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  • extensive margin (economics)

    rent: The classical economic view: …was pushed to the “extensive margin” (to less fertile acreage) but also as it was pushed to the “intensive margin” through more intensive use of the more fertile land. As long as the additional cost of cultivation was less than the addition to the value of the product, it…

  • extensometer (instrument)

    materials testing: Static tension and compression tests: …with a device called an extensometer; these measurements are used to compute strain.

  • extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle (anatomy)

    tennis elbow: …due to overuse of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) muscle, which originates at the lateral epicondylar region of the distal humerus. Tennis elbow can also be classified as tendinitis, indicating inflammation of the tendon, or tendinosis, indicating tissue damage to the tendon.

  • extensor muscle (anatomy)

    Extensor muscle, any of the muscles that increase the angle between members of a limb, as by straightening the elbow or knee or bending the wrist or spine backward. The movement is usually directed backward, with the notable exception of the knee joint. In humans, certain muscles of the hand and

  • extensor reflex (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Reciprocal innervation: The flexor and extensor reflexes are only two examples of the sequential ordering of muscular contraction and relaxation. Underlying this basic organization is the principle of reciprocal innervation—the contraction of one muscle or group of muscles with the relaxation of muscles that have the opposite function. In reciprocal…

  • extenuating circumstance (law)

    Extenuating circumstance, circumstance that diminishes the culpability of one who has committed a criminal offense and so can be considered to mitigate the punishment. Many Anglo-American legal systems do not prescribe minimum punishments for all crimes. The judge is thus free to consider all the

  • Exter, Alexandra Alexandrovna (Russian artist)

    Aleksandra Aleksandrovna Ekster, Russian artist of international stature who divided her life between Kiev, St. Petersburg, Moscow, Vienna, and Paris, thus strengthening the cultural ties between Russia and Europe. In this way and through her own artistic achievement, she did much to further the

  • exterior ballistics

    ballistics: Internal and external ballistics, respectively, deal with the propulsion and the flight of projectiles. The transition between these two regimes is called intermediate ballistics. Terminal ballistics concerns the impact of projectiles; a separate category encompasses the wounding of personnel.

  • exterior caste (social class, India)

    Untouchable, in traditional Indian society, the former name for any member of a wide range of low-caste Hindu groups and any person outside the caste system. The use of the term and the social disabilities associated with it were declared illegal in the constitutions adopted by the Constituent

  • extermination camp (Nazi concentration camp)

    Extermination camp, Nazi German concentration camp that specialized in the mass annihilation (Vernichtung) of unwanted persons in the Third Reich and conquered territories. The camps’ victims were mostly Jews but also included Roma (Gypsies), Slavs, homosexuals, alleged mental defectives, and

  • Exterminator (American racehorse)

    Exterminator, (foaled 1915), American racehorse (Thoroughbred), a dependable and durable horse who won 50 of 100 races in eight seasons. Because of the length of his career and his extraordinary ability to win sprints and long-distance races under heavy weights, some horsemen considered him s

  • externae gentes (people)

    Barbarian, word derived from the Greek bárbaros, used among the early Greeks to describe all foreigners, including the Romans. The word is probably onomatopoeic in origin, the “bar bar” sound representing the perception by Greeks of languages other than their own. Bárbaros soon assumed a deeply

  • external anal sphincter (anatomy)

    anal canal: The external sphincter is a layer of voluntary (striated) muscle encircling the outside wall of the anal canal and anal opening. One can cause it to expand and contract at will, except during the early years of life when it is not yet fully developed. Nerves…

  • external auditory canal (anatomy)

    External auditory canal, passageway that leads from the outside of the head to the tympanic membrane, or eardrum membrane, of each ear. The structure of the external auditory canal is the same in all mammals. In appearance it is a slightly curved tube that extends inward from the floor of the

  • external ballistics

    ballistics: Internal and external ballistics, respectively, deal with the propulsion and the flight of projectiles. The transition between these two regimes is called intermediate ballistics. Terminal ballistics concerns the impact of projectiles; a separate category encompasses the wounding of personnel.

