You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Estes, William Kaye (American psychologist)

    William K. Estes, American psychologist who pioneered the application of mathematics to the study of animal learning and human cognition. Estes received B.A. (1940) and Ph.D. (1943) degrees in psychology from the University of Minnesota. He taught and did research at Indiana, Stanford, Rockefeller,

  • Estetica come scienza dell’espressione e linguistica generale (work by Croce)

    aesthetics: Expressionism: …most important influence on modern aesthetics has been Croce. His oft-cited Estetica come scienza dell’ espressione e linguistica generale (1902; Aesthetic as Science of Expression and General Linguistics, or Aesthetic) presents, in a rather novel idiom, some of the important insights underlying the theories of his predecessors. In this work,…

  • Esteticheskiye otnosheniya iskusstva k deystvitelnosti (work by Chernyshevsky)

    Western painting: Russia: Chernyshevsky’s dissertation Esteticheskiye otnosheniya iskusstva k deystvitelnosti (1855; “The Aesthetic Relations of Art to Reality”), the main thesis of which was that art must not only reflect reality but also explain and judge it, provided a starting point for contemporary artists.

  • Estevan (Saskatchewan, Canada)

    Estevan, city, southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada. It lies along the Souris River at the latter’s junction with Long Creek, just north of the border with the U.S. state of North Dakota, about 125 miles (200 km) southeast of Regina. It was settled in 1892 with the arrival of the Canadian Pacific

  • Estévanes Calderón, Serafín (Spanish writer)

    Serafín Estébanez Calderón, one of the best-known costumbristas, Spanish writers who depicted in short articles the typical customs of the people. He moved to Madrid in 1830, where he published newspaper articles under the pseudonym El Solitario and pursued a career that combined Arabic studies,

  • Esteves, André Santos (Brazilian businesman)

    Petrobras scandal: …ensnared in the scandal was André Santos Esteves, the CEO of the Brazilian investment bank BTG Pactual, who was arrested on November 25.

  • Estevez, Emilio (American actor)

    John Hughes: …group of young actors—Molly Ringwald, Emilio Estevez, and Judd Nelson, among them—who collectively became known as the Brat Pack. (This name was a play on the Rat Pack, a close-knit group of celebrities of an earlier era that included Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis, Jr.) Hughes also found…

  • Esther (play by Racine)

    Jean Racine: Life: …to write two religious plays—Esther (first performed and published 1689) and Athalie—for the girls at the school she cofounded in Saint-Cyr. His other undertakings during his last years were to reedit, in 1687 and finally in 1697, the edition of his complete works that he had first published in…

  • Esther (masque by Handel)

    George Frideric Handel: Life: Another masque, Haman and Mordecai, was to be the effective starting point for the English oratorio.

  • Esther (biblical figure)

    Purim: …of the planned massacre reached Esther, beloved Jewish queen of Ahasuerus and adopted daughter of Mordecai, she risked her life by going uninvited to the king to suggest a banquet that Haman would attend. At the meal she pleaded for the Jews and accused “this wicked Haman” of plotting the…

  • Esther (opera by Weisgall)

    Hugo Weisgall: …music; his last completed opera, Esther (1993), was widely acclaimed. By the time of his sudden death following a fall in 1997, Weisgall had won numerous prestigious awards—including three Guggenheim fellowships—for his musical activities and accomplishments.

  • Esther (novel by Adams)

    Henry Adams: …1884 Adams wrote another novel, Esther. Published under a pseudonym, Esther dealt with the relationship between religion and modern science, a theme that engaged Adams throughout his life.

  • Esther Waters (novel by Moore)

    George Moore: Esther Waters (1894), his best novel, deals with the plight of a servant girl who has a baby out of wedlock; it is a story of hardship and humiliation illumined by the novelist’s compassion. It was an immediate success, and he followed it with works…

  • Esther, Book of (Old Testament)

    Book of Esther, book of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament. It belongs to the third section of the Judaic canon, known as the Ketuvim, or “Writings.” In the Jewish Bible, Esther follows Ecclesiastes and Lamentations and is read on the festival of Purim, which commemorates the rescue

  • Esther, Fast of (Judaism)

    Judaism: The five fasts: Ta?anit Esther (Fast of Esther), which commemorates Esther’s fast (compare Esther 4:16), is first mentioned in gaonic literature. The commemorative apsects of the fasts are closely associated with their penitential aspects, all of which find expression in the liturgy. Thus, Jews not only relive the tragic history…

