights of Barotseland to the British South Africa Company (BSAC)—without a full understanding of what the agreement said or of its implications. He believed he was signing an agreement with the British government and was unhappy…

  • Lochner v. New York (law case)

    Lochner v. New York, case in which, on April 17, 1905, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a New York state law setting 10 hours of labour a day as the legal maximum in the baking trade. The opinion drew a stinging rebuke from Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., whose dissent became the prevailing

  • Lochner, Stefan (German painter)

    Stefan Lochner, late Gothic painter, considered to be the greatest representative of the school of Cologne. He is known primarily for his highly mystical religious paintings. Little is known of his early life, but he is thought to have studied in the Netherlands, possibly under Robert Campin

  • Lochte, Ryan (American swimmer)

    Ryan Lochte, American swimmer who was one of the sport’s most successful Olympians. His 12 medals, 6 of which were gold, made him the second most-decorated male swimmer in Olympic history, behind teammate Michael Phelps. Lochte attended the University of Florida (B.S., 2007), where he won seven

  • Lochte, Ryan Steven (American swimmer)

    Ryan Lochte, American swimmer who was one of the sport’s most successful Olympians. His 12 medals, 6 of which were gold, made him the second most-decorated male swimmer in Olympic history, behind teammate Michael Phelps. Lochte attended the University of Florida (B.S., 2007), where he won seven

  • Loci communes (work by Melanchthon)

    Philipp Melanchthon: In 1521 Melanchthon published the Loci communes, the first systematic treatment of the new Wittenberg theology developed by Luther. Because of his academic expertise, he was asked to help in founding schools, and he played an important role in reforming public schools in Germany.

  • Loci communes rerum theologicarum (work by Melanchthon)

    Philipp Melanchthon: In 1521 Melanchthon published the Loci communes, the first systematic treatment of the new Wittenberg theology developed by Luther. Because of his academic expertise, he was asked to help in founding schools, and he played an important role in reforming public schools in Germany.

  • loci et res (mnemonic method)

    mnemonic: Early methodologies: …method is referred to as loci et res, or method of loci, and is an effective way to remember a series of items. The most usual method is to choose a large house in which the rooms, walls, windows, decorations, and furniture are severally associated with certain names, phrases, events,…

  • Loci Theologici (work by Gerhard)

    Johann Gerhard: …the standard Lutheran dogmatic treatise Loci Theologici, and spearhead of every major Lutheran theological gathering of his time.

  • loci, method of (mnemonic method)

    mnemonic: Early methodologies: …method is referred to as loci et res, or method of loci, and is an effective way to remember a series of items. The most usual method is to choose a large house in which the rooms, walls, windows, decorations, and furniture are severally associated with certain names, phrases, events,…

  • lock (waterway)

    Lock, enclosure or basin located in the course of a canal or a river (or in the vicinity of a dock) with gates at each end, within which the water level may be varied to raise or lower boats. Where the required lift is of considerable height, a series of connected but isolable basins, or locks, is

  • lock (security)

    Lock, mechanical device for securing a door or receptacle so that it cannot be opened except by a key or by a series of manipulations that can be carried out only by a person knowing the secret or code. The lock originated in the Near East; the oldest known example was found in the ruins of the

  • lock gate (civil engineering)

    canals and inland waterways: Medieval revival: In the 15th century the lock-gate system was much improved with the addition of paddles to control the flow of water in and out of the lock chamber through sluices in the gates or sides of the lock.

  • Lock Haven (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Lock Haven, city, seat (1839) of Clinton county, north-central Pennsylvania, U.S. It lies along the West Branch Susquehanna River (a major tributary of the Susquehanna), on the southern slope of Bald Eagle Mountain, 26 miles (42 km) southwest of Williamsport. Founded in 1834 by Jeremiah Church, a

  • Lock Haven State College (university, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania, public coeducational institution of higher learning in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is part of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education and comprises colleges of Arts and Sciences, and Education and Human Services. The university offers a range of

  • Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania (university, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania, public coeducational institution of higher learning in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is part of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education and comprises colleges of Arts and Sciences, and Education and Human Services. The university offers a range of

  • Lock, Matthias (English engraver)

    Thomas Chippendale: …had published designs earlier, and Matthias Lock, whom Chippendale had hired to provide special designs for clients.

