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  • Eumetopias jubatus (mammal)

    sea lion: The northern, or Steller, sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) is a pale- to golden-brown sea lion of the Bering Sea and both sides of the North Pacific Ocean. It is the largest member of the eared seals. Males are about 3.3 metres in length and weigh 1,000…

  • Eumetsat (international organization)

    space exploration: Meteorology: …Europe an intergovernmental organization called Eumetsat was created in 1986 to operate Europe’s meteorological satellites and provide their observations to national weather services. Agencies around the world cooperate in the exchange of data from their satellites. Meteorological satellites are an excellent example of both the ability of space systems to…

  • Eumolpid (Greek mythology)

    Eumolpus: …the priestly clan of the Eumolpids at Eleusis, a town west of Athens, and the site of the Eleusinian Mysteries, the best known of the Greek mystery cults. His name (meaning “good” or “strong singer”; i.e., a priest who could chant his litanies clearly and well) was a personification of…

  • eumolpique (prosody)

    Eumolpique, poetic measure devised by the French poet and composer Antoine Fabre d’Olivet (1767–1825). It consists of two unrhymed alexandrines (lines of iambic hexameter), the first verse of 12 syllables ending in masculine (stressed) rhyme, the second of 13 syllables ending in feminine

  • Eumolpus (Greek mythology)

    Eumolpus, mythical ancestor of the priestly clan of the Eumolpids at Eleusis, a town west of Athens, and the site of the Eleusinian Mysteries, the best known of the Greek mystery cults. His name (meaning “good” or “strong singer”; i.e., a priest who could chant his litanies clearly and well) was a

  • Eumycetozoida (organism)

    Slime mold, any of about 500 species of primitive organisms containing true nuclei and resembling both protozoan protists and fungi. The term slime mold embraces a heterogeneous assemblage of organisms whose juxtaposition reflects a historical confusion between superficial resemblances and actual

  • Eunan, Saint (Irish abbot and scholar)

    Saint Adamnan, ; feast day September 23), abbot and scholar, particularly noted as the biographer of St. Columba. Nothing is known of Adamnan’s early life. In 679 he was elected abbot of Iona, the ninth in succession from St. Columba, the founder. While on a visit to Northumbria, he adopted the

  • Eunapius (Greek historian)

    Eunapius, Greek rhetorician and historiographer whose Lives of the Philosophers and Sophists is important as a source of information on contemporary Neoplatonists (edited with Latin translation by J.F. Boissonade, 1849; with English translation by W.C. Wright, Philostratus and Eunapius, 1922).

  • Eunectes (reptile)

    Anaconda, (genus Eunectes), either of two species of constricting, water-loving snakes found in tropical South America. The green anaconda (Eunectes murinus), also called the giant anaconda, sucuri, or water kamudi, is an olive-coloured snake with alternating oval-shaped black spots. The yellow, or

  • Eunectes murinus (reptile)

    anaconda: The green anaconda (Eunectes murinus), also called the giant anaconda, sucuri, or water kamudi, is an olive-coloured snake with alternating oval-shaped black spots. The yellow, or southern, anaconda (E. notaeus) is much smaller and has pairs of overlapping spots.

  • Eunectes notaeus (snake)

    anaconda: The yellow, or southern, anaconda (E. notaeus) is much smaller and has pairs of overlapping spots.