  • Estherville (Iowa, United States)

    Estherville, city, seat (1859) of Emmet county, northern Iowa, U.S. The city lies along the West Fork Des Moines River, 90 miles (145 km) northwest of Fort Dodge. The site was settled in 1857 shortly after the nearby Spirit Lake Massacre of settlers by the Sioux, and it was named for Esther Ridley,

  • esthetics (philosophy)

    Aesthetics, the philosophical study of beauty and taste. It is closely related to the philosophy of art, which is concerned with the nature of art and the concepts in terms of which individual works of art are interpreted and evaluated. To provide more than a general definition of the subject

  • Estienne family (French printers)

    history of publishing: France: …Bade, Geoffroy Tory, and the Estienne (Stephanus) family, who published without a break for five generations (1502–1674), carried France into the lead in European book production and consolidated the Aldine type of book—compact, inexpensive, and printed in roman and italic types. The golden age of French typography is usually placed…

  • Estienne, Henri II (French scholar and printer)

    Henri II Estienne, scholar-printer, grandson of Henri Estienne, founder of the family printing firm in Paris, and son of Robert I Estienne, who left Paris to establish a printing firm in Geneva. Educated in classical literature, Estienne traveled as a young man in Italy, England, and Flanders,

  • Estienne, Robert I (French scholar and printer)

    Robert I Estienne, scholar-printer, second son of Henri Estienne, who founded the family printing firm about 1502 in Paris. Robert became head of the firm in 1526, and it was he who adopted the device of the olive tree for his title pages. In 1527–28 he published his first complete Bible in Latin,

  • Estigarribia, José Felix (president of Paraguay)

    Chaco War: …and sent forces under General José Estigarribia in their first major offensive against Fortín Boquerón, which fell at the end of September. Kundt was recalled by Bolivia, and he concentrated his forces in the south to attack Fortín Nanawa, where there was heavy fighting for several months.

  • estilo pombalino (Portuguese architectural style)

    Lisbon: Disaster and reconstruction: …the style became known as pombalino.

  • Estimate, Board of (council, New York City, New York, United States)

    New York City: The boroughs: …1990 included service on the Board of Estimate, a central financial agency. Borough presidents now also serve as conduits of neighbourhood concern to the mayor, the city’s chief administrator, and are responsible for appointing members of community boards, the City Planning Commission, and the Board of Education. These officials carry…

  • Estimated Average Requirement (diet)

    human nutrition: Dietary Reference Intakes: The Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) is the intake level for a nutrient at which the needs of 50 percent of the population will be met. Because the needs of the other half of the population will not be met by this amount, the EAR is increased…

  • estimated position (navigation)

    dead reckoning: …through the water, and the estimated position, which is the dead-reckoning position corrected for effects of current, wind, and other factors. Because the uncertainty of dead reckoning increases over time and maybe over distance, celestial observations are taken intermittently to determine a more reliable position (called a fix), from which…

  • estimated regression equation (statistics)

    statistics: Least squares method: Using these estimates, an estimated regression equation is constructed: ? = b0 + b1x . The graph of the estimated regression equation for simple linear regression is a straight line approximation to the relationship between y and x.

  • estimation (statistics)

    Estimation, in statistics, any of numerous procedures used to calculate the value of some property of a population from observations of a sample drawn from the population. A point estimate, for example, is the single number most likely to express the value of the property. An interval estimate

  • Estimé, Dumarsais (president of Haiti)

    Fran?ois Duvalier: A supporter of President Dumarsais Estimé, Duvalier was appointed director general of the National Public Health Service in 1946, and he directed the anti-yaws campaign in 1947–48. He was appointed underminister of labour in 1948 and the following year became minister of public health and labour, a post that…

  • estipe (architecture)

    Jerónimo de Balbás: …an element known as the estípite column (a square or rectangular column hidden in various places by receding and protruding planes separated by elaborate decorative elements). These columns serve as support for highly ornate Baroque decoration, primarily imitative of vegetation. His adopted son, Isidoro Vincente Balbás (c. 1720–83), also a…

  • estípite (architecture)

    Jerónimo de Balbás: …an element known as the estípite column (a square or rectangular column hidden in various places by receding and protruding planes separated by elaborate decorative elements). These columns serve as support for highly ornate Baroque decoration, primarily imitative of vegetation. His adopted son, Isidoro Vincente Balbás (c. 1720–83), also a…

  • Estissac, Geoffroy d’ (French bishop)

    Fran?ois Rabelais: Life.: …of which was his bishop, Geoffroy d’Estissac. He never liked his new order, however, and he later satirized the Benedictines, although he passed lightly over Franciscan shortcomings.