  • external carotid artery (anatomy)

    carotid artery: The external carotid artery ascends through the upper part of the side of the neck and behind the lower jaw into the parotid gland, where it divides into various branches. The external carotid artery gives off the following branches: (1) superior thyroid to the larynx and…

  • external ear (anatomy)

    human ear: Outer ear: The most-striking differences between the human ear and the ears of other mammals are in the structure of the outermost part, the auricle. In humans the auricle is an almost rudimentary, usually immobile shell that lies close to the side of the head.…

  • external galaxy (astronomy)

    galaxy: The external galaxies: Before astronomers could establish the existence of galaxies, they had to develop a way to measure their distances. In an earlier section, it was explained how astronomers first accomplished this exceedingly difficult task for the nearby galaxies during the…

  • external jugular vein (anatomy)

    jugular vein: The main vessels are the external jugular vein and the interior jugular vein. The external jugular vein receives blood from the neck, the outside of the cranium, and the deep tissues of the face and empties into the subclavian veins (continuations of the principal veins of the arms or forelimbs).…

  • external materials salvage

    recycling: External recycling is the reclaiming of materials from a product that has been worn out or rendered obsolete. An example of external recycling is the collection of old newspapers and magazines for repulping and their manufacture into new paper products. Aluminum cans and glass bottles…

  • external Merge (linguistics)

    Noam Chomsky: Rule systems in Chomskyan theories of language: …Merge,” a variant of “external Merge,” itself a crucial basic operation that takes two elements (such as words) and makes of them a set. In the early 21st century, internal and external Merge, along with parameters and microparameters, remained at the core of Chomsky’s efforts to construct grammars.

  • external motive (behaviour)

    motivation: Pull motives represent external goals that influence one’s behaviour toward them. Most motivational situations are in reality a combination of push and pull conditions. For example, hunger, in part, may be signaled by internal changes in blood glucose or fat stores, but motivation to eat…

  • external os (anatomy)

    cervix: …the vagina is called the external os; the cavity running the length of the cervix is the endocervical canal; the opening of the endocervical canal into the uterine cavity, the internal os. The endocervical canal transports sperm into the uterine cavity, allows the escape of blood from the uterus during…

  • external otitis (pathology)

    Otitis externa, dermatitis of the external auditory canal and sometimes also of the exposed ear. The skin on these ear parts becomes dry, scaling, and itchy, and there may be foul-smelling watery or purulent discharge, pain, fever, and intermittent deafness. Predisposing factors include excessive

  • external radiation therapy (medical procedure)

    cancer: Radiation therapy: Teletherapy, or external radiation therapy, uses a device such as a clinical linear accelerator to deliver orthovoltage or supervoltage radiation at a distance from the patient. The energy beam can be modified to adapt the dose distribution to the volume of tissue being irradiated.

  • external realism (philosophy)

    realism: Metaphysical realism and objective truth: Although several realist disputes seem to turn on whether statements of a certain kind are capable of being objectively true, it is far from obvious what being objectively true amounts to. The question of what it is for a statement…

  • external recycling

    recycling: External recycling is the reclaiming of materials from a product that has been worn out or rendered obsolete. An example of external recycling is the collection of old newspapers and magazines for repulping and their manufacture into new paper products. Aluminum cans and glass bottles…

  • external sphincter (anatomy)

    human nervous system: The urinary system: The external urinary sphincter, which works in concert with the internal sphincter, is made up of skeletal muscle controlled by motor fibres of the pudendal nerve. These fibres, arising from ventral horns of segments S2–S4, provide tonic excitation of the external sphincter. Because they are under…

  • external sty (medicine)

    sty: The external sty is an infection, usually with Staphylococcus bacteria, of a sebaceous gland in the margin of the eyelid. The eye becomes sensitive to light, tears flow copiously, and there is a sensation of a foreign body in the eye. The area of infection is…