  • Eunice (polychaete genus)

    annelid: Annotated classification: …examples of genera: Palola (palolo), Eunice, Stauronereis, Lumbineris, Onuphis. Order Orbiniida Sedentary; head pointed or rounded without appendages; proboscis eversible and unarmed; body divided into distinct thorax and abdomen; gills arise dorsally from thoracic region;

  • Eunice viridis (marine worm)

    palolo worm: viridis or Eunice viridis]) inhabits crevices and cavities in coral reefs. As the breeding season approaches, the tail end of the body undergoes a radical change. The muscles and most of the organs degenerate, and the reproductive organs rapidly increase in size. The limbs on the posterior…

  • Eunicida (polychaete order)

    annelid: Annotated classification: Order Eunicida Free-moving; head with or without appendages and eyes; proboscis with dorsal maxillae (upper jaws) of 1 to many paired pieces, a ventral pair of mandibles (lower jaws) more or less fused along the median line, and a pair of embedded maxillary carriers; parapodia single-lobed,…

  • eUniverse (American company)

    Myspace: …Internet marketing company eUniverse (later Intermix Media), created Myspace in 2003. It quickly distinguished itself from established social networking sites by allowing—and in fact encouraging—musical artists to use the site to promote themselves, earning Myspace a hip cachet and making it a favoured destination site for youth. It also developed…

  • Eunomius (Greek bishop)

    Eunomius, extreme proponent of Arianism (q.v.). With the Arian philosopher and bishop A?tius, he established the Eunomian sect (see Anomoean), which, although it had an ecclesiastical organization (centred on Constantinople) and several bishops, did not long survive Eunomius. After serving as

  • Eunotosaurus africanus (fossil turtle)

    turtle: Origin and evolution: Eunotosaurus africanus, the earliest known turtle, lived 260 million years ago. Eunotosaurus was toothed, and its midsection contained nine elongated trunk vertebrae, nine pairs of broad T-shaped dorsal ribs, and five pairs of gastralia (ventrally located abdominal ribs). Collectively, these modified bones may have served…

  • eunuch

    Eunuch, castrated human male. From remote antiquity, eunuchs were employed in the Middle East and in China in two main functions: as guards and servants in harems or other women’s quarters, and as chamberlains to kings. Eunuchs were considered the most suitable guards for the many wives or

  • Eunuchus (work by Terence)

    Terence: In the Eunuchus he added to Menander’s Eunouchos two characters, a soldier and his “parasite”—a hanger-on whose flattery of and services to his patron were rewarded with free dinners—both of them from another play by Menander, the Kolax (The Parasite). In the Adelphi, he added an exciting…

  • Eunus (Roman slave)

    Eunus, leader of a slave revolt against the Romans in Sicily from 135 to 132 bc. A Syrian by birth, Eunus was a slave at Enna in Sicily, where he gained the confidence of other slaves in a revolt against their masters. Before long 70,000 slaves were organized into a fighting force. Enna was

  • Euonymus (plant genus)

    Euonymus, genus of about 130 species of shrubs, woody climbers, and small trees, in the staff tree family (Celastraceae), native to temperate Asia, North America, and Europe. The genus includes many popular landscape ornamental shrubs and ground covers, a number of which are known for their vibrant

  • Euonymus alata (plant)

    burning bush: The winged spindle tree, or winged euonymus (E. alatus), is often called burning bush. A shrub growing to a height of 2.5 metres (8 feet), it has several cultivated varieties, including a dwarf, compact branching form, which is much used in landscaping. See also Euonymus.

  • Euonymus americana (plant)

    Euonymus: The strawberry bush (E. americanus) from the same region is lower and has pinkish fruits.

  • Euonymus atropurpureus (plant)

    burning bush: …is Euonymus atropurpureus, also called wahoo. This shrub, or small tree, up to 8 metres (26 feet) in height, is native to the eastern and north-central United States. It bears small purplish flowers and small scarlet fruits. The western burning bush (E. occidentalis), up to 5.5 metres (18 feet) tall,…

  • Euonymus europaeus (plant)

    Euonymus: The European spindle tree (E. europaeus), which grows to 6 metres (20 feet), keeps its poisonous pink and orange fruits after the leaves fall. In eastern Europe, gutta-percha resin is extracted from this plant. The wood is used for pegs and spindles, and several varieties of…

  • Euonymus fortunei (plant)

    Euonymus: Winter creeper euonymus (Euonymus fortunei), from East Asia, climbs by aerial rootlets. It has glossy evergreen leaves and clusters of greenish flowers followed by orange fruits. Its many cultivated varieties include bigleaf, glossy, sarcoxie, baby, longwood, and purpleleaf, widely used in landscaping.