  • estivation (biology)

    dormancy: Homoiotherms and heterotherms: …summer; such hibernation is called estivation. As a means of avoiding environmental stresses, hibernation and estivation are not common devices among warm-blooded animals and they are far less common among birds than among mammals.

  • Estland (historical region, Europe)

    Baltic states: The early modern age: three duchies—Courland, Livonia, and Estland—an administrative division that lasted until 1917. Estland, the northern part of modern Estonia, came under Swedish rule. Livonia, with its capital, Riga, became a part of Lithuania, while Courland became a hereditary duchy nominally under Lithuanian suzerainty. German law and administration were retained. The…

  • Estoire de Griseldis, L’? (French literature)

    French literature: Secular drama: …first serious nonreligious play was L’Estoire de Griseldis (1395), the story of a constant wife.

  • Estoire de la guerre sainte (French literature)

    Ambrose d'évreux: …Crusade is preserved in the Estoire de la guerre sainte (“History of the Holy War”), a poem of over 12,000 lines extant in an Anglo-Norman manuscript, but the Estoire is only an adaptation of Ambrose’s work. The original poem was used by Richard, a canon of Holy Trinity, London, as…

  • estoires de Venise, Les (work by Canal)

    Italian literature: The influence of France: >Les estoires de Venise (1275; “The History of Venice”) and the encyclopaedic Livres dou trésor (c. 1260; “Books of the Treasure”)—were much better acquainted with French, while poets such as Sordello of Mantua wrote lyrics in the Proven?al language, revealing an exact knowledge of the…

  • Estonia

    Estonia, country in northeastern Europe, the northernmost of the three Baltic states. Estonia’s area includes some 1,500 islands and islets; the two largest of these islands, Saaremaa and Hiiumaa, are off mainland Estonia’s west coast. Estonia has been dominated by foreign powers through much of

  • Estonia, flag of

    horizontally striped blue-black-white national flag. Its width-to-length ratio is 7 to 11.The Estonian students’ association Vironia was founded on September 29, 1881, when the country was part of the Russian Empire. The organization was dedicated to preserving the cultural traditions and language

  • Estonia, history of

    Estonia: History: The Estonians are first mentioned by the Roman historian Tacitus (1st century ad) in Germania. Their political system was patriarchal, based on clans headed by elders. The first invaders of the country were Vikings, who from the mid-9th century passed through Estonia and Latvia…

  • Estonia, Republic of

    Estonia, country in northeastern Europe, the northernmost of the three Baltic states. Estonia’s area includes some 1,500 islands and islets; the two largest of these islands, Saaremaa and Hiiumaa, are off mainland Estonia’s west coast. Estonia has been dominated by foreign powers through much of

  • Estonian (people)

    Baltic states: Early Middle Ages: …the Finno-Ugrians who subsequently became Estonians lived in eight recognizable independent districts and four lesser ones. Their kinsmen, the Livs, inhabited four major areas in northern Latvia and northern Courland. The western Balts were divided into at least eight recognizable groupings. The westernmost, the Prussians, formed 10 principalities in what…

  • Estonian Centre Party (political party, Estonia)

    Estonia: Political process: …the postindependence period was the Estonian Centre Party (an offshoot of the Estonian Popular Front), the organization whose leader, Edgar Savisaar, was independent Estonia’s first prime minister. It was soon joined by a wide variety of parties from across the political spectrum, including a number of single-issue parties. Shifting coalitions…

  • Estonian Greens (political party, Estonia)

    Estonia: Political process: …Social Democratic Party; and the Estonian Greens.