  • external urinary sphincter (anatomy)

    human nervous system: The urinary system: The external urinary sphincter, which works in concert with the internal sphincter, is made up of skeletal muscle controlled by motor fibres of the pudendal nerve. These fibres, arising from ventral horns of segments S2–S4, provide tonic excitation of the external sphincter. Because they are under…

  • external world (philosophy)

    epistemology: Knowledge of the external world: Most people have noticed that vision can play tricks. A straight stick submerged in water looks bent, though it is not; railroad tracks seem to converge in the distance, but they do not; and a page of English-language print reflected in a mirror…

  • externalism (epistemology)

    empiricism: Contemporary philosophy: …of epistemology known as “externalism” have argued that sensations (and other mental states) can play a role in justifying what humans think they know, even though the vast majority of humans are unaware of what that role is. The crude idea behind one form of externalism, “reliablism,” is that…

  • externality (economics)

    market failure: Externalities: When goods are produced, they may create consequences that no one pays for. Such unaccounted-for consequences are called externalities. Because externalities are not accounted for in the costs and prices of the free market, market agents will receive the wrong signals and allocate resources…

  • externally blown flap

    helicopter: Powered lift: …externally blown wing, and the externally blown flap.

  • externally blown wing (aeronautics)

    helicopter: Powered lift: …are the vectored jet, the externally blown wing, and the externally blown flap.

  • exteroception (physiology)

    phantom limb syndrome: …perception of external sensations (exteroception), including touch, temperature, pressure, vibration, and itch. Pain sensations range from burning and shooting pains to feelings of tingling “pins and needles.” While phantom limb syndrome occurs only in amputees, phantom sensations may be perceived in people who have survived strokes but lost function…

  • exteroceptor (anatomy)

    Sir Charles Scott Sherrington: …main groups of sense organs: exteroceptive, such as those that detect light, sound, odour, and tactile stimuli; interoceptive, exemplified by taste receptors; and proprioceptive, or those receptors that detect events occurring in the interior of the organism. He found—especially in his study of the maintenance of posture as a reflex…

  • exterritoriality (international law)

    Extraterritoriality, in international law, the immunities enjoyed by foreign states or international organizations and their official representatives from the jurisdiction of the country in which they are present. Extraterritoriality extends to foreign states or international organizations as

  • Extinct (IUCN species status)

    endangered species: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species:

  • Extinct in the Wild (IUCN species status)

    angel's trumpet: …species are now listed as extinct in the wild by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The species Brugmansia arborea, golden angel’s trumpet (B. aurea), B. insignis, red angel’s trumpet (B. sanguinea), B. versicolor, and B. vulcanicola

  • extinct language

    language: Written versus spoken languages: In studying ancient (dead) languages one is, of course, limited to studying the grammar of their written forms and styles, as their written records alone survive. Such is the case with Latin, Ancient Greek, and Sanskrit (Latin lives as a spoken language in very restricted situations, such…

  • Extinct Mammalia of Dakota and Nebraska (paper by Leidy)

    Joseph Leidy: …the subject, and “On the Extinct Mammalia of Dakota and Nebraska” (1869), described by the prominent U.S. paleontologist Henry Osborn as possibly the most important paleontological work produced in the United States.

  • extinction (biology)

    Extinction, in biology, the dying out or extermination of a species. Extinction occurs when species are diminished because of environmental forces (habitat fragmentation, global change, natural disaster, overexploitation of species for human use) or because of evolutionary changes in their members

  • Extinction (novel by Bernhard)

    German literature: The 1970s and ’80s: Ausl?schung: ein Zerfall (1986; Extinction), by Thomas Bernhard, takes the form of a violently insistent and seemingly interminable diatribe by a first-person narrator who returns from Rome to Austria for a family funeral. Bernhard’s novel expresses intense feelings of disgust and anger about Austria’s collaboration in Nazism. Elfriede Jelinek’s…

  • extinction angle (crystals)

    amphibole: Physical properties: …properties, including two directions of cleavage at approximately 56° and 124°, six-sided basal cross sections, characteristic colour, and pleochroism (colour variance with the direction of light propagation). Orthorhombic amphiboles exhibit less intense pleochroism than the monoclinic amphiboles.