  • Euonymus occidentalis (plant)

    burning bush: The western burning bush (E. occidentalis), up to 5.5 metres (18 feet) tall, is found along the western coastal United States. The winged spindle tree, or winged euonymus (E. alatus), is often called burning bush. A shrub growing to a height of 2.5 metres (8 feet),…

  • Euonymus radicans (plant)

    Euonymus: Winter creeper euonymus (Euonymus fortunei), from East Asia, climbs by aerial rootlets. It has glossy evergreen leaves and clusters of greenish flowers followed by orange fruits. Its many cultivated varieties include bigleaf, glossy, sarcoxie, baby, longwood, and purpleleaf, widely used in landscaping.

  • Euoplocephalus (dinosaur genus)

    Euoplocephalus, (genus Euoplocephalus), armoured North American dinosaur of the Late Cretaceous Period (99.6 million to 65.5 million years ago). Like its close relative Ankylosaurus and the more distantly related Nodosaurus, Euoplocephalus was a massive animal that likely weighed more than two

  • Euoticus (primate)

    bush baby: The needle-clawed bush babies are classified in another genus, Euoticus. The two species live in the rainforests of west-central Africa. They feed on tree exudate, clinging upside-down to the bark of a tree by digging in their sharp-pointed clawlike nails, stabbing the bark with specialized canine…

  • Eupagurus bernhardus (crustacean)

    hermit crab: Pagurus (Eupagurus) bernhardus, a common, bright red hermit crab of European and North American coastal waters, often carries one or more anemones on its shell. The robber crab, native to islands of the South Pacific, is a terrestrial species that has discarded the shell-dwelling habit.

  • Eupalinus of Megara (Greek engineer)

    mathematics: The pre-Euclidean period: …6th century bce the engineer Eupalinus of Megara directed an aqueduct through a mountain on the island of Samos, and historians still debate how he did it. In a further indication of the practical aspects of early Greek mathematics, Plato describes in his Laws how the Egyptians drilled their children…

  • Euparkeria (fossil reptile genus)

    Euparkeria, extinct genus of reptile very closely related to the ancestral archosaurs (a group containing present-day crocodiles and birds and ancestral dinosaurs and pterosaurs). Specimens are found as fossils in Middle Triassic rocks of South Africa (245 to 240 million years ago). Euparkeria was

  • Eupatoria (Ukraine)

    Yevpatoriya, city, Crimea, southern Ukraine, on the Kalamit Bay on the west coast of the Crimean Peninsula. Founded in the 6th century bce as a Greek colony and later renamed for Mithradates VI Eupator, sixth king of Pontus, the city has known many masters, passing to Russia with the annexation of

  • Eupatorium (plant genus)

    Eupatorium, genus of about 60 species of plants belonging to the aster family (Asteraceae). Members of the genus are found chiefly in temperate areas of the Northern Hemisphere, though some species are also found in tropical South America, the West Indies, and Mexico. Several are grown as

  • Eupatorium perfoliatum (plant)

    Boneset, (Eupatorium perfoliatum), North American plant in the aster family (Asteraceae). The plant is sometimes grown in rain gardens and attracts butterflies. Boneset tea is a folk remedy for fever, and traditionally the leaves were wrapped around broken bones to promote their healing. Boneset is

  • Eupatorium rebaudianum (plant)

    Stevia, (Stevia rebaudiana), flowering plant in the aster family (Asteraceae), grown for its sweet-tasting leaves. The plant is native to Paraguay, where it has a long history of use by the Guaraní people. The leaves contain a number of sweet-tasting chemicals known as steviol glycosides, which can

  • Eupatorium rugosum (plant)