  • Estonian Institute (Estonian cultural organization)

    Lennart Meri: In 1988 Meri founded the Estonian Institute, which promoted Estonian culture through contacts with Western countries. After Estonia’s first free elections in 1990, Meri entered politics when he was named foreign minister. Estonia became independent in 1991, and Meri was appointed ambassador to Finland in 1992. He then ran for…

  • Estonian language

    Estonian language, member of the Finno-Ugric branch of the Uralic language family, spoken in Estonia and in scattered pockets in surrounding regions. The language occurs in two major dialectal forms, northern and southern; the northern, or Tallinn, dialect is the basis of the Estonian literary

  • Estonian literature

    Estonian literature, body of writings in the Estonian language. The consecutive domination of Estonia from the 13th century to 1918 by Germany, Sweden, and Russia resulted in few early literary works in the vernacular. Writings in Estonian became significant only in the 19th century. Moreover,

  • Estonian People’s Union (political party, Estonia)

    Estonia: Political process: …parties are the generally conservative Estonian People’s Union, which includes many former communists; the Social Democratic Party; and the Estonian Greens.

  • Estonian Reform Party (political party, Estonia)

    Estonia: Political process: Since 2005, however, the centre-right Estonian Reform Party has led coalition national governments, most prominently in partnership with Pro Patria and Res Publica Union. Among the other important parties are the generally conservative Estonian People’s Union, which includes many former communists; the Social Democratic Party; and the Estonian Greens.

  • estoppel, collateral (law)

    procedural law: Effects of the judgment: The related doctrine of collateral estoppel (also called issue preclusion) precludes the parties from relitigating, in a second suit based on a different claim, any issue of fact common to both suits that was actually litigated and necessarily determined in the first suit. At the start of the 20th…

  • estoque (bullfighting)

    bullfighting: The rise of professional bullfighting: …and popularized use of the estoque, the sword still used in the kill, and the muleta, the small red flannel cloth draped over a 22-inch (56-cm) stick that forms the small cape used in the bullfight’s final act. Romero was famous for executing the more dangerous, dramatic, and difficult of…

  • Estoril (Portugal)

    Estoril, fashionable resort, western Portugal. It is located on Cascais Bay (the Portuguese Riviera) of the Atlantic Ocean, 15.5 miles (25 km) west of Lisbon and constitutes a parish of the city. Tourism is the economic mainstay of the town, which is both a summer and a winter resort. Its chief

  • Estournelles de Constant, Paul-H.-B. d’ (French diplomat)

    Paul-H.-B. d’Estournelles de Constant, French diplomat and parliamentarian who devoted most of his life to the cause of international cooperation and in 1909 was cowinner (with Auguste-Marie-Fran?ois Beernaert) of the Nobel Prize for Peace. In the French diplomatic service he reached the rank of

  • Estrada Cabrera, Manuel (president of Guatemala)

    Manuel Estrada Cabrera, jurist and politician who became dictator and ruled Guatemala from 1898 to 1920 through a standing army, secret police, and systematic oppression. After a church-directed education, he practiced law for a time in Guatemala City and was appointed a judge on the Supreme Court.

  • Estrada de Santiago (work by Ribeiro)

    Aquilino Ribeiro: …shorter fiction subsequently included in Estrada de Santiago (1922; “Road to Santiago”). He was a member of the Presen?a group in the 1920s. He remained active into the late 1950s, publishing A casa grande de Romarig?es (1957; “The Great House of Romarig?es”) and Quando os lobos uivam (1958; “When the…

  • Estrada Palma, Tomás (president of Cuba)

    Tomás Estrada Palma, first president of Cuba, whose administration was noted for its sound fiscal policies and progress in education. As a general in the revolutionary army, Estrada Palma served during the Ten Years’ War (1868–78) against Spain and became president of the provisional government in

  • Estrada, Erap (president of the Philippines)

    Joseph Estrada, Filipino actor and politician who served as president of the Philippines (1998–2001) and later mayor of Manila (2013–19). The son of a government engineer, Estrada entered the Mapua Institute of Technology with the intention of following in his father’s footsteps, but he eventually

  • Estrada, Joseph (president of the Philippines)

    Joseph Estrada, Filipino actor and politician who served as president of the Philippines (1998–2001) and later mayor of Manila (2013–19). The son of a government engineer, Estrada entered the Mapua Institute of Technology with the intention of following in his father’s footsteps, but he eventually

  • Estrades, Godefroi-Louis, comte d’ (marshal of France)

    Godefroi, count d’Estrades, marshal of France and one of Louis XIV’s ablest diplomats. Estrades served with distinction in the Low Countries during the Thirty Years’ War, conducted a famous defense of Dunkirk (1651–52), and took part in later campaigns in Catalonia (1655), Italy (1657), and Holland