  • extinction rate (biology and ecology)

    biodiversity loss: Human-driven biodiversity loss: …and 10,000 times the background extinction rate (which is roughly one to five species per year when the entire fossil record is considered). In addition, a 2019 report by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services noted that up to one million plant and animal species are facing…

  • extinctive prescription (law)

    property law: Acquisition by adverse possession, prescription, and expropriation: …in the adverse possessor (extinctive prescription). Or one might say that the adverse possessor, or the one who has fulfilled the requirements for prescription, acquires the title of the one whose title is time-barred (acquisitive prescription, strictly speaking). Both Anglo-American and civil law generally take the more extreme position…

  • extinguisher moss (plant)

    Extinguisher moss, any of the plants of the genus Encalypta (subclass Bryidae), which form large tufts on limestone rocks, ledges, and walls. About 8 of the 34 species in the genus are native to North America. They are usually 1 to 3 cm (0.4 to 1.2 inches) tall, with erect capsules (spore cases)

  • extirpation (conservation)

    conservation: Habitat loss: Some scientists use the term extirpation for local extinctions, reserving extinction to mean global extinction. In this section on factors causing extinction, the term has the global meaning.

  • extirpative surgery

    therapeutics: Surgical extirpation: Extirpation is the complete removal or eradication of an organ or tissue and is a term usually used in cancer treatment or in the treatment of otherwise diseased or infected organs. The aim is to completely remove all cancerous tissue, which usually involves…

  • extortion (law)

    Extortion, the unlawful exaction of money or property through intimidation. Extortion was originally the complement of bribery, both crimes involving interference with or by public officials. But extortion and, to a limited extent, bribery have been expanded to include actions by private citizens

  • extra (cricket)

    cricket: Extras: Only runs scored from the bat count to the batsman, but to the side’s score may be added the following extras: (1) byes (when a ball from the bowler passes the wicket without being touched by the bat and the batsmen are able to…

  • extra dynamite (explosive)

    dynamite: …and less expensive explosive called extra dynamite. See also explosive.

  • extra ecclesiam nulla salus (Roman Catholic dogma)

    Christianity: Contemporary views: …in the Roman Catholic dogma extra ecclesiam nulla salus (“outside the church no salvation”) and in the assumption of the 18th- and 19th-century Protestant missionary movements. The exclusivist outlook was eroded within advanced Roman Catholic thinking in the decades leading up to the Second Vatican Council and was finally abandoned…

  • extra expense insurance

    insurance: Indirect losses: …of the insured firm, (2) extra expense insurance, which pays the additional cost occasioned by having extra expenses to pay, such as rent on substitute facilities after a disaster, and (3) rent and rental value insurance, covering losses in rents that the owner of an apartment house may incur if…

  • extra point (American and Canadian football)

    gridiron football: The play of the game: …is allowed to attempt a conversion: a placekick through the goal posts for one point or a run or completed pass across the goal line for two points. (In the NFL the ball is placed at the 15-yard line for a kick attempt and at the 2-yard line for a…

  • extracellular fluid (physiology)

    Extracellular fluid, in biology, body fluid that is not contained in cells. It is found in blood, in lymph, in body cavities lined with serous (moisture-exuding) membrane, in the cavities and channels of the brain and spinal cord, and in muscular and other body tissues. It differs from

  • extracellular matrix (biology)

    cell: The extracellular matrix: A substantial part of tissues is the space outside of the cells, called the extracellular space. This is filled with a composite material, known as the extracellular matrix, composed of a gel in which a number of fibrous proteins are suspended. The gel…

  • extracellular matrix protein 1 (gene variation)

    inflammatory bowel disease: …variation of a gene called ECM1 (extracellular matrix protein 1) has been linked to ulcerative colitis.