    White snakeroot, (Ageratina altissima), poisonous North American herb of the aster family (Asteraceae). White snakeroot contains a toxic alcohol (tremetol), and cattle allowed to pasture on the plant may suffer muscular tremors (the “trembles”), weakness, constipation, and death. Persons who drink

  • eupatrid (Greek social class)

    Eupatrid, (Greek: “of a good father”), member of the nobility of ancient Athens. It is likely that public office before 594 bc was in practice confined to the eupatridae and that they had a political monopoly comparable to that of other Greek aristocracies in the Archaic period. Solon’s reforms, by

  • eupatridae (Greek social class)

    Eupatrid, (Greek: “of a good father”), member of the nobility of ancient Athens. It is likely that public office before 594 bc was in practice confined to the eupatridae and that they had a political monopoly comparable to that of other Greek aristocracies in the Archaic period. Solon’s reforms, by

  • Eupen (Belgium)

    Eupen-et-Malmédy: Eupen-et-Malmédy lies along the border with Germany and consists of the so-called cantons rédimés (“redeemed cantons”) of Eupen, Malmédy, and Sankt Vith. Until 1794 the region was part of the duchy of Limbourg, the ecclesiastical principality of Stavelot-Malmédy, and the duchy of Luxembourg. Under French…

  • Eupen-et-Malmédy (region, Belgium)

    Eupen-et-Malmédy, region in Verviers arrondissement, Liège province, Wallonia région, Belgium. Eupen-et-Malmédy lies along the border with Germany and consists of the so-called cantons rédimés (“redeemed cantons”) of Eupen, Malmédy, and Sankt Vith. Until 1794 the region was part of the duchy of

  • Euphausia superba (crustacean)

    krill: The body of E. superba is about 5 cm (2 inches) long and translucent, with reddish brown blotches. The swimming larvae pass through nine stages of development. Males mature in about 22 months, females in about 25 months. During a spawning period of about five and a half…

  • Euphausiacea (crustacean)

    Krill, any member of the crustacean order Euphausiacea or of the genus Euphausia within that suborder. Euphausiids are shrimplike marine animals that are pelagic in habit (i.e., they live in the open sea). They differ from true shrimp (order Decapoda) in that their gills are located on the swimming

  • euphausiid (crustacean)

    Krill, any member of the crustacean order Euphausiacea or of the genus Euphausia within that suborder. Euphausiids are shrimplike marine animals that are pelagic in habit (i.e., they live in the open sea). They differ from true shrimp (order Decapoda) in that their gills are located on the swimming

  • Euphemites (fossil snail genus)

    Euphemites, extinct genus of gastropods (snails) abundant during the Late Carboniferous Period (between 320 and 286 million years ago) in the shallow seas that covered the midcontinental region of North America. Euphemites was a small, globular snail with a broad and arcuate (bow-shaped) aperture.

  • euphonia (bird)

    Euphonia, any of several tropical American birds of the tanager family. See

  • euphonium (musical instrument)

    Euphonium, brass wind instrument with valves, pitched in C or B? an octave below the trumpet; it is the leading instrument in the tenor-bass range in military bands. It was invented in 1843 by Sommer of Weimar and derived from the valved bugle (flügelhorn) and cornet. It has a wide conical bore

  • euphony (sound)

    Euphony and cacophony, sound patterns used in verse to achieve opposite effects: euphony is pleasing and harmonious; cacophony is harsh and discordant. Euphony is achieved through the use of vowel sounds in words of generally serene imagery. Vowel sounds, which are more easily pronounced than

  • Euphorbia (plant)

    Spurge, (genus Euphorbia), one of the largest flowering-plant genera, with 2,420 species, many of which are important to man as ornamentals, sources of drugs, or as weeds. The genus takes its common name from a group of annual herbs used as purgatives, or spurges, mainly the 1-metre- (3.3-foot-)