  • estradiol (biochemistry)

    steroid hormone: Estradiol is the most potent of the estrogens. Functioning similarly to androgens, the estrogens promote the development of the primary and secondary female sex characteristics; they also stimulate linear growth and skeletal maturation. In other mammals these hormones have been shown to precipitate estrus (heat).…

  • estragon (herb)

    Tarragon, (Artemisia dracunculus), bushy aromatic herb of the family Asteraceae, the dried leaves and flowering tops of which are used to add tang and piquancy to many culinary dishes, particularly fish, chicken, stews, sauces, omelets, cheeses, vegetables, tomatoes, and pickles. Tarragon is a

  • Estraikh, Gennady (Russian scholar)

    Yiddish literature: The 21st century: Gennady Estraikh, a Russian-born scholar who later taught in London, also published fiction in Yiddish, including the book Moskver Purim-shpiln (1996; “Moscow Purim Plays”). Kobi Weitzner, editor of the Yidisher kemfer, was also a writer at the Yiddish Forverts.

  • estral cycle (physiology)

    dog: Reproductive cycle: The heat cycle of the female lasts from 18 to 21 days. The first stage is called proestrus. It begins with mild swelling of the vulva and a bloody discharge. This lasts for about 9 days, although it may vary by 2 or…

  • Estrangela (Syriac script)

    Syriac alphabet: …the oldest of these was Estrangela, or Estrangelo, which was in almost exclusive use until about 500. A schism in the Syriac church at the Council of Ephesus (431) resulted in the division of the Syriac language and script into two forms, western and eastern. The western variety nearly died…

  • Estrangelo (Syriac script)

    Syriac alphabet: …the oldest of these was Estrangela, or Estrangelo, which was in almost exclusive use until about 500. A schism in the Syriac church at the Council of Ephesus (431) resulted in the division of the Syriac language and script into two forms, western and eastern. The western variety nearly died…

  • estranol (chemical compound)

    steroid: Estrogens: Synthetic estrogens, such as estranol or mestranol (18), commonly used in oral contraceptives and for other therapeutic purposes, have acetylenic (containing triple bonds between carbon atoms) substituents. Nonsteroidal synthetic estrogens—e.g., diethylstilbestrol (19) and related compounds—are used clinically and also in animal husbandry to promote fattening of livestock and poultry

  • Estraordinario libro (work by Serlio)

    Sebastiano Serlio: Estraordinario libro, the last book of the treatise to be published in his lifetime, contained 50 fanciful designs for doorways, which were much copied in northern Europe and decidedly influenced the course of Mannerist architectural decoration.

  • Estratto della Poetica d’Aristotele (work by Metastasio)

    Pietro Metastasio: …the most interesting being the Estratto della Poetica d’Aristotele (1782), an exposition of his dramatic theories. Metastasio’s works ran into innumerable editions. During the 18th century his verses were translated into many European languages.

  • Estrées, Fort d’ (fort, Gorée Island, Senegal)

    Gorée Island: …of slavery artifacts, and the Fort d’Estrées (built in the 1850s) is the site of a historical museum. There are also museums of women’s history and of the sea. In 1978 Gorée Island was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site, and several of its historic structures were restored in the…

  • Estrées, Gabrielle d’, Duchess de Beaufort (French noble)

    Gabrielle d’Estrées, duchess de Beaufort, mistress of King Henry IV of France and, with him, founder of the Vend?me branch of the House of Bourbon. The daughter of the Marquis de Coeuvres, Gabrielle met Roger de Saint-Lary, later Duke de Bellegarde, at the court of Henry III and became his

  • Estreito (historical fort, Brazil)

    Rio Grande: …1737 a Portuguese fort called Estreito was built nearby. In 1745 its garrison and settlement were moved to the present site, which became a town in 1751 with the name of S?o Pedro do Rio Grande do Sul; it received city status in 1835. It was the capital of a…

  • Estrela Mountains (mountains, Portugal)

    Estrela Mountains, highest mountains in continental Portugal. The range lies in the north-central part of the country, between the basins of the Tagus and Mondego rivers. The western continuation of the Central Sierras (Sistema Central) of Spain, the range runs about 40 miles (65 km) from northeast

  • Estremadura (historical province, Portugal)

    Estremadura, historical coastal province of central Portugal that contains Lisbon and the Tagus River estuary. The landforms of Estremadura are geologically younger than other parts of the Iberian Peninsula, containing sandstone, limestone, and volcanic rock instead of granite and schist. The