  • lock-and-key hypothesis (chemistry)

    chromatography: Retention mechanism: Very specific intermolecular interactions, “lock and key,” are known in biochemistry. Examples include enzyme-protein, antigen-antibody, and hormone-receptor binding. A structural feature of an enzyme will attach to a specific structural feature of a protein. Affinity chromatography exploits this feature by binding a

  • Locke (film by Knight [2013])

    Tom Hardy: …as the title character in Locke (2013), a film that takes place almost entirely in a car, with Hardy as the only character who appears on-screen for the entire movie. In 2015 he starred in George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road as Max Rockatansky, a role that was made famous…

  • Locke v. Davey (law case)

    Locke v. Davey, legal case in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled (7–2), on February 25, 2004, that a Washington state scholarship program for academically gifted postsecondary students that explicitly excluded students pursuing degrees in theology did not violate the First Amendment’s free exercise

  • Locke’s solution (medicine)

    Ringer's solution: Mammalian Ringer’s solution (Locke’s, or Ringer-Locke’s, solution) differs in that it contains glucose and more sodium chloride than the original solution.

  • Locke, Alain (American writer)

    Alain Locke, American educator, writer, and philosopher, best remembered as the leader and chief interpreter of the Harlem Renaissance. Locke graduated in philosophy from Harvard University in 1907. He was the first black Rhodes scholar, studying at Oxford (1907–10) and the University of Berlin

  • Locke, Alain LeRoy (American writer)

    Alain Locke, American educator, writer, and philosopher, best remembered as the leader and chief interpreter of the Harlem Renaissance. Locke graduated in philosophy from Harvard University in 1907. He was the first black Rhodes scholar, studying at Oxford (1907–10) and the University of Berlin

  • Locke, Arthur D’Arcy (South African golfer)

    Bobby Locke, South African golfer who won the Open Championship (British Open) four times. A meticulous putter who was considered among the best in golf, Locke won the Vardon Trophy for lowest scoring average among male professional golfers in 1946, 1950, and 1954. Nine times the winner of the

  • Locke, Bobby (South African golfer)

    Bobby Locke, South African golfer who won the Open Championship (British Open) four times. A meticulous putter who was considered among the best in golf, Locke won the Vardon Trophy for lowest scoring average among male professional golfers in 1946, 1950, and 1954. Nine times the winner of the

  • Locke, David Ross (American humorist)

    Petroleum V. Nasby, American humorist who had considerable influence on public issues during and after the American Civil War. From an early age Locke worked for newspapers in New York and Ohio. In 1861, as editor of the Findlay (Ohio) Jeffersonian, he published the first of many satirical letters

  • Locke, John (English philosopher)

    John Locke, English philosopher whose works lie at the foundation of modern philosophical empiricism and political liberalism. He was an inspirer of both the European Enlightenment and the Constitution of the United States. His philosophical thinking was close to that of the founders of modern

  • Locke, Josef (Irish singer)

    Josef Locke, (Joseph McLaughlin), Irish tenor who was a beloved performer of sentimental and traditional Irish songs in British music halls, on radio, and in films in the 1940s and ’50s; his professional achievements—and his subsequent flight to Ireland to evade British tax officials—served as the

  • Locke, Matthew (British composer)

    Matthew Locke, leading English composer for the stage in the period before Henry Purcell. By 1661 Locke had been appointed composer in ordinary to the king. After his conversion to Roman Catholicism he was appointed organist to the queen. With Christopher Gibbons he wrote the music for James

  • Locked Room, The (work by Auster)

    Paul Auster: …a client named White; and The Locked Room (1986), the story of an author who, while researching the life of a missing writer for a biography, gradually assumes the identity of that writer.

  • Lockerbie (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Muammar al-Qaddafi: …civilian airliner in 1988 over Lockerbie, Scotland, led to United Nations (UN) and U.S. sanctions that further isolated Qaddafi from the international community. In the late 1990s, however, Qaddafi turned over the alleged perpetrators of the bombing to international authorities. UN sanctions against Libya were subsequently lifted in 2003, and,…

  • Lockerbie bombing (terrorist bombing, over Lockerbie, Scotland, United Kingdom [1988])

    Pan Am flight 103, flight of a passenger airliner operated by Pan American World Airways (Pan Am) that exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland, on December 21, 1988, after a bomb was detonated. All 259 people on board were killed, and 11 individuals on the ground also died. About 7:00 pm on December 21,