  • Euphorbia antisyphilitica (plant)

    candelilla wax: …a coating on candelilla shrubs, Euphorbia antisyphilitica or Euphorbia cerifera, which grow wild in northern Mexico and Texas. Candelilla wax resembles carnauba wax but is less hard. Because it blends with other waxes and is less costly, candelilla wax is used chiefly as an extender in formulas containing carnauba, paraffin,…

  • Euphorbia candelabrum (plant)

    spurge: …angled 15-metre-tall trees such as E. candelabrum and E. nyikae from East Africa; spined and angled succulent shrubs, 6 metres tall, such as E. grandicornis from southern Africa and E. lactea from the East Indies, both of which are grown as hedges in areas with a mild climate.

  • Euphorbia cerifera (plant)

    candelilla wax: …candelilla shrubs, Euphorbia antisyphilitica or Euphorbia cerifera, which grow wild in northern Mexico and Texas. Candelilla wax resembles carnauba wax but is less hard. Because it blends with other waxes and is less costly, candelilla wax is used chiefly as an extender in formulas containing carnauba, paraffin, and other waxes.…

  • Euphorbia characias (plant)

    spurge: …chartreuse that blooms in spring; E. characias, a 0.9- to 1.2-metre-tall European plant with sulfur-yellow bracts in summer; and E. griffithii, from the Himalayas, the fireglow variety of which has fire-orange heads in early summer.

  • Euphorbia corollata (plant)

    spurge: Important as weeds are flowering spurge (E. corollata), of the middle and eastern United States; the leafy spurge (E. escula), naturalized from Europe in the northern United States and adjacent Canada; spotted spurge (E. maculata); prostrate spurge and the related European petty spurge (E. peplus); and sun spurge (E.…

  • Euphorbia cyparissias (plant)

    spurge: …ornamentals of temperate climes include: cypress spurge (E. cyparissias), from Europe, a globe-shaped plant with needlelike foliage that is covered with golden bracts in spring; E. venata or E. wulfenii, from Europe, a plant, 0.9 to 1.2 metres tall, with greenish yellow heads on bluish foliage; cushion spurge (E. epithymoides),…

  • Euphorbia epithymoides (plant)

    spurge: …yellow heads on bluish foliage; cushion spurge (E. epithymoides), from Europe, a 30.5-cm globe of gold to chartreuse that blooms in spring; E. characias, a 0.9- to 1.2-metre-tall European plant with sulfur-yellow bracts in summer; and E. griffithii, from the Himalayas, the fireglow variety of which has fire-orange heads in…

  • Euphorbia escula (plant anatomy)

    spurge: …and eastern United States; the leafy spurge (E. escula), naturalized from Europe in the northern United States and adjacent Canada; spotted spurge (E. maculata); prostrate spurge and the related European petty spurge (E. peplus); and sun spurge (E. helioscopia).

  • Euphorbia fulgens (plant)

    spurge: The scarlet plume (E. fulgens), from Mexico, a 90-centimetre- (3-foot-) tall shrub with slender stems and scarlet bract clusters, is sometimes grown as a pot plant and in mild-winter areas as a garden shrub.

  • Euphorbia grandicornis (plant)

    spurge: …6 metres tall, such as E. grandicornis from southern Africa and E. lactea from the East Indies, both of which are grown as hedges in areas with a mild climate.

  • Euphorbia griffithii (plant)

    spurge: …sulfur-yellow bracts in summer; and E. griffithii, from the Himalayas, the fireglow variety of which has fire-orange heads in early summer.

  • Euphorbia heterophylla (plant)

    spurge: …west; and many varieties of fire-on-the-mountain (E. heterophylla), from the eastern and central United States to Peru, with red-marked, poinsettia-like green bracts and leaves of varied shape on 90-centimetre- (35-inch-) tall plants.

  • Euphorbia lactea (plant)

    spurge: grandicornis from southern Africa and E. lactea from the East Indies, both of which are grown as hedges in areas with a mild climate.