  • extrachromosomal inheritance (genetics)

    virus: Latency: …cells in the form of extrachromosomal genes (genes not integrated in chromosomes). These dormant viruses can be activated by many factors, such as trauma, another infection, emotional stress, menstruation, excessive exposure to sunlight, and various illnesses.

  • extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (medicine)

    therapeutics: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: The use of focused shock waves to pulverize stones in the urinary tract, usually the kidney (i.e., kidney stones) or upper ureter, is called extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The resultant stone fragments or dust particles are passed through the ureter

  • Extract (film by Judge [2009])

    Mike Judge: …year he wrote and directed Extract, a movie about a put-upon owner of a flavour-extract factory. Next, as creator of the live-action television series Silicon Valley (2014–19), Judge skewered the tech industry. He later cocreated Mike Judge Presents: Tales from the Tour Bus (2017– ), a documentary series about musicians…

  • extract (food)

    flavouring: Extracts, essences, and flavours employing only natural flavouring agents are called pure; those employing synthetics (in part or entirely) are called imitation, or artificial, flavourings.

  • extract (chemistry)

    perfume: …as perfumes but also called extraits, extracts, or handkerchief perfumes, contain about 10–25 percent perfume concentrates. The terms toilet water and cologne are commonly used interchangeably; such products contain about 2–6 percent perfume concentrate. Originally, eau de cologne was a mixture of citrus oils from such fruits as lemons and…

  • extract printing (textile industry)

    Discharge printing, method of applying a design to dyed fabric by printing a colour-destroying agent, such as chlorine or hydrosulfite, to bleach out a white or light pattern on the darker coloured ground. In colour-discharge printing, a dye impervious to the bleaching agent is combined with it, p

  • extraction (chemistry)

    alkaloid: …solution by a process called extraction, which involves dissolving some components of the mixture with reagents. Different alkaloids must then be separated and purified from the mixture. Chromatography may be used to take advantage of the different degrees of adsorption of the various alkaloids on solid material such as alumina…

  • extraction turbine

    turbine: Steam extraction: In bleeder turbines no effort is made to control the pressure of the extracted steam, which varies in almost direct proportion to the load carried by the turbine. Extraction also reduces the steam flow to the condenser, allowing the turbine exhaust area to be reduced. Controlled-extraction…

  • extraction, juice (food processing)

    fruit processing: Juice extraction: Fruit is prepared for juice extraction by removing unwanted parts. This may include pitting operations for stone fruit such as apricots, cherries, or plums or peeling for such fruits as pineapples. In one large class of fruit, citrus fruit, juice extraction and…

  • extraction, oil (chemistry)

    Oil extraction, isolation of oil from animal by-products, fleshy fruits such as the olive and palm, and oilseeds such as cottonseed, sesame seed, soybeans, and peanuts. Oil is extracted by three general methods: rendering, used with animal products and oleaginous fruits; mechanical pressing, for

  • extractive industry (economics)

    industry: Primary industry: …in the production process; and extractive industry, including the production of exhaustible raw materials that cannot be augmented through cultivation.

  • extractive metallurgy

    metallurgy: Extractive metallurgy: Following separation and concentration by mineral processing, metallic minerals are subjected to extractive metallurgy, in which their metallic elements are extracted from chemical compound form and refined of impurities.

  • extradimensional shift (learning)

    concept formation: Experimental studies: In “extradimensional” shift, the relevant dimension is changed (e.g., from GEK = GREEN to GEK = TRIANGLE), but the classification of some objects does not change (GREEN TRIANGLE is a GEK under both rules). The relative ease with which subjects handle such problems suggests something about…

  • extradition (law)

    Extradition, in international law, the process by which one state, upon the request of another, effects the return of a person for trial for a crime punishable by the laws of the requesting state and committed outside the state of refuge. Extraditable persons include those charged with a crime but

  • extradural hematoma (pathology)

    Epidural hematoma, a type of head injury involving bleeding into the space between the skull and the dura mater, the outermost layer of the protective structures surrounding the brain. It can occur when a traumatic force applied to the head is sufficient to cause a deformity of the skull and damage

  • extraformational breccia (rock)

    sedimentary rock: Epiclastic conglomerates and breccias: …the depositional basin itself; and extraformational, derived from source rocks that lie outside the area in which the deposit occurs. Epiclastic conglomerates and breccias together probably make up no more than 1 or 2 percent of the conventional sedimentary rock record.