  • Estremadura (region, Spain)

    Extremadura, comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) and historical region of Spain encompassing the southwestern provincias (provinces) of Cáceres and Badajoz. Extremadura is bounded by the autonomous communities of Castile-León to the north, Castile–La Mancha to the east, and Andalusia to the

  • Estremenho (Portuguese dialect)

    Portuguese language: …or Beira, (2) Southern (Estremenho), including Lisbon, Alentejo, and Algarve, (3) Insular, including the dialects of Madeira and the Azores, and (4) Brazilian. Standard Portuguese was developed in the 16th century, basically from the dialects spoken from Lisbon to Coimbra

  • Estremoz (Portugal)

    Estremoz, city and concelho (municipality), eastern Portugal. It is an ancient gated city and is overlooked by a 13th-century castle, in which St. Elizabeth (Isabel) of Portugal, widow of King Dinis, died in 1336. The castle is now a government-operated inn. Estremoz was an important base for the

  • Estrilda (bird)

    Waxbill, any of several Old World tropical birds named for the prominent red (the colour of sealing wax) of their conical bills. The name is used generally for birds of the family Estrildidae (order Passeriformes); less broadly for those of the tribe Estrildini of that family; and particularly for

  • Estrilda amandava (bird)

    Avadavat, (species Amandava, or Estrilda, amandava), plump, 8-centimetre- (3-inch-) long bird of the waxbill (q.v.) group (order Passeriformes), a popular cage bird. The avadavat is abundant in marshes and meadows of southern Asia (introduced in Hawaii). The male, in breeding plumage, is bright

  • Estrildid finch (bird family)

    Estrildidae, songbird family, order Passeriformes, consisting of approximately 140 species of waxbills and other small finchlike birds of the Old World, many of which are favourite cage birds. Members range in size from 7.5 to 15 cm (3 to 6 inches) long. They have short, stout bills and short legs

  • Estrildidae (bird family)

    Estrildidae, songbird family, order Passeriformes, consisting of approximately 140 species of waxbills and other small finchlike birds of the Old World, many of which are favourite cage birds. Members range in size from 7.5 to 15 cm (3 to 6 inches) long. They have short, stout bills and short legs

  • estriol (biochemistry)

    hormone: Estrogens: …and other mammals, estrone and estriol, are much less active than estradiol, estriol being the weakest. Estrone can be converted to estradiol and vice versa in the ovary and in other tissues; e.g., estradiol is converted, particularly in the liver, to estriol, which is an excretory product. The metabolism of…

  • Estro armonico, L’? (work by Vivaldi)

    Antonio Vivaldi: Life: …and string orchestra (Opus 3, L’estro armonico) was published by the Amsterdam music-publishing firm of Estienne Roger. In the years up to 1719, Roger published three more collections of his concerti (opuses 4, 6, and 7) and one collection of sonatas (Opus 5).

  • Estro poeticoarmonico (work by Marcello)

    Benedetto Marcello: …teatro alla moda (1720); and Estro poeticoarmonico (1724–26), a setting for voices and instruments of the first 50 psalms in an Italian paraphrase by G. Giustiniani. Il teatro alla moda is an amusing pamphlet in which Marcello vented his opinions on the state of musical drama at the time. The…

  • estrogen (hormone)

    Estrogen, any of a group of hormones that primarily influence the female reproductive tract in its development, maturation, and function. There are three major hormones—estradiol, estrone, and estriol—among the estrogens, and estradiol is the predominant one. The major sources of estrogens are the

  • estrogen replacement therapy (medicine)

    menopause: Estrogen therapy: The administration of estrogen is effective for treating many problems associated with menopause, including hot flashes, breast atrophy, vaginal dryness, and psychological symptoms. Estrogen is also effective for increasing libido. In addition, estrogen increases bone density, thereby decreasing the risk of fracture. Although estrogen…

  • estrogen therapy (medicine)

    menopause: Estrogen therapy: The administration of estrogen is effective for treating many problems associated with menopause, including hot flashes, breast atrophy, vaginal dryness, and psychological symptoms. Estrogen is also effective for increasing libido. In addition, estrogen increases bone density, thereby decreasing the risk of fracture. Although estrogen…

  • estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer (pathology)

    breast cancer: Types of breast cancer: Estrogen-receptor-positive cancers are responsible for roughly 60 to 70 percent of breast cancer cases in women.