  • Lockett, Anthony Howard (Australian rules football player)

    Tony Lockett, Australian rules football player who holds the record for most goals scored in a career (1,360). After making his senior-level debut with North Ballarat in 1982, Lockett began his Australian Football League (AFL) career with St. Kilda in 1983. He became a powerful and often

  • Lockett, Tony (Australian rules football player)

    Tony Lockett, Australian rules football player who holds the record for most goals scored in a career (1,360). After making his senior-level debut with North Ballarat in 1982, Lockett began his Australian Football League (AFL) career with St. Kilda in 1983. He became a powerful and often

  • Lockhart, Gene (American actor)

    Miracle on 34th Street: Cast: Assorted Referencesdiscussed in

  • Lockhart, John Gibson (Scottish biographer)

    John Gibson Lockhart, Scottish critic, novelist, and biographer, best remembered for his Life of Sir Walter Scott (1837–38; enlarged 1839), one of the great biographies in English. Lockhart, the son of a Presbyterian minister descended from the landed gentry, studied at the universities of Glasgow

  • Lockhart, Keith (American conductor)

    Boston Symphony Orchestra: In 1995 Keith Lockhart became conductor.

  • Lockhart, Robert Bruce (British journalist)

    Maksim Litvinov: …following January in exchange for Robert Bruce Lockhart, the British journalist who led a special mission to the Soviet Union in 1918. Litvinov then returned to Russia and joined the Commissariat for Foreign Affairs. He achieved prominence when he led the Soviet delegation to the preparatory commission for the League…

  • Lockhart, William (British army officer)

    Battle of the Dunes: Oliver Cromwell, sent his envoy William Lockhart with 6,000 infantrymen, veterans of the English Civil Wars, to reinforce Turenne on land. On June 13, 1658, a Spanish force led by Juan José de Austria arrived to relieve Dunkirk. Under Juan José was a rebel French force commanded by the renowned…

  • Lockheed 1649A Starliner (aircraft)

    history of flight: Postwar airlines: …direction, and the Lockheed 1649A Starliner, which could fly nonstop on polar routes from Los Angeles to Europe. The Starliner carried 75 passengers at speeds of 350 to 400 miles (560 to 640 km) per hour. Each of its Wright turbocompound radial engines developed 3,400 horsepower. Prior to the introduction…

  • Lockheed Aircraft Company (American corporation)

    Lockheed Martin Corporation, major American diversified company with core business concentrations in aerospace products—including aircraft, space launchers, satellites, and defense systems—and other advanced-technology systems and services. About half of the company’s annual sales are to the U.S.

  • Lockheed Corporation (American corporation)

    Lockheed Martin Corporation, major American diversified company with core business concentrations in aerospace products—including aircraft, space launchers, satellites, and defense systems—and other advanced-technology systems and services. About half of the company’s annual sales are to the U.S.

  • Lockheed Lounge (chair)

    Marc Newson: …piece, the aluminum and fibreglass Lockheed Lounge (1986). This was the first of several limited-edition chairs. Like many of his later furniture pieces, it is made of atypical materials. It has a seamless exterior and a Modernist yet somewhat retro form variously described as biomorphic or zoomorphic. In 1987 Newson…

  • Lockheed Martin Corporation (American corporation)

    Lockheed Martin Corporation, major American diversified company with core business concentrations in aerospace products—including aircraft, space launchers, satellites, and defense systems—and other advanced-technology systems and services. About half of the company’s annual sales are to the U.S.

  • Lockheed P-3 (aircraft)

    atmosphere: Measurement systems: …field experiments, such as the Lockheed P-3 aircraft employed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the United States, are heavily instrumented and often carry Doppler radar, turbulence sensors, and in situ measurement devices for cloud water, cloud ice content, and structure. The NOAA P-3 has been used…

  • Lockheed Vega (airplane)

    John Knudsen Northrop: …he designed and built the Vega, a high-wing monoplane noted for its plywood fuselage of monocoque, or stressed-skin, construction, in which the plywood sheath, rather than heavy internal trusses, provided the structural support.