  • Euphorbia lathyris (plant)

    spurge: 3-foot-) tall European E. lathyris, seeds of which were once used for their laxative effect. The diverse, worldwide genus includes many species in arid parts of Africa and India that resemble cactus plants. Unlike cacti, euphorbias have a milky sap. Euphorbia plants vary from flat, creeping herbs—such as…

  • Euphorbia leucocephala (plant)

    spurge: …is native, is the shrub pascuita (E. leucocephala), 1.5 to 4 metres tall, which is covered much of the winter with a mist of small, white bracts. In some varieties the leaves are dark red. The scarlet plume (E. fulgens), from Mexico, a 90-centimetre- (3-foot-) tall shrub with slender stems…

  • Euphorbia marginata (plant)

    Snow-on-the-mountain, (Euphorbia marginata), succulent plant of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), native to the central plains of the United States. The plants, which grow to a height of 60 cm (2 feet), have long, oval, light green foliage, with white-margined leaves near the top, where several

  • Euphorbia milii (plant)

    Crown of thorns, (Euphorbia milii), thorny plant of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), native to Madagascar. Crown of thorns is popular as a houseplant and is grown in warm climates as a garden shrub. Flowering is year-round but most plentiful in wintertime in the Northern Hemisphere. The common

  • Euphorbia nyikae (plant)

    spurge: candelabrum and E. nyikae from East Africa; spined and angled succulent shrubs, 6 metres tall, such as E. grandicornis from southern Africa and E. lactea from the East Indies, both of which are grown as hedges in areas with a mild climate.

  • Euphorbia pulcherrima (plant)

    Poinsettia, (Euphorbia pulcherrima), well-known member of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), commonly sold as an ornamental at Christmastime. The poinsettia is native to Mexico and Central America, where it grows in moist, wet, wooded ravines and on rocky hillsides. It was named for Joel R.

  • Euphorbia splendens (plant)

    Crown of thorns, (Euphorbia milii), thorny plant of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), native to Madagascar. Crown of thorns is popular as a houseplant and is grown in warm climates as a garden shrub. Flowering is year-round but most plentiful in wintertime in the Northern Hemisphere. The common

  • Euphorbia supine (plant)

    spurge: …as the weedy North American prostrate spurge (E. supine), which grows out of sidewalk cracks—to shrubs and trees. They have one female flower consisting of a single female reproductive structure, the pistil, surrounded by numerous male flowers of one stamen each. All these reduced flowers are enclosed in a cup-shaped,…

  • Euphorbia tirucalli (plant)

    spurge: …6-metre, fingerlike, much-branched stems is milkbush (E. tirucalli) from India, used in Africa and many tropical places as a hedge for huts or cattle enclosures. Wax plant (E. antisyphilitica), from Mexico, has similar but unbranched, rodlike, gray-green, mostly naked, 1-metre stems from the surface of which comes an important wax…

  • Euphorbia venata (plant)

    spurge: …with golden bracts in spring; E. venata or E. wulfenii, from Europe, a plant, 0.9 to 1.2 metres tall, with greenish yellow heads on bluish foliage; cushion spurge (E. epithymoides), from Europe, a 30.5-cm globe of gold to chartreuse that blooms in spring; E. characias, a 0.9- to 1.2-metre-tall European…

  • Euphorbia wulfenii (plant)

    spurge: …with golden bracts in spring; E. venata or E. wulfenii, from Europe, a plant, 0.9 to 1.2 metres tall, with greenish yellow heads on bluish foliage; cushion spurge (E. epithymoides), from Europe, a 30.5-cm globe of gold to chartreuse that blooms in spring; E. characias, a 0.9- to 1.2-metre-tall European…

  • Euphorbiaceae (plant family)

    Euphorbiaceae, spurge family of flowering plants (order Malpighiales), containing some 6,745 species in 218 genera. Many members are important food sources. Others are useful for their waxes and oils and as a source of medicinal drugs; dangerous for their poisonous fruits, leaves, or sap; or

  • euphoria (psychology)

    drug use: Psychological dependence: …the user develop physical dependence, euphoric effects become difficult to attain, and the continued use of the drug is apt to be aimed primarily at preventing withdrawal symptoms.