  • extragalactic astronomy (science)

    Edwin Hubble: …in establishing the field of extragalactic astronomy and is generally regarded as the leading observational cosmologist of the 20th century.

  • extragalactic radio source

    cosmology: Steady state theory and other alternative cosmologies: astronomer Martin Ryle’s counts of extragalactic radio sources during the 1950s and ’60s. These counts involved the same methods discussed above for the star counts by Dutch astronomer Jacobus Kapteyn and the galaxy counts by Hubble except that radio telescopes were used. Ryle found more radio galaxies at large distances…

  • extrait (chemistry)

    perfume: …as perfumes but also called extraits, extracts, or handkerchief perfumes, contain about 10–25 percent perfume concentrates. The terms toilet water and cologne are commonly used interchangeably; such products contain about 2–6 percent perfume concentrate. Originally, eau de cologne was a mixture of citrus oils from such fruits as lemons and…

  • extramarital coitus (sexual behaviour)

    Adultery, sexual relations between a married person and someone other than the spouse. Written or customary prohibitions or taboos against adultery constitute part of the marriage code of virtually every society. Indeed, adultery seems to be as universal and, in some instances, as common as

  • extrametrical (prosody)

    Extrametrical, in prosody, exceeding the usual or prescribed number of syllables in a given metre. Also, in reference to a syllable or syllables not counted in metrical analysis. In the following final couplet from a sonnet by William Shakespeare, the ending syllables are

  • Extramundana (work by Spitteler)

    Carl Spitteler: He produced, in verse, Extramundana (1883), seven cosmic myths of his own invention; Balladen (1896); Literarische Gleichnisse (1892; “Literary Parables”); and two cycles of lyrics, Schmetterlinge (1889; “Butterflies”) and Gras- und Glockenlieder (1906; “Grass and Bell Songs”). He also wrote two masterly stories—Die M?dchenfeinde (1907; Two Little Misogynists, 1922),…

  • extramural studies

    University extension, division of an institution of higher learning that conducts educational activities for persons (usually adults) who are generally not full-time students. These activities are sometimes called extramural studies, continuing education, higher adult education, or university

  • extranet (computer network)

    e-commerce: …businesses also frequently rely on extranets that allow encrypted communication over the Internet.

  • Extranjería, Ley de (Spanish law)

    Spain: Recent arrivals: …Spanish governments have passed several laws on foreigners, which have made it more difficult for people to enter Spain and easier for the authorities to deport them. Promulgated in 2000 (and subsequently modified), the Law on the Rights and Freedoms of Foreigners in Spain and Their Social Integration sought to…

  • extranuclear DNA (genetics)

    heredity: Extranuclear DNA: All of the genetic information in a cell was initially thought to be confined to the DNA in the chromosomes of the cell nucleus. It is now known that small circular chromosomes, called extranuclear, or cytoplasmic, DNA, are located in two types of…

  • extranuclear inheritance (genetics)

    virus: Latency: …cells in the form of extrachromosomal genes (genes not integrated in chromosomes). These dormant viruses can be activated by many factors, such as trauma, another infection, emotional stress, menstruation, excessive exposure to sunlight, and various illnesses.