  • lockjaw (disease)

    Tetanus, acute infectious disease of humans and other animals, caused by toxins produced by the bacillus Clostridium tetani and characterized by rigidity and spasms of the voluntary muscles. The almost constant involvement of the jaw muscles accounts for the popular name of the disease. Spores of

  • Lockley, Ronald Mathias (Welsh naturalist)

    Ronald Mathias Lockley, Welsh naturalist (born Nov. 8, 1903, Cardiff, Wales—died April 12, 2000, Auckland, N.Z.), wrote about island life, seabirds, and marine mammals; founded bird observatories in Great Britain and New Zealand; and wrote the script for the Academy Award-winning documentary The P

  • Locklin, Hank (American singer)

    Hank Locklin, (Lawrence Hankins Locklin), American country and western singer (born Feb. 15, 1918, McLellan, Fla.—died March 8, 2009, Brewton, Ala.), was known for his tremulous tenor voice on such chart-topping hit singles as “Send Me the Pillow You Dream On” (1949; 1958) and “Please Help Me, I’m

  • Locklin, Lawrence Hankins (American singer)

    Hank Locklin, (Lawrence Hankins Locklin), American country and western singer (born Feb. 15, 1918, McLellan, Fla.—died March 8, 2009, Brewton, Ala.), was known for his tremulous tenor voice on such chart-topping hit singles as “Send Me the Pillow You Dream On” (1949; 1958) and “Please Help Me, I’m

  • lockout (labour relations)

    Lockout, the tactic of withholding employment, typically used by employers to hinder union organization or to gain leverage in labour disputes. It is often accomplished by literally locking employees out of the workplace, but it can also be achieved through work stoppage, layoffs, or the hiring of

  • Lockport (New York, United States)

    Lockport, city, seat (1822) of Niagara county, western New York, U.S. It lies 25 miles (40 km) northeast of Buffalo. It was founded in 1821 and grew around the series of five double locks (1847) of the Erie Canal built to overcome a difference of about 60 feet (18 metres) between the levels of Lake

  • Locksley Hall (work by Tennyson)

    Locksley Hall, poem in trochaic metre by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, published in the collection Poems (1842). The speaker of this dramatic monologue declaims against marriages made for material gain and worldly prestige. The speaker revisits Locksley Hall, his childhood home, where he and his cousin

  • Locksley Hall Sixty Years After (work by Tennyson)

    Locksley Hall, poem in trochaic metre by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, published in the collection Poems (1842). The speaker of this dramatic monologue declaims against marriages made for material gain and worldly prestige. The speaker revisits Locksley Hall, his childhood home, where he and his cousin

  • Lockwood, Belva Ann (American lawyer)

    Belva Ann Lockwood, American feminist and lawyer who was the first woman admitted to practice law before the U.S. Supreme Court. Belva Bennett attended country schools until she was 15 and then taught in them until her marriage in 1848 to Uriah H. McNall, who died in 1853. She then resumed teaching

  • Lockwood, Gary (American actor)

    2001: A Space Odyssey: …astronauts Frank Poole (played by Gary Lockwood) and Dave Bowman (Keir Dullea), is sent to Jupiter to investigate. The middle segment of the film takes place on board Discovery and is perhaps the most memorable—and most straightforward. The ship’s computer, HAL 9000, which possesses human intellect and vocal ability, malfunctions…

  • Lockwood, Margaret (British actress)

    Margaret Lockwood, British actress noted for her versatility and craftsmanship, who became Britain’s most popular leading lady in the late 1940s. Lockwood studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, England’s leading drama school, and made her film debut in Lorna Doone (1935). A vivacious

  • Lockwood, Robert, Jr. (American musician)

    Robert Lockwood, Jr., (Robert Jr. Lockwood), American blues musician (born March 27, 1915, Turkey Scratch, Ark.—died Nov. 21, 2006, Cleveland, Ohio), was perhaps best known for his relationship with blues legend Robert Johnson, but he was an important guitarist, composer, and bandleader in his o

  • Lockyer, Edmund (Australian settler)

    Queensland: Early exploration and settlement: Patrick Logan and Edmund Lockyer explored the hinterland of the penal settlement, discovering coal and limestone deposits in the process. In 1827 Cunningham was the first European to explore the Darling Downs region west of the Great Dividing Range.

  • Lockyer, Sir Joseph Norman (British astronomer)

    Sir Joseph Norman Lockyer, British astronomer who in 1868 discovered in the Sun’s atmosphere a previously unknown element that he named helium after Hēlios, the Greek name for the Sun and the Sun god. Lockyer became a clerk in the War Office in 1857, but his interest in astronomy eventually led to

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