  • Euphoria inda (insect)

    flower chafer: Euphoria inda resembles a bumblebee and even buzzes while flying. The North American green June beetle (Cotinis nitida) is about 25 mm (1 inch) long, dull velvet green in colour, and edged in yellow and brown. It feeds on figs and other fruits, often causing…

  • Euphoria longana (plant and fruit)

    Longan, (Dimocarpus longan), tropical fruit tree of the soapberry family (Sapindaceae), native to Asia and introduced into other warm regions of the world. The edible white-fleshed fruits are somewhat similar to the related lychee and are commonly sold fresh, dried, or canned in syrup. The juicy

  • Euphorion (Greek poet and grammarian)

    Euphorion, Greek poet and grammarian, of Chalcis in Euboea, whose poetry was highly regarded in Hellenistic literary circles and later among Catullus’s generation of Roman poets in the 1st century bc. In Book III of the Tuscalan Disputations, Cicero called some younger poets of his day cantores

  • Euphormionis Lusinini Satyricon (work by Barclay)

    John Barclay: Barclay’s Euphormionis Lusinini Satyricon (1603–07)—a severe satire on the Jesuits, the medical profession, and contemporary scholarship, education, and literature—is modeled on the style of the Roman satirist Gaius Petronius Arbiter; it is an urbane and facile mixture of prose and verse. Filled with villains and rogues,…

  • euphotic zone (oceanography)

    marine ecosystem: Geography, oceanography, and topography: The euphotic zone is the layer closer to the surface that receives enough light for photosynthesis to occur. Beneath lies the disphotic zone, which is illuminated but so poorly that rates of respiration exceed those of photosynthesis. The actual depth of these zones depends on local…

  • Euphranor (Greek artist)

    Euphranor, Greek sculptor and painter from Corinth, contemporary of Praxiteles. In the Stoa Basileios at Athens he painted the “Twelve Gods,” “Theseus with Democracy and Demos,” and the cavalry engagement at Mantinea (362); none of these works survives. At Ephesus he depicted the feigned madness of

  • Euphrates Dam (dam, Syria)

    Euphrates Dam, dam on the Euphrates River in north-central Syria. The dam, which is located 30 miles (50 km) upriver from the town of Ar-Raqqah, was begun in 1968. Its construction prompted an intense archaeological excavation of the area around the town of ?abaqah. The dam is of earth-fill

  • Euphrates River (river, Middle East)

    Euphrates River, river, Middle East. The longest river in southwest Asia, it is 1,740 miles (2,800 km) long, and it is one of the two main constituents of the Tigris-Euphrates river system. The river rises in Turkey and flows southeast across Syria and through Iraq. Formed by the confluence of the

  • Euphrates University (university, Elazi?, Turkey)
  • Euphroniaceae (plant family)

    Malpighiales: The Chrysobalanaceae group: Trigoniaceae, Dichapetalaceae, and Euphroniaceae, each ovary chamber usually has only two ovules, and the seeds have at most slight endosperm. Within this group, Chrysobalanaceae, Trigoniaceae, Dichapetalaceae, and Euphroniaceae are especially close. All have leaf margins that lack teeth; there are often flat, rarely raised glands on the lower…

  • Euphronios (Greek artist)

    Euphronios, one of the most celebrated Greek painters and potters of his time. He experimented with new ideas, forms, and designs within the context of the Archaic tradition, especially the adoption and exploration of the new red-figure technique. His signature has been identified on a number of

  • Euphronius (Greek artist)

    Euphronios, one of the most celebrated Greek painters and potters of his time. He experimented with new ideas, forms, and designs within the context of the Archaic tradition, especially the adoption and exploration of the new red-figure technique. His signature has been identified on a number of