  • estrone (hormone)

    hormone: Estrogens: …in humans and other mammals, estrone and estriol, are much less active than estradiol, estriol being the weakest. Estrone can be converted to estradiol and vice versa in the ovary and in other tissues; e.g., estradiol is converted, particularly in the liver, to estriol, which is an excretory product. The…

  • estrous cycle (physiology)

    dog: Reproductive cycle: The heat cycle of the female lasts from 18 to 21 days. The first stage is called proestrus. It begins with mild swelling of the vulva and a bloody discharge. This lasts for about 9 days, although it may vary by 2 or…

  • Estrup, Jacob Br?nnum Scavenius (prime minister of Denmark)

    Jacob Br?nnum Scavenius Estrup, statesman and conservative prime minister of Denmark from 1875 to 1894. In 1864 Estrup entered the Landsting (upper chamber) as a member of the National Landowners’ Party. As minister of the interior from 1865, he made major improvements in the railways and in

  • estrus (reproductive cycle)

    Estrus, the period in the sexual cycle of female mammals, except the higher primates, during which they are in heat—i.e., ready to accept a male and to mate. One or more periods of estrus may occur during the breeding season of a species. Prior to ovulation the endometrium (uterine lining) t

  • estuarine crocodile (reptile)

    crocodile: Size range and diversity of structure: …niloticus) of Africa and the estuarine (or saltwater) crocodile (C. porosus) of Australia, attain lengths of up to 6 metres (20 feet) and weigh over 1,000 kg (about 2,200 pounds). Some fossil forms (such as Deinosuchus and Sarcosuchus) may have been between 10 and 12 metres (33 and 40 feet)…

  • estuarine lagoon (hydrology)

    lagoon: Water circulation: …flows is known as an estuarine lagoon and may be regarded as a special kind of estuary.

  • Estuarine style (Oceanic art)

    Oceanic art and architecture: Australia: It is followed by the Estuarine style, which developed during a period when saltwater conditions prevailed: a situation reflected in the use of crocodiles as subjects in paintings in the X-ray style (in which the internal organs are shown). A subsequent Freshwater phase is characterized by representations of ceremonial fans…

  • estuary (coastal feature)

    Estuary, partly enclosed coastal body of water in which river water is mixed with seawater. In a general sense, the estuarine environment is defined by salinity boundaries rather than by geographic boundaries. The term estuary is derived from the Latin words aestus (“the tide”) and aestuo (“boil”),

  • estudiante de Salamanca, El (work by Espronceda y Delgado)

    José de Espronceda y Delgado: El estudiante de Salamanca (1839; “The Student of Salamanca”), a milestone of Iberian Romanticism, is a variant of the Don Juan legend that carries to extremes the antisocial and antireligious attitudes of its protagonist. Espronceda was most admired for his lyric poetry, and his Poesías…

  • esu (unit of measurement)

    Coulomb force: …charge is one electrostatic unit, esu, or statcoulomb. In the metre–kilogram–second and the SI systems, the unit of force (newton), the unit of charge (coulomb), and the unit of distance (metre), are all defined independently of Coulomb’s law, so the proportionality factor k is constrained to take a value consistent…

  • Esus (Celtic deity)

    Esus, (Celtic: “Lord,” or “Master”), powerful Celtic deity, one of three mentioned by the Roman poet Lucan in the 1st century ad; the other two were Taranis (“Thunderer”) and Teutates (“God of the People”). Esus’ victims, according to later commentators, were sacrificed by being ritually stabbed

  • esusu (financial institution)

    Yoruba: …association of farmers; and the esusu, whose members contribute a fixed amount of money and from which they can receive loans. Political authority is vested in the oba and a council of chiefs; constituent towns each have their own ruler, who is subordinate to the oba. The oba is also…

  • Eswatini

    Eswatini, landlocked country in the eastern flank of South Africa, where it adjoins Mozambique. It extends about 110 miles (175 km) from north to south and about 80 miles (130 km) from west to east at its largest dimensions. In the colonial era, as a protectorate, and later as an independent

  • Eswatini, flag of

    national flag consisting of horizontal stripes of blue, yellow, crimson, yellow, and blue, with a Swazi shield and weapons in the centre. The flag’s width-to-length ratio is 2 to 3.The Swazi, famed as warriors, have a traditional shield that is made of black-and-white ox hide stretched over a

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
港台一级毛片免费观看