  • extraocular muscle (anatomy)

    space perception: Cues from the eye muscles: …effort arouses activity in two eye-muscle systems called the ciliary muscles and the rectus muscles. The ciliary effect is called accommodation (focusing the lens for near or far vision), and the rectus effect is called convergence (moving the entire eyeball). Each of these muscle systems contracts as a perceived object…

  • extraocular muscle palsy (eye disorder)

    Ophthalmoplegia, paralysis of the extraocular muscles that control the movements of the eye. Ophthalmoplegia usually involves the third (oculomotor), fourth (trochlear), or sixth (abducens) cranial nerves. Double vision is the characteristic symptom in all three cases. In oculomotor paralysis the

  • Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (Cambodian history)

    Khmer Rouge: …of Cambodia (commonly called the Khmer Rouge Tribunal) was established in 2006 as a joint operation between the United Nations and the government of Cambodia. The first indictments were handed down in 2007, and the first trial—against Kaing Guek Eav (better known as Duch), the former commander of a notorious…

  • extraordinary finance

    France: Military and financial organization: …I (1515–47) between ordinary and extraordinary finance—i.e., between revenue emanating from the king’s patrimonial rights and taxes raised throughout the kingdom. By the reign of Francis I, the king, even in times of peace, was unable to make do with his ordinary revenue from rents and seigneurial dues. In 1523…

  • Extraordinary Measures (film by Vaughan)

    Harrison Ford: …with roles in the drama Extraordinary Measures (2010), the comedy Morning Glory (2010), the science-fiction western Cowboys & Aliens (2011), and the corporate thriller Paranoia (2013). In the inspirational 42 (2013), about the life of Jackie Robinson, Ford portrayed the pioneering baseball executive Branch Rickey

  • extraordinary ray (optics)

    double refraction: One ray (called the extraordinary ray) is bent, or refracted, at an angle as it travels through the medium; the other ray (called the ordinary ray) passes through the medium unchanged.

  • extraordinary rendition

    Extraordinary rendition, extrajudicial practice, carried out by U.S. government agencies, of transferring a prisoner to a foreign country for the purposes of detention and interrogation. Those agencies asserted that the practice exempted detainees from the legal safeguards afforded to prisoners

  • Extraordinary Seaman, The (film by Frankenheimer [1969])

    John Frankenheimer: Films of the 1960s: The Extraordinary Seaman was released in 1969, after having sat on the shelf for two years. It was Frankenheimer’s first comedy and one of his most poorly received films, despite a cast that included David Niven, Faye Dunaway, and Alan Alda. Far better was The…

  • Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family (memoir by Rice)

    Condoleezza Rice: Her autobiographies are Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family (2010), which chronicles her life—notably her early years in segregated Alabama—before joining the Bush administration in 2001, and No Higher Honor: A Memoir of My Years in Washington (2011).

  • extrapleural pneumonectomy (surgery)

    mesothelioma: Survival prediction and treatment: A more aggressive operation, extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP), may be required in more-advanced cases. EPP involves the removal of tumour, pleura, diaphragm, and pericardium, with reconstruction of the latter two structures. The tumour grows over a very large surface area, and for that reason the risk of local recurrence following…

  • extrapolation (mathematics)

    automata theory: The automaton and its environment: …through a transformation) could be extrapolated. He saw that, if this process could be accomplished with sufficient speed, as would be possible with modern electronic circuits, then the extrapolated values would be obtained faster than the actual physically evolving process that produced the time series, and a prediction of the…

  • extrapyramidal symptom (biochemistry)

    mental disorder: Antipsychotic agents: These symptoms, which are called extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), resemble those of Parkinson disease and include tremor of the limbs, bradykinesia (slowness of movement with loss of facial expression, absence of arm-swinging during walking, and a general muscular rigidity), dystonia (sudden sustained contraction of muscle groups, causing abnormal postures),

  • Extras (British television program)

    Ricky Gervais: …as a struggling actor in Extras (2005–07), another collaboration with Merchant; his performance won him an Emmy Award in 2007 for best actor in a comedy series. In 2005–06 Gervais hosted The Ricky Gervais Show, an Internet podcast in which he, Merchant, and Karl Pilkington engaged in casual (if sometimes…

  • extrasensory perception (psychology)

    Extrasensory perception (ESP), perception that occurs independently of the known sensory processes. Usually included in this category of phenomena are telepathy, or thought transference between persons; clairvoyance, or supernormal awareness of objects or events not necessarily known to others; and

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