  • Euphrosyne (Greek goddess)

    Grace: …there were three: Aglaia (Brightness), Euphrosyne (Joyfulness), and Thalia (Bloom). They are said to be daughters of Zeus and Hera (or Eurynome, daughter of Oceanus) or of Helios and Aegle, a daughter of Zeus. Frequently, the Graces were taken as goddesses of charm or beauty in general and hence were…

  • Euphrosyne (annelid)

    annelid: Annotated classification: …examples of genera: Eurythoe (fireworm), Euphrosyne. Order Spintherida Body oval; median antenna on prostomium; pharynx retractable; dorsal surface with membranous ridges; ventral setae strongly curved; found on sponges; small; single genus, Spinther. Order Phyllodocida Free-moving; a

  • Euphues and His England (novel by Lyly)

    John Lyly: …Anatomy of Wit (1578) and Euphues and His England (1580), which together made him the most fashionable English writer of the 1580s. Euphues is a romantic intrigue told in letters interspersed with general discussions on such topics as religion, love, and epistolary style. Lyly’s preoccupation with the exact arrangement and…

  • Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit (novel by Lyly)

    John Lyly: …publication of two prose romances, Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit (1578) and Euphues and His England (1580), which together made him the most fashionable English writer of the 1580s. Euphues is a romantic intrigue told in letters interspersed with general discussions on such topics as religion, love, and epistolary style.…

  • euphuism (literature)

    Euphuism, an elegant Elizabethan literary style marked by excessive use of balance, antithesis, and alliteration and by frequent use of similes drawn from mythology and nature. The word is also used to denote artificial elegance. It was derived from the name of a character in the prose romances

  • Euphydryas editha (insect)

    conservation: Surviving but threatened small populations: …long-term study of the Bay checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha bayensis) in the grasslands above Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. In 1960 scientists began following the fate of several local populations of the butterfly at a time when grasslands around San Francisco Bay were being lost to housing developments. The…

  • Euplectella (sponge)

    Venus’s flower basket, any of several sponges of the genus Euplectella, especially E. aspergillum (class Hexactinellida, glass sponges). The name Venus’s flower basket derives from the sponges’ delicate, white, latticelike skeletons made of silica. In the living animal the skeleton is covered by a

  • Euplectella aspergillum (sponge)

    Venus's flower basket: …of the genus Euplectella, especially E. aspergillum (class Hexactinellida, glass sponges). The name Venus’s flower basket derives from the sponges’ delicate, white, latticelike skeletons made of silica. In the living animal the skeleton is covered by a thin layer of cells. E. aspergillum is found in a small area of…

  • Euplectes (bird)

    Bishop, any of several small African birds belonging to the family Ploceidae (order Passeriformes) and constituting the genus Euplectes. The breeding males are black-bellied and reddish or yellow above, with rufflike head feathering and fluffy rump feathers nearly covering their stumpy tails. The

  • Euplectes orix (bird)

    bishop: The 13-centimetre (5-inch) red bishop (E. orix), also called grenadier weaver, displays by flying about and clapping its wings. Red bishops have become established in southern Australia.

  • Euplectes progne (bird)

    runaway selection hypothesis: …dramatic examples is the African long-tailed widowbird (Euplectes progne); the male possesses an extraordinarily long tail. This feature can be explained by the females’ preference for males with the longest tails. This preference can be demonstrated experimentally by artificially elongating the tails of male widowbirds. Similarly, male European sedge warblers…

  • Eupleridae (mammal family)

    mongoose: Classification: Family Eupleridae (Malagasy mongooses, fossas, falanoucs, and fanalokas) 8 species in 7 genera belonging to 2 subfamilies of Madagascar. Subfamily Galidiinae (Malagasy mongooses) 5 species in 4 genera found only on Madagascar. Genus Galidictis

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